Minggu, 30 Juni 2013

Different Types of Brake Pads

Different Types of Brake Pads

A high-pitched squealing, when you push on the brakes, is often a good indication that it's time for new brake pads. This squealing happens when your brake pads wear down to the soft metal indicator which begins to rub against the brake rotor. There are four types of brakes on the market that are available. The type of pad you need is dependent on the type of vehicle you own and your driving habits. Although some pads provide better heat transfer which results in better braking, they can also be noisier. Knowing the different types of brake pads can help you make a more informed decision when it's time to replace them.

Semi-metallic Brake Pads

    Made from 30 to 65 percent metal, a semi-metallic brake pad is typically made from chopped copper, wire, iron powder or steel wool bonded together with friction modifiers. These are commonly considered to be one of the more durable types of brake pad and have great heat transfer. However, semi-metallic brake pads often wear down the brake rotors faster. In addition, they can be noisy and do not function well in very low temperatures.

Non-asbestos, Organic Brake Pads

    Commonly referred to as NAO, or organic, this type of brake pad is made from organic fibers, such as carbon, rubber, glass and Kevlar, along with high temperature resins and other filler materials. Although softer and less noisy than other types of brake pads, they wear out faster and create a lot more brake dust.

Low-metallic NAO Brake Pads

    Made from an organic formula, low-metallic NAO brake pads contain about 10 to 30 percent copper or steel to assist with heat transfer. Because of the added metal, it provides for better braking. However, the added metal also causes the brakes to be a little noisier and creates brake dust.

Ceramic Brake Pads

    Ceramic fibers, bonding agents and other filler materials make up this type of brake pad. There may also be small quantities of metal in the makeup of the ceramic brake pads. These are typically more expensive than the other types of pads because they are quieter and cleaner. Also, they don't wear down the brake rotors while still providing excellent braking for your vehicle.

How to Remove the Front Brake on a 2005 Colorado

The Colorado is a mid-size pickup made by Chevrolet. Removing the front brakes on the Colorado is not difficult. The brake pads make contact with the rotors to slow the Colorado and stop it. The friction between them is what wears your brake pads down. There is no definitive way to say how long a set of brake pads will last on your truck. The length of time they will last is relative to how much you use them. It does not take more than 30 minutes to remove a set of brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood, and drain enough brake fluid from the master cylinder with the turkey baster so that the level is half-way between the minimum and maximum. Place the fluid in the drain pan for recycling.

    2

    Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Jack the Colorado up with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the truck, and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts from the wheel using the lug wrench. Pull the wheel off the truck.

    3

    Place a C-clamp over the caliper with the front pad at the front jaw and the caliper at the back jaw. Tighten it until it forces the caliper piston back into the housing. Remove the caliper from the mounting bracket using a socket and ratchet. Unclip the retaining clips from the brake pads by pulling them off. Pull the brake pads off the caliper.

How Can You Remove a Factory Window Tint?

How Can You Remove a Factory Window Tint?

Removing the factory tint from your car windows can be quite a task. Tint film is composed of two layers. When pulled, the top layer may come off without too much trouble but leave the second layer behind. The most effective system includes pulling both layers together. If done incorrectly, you may spend hours scraping off the stuck pieces of tint. With the proper steps, you can remove the factory tint yourself and save the money a professional would charge to do the job for you.

Instructions

Windshields

    1

    Remove any obstructions from the window, such as the rear brake light.

    2

    Spray the outside of the window with water and then cover it with plastic. Cut away excess plastic so that the tarp is roughly the shape of the window.

    3

    Lay a tarp across the rear deck and seats. Cover the front dashboard with plastic. Spray the inside of the window with pure ammonia. You may want to wear a face mask. Ammonia is very strong.

    4

    Cover the ammonia-soaked window with plastic and secure the plastic with tape.

    5

    Park the car in a sunny area. Leave the car for one hour.

    6

    Peel the tint off the window. Remove the plastic from the corner of the window. Leave as much the window covered as possible so the ammonia does not evaporate.

    7

    Spray the corner again with ammonia. Use a razor to pull away the corner of the tint. Be careful not to cut through any defroster lines or antennas. Once the corner rises, grab the loose piece with both hands and pull it away from the window. Pull slowly and with consistent pressure; the goal is to pull the film off in one piece. You will pull the plastic off as the tint pulls away from the window. If necessary, spray ammonia as you pull. If the tint film breaks, spray ammonia and use the razor to restart it.

    8

    Scrub off the adhesive residue stuck to the window once the film comes off. Spray the window glass again with ammonia. Use a fine steel wool pad to scrub off the adhesive.

    9

    Spray the window with window cleaner and wipe it down with paper towels or newspaper.

Side Windows

    10

    Spray the window down with warm, soapy water. Let soak for two or three minutes.

    11

    Use a razor blade in a holder and cut an opening in the tint.

    12

    Slide the blade under the tint at the opening you cut. Pull enough of the tint film away so you can grasp it with your hands.

    13

    Pull the film, using both hands, away from the window. Remove the film in segments until the window is clear.

    14

    Spray the window down again with warm, soapy water. Scrape away any adhesive residue. Clean the window with spray cleaner and paper towels.

How to Install a Plymouth Windshield

The windshield on your Chrysler Plymouth only needs to be replaced when you have a stone chip or crack in the windshield that is larger than 1 inch in length. When you've removed the windshield, there is a special process that will need to be followed to install the windshield on your Plymouth. If you don't install the windshield properly, the glass won't adhere to the frame.

Instructions

    1

    Apply a liberal amount of urethane primer to the outside of the new windshield on the frit band. The frit band is the black strip running around the border of the glass.

    2

    Fit the rubber trim molding around the edge of the windshield glass.

    3

    Clean the frame of the vehicle where the old windshield was located by trimming the urethane on the vehicle down to 3 millimeters with a razor.

    4

    Clean the frame where the windshield will go with a cleaning brush. Make sure the frame is clear of debris.

    5

    Apply the urethane sealant to the window frame where the new windshield glass will go. Use an electric caulking gun as opposed to a standard one to get a more even bead of sealant. If the sealant is not laid properly or evenly, you may have trouble getting the glass to adhere properly, which could result in a leaky windshield.

    6

    Align the top, bottom and sides of the windshield to the frame of the Plymouth and press the glass into place. You may need the help of an assistant for this part because windshields for Plymouths are rather large. When aligning the windshield, it may be best to set the bottom of the windshield in place firs. Have an assistant hold it at the bottom to keep it from sliding, while you press the top in place. Allow the urethane to cure for 12 hours.

How to Repair a Brake Booster in a 1985 Ford Escort

The power brake booster on a Ford Escort works by harnessing the vacuum created by the vehicle's engine. This not only increases the force applied to the brakes, but also lessens the distance the brake pedal must to travel. If your brakes begin to feel like they don't engage until the pedal is almost to the floor, it could be a sign that your brake booster needs to be replaced.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Disconnect the ground cable from the negative battery terminal, by loosening the retaining bolt and removing the clamp from the negative battery terminal.

    2

    Remove the lower trim panel. It will be located inside the passenger compartment, below the steering column.

    3

    Locate the brake pedal pushrod. It will be inside the vehicle connected to the brake pedal. Remove the retaining clip from the end of the pushrod and disengage the pushrod from the brake pedal.

    4

    Disconnect the vacuum line from the brake booster. Use a pair of pliers to spread the spring clip and slide it away from the booster. Then pull the vacuum line off the fitting.

    5

    Remove the two bolts that connect the master cylinder to the brake booster.

    6

    Carefully slide the master cylinder forward. Be careful not to damage the steel brake lines attached to the master cylinder.

    7

    Remove the four bolts that connect the brake booster to the firewall. You may need an assistant working from the inside of the vehicle to hold the nuts while you remove the bolts.

    8

    Remove the brake booster from the vehicle.

Installation

    9

    Slide the brake booster into position.

    10

    Reinstall the four bolts and nuts that connect the brake booster to the firewall.

    11

    Slide the master cylinder into position against the brake booster and reinstall the two bolts that secure it.

    12

    Reconnect the vacuum line to the brake booster and reinstall the spring clip that retains it.

    13

    Slide the brake pedal pushrod into the hole on the brake pedal and reinstall the retaining clip.

    14

    Reinstall the lower trim panel beneath the steering column.

    15

    Reconnect the ground cable to the negative battery terminal.

Sabtu, 29 Juni 2013

How to Replace the Rotor in a Nissan Pathfinder

If your Nissan Pathfinder seems to be pulsing and shuddering when you hit the brakes but you know that the calipers and brake pads are in good shape, then it's time to change the rotors. Rotors only need to be changed if they get worn down and can't be resurfaced or if they become warped from excessive braking. Always change them in pairs for even braking performance.

Instructions

Change rotors in a 1989 to 1995 Nissan Pathfinder

    1

    Jack up your Nissan Pathfinder with jacks and jack stands. Block the wheels to keep your truck from rolling while you work.

    2

    Take off the tire and wheel assembly with a socket wrench or air ratchet. Remove the brake pads, caliper and bolts and the torque member.

    3

    Remove the grease cap from the hub. Then remove the cotter pin and the castellated nut. This allows you to then remove the old rotor with the wheel hub attached.

    4

    Clean any corrosion or debris from the area using a damp cloth. Apply multipurpose grease to the hub's oil seal lip and then put the new rotor into position with the hub.

    5

    Install the new rotor with the hub back in place and then make sure that the wheel bearings are in good shape and lubricate them. Install the castellated nut with a new cotter pin and then replace the grease cap.

    6

    Put the brake pads, caliper and bolts and the torque member back onto the wheel assembly using a torque wrench. Put the wheel assembly, tire and lug nuts back on and then repeat this process for each new rotor.

    7

    Lower the vehicle and tighten the lug nuts with a torque wrench or air ratchet and pump the brakes. If the brakes seem spongy, bleed the brakes and test your Pathfinder again to make sure that the installation was successful.

Change rotors in a 1996 to 2008 Nissan Pathfinder

    8

    Support your Pathfinder by using a jack and then secure it in place with jack stands. Be sure to place the jack stands so that the weight of the vehicle is properly supported.

    9

    Take off the tire and wheel assembly by loosening the lug nuts and removing them with a socket wrench or air ratchet with an appropriate adapter.

    10

    Remove the caliper and suspend it with mechanic's wire to prevent the caliper from getting disconnected from the brake line and to keep it out of the way while you change the rotor.

    11

    Separate the rotor from the wheel assembly. If your Pathfinder's rotors are corroded, be sure to remove all debris from the area with a damp cloth before you put the new rotor on.

    12

    Install the new rotor and tighten the holding screws. Replace the caliper and brake line to its original position and then discard the mechanic's wire. Install the wheel assembly and the tire.

    13

    Repeat this process to replace the other rotors and then lower the truck and tighten the tire lug nuts with a torque wrench. Road test your pathfinder to make sure the installation was successful.

Jumat, 28 Juni 2013

How to Replace Window Guides

Window guides, also called regulators, keep the car windows in position and allow them to move up and down through the door. The guides are secured within the door itself as they hold the window glass. The exact type of window guides depends on the type of vehicle you have. This will also determine the exact process needed to replace them. Replacing window guides requires you to get inside the door.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Disconnect the battery in the engine compartment by loosening the black cable's clamp with your wrench and removing this negative cable from the terminal.

    2

    Detach the door's window control. Rub a rag behind a manual crank to disconnect its clip. For an automatic control, pry off the control switch plate with a trim stick and unplug its wiring.

    3

    Pry off all trim bezels from the inner trim panel and remove all mounting screws with your screwdriver. Pry the panel off the door with a large trim stick along its edges and lift the panel off.

    4

    Remove or loosen the bolts connecting the window glass to the guide with your wrench and then lift the glass up and out of the door.

    5

    Remove the guide's mounting bolts; some have rivets that you must drill out. Collapse the guide on itself and remove it through the access hole in the door.

Installation

    6

    Install the replacement guide through the door's hole and open it up into position within the door. Apply the guide's bolts or fix it in place with a rivet gun -- whichever is needed for your model.

    7

    Lower the glass down into the door through the top opening and make sure it fully seats in the guides. Tighten the bolts for the window glass.

    8

    Reconnect the trim panel to the door using its clips and screws.

    9

    Connect the trim panels and window control to the door trim panel.

    10

    Reconnect the battery cable with its clamp.

Kamis, 27 Juni 2013

Do-it-Yourself Rear Window Repair on Mitsubishi Truck

Fixing the rear window of your Mitsubishi truck is like fixing the back window of any other truck. Most of the time, this kind of repair would require replacing your old window with a new one, especially if the former is heavily damaged or has a crack. Remember, however, that if the crack is just a small one, applying a good sealant will do the trick, and you won't need to buy a new window for your vehicle.

Instructions

    1

    Check your rear windows for damage by using a pail of water and see if there is a leak. This will help you locate where the damage is and will make your job a lot easier.

    2

    Determine whether the seal or the window itself is damaged. This will help you decide whether you only have to seal a leak or a crack or replace the window with a new one. If the seal is broken go to Step 3, if it's the window that's broken go straight to Step 4.

    3

    Replace the rubber seal on your rear window by cutting the rubber around it. Use your knife to do this. Take your time to remove the rubber until you can easily pull out the window. Put a new rubber seal around your window and put it back into the car's opening. Finish by applying a sealant. Make sure to have some water on hand so you can check if it seals perfectly.

    4

    Remove the rubber lock and then take out your window. Change the old window to the new one by firmly securing the area around it with the rubber seal. Finish this by applying sealant and then put the lock back in place.

    5

    Allow the sealant to cure for about 15 hours.

How to Make Brake Line Flare Fittings

How to Make Brake Line Flare Fittings

Brakes are easily one of the most crucial parts of a motor vehicle's safety system, so ensuring they are in working order is vital for safety. One part of the brake system that sometimes requires replacement is the brake lines, which deliver brake fluid and assist in applying pressure to the brakes. In order to properly attach brake lines they must have special fittings which are flared at the end to ensure a tight seal. Using special tools and flaring techniques, you can make brake line flare fittings.

Instructions

    1

    Place a pipe cutter on a piece of brake line pipe at the location you wish to create the flare.

    2

    Tighten down the pipe cutter by turning the tightening knob clockwise until it is firmly in place.

    3

    Spin the pipe cutter around the brake line pipe a few times to cut into the pipe. Turn the tightening knob again until it is secure and spin the pipe cutter around the brake line pipes a few more times. Continue this process until the pipe is cut through.

    4

    Cut away insulation at the end of the pipe approximately the length of the flare nut with a utility knife. Sand away any adhesive or paint on the pipe beneath the insulation with 400-grit sandpaper.

    5

    Attach a drill bit slightly smaller than the end of the pipe to be flared to a power drill and pass the bit into the end of the pipe to be flared. Spin the bit in the opening of the pipe to remove any burrs and rough edges created by the pipe cutter.

    6

    File any rough edges on the outside of the end of the pipe to be flared with a metal file.

    7

    Slide a flare nut onto the end of the pipe to be flared.

    8

    Slide the flare tool clamp over the flare nut and pipe and tighten it in place by turning the tightening knob clockwise.

    9

    Attach the flare tool to the flare tool clamp and position it so the tip of the flare tool is aligned with the opening of the pipe to be flared.

    10

    Turn the flare tool's handle clockwise until it drives down into the opening of the pipe and flares it open.

    11

    Unscrew the flare tool's handle, remove it from the flare tool clamp and unscrew the flare tool clamp tightening knob to release the pipe. Repeat this process at the other end of the pipe to make a double-flared line.

How to Fix a 1998 Honda Civic Power Window Track

How to Fix a 1998 Honda Civic Power Window Track

The power window track on your 1998 Honda Civic is used to guide your power windows up and down while preventing a sudden fall or an odd angle tilt. When this track is not functioning correctly, the direct result will be that your windows will not open and close properly. In order to alleviate this you will have to fix your power window track by reinserting the entire length of the window back into the power window track.

Instructions

    1

    Remove all of the exposed screws on the door panel, around the door handle, and in the armrest using a Phillips head screwdriver.

    2

    Lower the windows down as far as it can go.

    3

    Disconnect the wiring harness from the power window controls and remove the armrest and door handle.

    4

    Remove the speaker from the lower corner of the door and disconnect it from the wiring harness.

    5

    Pry off the door panel using your hands or a flathead screwdriver wrapped in a shop rag. Start at the lower corner and work your way around until the entire panel pops off.

    6

    Loosen the brass mounting bolt on the lower corner of the door.

    7

    Use the hole where the speaker was and move the window until it slides into the power window track.

    8

    Tighten the brass mounting bolt.

    9

    Reattach the door panel to the door by pushing it until all the tabs snap into place.

    10

    Snap the wiring harnesses for the speaker and the power window control back into place.

    11

    Screw the armrest, speaker, and door handle into place with the screws your removed earlier and a Phillips head screwdriver.

Rabu, 26 Juni 2013

How to Remove Dodge 3500 Rotors

How to Remove Dodge 3500 Rotors

The Dodge 3500 truck is a big vehicle, designed to tow heavy loads and carry big objects. As a result, the braking system on the truck is more heavy duty than on lighter vehicles, and everything is a lot heavier physically. Taking off the rotors on a Dodge 3500 can take a little bit of extra work, but it can still be done at home with a little help and some hand tools.

Instructions

    1

    Use the heavy-duty jack to lift up the front of the vehicle and set it on the heavy-duty jack stands. Ensure that the vehicle is completely and solidly on the stands before working on the vehicle.

    2

    Take off the front wheels using a tire iron, and set them out of your workspace. If the wheels are too heavy for you to remove yourself, have an assistant help you take them off.

    3

    Unbolt the brake caliper from the steering knuckle with the 1/2-inch ratchet and socket. Lift it off of the suspension, and hang it on the metal hook. Hang the hook on the front suspension. Make sure that the front brake lines are loose so that they don't get damaged.

    4

    Carefully lift the front rotors off of the wheel hub using your hands. If necessary, have an assistant help you lift the rotor off of the hub so that you don't strain your back in the process.

How to Remove Spots From Mirrors

How to Remove Spots From Mirrors

Unlike the mirrors in our homes, automotive mirrors are constantly exposed to the caprices of the weather. From pure rain, to water mixed with road dirt, to any number of other fluids and contaminants found on roads, it's a wonder automotive mirrors remain useful at all. Often, when the foreign fluid dries off the mirror, it leaves behind spots. As these spots continue to accumulate, they reduce visibility, creating the necessity to remove them.

Instructions

    1

    Spray the mirror with an ample amount of automotive window cleaner; never use household window cleaner on any auto glass.

    2

    Rub the area with a clean steel wool pad in a circular manner, making sure to avoid dragging the steel wool on any portion of the mirror that isn't glass (such as the plastic mirror frame). This may take some time, depending on the nature and extent of the spotting. Avoid pushing too hard, so that you don't accidentally crack the glass.

    3

    Pour clean water over the mirror to remove any grit or debris left over from the spots. Spray an ample amount of automotive window cleaner on the mirror.

    4

    Wipe the mirror off with a clean microfiber cloth.

    5

    Repeat Steps 1 through 5, as necessary, to remove spots on other mirrors.

Selasa, 25 Juni 2013

Tools for Auto Glass

Tools for Auto Glass

The automotive repair industry has remained economically sound despite the global recession, with levels of steady growth maintained between 2008 and 2009, according to the web site earth911.com. A proportion of this industry includes the installation, repair and maintenance of automotive glass and windscreens. This application can include anything from treating glass that has suffered a crack to the full replacement of an existing windshield. There are different tools utilized within the industry depending on the specific application.

Grip-On Clamp

    A grip-on clamp is used to install a new windshield. The tool holds setting blocks securely in place during the installation process, using two individual clamp fittings that are adjustable thanks to a regulating screw. The correct application of the tool is crucial to ensure the correct alignment of the windshield and help to maximize its durability.

Cold Blade Knife

    The cold blade knife aids in the separation of the existing windshield from its sealed bond. The blade can be re-sharpened after continued use, giving the product increased durability and shelf-life. Some designs of these windshield removal tools have adjustable blade positions to assist with awkward or complex windshield removal jobs.

Power Cut Out Tools

    Power cut out tools are also used to remove the windshield. The motorized blade of the tool rotates while cloaked by a protective sheath, which also enables the safe adjustment of the blade during use. These tools are generally heavy duty and are widely used by industry professionals, but can be purchased for general domestic use.

Senin, 24 Juni 2013

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Mazda6

The Mazda6 is one of several vehicles manufactured with disc brakes only. This is due to the efficient stopping power disc brakes have compared to drum brakes. The Mazda6 requires a special tool referred to as 49 FA18 602, which is available for purchase at the Mazda dealership.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts of the car's rear wheels using a torque wrench, but don't fully remove the wheels.

    2

    Raise the vehicle off the ground using a car jack. Support the vehicle on all sides. Remove the lug nuts completely and take off the rear wheels.

    3

    Remove the parking cable clip. Take out the upper caliper bolt and turn the caliper so that it faces down.

    4

    Take off the V-springs and rear disc brake pads. Separate the shims from the brake pads.

    5

    Push the rear caliper pistons into the bores of the Mazda6. This requires the use of tool 49 FA18 602.

    6

    Install the V-springs. Connect the new shims to the new brake pads. Install in the vehicle.

    7

    Torque the caliper bolt using a torque wrench. For the basic Mazda 6 models, torque it 27 to 36 foot pounds. For the Mazda Speed 6 models, torque it 16 to 23 foot pounds. Replace the wheels.

When Do You Replace Shocks?

Most mechanics recommend changing your car's shock absorbers every 60,000 miles. However, you should also test about once a year or every 12,000 miles. While testing the shocks can be a relatively simple and safe procedure, changing them should only be done by an expert. The replacement procedure depends on if the shocks are contained within assemblies with coil springs or not. Even then, the exact procedure always varies for each model vehicle.

Testing the Shocks

    Start with your tires and see if they are worn down abnormally, especially at one end. See if the oil or gas within the shock absorber is leaking and if there is any corrosion or worn bushings. See if the coil springs have snapped and if the vehicle's level is lower at one end than the other. Measure the gap between the wheel and wheel arch and then bounce the vehicle by pushing down at the end. See if it immediately bounces back up to the original high point or settles down lower.

Changing Shock Assemblies

    Raise and support the vehicle's front or rear end on jack stands and remove the wheels; loosening the lug nuts before raising the vehicle makes the wheels easier to remove. The shock assembly is mounted to the top of the wheel well with the bolts accessible from the engine compartment or trunk. Some components in the engine like the battery or air filter housing might need removing to reach the bolts and remove them. Go under the vehicle and remove all other bolts on the assembly, which is usually connected to the stabilizer bar and control arm. You need to support the control arm with a floor jack before disconnecting it. You might also need an assistant to remove the assembly given its weight. Use a heavy-duty spring compressor to compress the coil spring and then unscrew the nut on top of the absorber. Install the new shock absorber in the module and tighten the nut to the correct torque. Be very careful when releasing the spring compressor. Install the shock assembly in reverse order of removal.

Changing Shock Absorbers Alone

    When the rear shocks aren't within coil assemblies, you can reach them without removing the wheels on some vehicles, but you still must raise the rear end with jack stands. Also, raise the differential with a floor jack so there is no weight on the shocks. Remove the bolt connecting the shock absorber to the axle or steering knuckle first, then remove the other mounting nuts. If you need to compress the shock to remove it and install the new one, be advised that this will take a lot of force.

How to Repair a Rock Chip in a Windshield

Minor chips and cracks in a windshield don't always require a trip to the repair shop. Left untreated, the damage may spread quickly in cold weather, a rainstorm or from bumps in the road. If a minor crack spreads, you also risk failing a state inspection or receiving a fix-it-ticket. However, with a windshield repair kit and an hour of time, repairing a chip is a fairly simple process.There are numerous windshield repair kits available at most auto parts stores.

Instructions

    1

    Remove any loose glass inside the chip with a razor blade.

    2

    Clean the chip as well as a 2-foot radius around the area with a mixture of dish washing soap and water followed by denatured alcohol. If the kit has a doughnut-shaped or O-shaped adhesive, press it firmly onto the windshield around the chip. This will prevent the resin from trickling down the windshield.

    3

    Press the plunger on the resin-filled syringe to completely fill the chip with resin.

    4

    Use the razor blade to gently shave off any protruding adhesive after it has cured for several hours.

How to Repair a Stuck Rear Driver's Side Window

How to Repair a Stuck Rear Driver's Side Window

The rear driver's side windows on your vehicle may occasionally become stuck in either the closed or open position. The usual causes of this malfunction include the untimely failure of the window regulator or window motor. The window can also fall off or become stuck on its track if the glue holding the window to the track fails or if the track is obstructed by debris. Diagnosing and repairing this problem necessitates the removal of the interior door panel and trim.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the ignition key to the "On" position and attempt to operate the rear driver's side power windows. If you can hear the motor operating but the window won't move up or down, the window may be stuck on its track. If you can't hear the motor operating, the motor may need replacement. Check the fuses for the power windows before attempting to remove the window motor.

    2

    Disconnect the negative terminal cable from the battery with a wrench. This will decrease the likelihood of shock and prevent the battery from being drained.

    3

    Open the rear driver's side door. Remove the interior door panel and trim. The method for removing the panel and trim will vary depending on the vehicle. Consult your vehicle's service manual and be sure to keep track of all clips and screws.

    4

    Inspect the window's track for signs of obstruction. You may need to apply a liberal amount of lithium grease to the track. If the window is off-track, clean the window of all adhesive and apply urethane-based glue to the window's mounting point. Reattach the window to the mounting point and leave the window undisturbed in the up position for one to two days.

    5

    Inspect the window regulator and motor. The window regulator will need to be replaced if the cables are snapped or frayed. If the window motor does not work, it will also need to be removed. Methods for removing both components may vary depending on the vehicle.

    6

    Reattach the door panel and trim to the rear driver's side door when finished. Close the door and reattach the negative terminal cable to the battery.

Minggu, 23 Juni 2013

How to Remove the Brake Drum From a 2003 Ford Focus

How to Remove the Brake Drum From a 2003 Ford Focus

The Focus was introduced in the 2000 model year to replace the Escort as the company's economy vehicle. The Focus comes standard with a transverse-mounted four-cylinder engine, five-speed manual transmission, and power brakes. While the Focus uses front disc brakes, the rear brakes are of the drum variety with internally-expanding brake shoes. The drum must be removed before any service can be performed on the rear brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen, but do not remove the lug nuts on the rear wheels with a lug wrench. Raise one side of the rear of the car with a hydraulic or scissor jack using the jacking point on the bottom of the rocker panel just forward of the rear wheel. Place a jack stand under the rear suspension control arm. Lower the jack. Repeat this procedure to support the other side of the car. Do not apply the brake or the brake drum cannot be removed.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts with a lug wrench. Remove the rear wheels from the hubs and place them aside.

    3

    Locate the four bolts on the inside edge of the rear wheel control arm that attach to the wheel hub. Remove the bolts with a 13mm socket and a ratchet wrench in a counterclockwise direction. Place the bolts aside.

    4

    Press the retaining tab on the wiring connector for the rear wheel anti-lock braking system located on the inside of the wheel hub. Pull the connector from the wheel hub. Skip this step if your Focus does not have rear ABS brakes.

    5

    Pull the rear brake drum straight out from the wheel hub and remove it from the vehicle.

How to Repair a Window Channel on a Car

The window channel on a car is where the water runs down and away from the glass. Window channels also help keep water out of the inside of the car. However, the seams in window channels may eventually separate due to the sheet metal flexing. When this happens, reseal the seams in the window channel.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the window channel with soap and water.

    2

    Dry the channel with a lint-free towel.

    3

    Apply a bead of seam sealer to the seams on the window channel. Make sure that you get good coverage on any seams that are showing visible cracks.

    4

    Smooth the sealer across the seams with your fingers.

    5

    Allow the seam sealer to dry for at least 24 hours before exposing it to water.

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a Honda Civic

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a Honda Civic

The brakes on a Honda Civic use a combination of brake pads in the front and brake shoes in the rear. Hydraulic fluid is forced through steel brake lines to a caliper mechanism in the front and a hydraulic piston cylinder in the rear. The fluid forced the brake pads or shoes against a rotor (in the front) or a drum (in the rear). Most of the work done by the brakes in a Honda Civic is done by the front brakes due to the inertia of forward movement. Over time, the brake pads will wear out; once the pad material is 1/8" thick, you'll need to replace the brake pads on your Honda Civic.

Instructions

Break Replacement DIY

    1

    Loosen the wheel lug nuts by turning them 45 degrees counterclockwise.

    2

    Jack up the front of the vehicle. To do this, put the floor jack under the vehicle and jack up on the front jack point of the Civic (located near the radiator--it's an extension of the frame).

    3

    Put jack stands underneath the front of the frame or the front pinch welds of the Civic and lower the car onto the jack stands.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts on the front wheels once the Civic is on jack stands.

    5

    Pull the wheels off the wheel hub.

    6

    Remove the upper and lower bolts holding the caliper on the caliper mounting bracket.

    7

    Pull the caliper up off the rotor. Secure it to the coil springs above the rotor.

    8

    Remove the brake pads.

    9

    Press the caliper piston back into the caliper assembly. Place the face of one of the brake pads over the piston and force the pad against the piston with a C-clamp. The piston will collapse back into the caliper housing.

    10

    Insert the new brake pads into the caliper assembly and reassemble the brake assembly.

    11

    Spray the brake rotors and pads and calipers down with brake parts cleaner to remove any remaining brake dust.

    12

    Put the wheel back on the wheel hub and tighten the lug nuts.

    13

    Lower the Civic to the ground and torque the lug nuts to 100 ft. lbs.

Sabtu, 22 Juni 2013

Honda Brake Problems

Honda Brake Problems

All kinds of automobiles experience brake troubles and issues; vehicles manufactured by Honda are no exception. Spotting brake problems, however, does not have to be difficult. In fact, you can save time and money on repairs if you can tell when your car needs its brakes fixed before it becomes a major issue.

Issues

    While it is not the most common problem among vehicles produced by Honda, brake problems do occur from time to time. These problems are typically characterized by noises in the brakes, such as rhythmic, constant brake noises and a spongy feeling upon applying pressure to the brake pedal. These signs can indicate problems such as warped rotors, worn-out pads and hydraulic leaks.

Causes

    Brake problems are frequently caused by excessive wear and tear, since the brakes are one of the most frequently used parts of the car. Brake rotors can start to malfunction due to overstress, while hydraulic issues are due to leaks in the cylinder or valves supporting the brake system. Additionally, hydraulic problems can begin when the cylinder runs out of brake fluid.

Repair

    As brake repairs on vehicles manufactured by Honda can be particularly complex, attempting do-it-yourself repairs on these automobiles is not recommended. While other car makes and manufacturers are more adept to simple repairs that can be done by amateur mechanics, it is recommended that Hondas be maintained and repaired only by certified professionals. In addition, self-repair often voids the warranty issued by Honda, and replacement parts are only offered by Honda, and Honda certified repair centers.

Maintenance

    To ensure safety and reliability, it is recommended that owners inspect the condition of the brakes at least twice a year and only use hydraulic fluids that are approved by the company to maintain the brakes optimum performance. Worn-out brake pads, drums and shoes should be replaced as soon as possible to avoid further damage to the brakes and vehicle as a whole. In addition, Honda owners should check out additional parts such as hoses, fittings, calipers and wheel cylinders for wear and tear in order to avoid major brake repairs.

Significance

    Your car's slightest squeaks may indicate that something's gone wrong with the brakes, which may lead to further engine problems and even cause accidents in the long run. Having your brakes maintained and immediately repaired in the event of a problem will be significant in ensuring less costly repairs over the life of your automobile as well as the safety of you and your passengers.

Car Window Installation Instructions

Car Window Installation Instructions

If you find your car door window broken, you can save some money by repairing the damage yourself. Just handle the spare glass carefully and follow the steps below. It will be helpful to have the specific manual for the car to be worked on, just in case.

Instructions

    1

    Pry the panel off the door by pulling out the snaps and screws of the panel. Use gentle pressure. Once the interior of the door panel is exposed, peel the weatherproofing sheet. You should be able to see several access points. Locate the lift mechanism, bracket and clips.

    2

    Notice the white clip that would normally be supporting the glass pane. Put the gloves on and remove the remains of the glass very carefully. Use a vacuum to get all the glass pieces out.

    3

    Remove the black rubber strip off the edge of the door window cavity and slide the spare glass into the door.

    4

    Attach the new glass onto the lifting arm's bracket. Fasten the bolts to hold elements in place but be careful not to crack the new glass.

    5

    Check to see whether the glass is aligned correctly and moves smoothly. Set the black weatherstripping and the plastic sheet barrier back in place and reinstall the door panel by following the removal instructions in reverse.

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads of a 1997 Nissan Maxima

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads of a 1997 Nissan Maxima

The rear disc brakes on the 1997 Nissan Maxima do not require a special caliper piston reset tool kit, despite being a screw-in piston. Although the tool kit would still work nicely for compressing the caliper pistons, a regular pair of needle-nose pliers will work, unlike many other makes and models of vehicles with rear disc brake applications with screw-in caliper pistons. While some of the 1997 Maxima's came with rear drum brakes (with brake shoes), rear disc brakes that use brake pads were also featured on the Nissan sedan.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Nissan Maxima on a level surface (suitable for lifting and supporting the vehicle), but do not apply the parking brake.

    2

    Loosen the rear wheel nuts on both of the rear tires with the wheel nut wrench.

    3

    Lift the rear corners of the Maxima with a jack, and lower the vehicle, so it is supported by the jack stands.

    4

    Remove the wheel nuts and rear wheels.

    5

    Remove the rear brake parking brake cable bracket bolt with a metric combination wrench. Remove the bracket from the rear caliper.

    6

    Remove the lower caliper bolt with a metric combination wrench.

    7

    Pry/pivot the caliper upward off the pads and the rotor with the screwdriver.

    8

    Turn the caliper piston, clockwise, with the caliper piston reset tool kit or a pair of needle-nose pliers, until it is fully seated in the piston bore.

    9

    Pull out the pad springs, and remove the rear brake pads from the caliper mount. Use the screwdriver, if necessary, to pry the pads out of the mount.

    10

    Apply a coating of the caliper silicone-based grease (supplied in the brake pad replacement set) on the brake pad/mount mating surfaces (upper and lower).

    11

    Apply the stick-on shims (supplied in the replacement brake pad set) to the backing plates of the replacement brake pads (unless staked).

    12

    Install the replacement pads into the caliper mount, and replace the brake pad springs.

    13

    Pivot the caliper downward over the pads and the rotor. Replace the lower caliper bolt, and tighten it with a combination wrench.

    14

    Replace the parking brake caliper bracket. Tighten the bolt.

    15

    Repeat Step 5 through Step 14 for the other rear wheel.

    16

    Replace the wheels and wheel nuts. Tighten the wheel nuts, before lowering the Maxima to the ground.

    17

    Tighten the wheel nuts to 80 ft-lbs., with a torque ratchet (in a crisscross manner) and a metric socket.

    18

    Pump the brake pedal, until it feels firm, before releasing the parking brake. Test drive the Maxima in an enclosed area.

How to Repair the Rear Disc Brakes on a 2004 Ford F250 Super-Duty

How to Repair the Rear Disc Brakes on a 2004 Ford F250 Super-Duty

Replacing the brakes on your Ford F250 Super Duty is a great way to solve a problem and save money on an expensive trip to the repair shop. The rear brakes are smaller than the fronts because they are not used as much during braking, so don't be surprised if the replacement pads look a little smaller than the pads for the front brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle in a flat area and chock the front wheels. Loosen the rear lug nuts but don't remove them. Raise the rear of the truck off the ground, remove the lug nuts and remove the wheel.

    2

    Remove the two long bolts holding the caliper in place. Once these have been removed, the caliper will swing off the wheel. Be careful not to let it hang on the brake line as this may damage the line.

    3

    Slide the pads out from the caliper. The pads are not attached by anything, but they may have become sticky, so pull them firmly.

    4

    Compress the caliper piston with the clamp. This will raise the level of brake fluid in the reservoir, so make sure you don't make it overflow. If you need to, you can siphon off any extra fluid.

    5

    Swing the caliper back into place over the rotor and the new brake pads. Gradually reduce the pressure on the caliper piston and the caliper will accept the new pads. Check the level of brake fluid in the reservoir and top it up if you need to.

    6

    Replace the two bolts that hold the caliper in place.

    7

    Replace the wheel and hand-tighten the lug bolts. Lower the car from the jack stands and torque the lug bolts to spec.

Instructions for Changing the Brake Shoes on a 2003 KIA

Instructions for Changing the Brake Shoes on a 2003 KIA

Kia Motors has built a reputation for inexpensive automobiles. To compete successfully in the low end of the market Kia vehicles often incorporate cost-saving technologies. As an example, many Kia models make use of drum brakes on the rear wheels. Although generally less effective than disc brakes, drum brakes are less expensive, and in the rear position they do not seriously compromise overall braking performance. Owners of vehicles with rear drum brakes will benefit from understanding how they should be serviced.

Instructions

    1

    Slacken the lug nuts on both rear wheels with a lug nut wrench. Raise the back end of the vehicle and support it securely with jack stands on both sides. Remove the rear wheels.

    2

    Unfasten the drums on both rear wheels. The drums will be held on by two or four bolts depending on the model. Pull the drum straight off the hub. If the drum is stuck it can be jacked off by threading two 8 mm jacking bolts into the holes in the drum and evenly tightening both bolts to jack the drum off the hub assembly.

    3

    Remove the upper return spring by gripping the end of the spring firmly with pliers and unhooking the spring end from the brake shoes. Unhook the other end and set the spring aside. On models with an adjuster mechanism, detach the adjuster lever spring by gripping the spring end firmly with pliers and unhooking it from the adjuster lever. Unhook the other end and set the spring aside. Remove the lower return spring in the same way.

    4

    On models with an adjuster mechanism, rotate the adjuster wheel clockwise to relieve the lower return spring tension on the brake shoes. Remove the adjuster wheel by sliding it out from in between the two brake shoes.

    5

    Remove the two hold-down pins that hold each shoe to the backing plate. On models with hold down clips, pull the clips off with pliers and then push the pins out through the backing plate. For other models use a hex wrench or large screwdriver to rotate each pin clockwise until keys on the pin ends line up with the grooves in the hold-down pin clips and then pull the pins out. Pull the hold-down clips out with pliers.

    6

    Remove the primary brake shoe, then pull out the secondary brake shoe assembly. Disconnect the parking brake cable from the secondary shoe by removing the retaining clip from the cable end and then slipping the cable off the shoe. Use a large screwdriver to spread the operating lever retaining clip, then grasp the clip with pliers and pull it off. Slip the operating lever off the secondary brake shoe.

    7

    Check the inside diameter of the brake drum at several points using a drum micrometer. The diameter should be the same in all directions, indicating that the drum is round. Check the interior surface of the drum for any deep grooves, cracks or glazed spots. Compare the drum diameter to the manufacturer's specifications. Replace the drum if the diameter exceeds the specified maximum, or if it is cracked or irreparably damaged.

    8

    Clean the backing plate and all removed brake components with brake cleaning fluid. Spray all parts liberally with the fluid and use rags to wipe them down. Use a metal drip pan to catch excess fluid and dispose of the used fluid as required by local regulations.

    9

    Unscrew the halves of the adjuster wheel, if applicable, and thoroughly clean the threads with brake cleaning fluid. Lubricate the threads with brake grease and reassemble the parts. Apply brake grease to the points where the brake shoes contact the backing plate, the points where the cylinder contacts the brake shoes, and the pivot points at the brake shoe hold-down pins and the operating lever pivot.

    10

    Reassemble the parts, using new brake shoes, by following the above steps in reverse order. Use the other wheel as a reference on how the parts fit together. Start the vehicle and pump the brakes to set the self-adjusting mechanism. Repeat all steps on the brake on the other side to complete the job, replace the wheels and then lower the automobile.

How to Unhook an Anti-Lock Brake Wiring Connector

Modern vehicles have all wheel sensors called wheel speed sensors. These sensors send wheel speed information to the ABS control module through a wire connection to the control module. If these sensors do not function correctly, braking system will operate erratically and could cause accident or injury if the brakes apply at the wrong time. Checking and replacing ABS break sensors is an easy job but must be done according to the service manual for your vehicle.

Instructions

Disconnecting a wheel speed sensor

    1

    Loosen the lock nut with an open end box end wrench. Turn the wrench counterclockwise until the lock nut is removed.

    2

    Use a small flat tip screw driver to gentle pry up the clip on both sides of the sensor. The wire connector will then be loose enough to remove.

    3

    Pull gently on the wire connector until it disengages from the speed sensor connection.

    4

    Remove the wired connection by hand. Once removed, check the wire connection for corrosion or signs of heat damage. If either condition exists, use your wire stripper/cutter to remove the connector and replace it with a new one.

    5

    Use your wire stripper/cutter to remove about a 1/8 of an inch of insulation when installing the new connector. Use a wire connector that matches the wire size to connect the wire to the new plug-in connector. Plug the new connector into the male fitting on the wheel hub.

Jumat, 21 Juni 2013

How to Install a Used Windshield

How to Install a Used Windshield

A used windshield can save you money. Installing one yourself can save even more money. This can be a simple process if you have a helper to prevent the new windshield from breaking. You need to replace an old cracked windshield because it can be illegal and can obstruct your view when driving.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the molding with a flat-head screwdriver. Be careful when taking it off because you will reuse it.

    2

    Take a nail and poke a hole in the sealer that is holding in the old windshield. Put the guitar string through the hole. Go around the windshield slowly with the guitar string, pulling it back and forth to loosen the old windshield sealer.

    3

    Take out the old windshield. Use the putty knife to remove most of the old sealer. Put some gasoline on an old rag; place it where the sealer remains and let it soak. Finish taking the windshield sealer off with the putty knife.

    4

    Place the new windshield sealer around the frame. With your helper, center the used windshield in the frame. Put the bottom in first and then lay the windshield down until it is in. Press around all of the edges to seal, and replace the molding.

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Pontiac Bonneville

The Pontiac Bonneville has either disc or drum brakes in the rear of the car. Both types of brakes provide adequate stopping power for a passenger car. Replacing the rear disc brakes on a Bonneville is a simple procedure to perform. Read further to learn how.

Instructions

Removal of the Old Disc Brakes

    1

    Verify that the brake fluid is less than half full. If necessary, siphon some of the brake fluid from the reservoir with a syringe or suction gun. Empty it into an approved container and dispose of it according to your local regulations.

    2

    Raise the rear of the Bonneville off the ground with a car jack. Support it on all sides with jack stands to prevent tipping. Keep children and animals away from the vehicle while servicing it.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts of the wheel and tire assembly with a torque wrench. Remove the assemblies and set aside face up to prevent damage to them.

    4

    Compress the caliper piston into the bore with a large C-clamp to make room for the brake caliper to pivot off its bracket. Be sure you do not compress it more than one millimeter of piston travel.

    5

    Unscrew the parking brake cable guide pin bolt from the lower control arm. Take out the bottom brake caliper pin bolt and rotate the caliper upwards. Hang the caliper from the frame of the Bonneville with mechanical wire to prevent breaking the brake hose.

    6

    Slide out the inboard and outboard brake pads. Inspect the brake pad retainers and replace if damage is apparent.

Installation of the New Disc Brakes

    7

    Verify that the brake caliper suspension boots, pin bolts and piston boot are free of damage. If you see visible damage or corrosion, replace them.

    8

    Turn the piston clockwise with a spanner wrench until it retreats into the bore. Align the notches in the piston with the alignment pins on the new brake pads.

    9

    Lubricate the rear brake caliper bolts with a high temperature lubricant. Fasten the brake pad retainers to the brake caliper bracket, followed by the inboard and outboard brake pads.

    10

    Release the caliper from the mechanical wire and place it in the caliper bracket over the brake pads. Replace the brake caliper pin bolt and torque to 20 foot/pounds.

    11

    Insert the parking brake guide bolt in the lower arm and torque to 18 ft. lb. Replace the wheel assembly and lower the Bonneville to the ground.

    12

    Pump the brake pedal 2/3 of the way down to seat the pistons and brake pads. Replace any brake fluid that was lost.

Kamis, 20 Juni 2013

How to Repair a Clamshell Chip in Windshield

A clamshell chip in a car windshield looks just as it sounds. A small shell like indentation in a windshield causes both limited vision and a distracting obstruction. Below are instructions on how to repair a clamshell chip using professional glazing equipment.

Instructions

    1

    Use a small drill tool such as the kind used in hobby work to shade in the interior of the clamshell chip. This is a soft circular motion to even out the indentation. The surface of the glass will feel rough to the touch when you are finished.

    2

    Apply a sufficient amount of resin into the indentation to an even level. Use a dabbing motion to avoid spilling out too much. This glass resin is available at department stores or online.

    3

    Apply a sufficient amount of pit resin over the top of the resin in Step 2.

    4

    Place the resin patch that comes with the resin over the top of the clamshell chip. Push it down gently to balance out all the resin and mixing the two types of resin together in the process.

    5

    Allow resin to cure (in accordance with the instructions on the back of the packet) before scraping off with a small clean razor blade. Be sure to push along and not into the glass as you remove the resin from the surface.

    6

    Wipe across the surface of the now smooth and level glass surface with a little window cleaner and a soft cloth. This should remove any remaining resin residue.

    7

    Polish the glass either by hand or with a polishing tool to finish off the repair.

How to Service Rear Brakes

How to Service Rear Brakes

In the automobile braking system, the rear brakes contribute about 20 to 30 percent of the total braking power. Even though most of the braking power is in the front brakes, rear brake servicing is every bit as important as front brake servicing. Any problem with the rear brakes that is left unattended can easily escalate into a serious safety concern. Rear brakes can be either disk or drum type brakes, and the weekend mechanic should be familiar with basic maintenance procedures for both types of brakes.

Instructions

Disk Brake Service

    1

    Park the vehicle on a level surface. Do not set the parking brake. Securely block the front wheels to prevent accidental vehicle movement. Slightly loosen the lug nuts then jack up the car. Support the vehicle securely on a jack stand. Completely remove the lug nuts and pull the wheel off.

    2

    Remove the two caliper guide rod bolts. Sometimes there are protective rubber caps on the bolt heads. These can simply be pried off. Firmly grip the caliper with both hands and roll it back and forth a few times to separate the brake pads slightly. Remove the caliper assembly from the disk and hang it out of the way with a bungee cord. Be careful not to stretch or damage the flexible brake line.

    3

    Slide the brake pads and shims out of the caliper. If retaining clips are present, these can be pried off with a screw driver or pulled off with pliers. Be careful to not damage the clips during removal.

    4

    Retract the piston back into the cylinder by hooking the frame end of a large C-clamp on the back of the caliper, placing the spindle swivel of the clamp on the piston face, and tightening the clamp. Be careful not to pinch or damage the rubber piston boot. For rear brakes with the parking brake incorporated into the brake cylinder, hook a large C-clamp over the back of the caliper, and position the clamp spindle swivel on the piston face. Tighten the clamp to put firm pressure on the piston, but do not try to force the piston back. Grip the piston with large channel lock pliers, and rotate the piston clockwise to screw it back into the cylinder. Maintain the backward pressure on the piston by tightening the C-clamp after every piston rotation. Be careful not to damage the rubber piston boot.

    5

    Measure the disk thickness at several places using the brake disk micrometer. Examine the disk for cracks, deep scores or other damage. If the disk is irreparably damaged, or if the thickness is below the manufacturer's specified minimum, replace the disk. The minimum thickness is usually stamped into the metal around the rim of the disk. Minor disk damage can be repaired for a reasonable cost by having the disk machined at your local auto parts store.

    Measure the pad lining thickness with the ruler. If the thickness is below the manufacturer's recommended minimum, or if the linings are damaged or uneven, replace the pads. The minimum thickness can be found in a suitable repair manual, which is often available at the local library. Otherwise, ask for this information at your auto parts store.

    6

    Remove any retaining screws or bolts from the disk, and pull the disk straight off the hub. If the disk is seized, tap the center part of the disk firmly with a rubber or plastic mallet, taking care not to hit the friction surface or outer rim.

    7

    Install a new disk, if needed. Liberally lubricate the caliper bolts with brake grease, before reinserting them in their mounts. Reassemble the caliper, using new pads and shims, if needed, and reinstall the caliper. Replace the wheel.

    8

    Repeat the procedure on the other rear wheel. Lower the vehicle. Start the engine, and pump the brakes a few times to re-extend the retracted pistons. Test the brake operation before driving.

Drum Brake Service

    9

    Park the vehicle on a level surface. Do not set the parking brake. Securely block the front wheels to prevent accidental vehicle movement. Slightly loosen the lug nuts then jack up the car. Support the vehicle securely on a jack stand. Completely remove the lug nuts and pull the wheel off.

    10

    Remove the brake drum. On many brakes the drum can be pulled right off the hub. On others, the drum may be secured by retaining screws or bolts. If so, remove these before pulling the drum off. On older brakes the drum may be secured with a single large hub nut that must be removed before removing the drum. If the drum is seized, firmly tap the outer shoulder with a rubber or plastic mallet to loosen it. If the brake shoes are pressing on the inside of the drum and preventing its removal, first be sure that the parking brake is not engaged. Next, look for a port on the backing plate with a rubber cover. Remove the cover to reveal the brake self-adjuster wheel. Reach inside with a small screwdriver, and rotate the self-adjuster to release tension on the brake shoes and back them away from the drum.

    11

    Measure the inside diameter of the brake drum with a brake drum micrometer. The diameter should be the same in all directions, indicating that the drum is round. Compare the measured diameter to the manufacturer's specified maximum diameter, which is usually stamped into the metal on the outside of the drum. Check the drum for cracks, deep scores, or other damage. If the drum diameter exceeds the allowable maximum, or if the drum is irreparably damaged, it should be replaced. Minor drum damage can be repaired by having the drum machined at an auto parts store. Measure the shoe lining thickness. Compare the measurement to the manufacturer's specified minimum thickness, which can be found in the vehicle's shop manual or aftermarket repair manual. These can usually be found at the local library. Check the brake shoe linings for damage or uneven wear, and replace if necessary.

    12

    Remove the brake springs. Brake springs are hooked at both ends and are removed by gripping the end of the spring with pliers and pulling to unhook it. First remove the large return springs that connect the front and rear brake shoes, followed by the smaller springs for the adjuster mechanism lever, the parking brake operating lever or any other springs that are present.

    13

    Remove the adjuster mechanism, and any metal struts that are sitting between the brake shoes. With no spring tension to hold them, these should slide out from between the shoes.

    14

    Remove the shoe hold-down pins. For pins with spring clips, grip the pin and the clip with separate pliers and rotate them until the clip releases. For pins with retaining springs, grip and retaining washer and rotate it until the notches in the washer align with the tabs on the pin end and pull the washer and retaining spring off the pin. With the retainers removed the the front brake shoe is now free and can be removed.

    15

    Disconnect the parking brake cable from the rear brake shoe. Pull off the retaining clip that holds the cable end, and slip the cable out of its anchor point. Pull the rear shoe off the backing plate.

    16

    Clean the backing plate and all removed parts with brake cleaning fluid. Use rags and a wire brush to remove stubborn deposits. Unscrew the adjuster wheel and remove the pushrod end. Clean the parts with brake cleaning fluid and lubricate the threads and the pushrod female section with brake grease before reassembling. Apply brake grease to the points where the brake shoes contact the backing plate, and the points where the brake shoes pivot on the hold-down pins. Lubricate the points where the cylinder contacts the shoes and the operating and adjusting levers pivot points. Be careful not to get grease on the drum or shoe lining surfaces.

    17

    Reassemble the brake by following steps in opposite order. Repeat the procedure on the other brake. Replace the wheels and lower the car. Start the engine and gently pump the brakes a few times to extend the pistons. Make a few careful stops in reverse to set the adjusters. Test the brake operation before driving normally.

How to Remove Scratches from a Car Mirror

How to Remove Scratches from a Car Mirror

If you have a scratched mirror, or even glass, did you know that you can buff it out yourself for a fraction of the cost of having it professionally repaired or replaced? You probably already have all of the supplies you will need to do this yourself at home.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the mirror or glass well using your everyday glass cleaner and lint free towel, or use a mixture of ammonia and water instead of the glass cleaner.

    2

    Apply a small amount of the jewelers rouge or everyday whitening toothpaste to the scratch. While wearing the dust mask, lightly buff the scratched area. Don't apply too much pressure or you may weaken the glass.

    3

    Clean the area and check for scratches. If they are still visible, repeat the process up to 2 more times. Light scratches should be mostly gone by now. Deeper scratches may not be able to be buffed out with this process.

How to Replace Door Glass on a 1994 Blazer

How to Replace Door Glass on a 1994 Blazer

Wayward balls, rocks, gravel can all damage window glass. This is especially true for vehicle windows. Replacing door window glass in a 1994 Chevrolet Blazer is not as hard as it sounds. Window glass does not require the specialty tools windshields require. Everyday household tools and a helper are all you need for this repair.

Instructions

    1

    Lower the window to be replaced on the Blazer all the way down. Disconnect the negative cable from the battery.

    2

    Pry off the cover on each side of the pull strap with a small flathead screwdriver. Remove the screws with a Phillips screwdriver.

    3

    Remove the screw in the Blazer's armrest with a Phillips screwdriver.

    4

    Remove the window crank for manual windows. Pry off the control switch panel with a flathead screwdriver for automatic windows.

    5

    Insert a large flathead screwdriver between the door panel and trim to disengage the retaining clips. Slide the screwdriver around the entire trim until all retaining clips are disengaged.

    6

    Remove the trim panel from the Blazer. Peel the plastic water shield back.

    7

    Remove the retaining screws with a Phillips screwdriver. Pull the door module back. Disconnect the door lock and handle rods. Disconnect the electrical connector.

    8

    Remove the two glass run channel bolts, on the door by the hinges, with a ratchet and socket. Pull the channel away from the glass.

    9

    Tilt the door module and window glass assembly. Lower the module and assembly out of the bottom of the door.

    10

    Bend the tab down on the window run channel. Slide the window glass out.

    11

    Slide the new glass into the window run channel. Raise the door module and assembly into the bottom of the door.

    12

    Push the window channel toward the glass. Install the channel bolts with a ratchet and socket.

    13

    Connect the electrical connector. Connect the door lock and handle rods.

    14

    Push the door module in. Install the retaining screws with a Phillips screwdriver.

    15

    Place the trim panel in position. Press the door panel into place until the clips engage. Install the armrest screw with a Phillips screwdriver. Install the manual crank or control panel.

    16

    Reconnect the negative battery cable.

Rabu, 19 Juni 2013

How to Repair Frozen Brake Pads

How to Repair Frozen Brake Pads

Seized brakes, also known as "frozen" or "stuck" brakes, can be frustrating to the car or truck owner. Frozen brakes prevent the vehicle from being used or could create a potentially dangerous road hazard when driving. There are several different causes of frozen brakes: misaligned parking brakes or brake pads, stuck wheel cylinders, dislodged brake drums or a stationary caliper piston are common culprits. The key to remedying the problem is determining the cause.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the vehicle onto a hydraulic lift, put the transmission in neutral and turn the car off. Lift the car until the vehicle is about shoulder height and manually spin each wheel. The wheel that doesn't spin freely and has a tendency to stick at certain points is the one that needs to be addressed. Pry off the hubcap and use a lug wrench to remove the lug nuts; once done, slide the wheel off.

    2

    Remove the bolts securing the caliper in place and remove the caliper: if it sticks and is overly difficult to remove, the caliper may be the problem. Visually inspect the brake pads behind the caliper: if signs of visible wear and tear are present such as fraying, you'll need to have new brake pads installed by a licensed mechanic.

    3

    Look at the sides of the caliper if the above doesn't apply. You're checking for signs of visible wear on the caliper itself: road grit has a tendency to accumulate inside the caliper's rubber casing, so if there are cracks or chips in the casing, grit may be causing the frozen brakes. Pry the casing off, re-lube the caliper and slide a new casing over the caliper to fix the situation.

    4

    Pull out the plug on the brake drum and insert an adjustment tool and a flathead screwdriver into the hole. Pry the retainer away from the brake wheel and turn the wheel to reveal the adjusting mechanism. Generously lube the mechanism and put everything back together to fix the brake seizure.

    5

    Use your hand to press down on the brake (or have someone else do this for you) to check to see if the brake fluid is freely flowing into the bleeder screws. Open each screw individually as the brake pedal is pumped to monitor flow; replace any bleeder screw that doesn't have brake fluid flowing from it.

How to Change the Rear Brakes for a 1989 Cutlass Supreme

The rear brake pads on a Cutlass Supreme wear down over time but typically not as fast as the front pads. Although the rear brakes don't have to endure the weight of the engine when stopping, they work to keep your car level. Damaged or badly worn rear brakes will cause your car to aggressively lunge forward at any stopping attempt. Rather than spending half of your day at the auto repair shop, you can change the rear brakes on the 1989 Cutlass Supreme right at home. The repair should take you 40 minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Place a wheel block firmly into position in front of both driver and passenger front tires. Use a lug wrench to loosen the rear driver's side tire's lug nuts a half-turn counterclockwise.

    2

    Raise the car with the hydraulic jack forward of the tire. The tire should visibly measure 6 inches from the ground. Place a jack stand on the left of the jack beneath the frame rail to help support the weight of the Cutlass Supreme.

    3

    Remove all of the lug nuts and slide the tire off the wheel studs, using both hands. Roll the tire to the side of your work area and place the lug nuts in a safe location free of dirt.

    4

    Note the position and direction of both brake pads on the caliper. They must be replaced just as you see them. Both pads are held in place on the caliper by the clips that are mounted on the surface of each pad. The clips will simply pop out of place.

    5

    Remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts at the rear of the brake caliper with a socket wrench. Put the bolts in your pocket for safekeeping. Place a 5-gallon bucket within the wheel well right next to the brake caliper.

    6

    Use both hands to lift the brake caliper up and off the rotor then set it down on top of the bucket. Pop the outer brake pad off the caliper and then pop the inner brake pad off the caliper piston.

    7

    Rotate the caliper piston clockwise with a pair of 12-inch adjustable pliers until it appears completely level in its bore hole. The bore hole is the housing that the piston protrudes from, and the piston must be forced back down into it to install the new brake pads.

    8

    Install the new inner brake pad just as you removed the old pad then install the new outer pad in the same manner. Both pads should pop back into place with a minimal amount of force.

    9

    Lift the brake caliper off the bucket using both hands and slide it back down over the rotor. Install both of the caliper mounting bolts by hand and tighten them until snug. Set your 3/8-inch drive torque wrench to 92 foot-pounds and secure both bolts in place. Move the bucket out of your work area.

    10

    Mount the tire back onto the wheel studs and replace all of the lug nuts by hand. Then use your lug wrench to tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern until snug. Remove the jack stand and lower the car until the tire makes contact with the ground. Reset the torque wrench to 100 foot-pounds and continue tightening the lug nuts in the star pattern until secure.

    11

    Lower the car and remove the hydraulic jack. Pump the brake pedal slowly until you feel it stiffen beneath your foot. Repeat the entire process to replace the rear passenger's side brake pads.

How to Replace the Rear Brake Rotors in a 1994 Toyota Celica

How to Replace the Rear Brake Rotors in a 1994 Toyota Celica

The rear brakes on a 1994 Toyota Celica do just a small percentage of the braking in the car, but over time, the rear brakes wear down just as fast as the front. With rear disc brakes, this means getting the stock rotors turned, or replacing them. If your rear rotors have already been turned once, chances are good that you'll need to replace them first, which should take about 30 minutes a side.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the rear of the Celica using the jack and set the car down onto the jack stands. Take off the back wheels with the tire iron.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper from the rear suspension using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, then hang the caliper from the rear spring using the bungee cord. Install the two 8mm bolts into the threaded holes on the face of the rotor. Tighten them in place with the ratchet until the rotor pops off of the hub. Pull the rotor off with both hands.

    3

    Slide the replacement rotor onto the wheel hub using your hands, then install two lug nuts using your hands to keep the rotor on the hub. Install the brake caliper onto the rotor with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket.

    4

    Remove the wheel lugs with your hands, then reinstall the rear tires using the tire iron. Lower the Celica off the stands with the jack.

How to Remove a Windshield From a 1996 Oldsmobile Delta 88

How to Remove a Windshield From a 1996 Oldsmobile Delta 88

The Oldsmobile Delta 88, or "88" for short, was a full-size vehicle manufactured at the end of the 1940s until 1999. You can remove the windshield from your 1996 Oldsmobile Delta 88 to save you the expense of paying an automotive glass shop to do it for you. It is not a difficult task to accomplish if you have someone to help you remove it. And it should take you only about 30 minutes. You will need a few tools and supplies, which you can purchase at a hardware or auto parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Lift up the windshield wipers to the cleaning position. Loosen and remove the nuts that hold the wipers in place with an adjustable wrench. Pry up the windshield wipers with a flathead screwdriver.

    2

    Put on gloves and pry up the rubber seal around the windshield with a pry tool. Remove the seal from the windshield with your hands after you have loosened it.

    3

    Poke the wire tool through the seal between the windshield and the frame. Run the wire around the entire perimeter of the windshield. This will break the urethane seal.

    4

    Position your helper at the outside front of the Oldsmobile. Have your helper put on thick work gloves. Sit inside the Delta in the driver's or passenger's seat and push the windshield out of the frame with your hands while your helper catches it from outside the car.

    5

    Scrape off any old glue from the windshield frame with a utility knife.

Selasa, 18 Juni 2013

How to Install Car Door Glass

How to Install Car Door Glass

The window glass in your car is one of the few things protecting its interior from the outside elements. Rain and other weather can cause damage to the electronics inside your car and can be a source of annoyance. You can cover it with plastic, but that can only last for so long. You need to know how to install that new glass so you can get the job done. It is a relatively simple task once you know the steps involved.

Instructions

    1

    Open the car door and leave it open.

    2

    Remove the screws holding the door panel to the frame. The amount and location of the screws varies based on the type of car. Most vehicles have a few in the armrest and three on either door jamb.

    3

    Remove the clips from the panel with a trim clip remover to pry them loose. Pull the panel away from the frame and disconnect the wires if it has power windows. Set the panel off to the side.

    4

    Locate the window slides attached to the window regulator at the base of the window. Remove the bolt that runs through it using a ratchet and socket. Pull the window from the door panel by pulling it straight up and out of the frame.

    5

    Slide the new window in place by pushing it between the rubber pieces at the top of the door and pushing it all the way until it meets the regulator.

    6

    Push the bolt through the window slides at the base of the window and tighten it down until it is secure.

    7

    Reattach any wires that plug into the door panel, line up the trim clips and hit them lightly with your hand until they snap into place.

    8

    Tighten all of the screws on the panel using the screwdriver until it is secured.

    9

    Roll the window up and down to verify it is operating properly.

How to Replace the Brakes on an Acura 2003 RSX

The brakes on your 2003 Acura RSX are disc brakes. Acura decided to use caliper-and-disc style brakes for all four wheels. This means that all four brakes are changed essentially the same way. The rear brakes have an emergency-brake cable, but that's the only difference. You'll need to replace your brakes when the pad material is around one-eighth of an inch or less. Replacement brakes can be purchased from most auto-parts stores.

Instructions

    1

    Jack up the front and rear of your RSX using a floor jack. Start with the front. Make sure you are jacking on the factory jack points located behind the radiator and behind the trunk. Place a jack stand under each of the front and rear pinch-weld supports under the vehicle and lower the RSX onto the stands.

    2

    Unbolt the lug nuts on the wheels using an impact wrench. Then, pull the wheels off of the wheel-hub assemblies.

    3

    Wrap the C-clamp around the brake caliper so that the screw end of the clamp sits flush against the outboard brake pad. Then, tighten the clamp to compress the caliper piston.

    4

    Remove the clamp when you can no longer tighten it, and unbolt the upper and lower caliper-mounting bolts and pull the caliper off the brake rotor.

    5

    Have an assistant hold the brake-caliper assembly. Do not let it hang by the rubber brake hose.

    6

    Unscrew the two screws in the center of the brake rotor using a screwdriver. Most vehicles don't use mounting screws on their brake rotors. Honda, which makes Acura vehicles, does. It will be impossible to remove the rotor if you don't remove these screws.

    7

    Slide the rotor off and slide the new rotor on. Installation is the reverse of removal.

    8

    Remove the old brake pads and insert the new pads into the caliper assembly.

    9

    Mount the brake caliper and tighten the caliper-mounting bolts to 53 ft-lbs. with a torque wrench. The rest of the installation is the reverse of removal.

    10

    Repeat steps 2 through 9 for the rest of the brakes. When replacing the rear brakes, the only change in procedure is that you will need to remove the emergency-brake spring from the caliper with a pair of pliers before removing the caliper-mounting bolts.

How to Replace the Rotor in a Honda Prelude

Rotors, also known as brake discs, only need to be replaced if they get worn down or warped. If the rotors in your Honda Prelude can't be resurfaced, then it's time to swap them out for new ones. The process is fairly simple and you can do it in your own garage.

Instructions

    1

    Get new rotors for your Honda Prelude. When replacing rotors it is recommended that you replace all the rotors at once to avoid uneven wear.

    2

    Bleed the brake line from the master cylinder by about two-thirds to prevent overflow. Support your vehicle with jacks and jack stands to prevent it from rolling when working on the rotors.

    3

    Remove the tire and wheel assembly. Remove one of the caliper bolts and rotate the caliper. Take off the mounting bracket for the brake line, but do not disconnect the brake line. Suspend the free caliper with mechanic's wire to prevent straining the brake line.

    4

    Unfasten the holding screws and then remove the old rotor. Be sure to clean off the oily coating on the new rotor before replacing it.

    5

    Install the new rotor onto the hub. Replace the rotor holding screws. Push the piston back into the cylinder wall and put the caliper and attached brake line back into place. Tighten and torque the caliper mounting bolts.

    6

    Replace the tire and wheel assembly. Repeat these steps for each set of rotors. Then lower your car, tighten and torque the lug nuts and refill the brake cylinder with new brake fluid. Road test your Honda prelude to make sure that the installation was successful.

Senin, 17 Juni 2013

Tips for Removing Scratches on Windshields

With the cost of replacing windshields getting higher all the time, it pays to take the time to repair them if possible. Scratches are a problem that should be addressed not just because they are unsightly, but also because they can be dangerous. Scratches reflect light in a way that hinders visibility, and it can even be blinding when facing bright, direct sunlight. Fortunately, many scratches can be repaired.

Gather the Materials

    There are just a few materials needed for repairing scratches in glass, but they may take a little time and research to find. You will need some jeweler's rouge, also known as cerium oxide. This can usually be found at a jewelery supply shop or hobby store. Make sure that you buy the type that is red in color. You will also need glycerin, which is available at most pharmacies. Buy these in small quantities, as each batch only requires 2 tablespoons of each product. Gain access to an electric buffer and buy a firm felt pad for it. Then gather a small bowl, some clean rags, clear nail polish and a little window cleaner.

Technique

    Make a paste by mixing the water, glycerin, and jeweler's rouge in a small bowl. Apply a small amount of the paste onto the scratch on the glass. Mount the felt polishing pad on the buffer, and begin by gently rubbing the compound on the window. Apply pressure a little at a time, as you do not want to press too hard and crack the glass. Let the area dry briefly, approximately 30 seconds, and then wipe the area clean with a rag.

Finishing Touches

    Inspect the area and look to see if it has been repaired to your liking. If not, repeat the process. Many times, multiple applications will yield better results. If you find that there is a little distortion in the surface of the glass after finishing, you can apply a little clear nail polish to repair it. Allow it to dry completely and finish the job by cleaning any residue with window cleaner.

Minggu, 16 Juni 2013

How to Remove a Windscreen Chip

How to Remove a Windscreen Chip

Getting a chip in your windscreen can do more than just look ugly. A chip can very quickly develop into a large crack, allowing moisture into the layers of the windscreen, which would then have to be replaced. However, so long as the chip is smaller than a quarter, it is possible to repair the damage yourself. Windscreen (or windshield) repair kits are available in the automotive section of most major retailers.

Instructions

    1

    Dry the windscreen completely. If it is raining or snowing, move the car into a garage to allow it to dry. You can use a hair dryer to hasten the process, but you must make sure there is no moisture inside the chip. If there is, it will get sealed in and cause the windscreen to fog.

    2

    Clean the damaged area with acetone and a paper towel. Acetone will evaporate quickly, but don't use so much that it soaks into the chip.

    3

    Peel the backing film off the repair kit's adhesive strip and press the strip onto the windscreen, centered over the chip. Rub it with your fingernail to make sure it has a very strong bond. Once it is secure, peel off the front piece of film, leaving only the adhesive strip.

    4

    Stick the plastic adapter onto the adhesive strip, centered over the chip. Make sure it is secured by rubbing it with your fingernail.

    5

    Turn the syringe of adhesive up (with the plunger pointed at the floor) and remove the cap. Pull the plunger back slightly to prevent material from spilling out of the tip.

    6

    Attach the tip of the syringe to the plastic adapter.

    7

    Pull the plunger all the way back with the syringe attached to the adapter. This will create a vacuum, pulling all air out of the chip. Hold the plunger this way for a full minute, allowing the air from the chip to bubble up through the adhesive. The adhesive will settle down at the tip of the plunger.

    8

    Let go of the plunger handle once all of the air has bubbled through the adhesive. The vacuum will force adhesive into the chip.

    9

    Repeat the pullback and release action four or five times to fully impregnate the chip with adhesive.

    10

    Remove the syringe, plastic adapter and adhesive strip from the windscreen.

    11

    Wipe off excess adhesive from the windscreen with acetone on a paper towel, but be sure to leave a bump over the chip.

    12

    Allow the adhesive to cure for several hours.

    13

    Use a sharp razor blade to slice the adhesive bump off the windscreen, completing the repair.

How to Remove the Back Window of a 98 Dodge Caravan

Replacing the glass on a '98 Dodge caravan at a car repair shop can be quite expensive. Prices can range from $250 to over $350. This does not even include the cost of window tinting or any other service. If you have the knowledge and time, it is much cheaper to remove the glass yourself. Removing the glass usually takes one to two hours and is quite simple once you get the hang of it.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the windshield wiper from the back window on your '98 Dodge Caravan. Unclip the wiper blade and set aside. Find a socket that fits on the bolt that holds the bottom of the wiper arm to the window. Unscrew the wiper's nut and pull it out. Set aside. Rock the wiper arm back and forth until it loosens from the window. Pull the wiper off and set it aside as well.

    2

    Get inside the van and locate the plastic molding and plastic clips that hold the window in place. These will be located along the top, bottom and sides of the back window. Keep the clips remain intact, as they will be needed to hold in the replacement window. Remove the window molding hiding the edges of the glass.

    3

    Remove the window clips gently. It may be necessary to use a razor to cut away the sealant holding the clips to the glass. Go very slowly, as it is very easy to shatter the glass during this step.

    4

    Get outside the car and approach the window from the back. Use a razor blade and push it in between the glass and the pinchweld. The pinchweld is the groove that the glass rests in. Cut the urethane sealant slowly using a sawing motion. Cut all the way around the edges of the glass. This can take anywhere from 15 minutes to a little over an hour. Don't to rush this step as the glass can shatter easily from too much pressure from the sawing motion. However, it is impossible to cut the urethane without sawing as it is an extremely tough material. It may be necessary to go back inside the car and cut some of the urethane from the inside as well, using an extended razor handle.

    5

    Tap gently on the glass to remove it from the casing. Since the '98 Dodge caravan is so large, you will need the help of a friend to guide the glass safely. Lay out several blankets and pillows in case you lose hold of the glass. Put the glass in a safe location.

    6

    Clean the pinchweld to prepare it for the new glass. You can vacuum it out or dust it out with old rags. You may need to use a damp cloth to clean out the dirtier areas. The area is now ready for the new glass.

How Do I Change the Brake Shoes on a 2001 KIA Sportage?

How Do I Change the Brake Shoes on a 2001 KIA Sportage?

Kia Motors first introduced the Sportage in 1995. The first generation design was discontinued in 2002 before the model was reintroduced in a new configuration in 2005. The pre-2002 models were equipped with drum rear brakes, and changing the brake shoes is a part of good brake maintenance. Doing this job yourself can save both time and money.

Instructions

    1

    Crack the rear wheel lug nuts with a lug nut wrench, and then jack up the rear of the car. Set the car on jack stands positioned under the marked vehicle lifting points. Completely remove the lug nuts, and then remove the rear wheels.

    2

    Remove the four hub nuts using a wrench or socket, and remove the drum by pulling it straight off the hub. If the hub is stubborn, tap the edges with a hammer, using a piece of wood to protect metal edges.

    3

    Remove the adjuster lever spring by grasping the spring end nearest the adjuster lever with pliers and lifting the hooked spring end off the adjuster lever. Remove the return spring by grasping the long end of the spring with pliers and unhooking it.

    4

    Turn the adjuster star wheel clockwise to relieve the tension on the brake shoes. Remove the adjuster assembly by lifting it up until the slots on either end are no longer engaged with the brake shoes.

    5

    Rotate the two hold-down pins until they align with the grooves in the hold-down pin clips. Remove the hold-down pins by slipping them through the grooves in the clips, and then remove the hold down pin clips.

    6

    Remove the primary brake shoe by pulling it straight out.

    7

    Remove the secondary brake shoe by carefully pulling it straight out, taking care not to kink the attached parking brake cable. Use pliers to remove the parking brake cable from the secondary shoe. Remove the control lever retaining clip by spreading it slightly with a large screwdriver, grasping the clip with pliers and pulling it off. Remove the control lever from the secondary brake shoe.

    8

    Measure the diameter of the drum at several points using the drum micrometer. Maximum acceptable diameter is 9.89 inches. If the drum diameter exceeds this, then it must be replaced. The drum diameter should be the same at all points measured. The interior surface should be free from grooves and cracks.

    9

    Clean the backing plate with brake cleaner. Separate the adjuster star wheel, clean the parts with brake cleaner and coat the threads with anti-seize compound before reassembling. Also apply anti-seize compound to the backing plate at the points where the brake shoes contact the plate.

    10

    Reassemble the brake assembly by reversing the previous steps. Use new springs and clips rather than reusing the old ones. Before reattaching the drum, be sure the adjusting lever contacts the star wheel. Rotate the star wheel until the outside diameter formed by the shoes (as measured with the drum micrometer) is 0.020 to 0.040 inches less than the drum inside diameter. The star wheel can be rotated by placing a screwdriver blade between the teeth of the star and moving the wheel assembly in the desired direction. Install the drum, install the wheels and test the brakes.

Sabtu, 15 Juni 2013

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a Ford Expedition

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a Ford Expedition

The brake pads on your Ford Expedition require replacement at regular intervals. Every 12 months, or before if necessary, you need to check the lining on the brake pads. This lining contains friction material that wears out after a period of service. If the back material on the brake pads is too thin, you need to replace them to make sure the brake system keeps working properly. Here, you will find the necessary steps to install new brake pads to the rear wheel assemblies on your Expedition model.

Instructions

Remove the Brake Pads

    1

    Check the brake fluid in the master cylinder. If it is over half full, remove some fluid using a hand siphon pump and leave the lid loose. Then place shop rags underneath the master cylinder to catch brake fluid spill during the brake pad replacement.

    2

    Turn off the air suspension if your Ford Expedition model is equipped with it. This will prevent your from accidentally activating the system as you work near the suspension. If necessary, consult your car owner's manual.

    3

    Loosen the lugs on both rear wheels using a lug wrench.

    4

    Shift the transmission into neutral.

    5

    Lift the rear of your Expedition using a floor jack and support it on two jack stands.

    6

    Chock the front wheels.

    7

    Remove both rear tires.

    8

    Press the center of the caliper-anchor housing spring with your thumb until the spring unlatches at both ends. Then remove the spring.

    9

    Detach the boots from the brake-caliper guide pins and discard them. Use a pair of slip joint pliers, if necessary.

    10

    Unscrew the two guide pins from the brake caliper using a ratchet and socket or torx bit. Discard the caliper guide pins as well.

    11

    Lift the brake caliper from the brake rotor and secure the caliper to the suspension using a piece of wire to avoid damage to the brake hose attached to the caliper.

    12

    Remove the front brake pad from the brake caliper.

    13

    Push the caliper cylinder into its bore using a C-clamp. Use the rear brake pad on the caliper to support the C-clamp screw as it pushes the cylinder.

    14

    Remove the rear brake pad from the brake caliper.

Install the New Brake Pads

    15

    Set the new brake pads into the brake caliper.

    16

    Install the brake caliper onto the brake rotor.

    17

    Start the two new guide pins on the brake caliper by hand. Then tighten the pins using the ratchet and socket or torx bit.

    18

    Set the lower and upper arm of the anchor housing spring into the caliper anchor plate. Then press down on the spring with your thumb until the spring snaps in place over the brake caliper cavities.

    19

    Depress the brake pedal several times to make sure the brakes are working properly.

    20

    Install the tire and the wheel lugs. Then replace the brake pads on the opposite wheel assembly and install the tire and the wheel lugs.

    21

    Lower the vehicle and finish tightening the wheel lugs on both rear tires.

    22

    Remove the chocks from the front tires.

    23

    Add new DOT 3 brake fluid to the master cylinder if necessary. Tighten the lid and remove the shop rags.

    24

    Turn on the air suspension if your Expedition is equipped with it.