Senin, 29 Juli 2013

How to Repair a Power Window on a Windstar 2002

The primary components of a power window are the glass, the regulator that holds the glass, the control switches and the wiring connecting the switch to the regulator. Cracked or broken window glass needs to be replaced, but the regulator, the switches and the wiring can also cause problems. What you need to do for repairs depends on where the malfunction is. This can be tricky on a Ford Windstar 2002 van, as the window glass and regulator are installed with rivets instead of bolts.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect the van's negative battery cable with the window down.

    2

    Pry out the trim cover for the inside handle with a small flat screwdriver, then pull out the switch control plate, disconnecting its electrical connector. Replace the control plate and skip to Step 8 if that's all you need.

    3

    Pull out the side mirror cover, then remove all the screws on the door panel along the edges and behind the switch plate. Pull the panel off its clips and off the door, then peel away the watershield.

    4

    Disconnect the electrical connector for the window regulator. If the wiring is damaged and this is the only issue, install a new wiring harness and skip to Step 7.

    5

    Drill out the rivets holding the window glass to the regulator and lift the glass out of the door. Drill out the regulator's rivets, then pull the arm bracket and regulator out through the service hole.

    6

    Install the new regulator within the door and fasten it with a rivet gun. Slide and lower the door glass into the door and regulator and apply rivets to it, then connect the electrical connector.

    7

    Paste the watershield back onto the door and reinstall the door panel with its clips and screws.

    8

    Plug in the electrical connector and install the switch plate followed by all other small trim panels you removed.

    9

    Reconnect the battery cable.

How to Remove Window Tint Adhesive

How to Remove Window Tint Adhesive

Window tint has evolved, and replacing old tint adhesive is a common automotive repair. Old-style tint adhesive that used to turn purple and bubble off the glass has been replaced with longer-lasting films. Removing the old adhesive is actually a simple process; it just takes time and patience. The backyard repairperson can remove tinting film from several windows in about two hours.

Instructions

    1

    Spray the inside of the window with the ammonia-based cleaner until it is saturated. Normally, it is advised that ammonia cleaners not be used on the inside of tinted windows, because it will detach the film from the glass. The higher the ammonia content of the cleaner, the more it dissolves the tint glue.

    2

    Separate the film from the glass around the edges. Find the edge of the glass and run the razor between it and the film, spraying the area to induce separation. Ideally, about two inches of separation around all edges of the glass is enough to get a grip on. Realistically, the film will come off in small slivers that will require diligence to peel. What is needed is a "tab", or section of film that can be pulled and sprayed to remove the entire primary film layer. What is left after pulling the film free is a layer of glue that has bonded to the glass over years.

    3

    Spray a liberal dose of glue cleaner onto the layer of glue left on the glass. Using the towel, rub the glue into "streaks", and then dose the area with more glue cleaner. Eventually, there will be a small glob of glue in one patch, and it can be scraped off with the razor blade. Several globs may occur, but using the towel to apply friction saves time versus trying to scrape the window with the razor alone.

    4

    Clean with the window cleaner once more. With the glue mostly gone, the ammonia based cleaner should restore the window to a pre-tint state.

Minggu, 28 Juli 2013

How to Remove the Brake Rotors on Your Car

The braking system of your car is extremely important to the safety of you, your passengers and other drivers. To understand how to maintain and repair this system yourself is a valuable skill. Removing the brake rotors is one of those key processes in understanding the operations of the brake system and how to repair it properly.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the lug nuts that hold the rotor, or disc, in place. Set these lug nuts somewhere safe and secure so you don't lose them. If the rotor, or disc, is held into place by metal retainers, cut them off using diagonal cutters and discard them.

    2

    Consider if you need to remove the brake caliper mounting bracket. This will depend on the make and year of your car. Consult your vehicle's repair manual for specific instructions on how to do this.

    3

    Slide the disc off the nuts. If it appears to be stuck, do not force or hit it with a hammer. This situation needs to be resolved with care and patience. If the rotor's surface is struck, it can warp past the point of being reparable.

    4

    Tap around the side of the "top-hat" surface. Tap around the studs, taking care not to hit any threads. Do this for a couple of rounds around the rotor or disc. It should slowly start to come loose and you can work it off of the lugs.

Sabtu, 27 Juli 2013

How to Replace Brake Fluid in a Honda Civic

How to Replace Brake Fluid in a Honda Civic

Honda Civics use a power brake system to supply the stopping power. The power brakes operate the same on most every vehicle: A power booster uses a vacuum to increase the power of the brake pedal when engaging the master cylinder and hydraulic brake system. The brake system uses a fluid that becomes contaminated with age and use and requires periodic flushing. The job is a pretty simple one, though you will need an assistant.

Instructions

Flush the Brake Lines

    1

    Remove the brake reservoir cap and siphon out any fluid using a turkey baster. Replace the fluid with clean DOT-3 brake fluid once empty.

    2

    Place the jack beneath the axle and raise the Civic one wheel at a time. Remove the lug nuts from the tires using a lug wrench. Set the tires and lug nuts to the side. Place a jack stand beneath the axle or frame and remove the jack.

    3

    Loosen all four bleed screws so that fluid runs out. The rear brakes are either drum or disc brakes. Locate the bleed screw on rear disc brakes on top of the caliper. The drum brake bleed screw sits on the back of the drum above the axle. Front disc brake bleed screws face the engine on the caliper.

    4

    Have your assistant press the brake pedal firmly to the floor and hold it. Tighten each bleed screw and release the pedal. Check the fluid in the reservoir and refill as needed. Repeat the process until clean fluid is coming out of the bleed screws.

Bleed the Brakes

    5

    Bleed the passenger rear brake first. Start with the wheel furthest from the reservoir to ensure all trapped air is forced out. Bleed the driver rear brake second, the passenger front brake third, and the driver front brake last.

    6

    Place one end of rubber tubing on the bleed screw and the other end submerged in DOT-3 brake fluid in a clear plastic container. Check the reservoir and fill as needed.

    7

    Have the assistant press the brake pedal firmly to the floor and hold. Loosen the bleed screw and monitor the flow of fluid and air bubbles out of the tube. Tighten the bleed screw once the flow stops and release the pedal. Repeat the process until no air bubbles come out of the tube for at least three turns.

    8

    Repeat Steps 2 and 3 until all the wheels are done as outlined in Step 1.

    9

    Replace each tire and tighten the lug nuts. Raise the vehicle slightly at each wheel to remove the jack stand and lower to the ground. Tighten all the lug nuts with the lug wrench once all wheels are on the ground. Top off the brake reservoir and replace the cap.

How to Install a Fiero Windshield

The Fiero sits rather low to the ground. This low center of gravity gives the Fiero excellent handling, but also makes it prone to a lot of stone chips. These tiny cracks can quickly spread, and when they get to be larger than an inch in length, you need to replace the windshield or you risk the entire windshield shattering. Once the windshield has been removed, installing a windshield on a Pontiac Fiero is fairly straightforward. However, make sure that you follow a specific procedure so that the glass will properly adhere to the frame.

Instructions

    1

    Clear away any residual urethane on the windshield window frame. Cut the old urethane down to approximately 3 mm.

    2

    Clean the pinch weld area on the sides of the frame with a brush. Make sure that there is no remaining debris.

    3

    Coat the frit band with urethane primer. The frit band is the black edging on the glass. The primer opens the pores on the frit band and allows it to adhere to the urethane.

    4

    Run a thick bead of urethane around the perimeter of the frame where the windshield will go. Use the 3 mm of remaining urethane as a guide.

    5

    Align the top, bottom and sides of the windshield on the Fiero's frame and press the windshield into place. Allow the urethane to cure for at least 12 hours.

Jumat, 26 Juli 2013

How to Change Brake Fluid in a Motorcycle

Motorcycles go from 0 to 60 miles per hour in under 3 seconds. With all of that speed, stopping becomes even more important than in a car. To make sure your motorcycle stops properly and consistently, you should change your motorcycle's brake fluid about every two years. With a brake bleeding kit, changing your motorcycle's brake fluid can be done simply and quickly.

Instructions

    1

    Attach the bleeding kit tube to the brake fluid nipple on the brake caliper. Twist loose the nipple. The old brake fluid will empty through the kit's tube into the kit's container. Place the container that comes with the kit into a larger container to collect any spillage.

    2

    Remove the master cylinder cap to make sure it does not completely empty. Refill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid while the old fluid is flushed out.

    3

    Pump the brake lever so the brake fluid is forced through the tube into the container. You will know that the fluid is fully flushed when the fluid in the bleeding kit tube is completely clear.

    4

    Keep squeezing the brake and re-tighten the brake fluid nipple. Replace the master cylinder top cover. Remove the brake bleeding kit and clean up any spillage. The fluid will harm the paint if it is not cleaned completely.

How to Install an Old Chevy Windshield

How to Install an Old Chevy Windshield

The condition of an old Chevy is one which must be continually monitored. The windshield is one component which must be serviced regularly. If you find a crack or a break in your windshield you must either repair or replace it. Both procedures will involve removing and installing the windshield. The process to carry out this work is fairly simple but requires help to remove and insert the windshield.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the rear-view wing mirrors from your Chevy by using a screwdriver to remove the mounting screws which hold them in place. This will give you easy access to the windshield.

    2

    Remove the rubber seal completely from around the edges of the windshield. Use a sharp knife or blade to cut away all of the seal. As you cut the edges carefully use your hands to pull it off from around the vehicle. Place the seal in the trash.

    3

    Press against the windshield from inside the Chevy to remove it from the vehicle. Have someone outside the vehicle to help you life the windshield from the car.

    4

    Apply a thin layer of petroleum jelly to the new windshield. This will help seal it in place on the vehicle. Attach the new gasket to the shield so that the heavy part is on the bottom and the slit is at the side. Place a cord around the edges of the windshield to give it added support when placed in to the vehicle.

    5

    Place the new windshield on to the vehicle. Press down on the glass from outside the car to allow the seal to set in place. Attach the cord to the inside of the vehicle. Clean the windshield and dashboard to ensure there are no shards of glass in the vehicle.

How to Adjust the Brakes in a Toyota Pickup

How to Adjust the Brakes in a Toyota Pickup

Toyota pickup trucks are equipped with self-adjusting drum brakes. As you press on the brake pedal, the brake shoes will wear down and create a space between the drum and the shoes. To ensure that your Toyota's brakes are operating optimally, you should manually adjust them, especially if you feel the brake pedal is too low to sufficiently stop the truck.

Instructions

    1

    Disengage the parking brake and put one wheel chock behind each of the truck's front wheels. This will keep the truck from moving as you work on it.

    2

    Position a floor jack under the rear of the truck and lift it up until the wheels are off the ground.

    3

    Slip two jack stands under the control arms located next to each wheel. Lower the jack until the car is resting on the jack stands.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Take off the wheel and set it aside.

    5

    Twist off the brake drums, striking them with a hammer, if necessary, to make them come loose.

    6

    Wear a respirator or face mask and wash the brake shoes with soapy water after removing the drums.

    7

    Locate the star-shaped self-adjuster under the wheel cylinder and turn it clockwise. This will spread open the shoes a bit. Slip the drums back onto the shoes. If the drum goes on very easily, then you know you have adjusted the brakes correctly.

    8

    Reinstall the wheels on the pickup and tighten the lug nuts by hand. Lift the truck with the floor jack and move the jack stands out of the way. Lower the truck to the ground and put on the parking brake.

    9

    Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench and remove the wheel chocks from behind the tires.

How to Adjust Brakes for an 8N Ford

The braking system on Ford 8N tractors is made up of rear brake shoes and brake drums. When the brake pedal is pushed down, the brake shoes move toward the brake drum until the shoes are fully compressed to the drums. The amount of force that the brake shoes apply to the brake drums is determined by how hard the brake pedal is pushed down. When the brake pedal is released, the brake shoes retract away from the brake drum. As the brake shoes wear, they will need to be readjusted for the brakes to continue working properly.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 8N tractor on a flat surface and chock the front wheels to prevent the tractor from rolling.

    2

    Slide behind the left rear wheel and locate the adjustable bolt on the back of the wheel backing plate. The adjustable bolt has a square head that requires an adjustable wrench to turn. Also locate one of the access holes on the back of the backing plate that will allow you to see the brake shoes.

    3

    Shine the flashlight through the access hole and locate the position of the brake shoes. Turn the adjustable bolt on the backing plate clockwise with the adjustable wrench until the bolt stops turning.

    4

    Shine the flashlight back through the access hole and make sure that the brake shoes have moved completely against the surface of the brake drum.

    5

    Back off the adjustable bolt a couple of turns counterclockwise until the brake shoes are about 1/8-inch away from the brake drum surface. Use the flashlight to determine the distance of the brake shoes from the brake drum surface.

Kamis, 25 Juli 2013

How to Replace a Brake Bulb

How to Replace a Brake Bulb

Brake lights are an important part of a well operating vehicle because they signal other drivers that you are slowing down or coming to a stop. Without brake lights, you have an increased risk of having an accident. In addition, police officers can pull you over and issue you a ticket for faulty equipment if you have a brake light bulb that has burned out. However, there is no need to put yourself at risk of an accident or to incur the cost of expensive tickets when you can replace the bulb yourself. The process is easy enough for anyone to do.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase the correct replacement bulb for your vehicle make and model. You can use the Internet to find the correct bulb or ask an attendant at an auto supply store to look it up for you.

    2

    Determine how to access your brake light bulb by inspecting the brake light assembly for screws. If there are screws, you can access the bulb from the outside of the vehicle. If your brake light assembly has no screws, you will need to access the bulb from inside the trunk.

    3

    Unscrew the lens cover from the outside of the vehicle or remove the plastic panel cover from inside the trunk.

    4

    Unscrew the old bulb by pushing it in and turning. Dispose of the old bulb in a small cardboard box to prevent it from breaking and cutting you when you handle the garbage.

    5

    Use a wire brush or cleaning rag to remove corrosion from the empty socket.

    6

    Insert the new bulb into the empty socket, and then push it in and turn to screw it into place. Have a friend step on the brake pedal so you can make sure it is working properly.

    7

    Replace the plastic panel cover inside of the trunk or screw the lens cover back into place.

    8

    Turn on your headlights, press on the brake pedal and have a friend check to make sure that all of the lights are working properly.

Senin, 22 Juli 2013

How to Repair a Cracked Car Window

How to Repair a Cracked Car Window

Window damage on your vehicle is among the easiest repair jobs. Just because you have some cracks in the auto glass doesn't mean you need professional repair services. A sunny day and a few supplies available at most auto stores are all you need to get the job done.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car in the sun. Wash the window to remove all buildup. A simple solution of detergent and water will do. Use a soft sponge or cloth to wash and dry the window completely.

    2

    Pick out loose pieces of glass from within the crack. Put your goggles on, then turn the razor blade on its edge to flick them out. Be careful not to cut yourself.

    3

    Suction the stabilizer to the window over the damaged areas. Press the suction cup against the window until you can see and feel the suction between both elements.

    4

    Put the tube filled with resin into the injector, then place the injector into the stabilizer.

    5

    Take the injector out so the suction can begin to pull the resin into the cracks, naturally filling them for repair.

    6

    Lift the stabilizer off the window after all of the resin has been drawn out of the tube.

    7

    Place a strip of curing film onto the repaired area. Do not remove the strip until the resin has completely cured.

How to Change the Drum Brakes on a 2002 Chevy S-10

The Chevrolet S-10 was first introduced in 1983. The 2002 Chevrolet S-10 came equipped with a 2.2-liter inline four-cylinder in the base model. The more popular engine in the 2002 S-10 was the 4.3-liter Vortec V-6, optional in all sub-models. The rear drum brakes on the 2002 S-10 can be quite challenging to replace, depending on how much of the rear drum brakes you are replacing. The rear brake shoes and drums do not wear out as quickly as the front pads most of the time.

Instructions

Drum Brake Replacement Instructions

    1

    Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts on the truck. Raise the rear of the truck with a jack. Place jack stands beneath the rear axle housing, about 6 inches inward from the rear tires. Leave yourself room to access the rear brake backing plate without being hindered by the jack stands. Lower the truck onto the jack stands. Remove the rear lug nuts completely, then remove the rear wheels from the truck.

    2

    Remove the brake drum from one side of the S-10. If the brake drum does not come off easily by hand, remove the rubber stopper on the back of the brake backing plate. Insert a flathead screwdriver into the hole in the backing plate and adjust the self-adjuster wheel in an upward motion. This will release the brake shoe pressure inside the drums. Tap the drums on the forward and rear facing sides with a rubber mallet. Remove the brake drums from the brake assembly.

    3

    Spray the entire brake shoe assembly and spring hardware with brake cleaner to remove excess debris and brake dust. Remove the brake return springs from both brake shoes with a brake shoe spring hook tool. Remove the springs from the upper center post of the brake assembly. Remove the shoe guide from the upper center post by hand.

    4

    Remove the circular hold-down springs from both brake shoes using the cylindrical brake shoe spring tool, or a nut driver. Turn the cap on the hold-down spring, while holding the pin still from behind the backing plate with your thumb. When the cap aligns with the flattened head of the pin, the cap will release and allow you to remove the hold-down spring. Pull the hold-down pin out from the rear of the backing plate.

    5

    Remove the actuator lever and the actuator pivot from the bottom of the brake shoe, using your hands in a twisting motion to free the actuator from the shoe. Remove the lever return springs with a brake spring tool if needed. Spread the brake shoes apart, remove the brake strut and spring assembly from between the two shoes. Remove the parking brake lever from the rear-facing shoe. Remove the self-adjuster wheel and self-adjuster return spring from the shoes.

    6

    Inspect the wheel cylinder on the upper portion of the outboard face on the brake backing plate. If the rubber boots are worn, cracked or torn, then replace the wheel cylinder. If the wheel cylinder is good, skip to Step 8. Replace the wheel cylinder by removing the banjo brake-line bolt from the rear of the cylinder using a line wrench. Remove the two mounting bolts from the rear of the backing plate. Remove the old wheel cylinder.

    7

    Install a new wheel cylinder onto the outboard face of the backing plate. Tighten the mounting bolts snug with a ratchet and socket. Install the rear brake line and banjo bolt onto the new wheel cylinder from behind the backing plate. Tighten the banjo bolt to 33 foot-pounds with a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket. Brake bleeding will be necessary if you replace either or both wheel cylinders.

    8

    Inspect the brake drum for severe pitting or scoring lines on the inboard sides of the drum. If pitting or scoring is present, discard and replace the drums. Measure the inboard opening of the brake drum. If the opening between the two inboard sides is more than 9 9/16 inches across, replace the brake drum. If the drum is within specifications, spray the entire inside of the drum out with aerosol brake cleaner.

    9

    Transfer the parking-brake lever pin from the old rearward brake shoe to the new shoe using a pair of pliers, if needed. Install the new rearward shoe with the longer brake lining onto the outboard face of the backing plate. Install the parking brake lever on the new shoe. Install the second brake shoe and set the self-adjuster lever and spring between the two new shoes. Use a brake spring tool to set the spring if needed.

    10

    Install the adjuster lever and pivot onto the rearward shoe by hand, then install the hold-down pin from behind the backing plate, through the rearward shoe. Install a new hold-down spring and cap over the pin, while holding the pin with your thumb from behind. Turn the cap with a cylindrical brake spring tool, until the cap opening and the flattened head of the pin form a "+" shape. This shape signifies that the cap is locked onto the hold-down pin.

    11

    Install the hold-down pin, spring and cap on the forward facing brake shoe using the directions from the previous step. Install the brake strut and spring assembly between the two brake pads. Install the brake lever return spring between the lever and the rearward brake shoe.

    12

    Install the brake shoe guide onto the upper center post of the brake assembly. Attach the rearward upper return spring to the brake shoe by hand with a twisting motion. Install the spring up and over the upper center post with a spring hook tool. Install the forward facing return spring into the brake shoe. Install the spring onto the upper center post. Lift the brake adjuster lever upward by hand and adjust the brake adjuster screw inward as far as it will go by hand.

    13

    Install the brake drum over the new brake shoe assembly. Install a single lug nut onto one of the wheel studs by hand to hold the drum in place against the wheel hub. Proceed to the bleeding portion of this project at this time if you changed the wheel cylinders. If you did not change the wheel cylinders, proceed to the brake adjusting section.

    14

    Repeat Steps 3 through 12 to complete the brake shoe, hardware, drum and wheel cylinder replacement on the second side of the S-10.

Drum Brake Bleeding Instructions

    15

    Ask an assistant to sit in the driver's seat of the truck. Place a drain pan beneath one of the rear brake assemblies with the majority of the pan opening inward from the assembly. Ask your assistant to depress the pedal slowly and hold the pedal to the floor of the truck. Open the bleeder screw, when the pedal is down and being held, using an open-end wrench. Close the bleeder screw snug with the wrench. Repeat this primary bleeding on the truck three times on both sides.

    16

    Ask your assistant to slowly pump the rear brake pedal until the pedal becomes hard to depress. Instruct your assistant to hold the brake pedal with his foot and follow the pedal to the floor and hold it down. Open the bleeder screw when the pedal is being held. Allow the air to escape the screw hole. Close the screw with your open-end wrench. Repeat this pressurized bleeding method three times on each side of the truck, or until no more air escapes the brake line. Double-check that both bleeder screws are snug with your open-end wrench.

    17

    Remove the single lug nut from the face of the brake drum. and proceed to the brake adjusting section of this project.

Brake Adjusting Instructions

    18

    Turn the ignition key on the truck to the "II" or accessories position, without starting the truck. Place the gear selector switch into the "N" or neutral position if you have an automatic transmission. If you have a manual transmission, simply depress the clutch and wiggle the transmission shifter into the neutral position. Step out of the truck and proceed to one rear side of the truck.

    19

    Install the rear wheel on one side of the S-10, and tighten the lug nuts snug with a tire iron. Spin the rear wheel using both hands. If the rear wheel makes one complete rotation and stops, the brakes do not need to be adjusted. If the rear wheel spins more than one full rotation, adjust the self-adjuster wheel from the rear of the backing plate with a flathead screwdriver to tighten the brakes. If the wheel does not complete one rotation, turn the self-adjuster wheel upward to loosen the rear shoes slightly.

    20

    Repeat Step 2 to adjust the rear drum brakes on the second side of the truck. Raise the truck off the jack stands when you have completely adjusted the rear brakes. Remove the stands from beneath the truck. Lower the S-10 to the ground. Tighten the rear lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds with a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket.

DIY: Brake Line Removal in a 1991 Saturn

If the brake lines are bad on your Saturn, then the brakes on the affected wheel or wheels will not work. Kinks or holes in the brake lines require that you replace the line. Trying to straighten a kink in the hose will only weaken the line. If you plug a hole, then the repair is temporary at best. Brake lines are not that expensive, and the peace of mind you get knowing the lines are safe is priceless. It does not take very long to replace a brake line. The hardest part of the project is crawling under the car to do the work.

Instructions

    1

    Open the engine compartment of the Saturn and disconnect the negative cable from the battery using a wrench to loosen the terminal nut. Drain the fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster. Place the fluid in the drain pan for recycling.

    2

    Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels, or in front of the front wheels, based on which end you have to work on. Lift the Saturn with the jack on the end you need to work on and brace it with the jack stands. Remove the wheel on the affected side using the lug wrench to loosen the lug nuts. Crawl under the car and locate the affected brake line.

    3

    Clean the fittings on the brake line that you need to remove. The area must be clean or you will get dirt in the braking system, which is a hazardous situation. Place the drain pan under the brake line and loosen the fitting with a wrench. Allow the fluid to drain from the line.

    4

    Move to the other end of the brake line and loosen the fitting with a wrench to remove the brake line. Allow the fluid to drain into the drain pan. Put the new brake line in place and tighten the fittings using the wrench. Snap the line into any clips that are present to secure it. Remove the jack stand from under the Saturn. Lower the car to the ground.

    5

    Connect the negative battery cable and tighten the nut with a wrench. Refill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid. Bleed the brake lines by having a helper pump the brakes several times and hold them. Open the bleeder valve with a wrench and expel the air from the brake system. Repeat as necessary until the air is out of the lines.

Minggu, 21 Juli 2013

How to Replace Brakes on a 2005 Lexus ES330

How to Replace Brakes on a 2005 Lexus ES330

The brakes on the 2005 Lexus ES330 are a wear item that should be checked during every inspection. If the brakes are not changed in time, the semi-metallic material can completely wear away, leaving bare metal. This metal surface can damage the rotor by etching grooves into the rotor's surface. Replacing the brakes is a relatively straightforward task you can complete in under an hour, in most cases.

Instructions

    1

    Park your Lexus ES330 on a flat, level spot. Open the hood and locate the brake master cylinder reservoir near the firewall on the driver's side. Use a turkey baster to siphon one-third of the brake fluid in the reservoir. Place the fluid in a sealable container and dispose of it in an environmentally friendly manner.

    2

    Use a lug wrench to loosen the wheel lugs on all wheels. Use a floor jack to raise the vehicle. Set the vehicle on jack stands placed underneath the vehicle's jack support areas. Finish removing the wheel lugs and pull the front wheels off the vehicle.

    3

    Remove the two retaining bolts holding the caliper to the rotor with a socket wrench. Pull the caliper off the rotor and suspend it from the frame with mechanic's wire. Detach the old brake pads from the caliper.

    4

    Place an old brake pad over the caliper piston and attach a C-clamp between the piston and the back of the brake caliper. Tighten the C-clamp to push the piston back inside of the caliper.

    5

    Remove the metal shims from the old brake pads and clip them onto the new brake pads. Place the new brake pads into the caliper and place the caliper back over the rotor. Reattach the two retaining bolts to the caliper and tighten them with a socket wrench. Repeat the procedure on the other front tire, and on the rear brakes, if necessary.

    6

    Mount the wheels onto the vehicle and hand-tighten the wheel lugs. Remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the wheel lugs to 76 foot-pounds with a torque wrench.

    7

    Refill the brake master cylinder reservoir with DOT 3 brake fluid until the fluid level reaches the "MAX" fill line. Close the cap on the reservoir and close the hood.

How to Remove the Windshield Without Breaking It

How to Remove the Windshield Without Breaking It

Usually you would only remove your vehicle's windshield if it were broken beyond repair. Taking your car to an auto center for a windshield repair can be costly, so consider doing this on our own. The help of a friend may be needed at the end, but you can do the dirty work yourself with all the right supplies. Only a few are needed.

Instructions

    1

    Lay the towel on top of the windshield, and be prepared to slip it under the stainless trim once it is lifted.

    2

    Place the trim removal tool underneath the stainless trim, pull upward slightly, and then quickly slip the edge of the towel underneath it. Doing this prevents scratches on the glass.

    3

    Pull the removal tool downward as it catches on the clips that hold the windshield in place. The clips will release, and that strip of trim will come loose. Continue doing this around the entire windshield frame until all trim is removed.

    4

    Cut the butyl window seal that is in place along the outside rim of the windshield. Slide the knife underneath the seal to remove it. The only thing exposed at this point will be the metal frame.

    5

    Remove the windshield completely. Place the cold knife blade at a 90 degree angle between the windshield and its metal frame. Turn the handle to begin separating the windshield from the frame, and then force the knife through the butyl material using the T-handle.

    6

    Get inside of the car and push the windshield outward. If you have another person working with you, have them grab the windshield as you push it outward so it does not hit the ground and shatter.

How to Change the Brake Pads on a '94 Ford Ranger

How to Change the Brake Pads on a '94 Ford Ranger

One of the most important systems to maintain on your 1994 Ford Ranger is the braking system. Your brake pads will wear down over time, reducing their effectiveness and taking longer to stop your truck. Even worse, worn-out brakes can fail, leading to serious injury or worse. Like most vehicles, the majority of Ford Rangers have drum brakes on the rear wheels and disk brakes on the front wheels. You'll need an assistant to help with this task.

Instructions

Drum Brakes

    1

    Park the Ranger on flat ground and shut off the engine. Put the parking brake on and make sure that the transmission is in "Park." Loosen (but do not remove) the lug nuts on the rear wheels.

    2

    Jack up the back of the truck. Place jack stands underneath the truck on each side, and slowly lower the Ranger onto the jack stands.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts from the rear wheels and take the wheels off the truck.

    4

    Remove the drums from the wheel hubs. If the drums won't slide off, retract the brake shoes by removing the rubber plug on the back of the brake, sliding a flathead screwdriver through the hole and rotating the sprocket inside with an upward motion. Continue rotating the sprocket until the drum slides off.

    5

    Clean the wheel hub with brake wash. Wear gloves and safety goggles, and place a drain pan underneath the wheel to collect the brake wash.

    6

    Disconnect the shoe retracting springs from the pin at the top of the brake with the brake spring removal tool, followed by the springs at the bottom of the brake.

    7

    Lift up the auto-adjuster tab with a screwdriver and a pair of pliers and disconnect the auto-adjuster cable. The auto-adjuster tab is a small metal tab on the bottom of the brake.

    8

    Lift the primary braking shoe off of the wheel hub (it won't be attached to anything). Detach the secondary brake shoe from the parking brake cable and remove it.

    9

    Wash the wheel hub with brake wash.

    10

    Apply brake grease to the wheel hub where it comes into contact with the brake shoes.

    11

    Slide the new brake pads into position.

    12

    Reassemble the brakes by reversing the process you used to disassemble them.

Disk Brakes

    13

    Park the Ranger on flat ground and shut off the engine. Put the parking brake on and make sure that the transmission is in "Park." Loosen (but do not remove) the lug nuts on the front wheels.

    14

    Jack up the front of the truck. Place jack stands underneath the truck on each side, and slowly lower the Ranger onto the jack stands.

    15

    Remove the lug nuts from the front wheels and take the wheels off the truck.

    16

    Lift the brake caliper off the caliper mount, then detach the brake pad from the caliper slides.

    17

    Reset the brake caliper with a brake caliper reset tool.

    18

    Reinstall the caliper mounting bolts.

    19

    Install the new brake pads.

    20

    Reinstall the brake caliper, reversing the order in which you disassembled it, making sure that all bolts are secured tightly on the brakes.

Bleeding the Brakes

    21

    Open the hood. Remove the brake fluid from the reservoir in the engine compartment with a turkey baster. Fill the reservoir with new brake fluid.

    22

    Put a clear tube attached to a bottle over the nipple on the bleeder screw (you can get the tube and bottle at an auto-parts store). Get an assistant to pump the brake pedal a few times.

    23

    Tell your assistant to press down hard on the brake pedal and hold it. Loosen the brake fluid bleeder screw on the wheel cylinder (drum brakes) or caliper (disk brakes). Close the screw right before the brake pedal hits the floor. Repeat this step five times, then refill the reservoir.

    24

    Tell your assistant to pump the brakes about 10 more times, then open the bleeder screw. Continue to do this until you no longer see air bubbles in the brake fluid.

    25

    Fill the brake reservoir again, then bleed the brakes on the other three wheels.

    26

    Place the wheels back onto the truck. Reattach the lug nuts. Lift the truck off the jack stands.

    27

    Remove the jack stands, and slowly lower the truck to the ground.

Sabtu, 20 Juli 2013

DIY Windshield Repair for a Bull's Eye

DIY Windshield Repair for a Bull's Eye

Act quickly when you get a bull's eye stone chip in your windshield and save hundreds of dollars in replacement costs. Windshields are made with a layer of laminate sandwiched between two layers of glass. Impact from a stone creates an air filled separation between the outer layer and the laminate. To repair this, the air must be replaced with a transparent bonding resin. A single use do-it-yourself bull's eye repair syringe kit is less than $20 as of 2010 at auto parts and department stores, and repair time is approximately an hour.

Instructions

Preparation

    1

    Ensure your vehicle is indoors or under complete shade. The repair resin hardens with ultraviolet rays from sunlight.

    2

    Warm the glass, if necessary. Glass should be around room temperature. If it is too cold, warm it with a hair dryer. Gradually warm the glass with a repeated spiral motion starting from the frame of the windshield and slowly moving toward the break. Keep the hair dryer about 12 inches away from the glass. Too much heat too soon can cause the break to spread. If the vehicle has been in the sun and the glass is too hot, let your vehicle sit in the shade with the windows open until it cools enough to touch. The break should be dry. Do not attempt the repair if it has just rained or too soon after the morning dew.

    3

    Clean the windshield within 2 inches of the chip with glass cleaner or soap and water to prevent dirt from contaminating the repair site. Spray/wet the towel or rag then wipe the glass. Do not apply spray/water directly to the windshield. This method will avoid getting moisture in the bull's eye. Use a paper towel moistened with alcohol to clean the repair site, then scrape out any loose glass and dirt from the pit with the needle, pin or corner of a razor blade.

Repair

    4

    Remove the two-sided self-sticking disk from the package and peel off the protective backing on one side. Position the disk over the break, with the chip directly under the hole, and press gently on the glass. Gently smooth it over several times with your thumb or finger from the middle outward to ensure an airtight seal.

    5

    Peel the protective backing from the top side of the disk. Center the the injection pedestal on the disk and press the edges around the hollow angled stem gently to ensure a tight seal. Note that the pedestal should be positioned so the stem is pointing as straight up as possible.

    6

    Cut the tip off the tube of resin and slowly pour about three quarters of the liquid resin into the stem, being careful no to overfill. Recap and save the remaining resin for the end of the repair.

    7

    With one hand supporting the stem and pedestal, firmly press the syringe into place (with plunger already at the bottom) ensuring a tight seal. Hold the base of the syringe and gently pull the plunger up and lock it in the position indicated near the top. Wait 10 minutes while the air is slowly drawn up from the bull's-eye.

    8

    Separate the syringe from the pedestal and reattach firmly. This breaks the cycle and allows air pressure in for the next step.

    9

    Gently press the plunger down and lock into the position indicated on the syringe and wait at least 20 minutes. The pressure created will force the repair resin into the bull's-eye to replace the previously displaced air. Too much pressure too soon will go beyond the bull's-eye and create a daisy effect.

    10

    Separate the syringe from the stem and pedestal and use the razor blade to help remove the attached disk and pedestal from the windshield. Use a paper towel to catch any resin dripping from the repair.

    11

    Squeeze the tube of remaining resin to place a few drops into the chip and then cover with the plastic curing film included in the kit. Move your vehicle into the sun and let the repair cure for 15 minutes to an hour, depending on how cloudy it is.

    12

    After the resin has hardened, peel off the curing film by prying a corner up with a razor blade. A raised resin patch will be left and must be scraped flush with the glass. Using the razor blade, scrape from the edges inward to prevent pulling the patch resin from the pit of the chip. Your repair is complete. Clean the windshield and dispose of the repair materials responsibly.

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Miata

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Miata

The rear brake pads that come equipped on some Mazda Miata models (also known as the MX-5 Miata) only account for about 30 percent of the braking power for the compact import. Therefore, the front brake pads do more of the work and will require more frequent service. However, the rear pads will eventually have to be replaced since they're smaller and not as thick as the front brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Remove one-third of the brake fluid from the master cylinder in the engine compartment after parking the Miata on a hard level surface suitable for lifting and supporting the vehicle. Discard the fluid.

    2

    Ensure the parking brake is not engaged and place a tire block in front of one of the front tires.

    3

    Loosen the rear wheel nuts with the jack wrench by turning them one-quarter turn counterclockwise.

    4

    Lift the rear of the Miata with the car jack, one side at a time, and then support the car on jack stands in a safe and secure location. Finish removing the wheel nuts and wheels.

    5

    Locate the manual caliper piston adjustment gear plug on the back side of the caliper housing and pull it out of the housing by hand.

    6

    Insert a metric Allen wrench key and turn the piston adjustment key counterclockwise until the caliper piston is fully retracted within its bore. Replace the plug after the piston has been retracted.

    7

    Remove the lower caliper bolt with a metric hand wrench and lift the caliper upward off of the brake pads.

    8

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket and then remove the brake pads' upper and lower hardware clips from the bracket.

    9

    Install the new hardware clips onto the bracket and then apply a light coat of silicone brake lubricant to the brake pad contact points on the clips.

    10

    Insert the new pads onto the hardware clips in the mounting brackets.

    11

    Pivot the caliper down over the pads and rotor, align the lower caliper mounting bolt and then tighten the bolt to 30-foot pounds with a torque wrench and metric socket. Replace the pads on the opposite side.

    12

    Replace the wheels and wheel nuts and then tighten them flush to the wheel and hub. Raise the Miata up just enough to remove each jack stand and then lower the Miata slowly to the ground. Torque the wheel nuts to 80-foot pounds with a torque wrench and socket in a crisscross pattern.

    13

    Ensure the master cylinder cap is secure and then pump the brake pedal several times until it feels normal. This will seat the new pads to the rotors and extend the caliper pistons outward.

    14

    Recheck the brake fluid in the master cylinder and top off as necessary with new brake fluid only.

How Often Should You Change Your Brake Pads & Shoes?

How Often Should You Change Your Brake Pads & Shoes?

    Many factors affect the frequency with which you must change your brake pads and shoes.
    Many factors affect the frequency with which you must change your brake pads and shoes.

Change When They Look Worn

    A quick visual check of the brake pads, including a quick measurement of the remaining pad, can determine whether the pads need replacing. Most mechanics advise that if a pad has below 2/32 of an inch left, it should be replaced.

Change at the Sound of the Metal Indicator

    Most drivers wait until they hear the sound of the metal wear indicator, which can only be heard after the brake pad is worn. This is a solid indicator that the brake pads are worn heavily and need to be replaced. You do not need to visually inspect the pads for wear when the sounds is evident. Many mechanics advise that brake shoes be replaced whenever the brake pads are changed, regardless of wear.

Bottom Line

    Brake pads and shoes can last upward of 50,000 mile on some vehicles and as little as 10,000 miles on others. The length of time between changing your brake pads and shoes often depends on your driving style, the quality of your brake pads and shoes, vehicle weight and road conditions. The visual method of inspecting the brake pads for wear below 2/32 of an inch will guarantee that you'll know the pad needs replacing before the metal wear indicator can cut into the rotors, resulting in further damage and higher replacement costs.

How to Replace the Front Rotors on a 2001 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer Edition

How to Replace the Front Rotors on a 2001 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer Edition

When it comes time to replace the brake rotors on your Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer edition, consider doing it yourself. Labor rates are high in repair shops, and the project is easy enough to complete at home. The brake rotors are important to the proper operation of your braking system. If the surfaces of the brake rotor are not in good condition, your brakes will not be effective. Another thing that can happen is that the brake rotors will warp. This is evident when you apply the brakes, and the SUV begins to shake.

Instructions

    1

    Place the wheel chocks behind the rear tires of the Ford Expedition. Raise the SUV with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the vehicle, and raise it to the frame.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts from the wheel, using the lug wrench. Pull the wheel off the Expedition. Remove the brake caliper and anchor plate, using a socket and ratchet to remove the bolts. Secure the caliper to the strut, using a wire tie. Do not allow the caliper to hang loose, or you will damage the brake line.

    3

    Pull the brake disc off the wheel assembly, and put the new one on. Cut the wire tie, holding the brake caliper, using the pliers, and bolt it into place on the wheel, using the socket and ratchet. Replace the wheel, and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    4

    Remove the jack stand from under the SUV, and lower the vehicle to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

How to Install a 1953 Ford Pickup Windshield

When installing the new windshield in your 1953 Ford Pickup, you should have someone on hand to help insert the windshield into the vehicle. You can pick up the tools and components you will need for the job from your local auto parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Use a Phillips-head screwdriver to remove one of the two mounting screws on the base of the rear-view wing mirror. Slide the wing mirror off its base. Repeat the process on the second wing mirror. This will give you best access to the windshield.

    2

    Cut the rubber seal around the edges of the windshield, from inside the truck, with a sharp blade. Pull the rubber seal away with your hand. Carefully push the windshield out of the frame. Have someone on hand outside the vehicle to help lift the windshield off the truck.

    3

    Attach the new gasket on to the windshield so that the heavy part of the gasket is on the inside of the windshield and the slit on the outside.

    4

    Insert a nylon cord around the outer groove of the windshield. This will allow you to pull the gasket to the inner side of the windshield once the windshield is in place.

    5

    Lift the windshield in to place in the frame. Have someone on hand to help lift the windshield in to place. Make sure that the end of the cord is inside the frame.

    6

    Pull the nylon cord from the inside of the vehicle to work the rubber lip to the inside of the frame.

How Long Should a Windshield Sit?

How Long Should a Windshield Sit?

    Vehicle windshields need to be replaced from time to time.
    Vehicle windshields need to be replaced from time to time.

Two to Four Hours

    Your vehicle should be allowed to sit for two to four hours after windshield installation, according to RV Glass Solutions. This estimate is enough time for urethane to dry and the windshield to set. Having your window replaced on a warm, dry, day is also recommended.

Don't Rush It

    According to Capitol Glass Works, glass installation requires a full 24 hours before drive away is recommended. Hurrying the set time on a windshield replacement is a safety issue, so it's best to avoid rushing for mere convenience.

Bottom Line

    With today's quick drying urethanes and mobile businesses that will replace your windshield in a parking lot while you work, it is unnecessary to wait longer than two to four hours for your new windshield to sit before driving.

Jumat, 19 Juli 2013

What Should I Do If My Rear View Mirror Falls Off?

What Should I Do If My Rear View Mirror Falls Off?

A rear view mirror allows a driver to see what is happening behind the vehicle while driving. It is especially important while parking, maneuvering at slow speeds and changing lanes. Over time, the adhesive bond that connects the rear view mirror to the windshield glass can weaken and the mirror can fall off. Most mirrors can be replaced easily by the home mechanic.

Preparation

    In most cases, when a rear view mirror falls off the windshield, it will leave behind an adhesive residue. Begin by placing a piece of masking tape just above this residue and marking on the tape where the centerline of the mirror was. Then use a flat razor blade to clean the adhesive off the windshield.
    The rear view mirror connects to the windshield via a small metal plate at the base of the mirror mount. Find the correct size hex or torx head screwdriver and loosen the screw at the base of the mirror. Note which side was against the windshield. Clean the old adhesive off this side of the metal plate.

Reattaching the Base Plate

    Buy a specialty rear view mirror adhesive kit from an auto parts supplier. Most will come with directions and any special precautions for the specific product listed on the back. Work in a well-ventilated area. These adhesives contain toxic chemicals that can be hazardous to humans if inhaled in large quantities. If you are working outside on a cold day, use a hair dryer or heat gun to heat the mounting surfaces. Keep the heat source at least 12 inches away from the windshield. Heating the glass too quickly or too much can cause the glass to crack or shatter. The kit may contain a cleaning agent that must be applied before the glue. If it doesn't, use rubbing alcohol to clean the surfaces. Most rear view mirror adhesive kits contain a two-part epoxy. Mix the two parts together and apply it to the base plate. Use the mark you made on the masking tape to align the base plate, and press the plate onto the glass. Hold the plate for 10 to 15 minutes until the epoxy sets up.

Reattaching the Mirror

    Wait at least 10 hours before attempting to mount the mirror on the plate. This will give the epoxy time to harden. Then simply slide the mirror base over the plate and tighten the retaining screw.

How to Replace a Brake Line in a Plymouth Neon

Although the Dodge/Plymouth Neon is no longer in production, there are still quite a few on the road. This is a good sign for owners who need to replace parts like brake lines, as replacement parts for the Neon are still readily available.

Instructions

    1

    Top off the brake fluid level and tighten the reservoir cap to help prevent excess fluid loss during the brake line replacement. The Neon's brake fluid reservoir is located behind the battery on the driver's side.

    2

    Support the car securely on jack stands and remove the first wheel. Locate the brake line section you'll remove, which is directly connected to the brake hose.

    3

    Study the section of brake line and take note of how it is bent. Bend the replacement line the same way. Bend the replacement line more or possibly cut it if it is longer.

    4

    Disconnect the bolts at each end of the line to remove it. Use two line wrenches since there should be two bolts on each connector. Remove the end on the brake hose first.

    5

    Install the new line. Connect it in reverse order, meaning you attach the brake hose end last. Thread the bolts by hand, and then tighten with the line wrenches.

    6

    Bleed the brake system to remove air. Open the bleeder valve on the brake caliper, attach a vinyl tube to it and place the other end in a container of brake fluid. Have another person depress the brake pedal to purge the air.

    7

    Attach the wheel and repeat the process for the other brake lines. Top of the brake fluid level and test the brakes after everything is complete.

How to Find Truck Mirror Replacements

How to Find Truck Mirror Replacements

From time to time trucks need replacement parts and if you're looking for truck mirror replacements you may not know where to begin. Finding mirror replacements can be easier than you think if you just know where to get started. Don't let your truck be driven around with cracked or damaged mirrors, find new ones easily and affordable.

Instructions

    1

    Try a salvage yard, also known as the junkyard, which can have plenty of truck mirrors and with new part-finding technology, all you need to know is your truck's make, model and year in order for them to do a search for you. Buying replacement mirrors from a salvage yard is less expensive than getting a new one from a parts store or dealership.

    2

    Locate a dealership. If you can't find your truck mirror at a salvage yard or want to have only new equipment on your truck you can locate a new mirror replacement at the dealer who sells your model of truck. If they don't have it in stock they can order it for you. Prices are usually more expensive but you will get new parts made specifically for your truck.

    3

    Visit a parts store, which can order truck mirror replacements at prices usually less expensive than a dealer. However, keep in mind that some parts stores will have to order the part from the dealer, which can cost more than if you had the dealer order it for you since the parts store is now the middleman. Some will have other brands of truck mirror replacement parts and will carry them in stock.

    4

    Try an online site. Sites such as Automotive Mirrors and Pick Up Specialties have truck mirror replacement parts that you can order from the comfort of your home. All you need is the truck's make, model and year and have a credit card handy.

Volkswagen Jetta Rear Rotor Removal

Volkswagen Jettas equipped with rear disc brakes have a rotor mounted on the rear axle hub. The surface of the rotor will wear with use, and periodically it will need to be replaced. In some instances, the rotor can warp or distort, and will need to be replaced sooner that at the scheduled replacing time. Removing the rear rotor from a Volkswagen Jetta is a task that can be performed by an amateur mechanic: All you need are a few simple tools.

Removing the Wheels

    Disconnect the ground cable from the negative battery terminal. Loosen the retaining bolt with a wrench, then pull the clamp off the terminal. Block the front wheels and tires. Raise the rear of the vehicle using an automotive jack and support with jack stands. Unscrew the lug screws on the rear wheels, using a lug wrench. Pull the wheel off the hub and remove it from the vehicle.

Removing the Rear Rotor

    Unscrew the two bolts that hold the brake caliper bracket in place. Lift the brake caliper upwards, and use a wire or plastic tie to connect it to the coil spring. Make sure you do not put any stress on the rubber brake line. Pry the center cap off the hub, using a flat blade screwdriver. Pull the cotter pin from the hub. Using needle nose pliers, straighten the ends of the cotter pin and pull it from the hub nut. Pull the toothed washer out of the hub, using your hand. Unscrew the hub nut, using a socket. Next, pull out the washer and wheel bearing. Pull the brake disc outward, and slide it off the hub, then remove it from the vehicle.

How to Change a Rotor on a Ford F-150

How to Change a Rotor on a Ford F-150

Rotors are often overlooked during the replacement of the brakes on a vehicle. The Ford F150 uses front rotors and rear drum brakes on most models. This article will address the front rotors only, as this is the configuration found on most trucks.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the front of the truck with a floor jack and support it on a set of jack stands. Be sure the stands are under the frame and are not going to slide or move.

    2

    Remove the front tires from the truck, using a socket and breaker bar to remove the lug nuts. Set the lug nuts aside for use later when you replace the tires.

    3

    Locate the two bolts on the back of the brake caliper. Remove both bolts with an Allen wrench and lift off the caliper. Support the caliper with a piece of string or wire so that it does not hang on the rubber brake hose.

    4

    Locate and remove the two bolts on the back side of the steering knuckle that hold the mounting bracket for the caliper onto the knuckle. Use a wrench or socket to remove the bolts. Remove the bracket and set it aside.

    5

    Slide the rotor off the wheel studs. Once it is free from the studs you can set it aside and slide the new rotor onto the wheel studs.

    6

    Reinstall the brake pad mounting bracket and tighten the two bolts, with a socket and torque wrench. The torque specification is different from year to year, so you will need to check with the dealer to get the right specification for your truck.

    7

    Insert the brake caliper back into the mounting bracket and install the two bolts that hold it. Tighten the bolts with an Allen wrench until snug. Do not over-tighten these bolts or you may strip the heads on them, making them very hard to remove later.

    8

    Install the wheel and tire back on the truck and thread the lug nuts onto the wheel studs. Tighten with a lug wrench or socket and breaker bar. Torque the lug nuts to the manufacturer's specification.

    9

    Remove the jack stands from under the frame and slowly lower the truck back to the ground, using your jack. Test the brakes before driving the truck on the road.

Kamis, 18 Juli 2013

How to Remove Window Tint Steam

How to Remove Window Tint Steam

All window tints become cracked or damaged over time, requiring you to remove the tint in order to apply a new sheet. When it comes to removing window tint, using a steam machine is one of the best options. Professionals use steamers because it makes the process go a lot faster and smoother and there is less of a chance of damaging the window in the process. Applying steam the window dissolves the adhesive, allowing you to peel away the tint in a quick motion.

Instructions

    1

    Apply steam to the interior of the window to lift the tint film. Run steamer along the outer edges of the film for two to three minutes working side to side.

    2

    Lift the edge of the film using your finger nails and slowly pull downward applying steam heat to the film as you go. The steam will continually melt the adhesive, allowing you to lift away the full section of tint leaving minimal residue and pieces behind.

    3

    Scrape away any large sections that remain on the window using a razor blade. Spray with soapy water during this process to keep the area moist.

    4

    Soak the window thoroughly with soapy water and scrub clean with a super-fine steel wool scrub. This will lift up any adhesive left on the surface. Wipe window clean with dish soap water and paper towels.

How to Remove a Driver's Side Power Window Panel

There are many reasons a driver's side power window panel might need to be removed. Any time the power windows go out, it is necessary to remove the panel to figure out what the problem is. Car repair centers typically charge a lot of money to fix this. If you are handy with electrical equipment or just want to see how things work for yourself, it is a simple matter to remove the door panel and pull out the window panel. From there almost anything can be done to the power windows.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the mirror panel. This is the panel that is the closest to the driver's side mirror on the inside of the door. It should pop out easily. Set aside.

    2

    Remove the pull handle. Unscrew the screw connecting the door handle to the door. (Throughout the process, put all screws in a bucket so you don't lose them.) Pull the handle until it loosens, and then slide it toward the steering wheel. This will remove the door handle from the door. Unscrew the two screws connecting the other half of the door handle to the door.

    3

    Uncover the screw at the front of the door connecting the door cover to the inside of the door. Remove the screw behind the door handle. Unclip the connector holding the door handle to the door. Twist toward you and pull off gently. Pry the pop lock up -inch, using a flathead screwdriver. Remove the whole lock with your hands or pliers.

    4

    Grab the door panel and gently wiggle it side-to-side. Wiggle top, bottom, and sides. The door panel should pull easily up and off the door. The panel will be connected to the door with several wire connectors. Gently free these by pressing the tab on each connector.

    5

    Remove the plastic sheeting covering the power window controls. The controls should be placed near the window.

    6

    Use the flathead screwdriver and pliers to carefully remove the power window panel from the inside of the door. It should be connected to the door with wires and screws. Unscrew all the screws and put them in the bucket. Unclip the wires by pressing on their tabs. Pull the window panel out with pliers or your fingers depending on the size. You're finished removing the window panel from the door.

How to Replace the Windscreen on a 1994 Acura Legend

How to Replace the Windscreen on a 1994 Acura Legend

The windscreen in your 1994 Acura Legend must be kept in the best possible condition to ensure full visibility when you are driving on the road. If your windscreen is too damaged for minor repairs, you can remove the windscreen from your vehicle to have it replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Locate the two screws on the underside of the rearview wing mirror that fix the base in place. Use a Phillips-head screwdriver to remove the two screws. Slide the wing mirror away from its base. Repeat the process on the second wing mirror.

    2

    Use a sharp blade to cut away the rubber trim from around the frame of the windscreen. Make an initial incision at the top of the windscreen and cut away the rest of the trim, moving around the screen in a clockwise direction. If you are just repairing the screen and not completely replacing it, take care not to scratch or further damage your screen.

    3

    Enter the inside of the vehicle and carefully press the windscreen outwards away from the frame. Have someone outside the vehicle to help take the weight of the windscreen.

    4

    Apply a thin layer of windscreen sealant around the edge of the windscreen. Attach a rubber gasket to the dead center of the bottom of the windscreen. The gasket should have the heavy part of the inside of the windscreen and the slit on the outside.

    5

    Tie a nylon cord around the outer groove of the windscreen. Lift the windscreen onto the frame of the Acura. Press the windscreen against the frame for a few minutes to allow a seal to set in place. Enter the vehicle and pull the cord across the windscreen to allow the rubber lip to set in place. Reattach the wing mirror by sliding it back onto the base and fixing it securely in place with the the two base screws.

About Replacement Car Windshields

Car windshields are made up of two pieces of glass that have a film of plastic sandwiched between them, so that, in the event of an accident, they stay together rather than shattering over the occupants and causing harm. Windshields are easily scratched by worn wiper blades or when removing ice. Chipping from rocks or debris on the road is also another factor that can easily ruin a windshield. Once a crack has begun, no matter how small it is, it will continue to grow with the temperature changes.

The Replacement Process

    If you have full-coverage insurance on the vehicle, the insurance company will replace the windshield without increasing your payment, as long as the windshield is professionally installed. Professional installers will come out to your home or business to replace a windshield for you. You will be charged for the new windshield and the labor for installation.

Types

    Replacement windshields can be purchased with or without a tint across the top. The depth of the tint must be considered in relation to the height of the windshield, so that the tint is not directly in the field of view once the windshield is installed. There are also windshields with a built-in antenna down the center and a connector on the bottom side. If the car did not come with this type of windshield, a hole has to be drilled through the firewall to connect the antenna to the radio.

Considerations

    If you want a windshield with a built-in antenna, first check the type of connection to the radio. Radio antennas come in many different sizes, and not all are compatible with your radio.

    Ask to see a chart showing the different degrees of tint on the upper portion of the windshield to see which one is desired. Make sure you know the rules regarding tint in your local area. Some states do not allow more than a couple of inches of tint on the windshield. Once the window is installed, you own it, because it will usually not come out without damage.

Alternatives

    Many times, it is far less expensive to go to a used-auto-parts store and buy a used windshield, then call one of the windshield companies to send someone over to install it. You will save on the price of the windshield. Also, many stores will install the parts you purchase from them.

Warning

    Do not try to remove a windshield yourself if you plan on reusing it (i.e., in cases of car restorations). Even one little hair of glue left on the edge of the windshield will cause it to break. It is better to call one of the mobile windshield companies and have them remove the windshield for you; then, when you are ready to reinstall it, have them come out and do it for you.

Symptoms of a Leaky Sunroof

Symptoms of a Leaky Sunroof

The sunroof is becoming an increasingly popular option on many modern cars. Whether small panels over the driver's seat, or multi-paneled sunroofs that provide fresh air and light to rear seat occupants, the addition can be a part of just about any type of vehicle. However, sunroofs do sometimes leak. Knowing what symptoms to watch for can ensure you get your sunroof repaired before the damage becomes too severe.

    Sunroof Panel
    Sunroof Panel

Noise

    One of the most common symptoms of a leaking sunroof is an increase in the amount of wind or road noise entering the car. This can be the first symptom, as it doesn't take much of a gap for wind to enter the car at high speeds and create a whistling or pulsating effect. In some cases, the sunroof or its housing may simply need to be tightened. Other times the sunroof may require a deflector which is a strip of molded plastic that directs wind away from the opening.

Fogging

    Another common symptom of a leaky sunroof is fogging, which can occur on the panel or on other glass, plastic, or metal surfaces inside the car. The fogging is caused by moisture entering the car through the leaks, often overnight as temperatures drop. Fogging can be especially common in humid weather, but should generally not occur inside the vehicle unless there is a leak somewhere.

Water

    When a sunroof leak is substantial, water may be able to enter the car. In these cases there will often be no mistaking the source of the leak, as water will pool up directly below the sunroof. The ceiling upholstery may even appear wet or discolored. This can especially happen during a car wash, when high-pressure water is applied to the vehicle roof, or when driving in rain or snow. Leaks large enough to admit water should be sealed or repaired soon after detection, and before other problems occur.

Rust

    A symptom of a prolonged sunroof leak is often rust. This can occur on the chrome (or chromed plastic) trim around the sunroof, either on the inside or outside of the vehicle. Rust can also spread to the metal roof panels, often requiring extensive repair. If you can see the rust, you can repair it. Try sanding the spots away, re-coating the affected area with a waterproof sealant, and fixing the initial leak.

Control Failure

    The most severe symptom of a serious leak is a sunroof that does not operate at all. The relay, wiring, and motors that control its motion are all susceptible to damage from moisture, and may interfere with other electronic systems in the car, such as dashboard instruments. A sunroof that experiences this sort of damage has usually shown one or more of the other symptoms first, which is why prompt repair of any leak is the best choice.

Rabu, 17 Juli 2013

How to Change the Rear Brake Rotors on a 2003 Sport Trac

How to Change the Rear Brake Rotors on a 2003 Sport Trac

The Ford Explorer Sport Trac was a four-door truck with a short pickup bed on the rear. The 2003 Explorer Sport Trac was available in two- and four-wheel-drive packages. The 2003 Sport Trac featured a 215-horsepower 4.0-liter V-6 engine. The rear rotors on the 2003 Sport Trac are held in place by the rotor. There is no bulky mounting bracket to remove. The insides of the rotors house the parking brake shoes, which makes removal of the rotors somewhat difficult if the shoes are over-adjusted.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of the Sport Trac and check the brake fluid level in the reservoir. Remove fluid in the reservoir with a bottle siphon, until the fluid is down about a half inch below the "Full" mark.

    2

    Loosen the rear lug nuts on the truck, with a tire iron. Raise the rear of the truck with a jack. Place jack stands beneath both ends of the axle housing, about 4 inches inward from the rear wheels. Set the Sport Trac down on the jack stands. Remove the rear lug nuts, then remove the rear wheels from the truck.

    3

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts from one side of the Sport Trac, with a ratchet and a Torx socket. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using a pry bar if needed. Hang the caliper from the rear coil spring, with a metal coat hanger or rod.

    4

    Remove the outboard brake pad from the caliper, using a flat-head screwdriver to pry the tabs on the pad free from the caliper. Install a C-clamp around the inboard pad and the rear of the caliper. Tighten the C-clamp to compress the caliper piston completely into the caliper. Remove the C-clamp and the brake pad when you are finished. Pry the brake pad free of the inside of the caliper piston if needed.

    5

    Remove the old brake rotor by hand. If the rotor is stuck, remove the oval-shaped rubber stopper on the brake backing plate, from behind the brake assembly. Insert a flat-head screwdriver and push the adjuster wheel upward to loosen the parking brake shoes, from inside the rear rotor. Tap the raised face of the rotor to the left and right (facing the rotor), lightly with a hammer, to help push the parking brake shoes and linings inward to release the rotor.

    6

    Coat the hub face that mates to the back of the rotor thoroughly with caliper grease. This will prevent the rotor from seizing onto the hub face due to corrosion. Inspect the parking brake shoe linings. The shoes are not that thick to begin with, but if they are worn down to the metal backings, they definitely need to be replaced. Parking brake shoes wear differently, depending on how you use the brake and how often.

    7

    Install the new brake rotor onto the hub by hand. Turn a single lug nut onto one of the studs, until it butts against the face of the new rotor. This will hold the rotor in place for the rest of the installation process. Spray the entire inboard and outboard faces of the rotor with aerosol brake cleaner. Remove all of the anti-rust oil from the brake rotor factory. Remove any oily fingerprints you may have put on the rotor as well.

    8

    Coat a new inboard brake pad with a light coating of caliper grease. Install the new brake pad inside the caliper piston hole. The three prongs in a triangular pattern on the inboard pad will grab the caliper piston. Use a flat-head screwdriver to gently pry the pad completely into the piston hole if needed. Install the outboard pad by pushing it onto the caliper, then use a flat-head screwdriver to adjust the pad tabs into the indents on the caliper body.

    9

    Unhook the brake caliper from the coil spring and place the caliper back onto the brake assembly. Install a half-inch female to 3/8-inch male adapter onto your torque wrench, then install the Torx bit onto the adapter. Tighten the caliper mounting bolts to 24 foot-pounds with a half-inch-drive torque wrench and socket. Replace the rubber stopper on the backing plate. Remove the single lug nut from the front of the rotor.

    10

    Repeat Steps 3 through 9 to complete the rotor replacement on the second side of the Sport Trac.

    11

    Raise the Sport Trac off of the jack stands, then remove the stands from beneath the truck. Lower the Sport Trac to the ground. Torque the rear wheels to 100 foot-pounds of torque with your torque wrench and a wheel nut socket. Check your brake fluid level under the hood, and add fluid until the level reaches the "Full" mark on the reservoir. Install and tighten the reservoir cap.

    12

    Sit in the driver's seat of the Explorer, and pump the brake pedal about 10 to 15 times slowly. If the brake pedal does not stiffen after about five pumps, and the pedal extends near or all the way to the floor, stop pumping. Check the brake lines for leaks. If no leak exists, then proceed to bleeding the brake system.

How to Repair a Warped Brake Rotor

How to Repair a Warped Brake Rotor

A warped brake rotor on your vehicle is a nuisance and a danger, especially if it's cracked. Though it's referred to as a warped rotor, most often it's a rotor that has worn unevenly with a varying thickness. One symptom of a warped rotor is when you push the brake pedal and feel it pulsating. A clunking noise is another. Experienced home mechanics can repair warped rotors themselves by following a series of steps.

Instructions

Raise the Vehicle

    1

    Insert blocks behind the rear wheels and apply the emergency brake.

    2

    Loosen all the lug nuts, but don't totally remove any.

    3

    Unsnap the master cylinder lid and wrap a shop cloth around it to catch any fluid spills. When the caliper is squeezed it might push fluid over the top of the master cylinder's reservoir.

    4

    Position the floor jack under the center of the front frame and jack it up. If a small jack is used, raise one wheel at a time.

    5

    Place two jack stands under the vehicle's frame, one under each side near the front wheels.

    6

    Unbolt all the lug nuts and remove both front wheels.

Remove the Calipers and Rotors

    7

    Place a clamp over the caliper and compress it. Push the piston all the way into the caliper .

    8

    Unscrew the two bolts that secure the caliper to the spindle and remove the caliper. Take care not to stretch or damage the hydraulic brake line.

    9

    Remove the grease cap, cotter pin and spindle nut. Bump the rotor enough to pop the outer wheel bearing from its seat.

    10

    Remove the rotors and replace them with the new set.

    11

    Replace the brake pads and reinstall the caliper.

How to Check Brake Calipers

Brake calipers apply hydraulic pressure to the brake pads. The pads squeeze against the rotor on each side and slow the vehicle. This is much the same way caliper brakes work on a bicycle. When you activate the cable-driven hand brake, the caliper squeezes the pads on either side of the tire rim and slows the bicycle. The difference between the two is hydraulic pressure. There are a few reasons why a brake caliper can stop functioning the way it was intended to. Checking the caliper for performance issues is recommended when your brakes aren't working properly.

Instructions

    1

    Lift and support the vehicle using a jack and jack stand(s). Be sure to loosen the lug nuts with a lug wrench before lifting and supporting the vehicle.

    2

    Inspect the brake hose and caliper for visible signs of brake fluid leaks. Brake hoses with visible cracks or deterioration should be replaced immediately. Brake fluid seeping or leaking from the caliper piston may or may not be visible until the caliper is removed. An excessive leak will be obvious and the caliper should be replaced.

    3

    Place the C-clamp over the caliper so the bottom drive of the C-clamp sits against the outboard pad and the top of the clamp sits over the caliper housing. Tighten the clamp in order to compress the caliper piston. If the piston does not retract or gives excessive resistance, the piston is compromised and requires replacement. When checking rear calipers, be aware that some require screwing in the piston which requires a special tool kit in order to achieve. Trying to compress a screw-in piston with a C-clamp or like device can damage the piston or clamp or both. Screw-in piston type calipers are only used on some rear disc brake systems.

    4

    Move the caliper with your hands once the piston is retracted. Free-floating calipers employ slides that need to move back and forth. The slides may be separate or integrated with the caliper bolts. It is not uncommon for the slide or slide bolts to corrode and prevent the caliper from moving properly. To fix the problem the caliper would need to be removed by removing the caliper guide bolts or slide bolts. The bolts would require cleaning and re-lubricating or replaced and lubricated. Internal slides can also be maintained in this fashion.

    5

    Remove the pads and compare the pad wear from both. One pad wearing more than the other may indicate a sticking piston or sticking slide. Common side effects in this case include the vehicle pulling to one side when the brake pedal is applied. If the slide or piston is beyond reconditioning, replace the caliper and then bleed the brake system

    6

    Bleed the brake system any time the hydraulic system is exposed to air. Brake crimps placed on the brake hoses will prevent too much air from entering the system, but bleeding will still be required. To bleed the brake incorporate the assistance of someone to pump the foot brake pedal four to five times and hold it in the down position. Open the bleeder screw on the caliper and allow air to purge from the brake lines. Strategically place a drip pan below the caliper to catch the brake fluid. Close the bleeder screw while the pedal is still in the down position and then repeat until the pedal feels firm. Add more brake fluid to the master cylinder to prevent it from running dry when bleeding brakes. Also, return the cap or cover to the master cylinder before allowing the assistant to pump the brake pedal again.

How to Install an Austin Healey Windshield

How to Install an Austin Healey Windshield

You can install a new windshield on your sporty Austin-Healey right from home, using some supplies purchased from any auto parts store. You will need the help of an assistant to complete this task. Save a little bit of money by locating a quality, used windshield from an auto wrecking yard or parts seller. It is very important to correctly install your windshield so that it will properly protect you and your passengers. The rubber gasket and urethane glue affix the windshield to the frame.

Instructions

    1

    Warm up the new gasket to make it looser and easier to stretch around the windshield. You can do this by putting it in a warm room or in the sun.

    2

    Fit the rubber gasket around the replacement windshield. The slit on the gasket needs to face outside the Austin-Healey. Run a thin bead of sealant all the way around the outermost channel of the gasket.

    3

    Wipe petroleum jelly onto the gasket's outer groove, putting a little bit extra at the top and bottom center of the gasket.

    4

    Run a heavy nylon cord into this outer groove and leave about a foot length on each end of the cord hanging out from the bottom center of the gasket.

    5

    Put on some work gloves. Place the windshield into the Austin-Healey's windshield frame from outside of the vehicle while your assistant guides it into place from inside the vehicle. Ask the assistant to pull the cord ends inside the car so that they are resting on the dashboard.

    6

    Press the gasket onto the frame from outside the car while your assistant pulls on one end of the cord slowly, pulling the gasket's lip out and around the windshield frame.

    7

    Allow the urethane sealant to cure for about two days before driving the vehicle.

How to Replace an Outside Rear View Mirror

How to Replace an Outside Rear View Mirror

With most late model cars, the outside rear view mirrors attach to the outside door frame with three bolts, located under the plastic shroud located inside the door, directly opposite the mirror. Since the automotive industry moved away from glass mirrors with metal hand adjusted mirrors to reflective plastic mirrors housed inside of a plastic shell, this has been the standard for most models. Due to the level of high abuse that these mirrors can take, they remain in use because they rarely break on impact.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the mirror shroud from the inside of the door frame. The shroud usually press fits onto the door with little plastic tabs. Remove it by pulling on it to release the tabs. In some cases, screws hold the shroud in place. If this is the case, remove the screws with a screwdriver before pulling the shroud off the door.

    2

    Disconnect the wiring harness for the electronic controls located inside of the mirror. Not all mirrors have electronic controls. If you do not see a wiring harness behind the shroud, skip this step.

    3

    Remove the nuts that secure the mirror to the door. Usually, there are three threaded posts molded into the plastic cover of the mirror. Use a long-well socket and ratchet to make it easier to reach the nuts. As you remove the last nut, the mirror wants to fall out of the door. Hold it, or have someone hold it so it doesn't fall and scratch your paint when you remove the final nut.

    4

    Inspect the new mirror to ensure the base (the part that presses against the door) has a rubber seal on it to prevent water from getting into the door. If it does, move to the next step. If the seal is missing, transfer the seal from the old mirror to the new one.

    5

    Slide the threaded posts into the door and secure them with the nuts supplied with the new mirror.

    6

    Reconnect the wiring harness. If the mirror does not have a wiring harness, skip this step.

    7

    Press the shroud into place to hide the wiring harness and nuts.

How to Put a Master Cylinder & Power Booster Together for a 1971 Chevrolet C10

Many 1971 Chevrolet half-ton trucks came with manual brakes. This means that the brake master cylinder push rod is connected directly to the brake pedal, a set-up which requires more pedal effort to apply the brakes than a vehicle that has power brakes. Adding power brakes to your truck can be done by installing a brake booster in between the master cylinder and the brake pedal. With the right parts and a few tools, your 1971 C10 truck can have power brakes.

Instructions

Removing the Existing Master Cylinder

    1

    Remove the split pin from the large pin that attaches the bracket on the upper portion of the brake pedal to the master cylinder push rod under the dashboard with a pair of pliers. Discard the split pin. Slide the large pin out of the brake pedal bracket and the push rod and place it aside.

    2

    Open the hood and remove the master cylinder reservoir cap. Siphon the brake fluid from the reservoir with a syringe. Twist off the two brake lines from the master cylinder, using a tubing wrench placed on the brake line fittings.

    3

    Remove the retaining bolts from the master cylinder mounting flange with a socket and ratchet. Slide the master cylinder straight out from the firewall until the push rod clears, then remove it from the engine compartment.

Brake Booster Installation

    4

    Position a brake booster adapter plate against the firewall, lining up the original master cylinder mounting holes with the holes in the bracket. Bolt the adapter to the firewall using these holes. Drill through the remaining holes in the bracket with a 3/8-inch drill bit and a power drill to create mounting holes in the firewall for the brake booster.

    5

    Place a rubber booster-to-firewall gasket over the large hole in the center of the adaptor plate. Position the brake booster against the firewall, sliding the booster push rod through the gasket. Line up the holes in the booster mounting bracket with the newly drilled holes in the adapter plate and bolt it into place, using a socket and a ratchet.

    6

    Line up the hole at the end of the booster push rod, inside the truck cab under the dashboard, with the hole in the brake pedal bracket. Insert the large pin through the hole. Insert a new split pin through the small hole in the end of the pin. Bend the protruding end of the pin with pliers to keep it from working out of the hole.

Installing the New Master Cylinder

    7

    Place the master cylinder on a bench or work area. Connect the two tubes of a bench-bleeding kit -- available from most auto parts stores -- to the fittings on the bottom of the cylinder where the brake lines would normally attach and tighten them with a tubing wrench. Place the opposites ends of the tubes into the master cylinder reservoir.

    8

    Fill the reservoir with brake fluid. Move the master cylinder push rod in and out until air bubbles stop coming from the ends of the hoses in the reservoir. Add fluid to the reservoir during this process as needed to keep it full. Remove the bench bleeding kit from the cylinder. Replace the reservoir cap.

    9

    Keep the master cylinder level. Line up the holes in the mounting flange of the cylinder with the threaded studs on the booster. Push the cylinder up against the booster. Place nuts on the studs and tighten them with a socket and ratchet. Attach the brake lines to the master cylinder and tighten the fittings with a tubing wrench.

    10

    Start the engine and pump the brake pedal until it feels firm, indicating that the booster and master cylinder are working properly. Stop the engine and check that all air has been removed from the brake fluid in the master cylinder and that the brake booster is connected correctly, if the brake pedal remains soft.

How to Remove the Front Rotor on a 1988 Ford F-150

How to Remove the Front Rotor on a 1988 Ford F-150

The front rotors on a Ford F-150 are what the brakes use to stop the vehicle. The brake caliper sits on top of the rotor and when you apply the brakes, the brake pads compress onto the rotor, causing the vehicle to come to a stop. Once the brake pads wear down, their rivets start to penetrate the face of the rotor, causing grooves. Once a rotor is grooved or worn out, it will need to be turned or replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Park the truck on a flat surface. Jack the truck up and place the front axles on jack stands. Release the jack stands so that the front axles rest on them equally.

    2

    Remove the front tire with a lug wrench and set the tire to the side.

    3

    Remove the brake caliper that is sitting on top of the rotor. Do this by removing the top and bottom bolts on the caliper with a ratchet and a hex bit or star bit. Leave the brake line attached to the caliper.

    4

    Push the brake pads off of the rotor by prying them away with a flat head screwdriver. This will free the rotor up so that you will be able to remove the caliper from the rotor. Remove the brake pads and set them to the side.

    5

    Lift the caliper straight up off of the rotor and gently set the caliper down. Place the caliper to the side so that the brake line is not in a bind. Too much pressure of the caliper pulling on the brake line can cause the brake line to break.

    6

    Remove the front cap on the very front of the rotor. This cap holds the grease in the front part of the rotor.

    7

    Remove the cotter pin from the nut and the shaft with a screwdriver or a pair of pliers. Put the cotter pin and the nuts into a small container to keep up with everything.

    8

    Remove the front locking nut by using the proper size socket and a ratchet and extension. The front locking nut is a jam nut for the second nut. Put the nut into the container.

    9

    Remove the second nut, which is the spindle nut, and put it into the container.

    10

    Remove the washer that is holding the wheel bearing into place and place it into the container.

    11

    Remove the wheel bearing by either shaking the rotor or prying the wheel bearing out with a screwdriver. Gently set the wheel bearing inside of the container.

    12

    Slide the rotor straight off of the spindle and towards you by holding the rotor with both hands and pulling it straight towards you.

Selasa, 16 Juli 2013

How to Change the Front Rotors on a Ford Taurus

The front brake rotors on the Ford Taurus models are the main parts that the brake pads press against to bring the Taurus to a stop. Once the brakes are applied, the cylinder inside of the brake caliper compresses against the brake pads. The brake pads then compress against the brake rotor to stop the car. Once the brake pads wear down, they will leave grooves inside of the brake rotors and the brake rotors will need to be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Ford Taurus on a level surface and shut the engine off. Set the emergency brake and open the hood.

    2

    Unscrew the cap to the brake fluid reservoir and set it in a safe place.

    3

    Jack up the front of the Ford Taurus and put the jack stands behind each front tire along the frame rail of the Ford Taurus. Lower the Taurus onto the jack stands. Inspect to make sure that the Taurus is sitting securely and evenly under the frame rails.

    4

    Remove the driver side front tire with the lug wrench. Turn the lug nuts counter-clockwise to loosen and remove the lug nuts.

    5

    Slide the wheel off of the wheel hub and set the wheel to the side.

    6

    Remove the two upper and lower 12mm caliper mounting bolts in the rear of the caliper with a 1/2 inch drive ratchet and a 12mm socket. Turn the bolts counter-clockwise to loosen and remove.

    7

    Slide the flat head screwdriver into the top rear of the brake caliper and pry the rear brake pad inward. This will compress the caliper cylinder and allow you to slide the caliper off of the brake rotor.

    8

    Slide the brake caliper straight off of the top of the brake rotor. Hang the brake caliper to the front coil spring with a bungee cord to keep the caliper from hanging by the brake line.

    9

    Put on the safety glasses to keep any debris and trash from getting into your eyes when hammering. Tap the rear of the brake rotor with the rubber mallet all the way around the rotor until the rotor loosens from the hub. Slide the front rotor straight off of the hub.

    10

    Line the new rotor up with the lugs on the hub and slide the rotor straight onto the hub. Slide the caliper back over the top of the brake rotor.

    11

    Screw the two upper and lower 12mm caliper mounting bolts back into the rear of the brake caliper. Tighten these two bolts very tight with the 1/2 inch drive ratchet and 12mm socket.

    12

    Slide the wheel back onto the hub and screw the lug nuts back onto the lugs. Tighten the lug nuts by turning the lug nuts clockwise with the lug wrench. Follow these same steps for replacing the front brake rotors on the front passenger side of the Taurus.

    13

    Jack the Taurus up and remove the jack stands. Lower the Taurus to the ground.

    14

    Add DOT-3 brake fluid to the brake fluid reservoir if needed. Screw the cap back onto the brake fluid reservoir and close the hood.

    15

    Crank the Taurus and pump the brakes until you feel the brakes get tight. Pumping the brakes will compress the brake pads back to the original distance from the brake rotor. Turn the engine off. Job complete.