Kamis, 28 Februari 2013

Odyssey Brake Problems

The Honda Odyssey has been one of the most popular minivans on the market since its debut in 1995. Known for its spacious cabins and innovative designs, the Odyssey, now in its third generation, consistently ranks among the industry leaders in performance. Unfortunately, the Odyssey has had a somewhat checkered history with brake problems.

Facts

    The 2009 model Honda Odysseys were the subject of a voluntary recall involving 421 minivans after a problem was discovered with the brake lines. The wrong front brake hoses were installed during assembly, creating a potential issue with one of the caliper bolts. Over time, the hose rubbing against the caliper could cause the hose to tear or puncture. This seemingly innocent assembly mistake could result in tragic consequences.

Significance

    If the Odyssey brake hose falters, brake fluid would leak and eventually lead to diminished brake system performance. This could mean slow response times, locking or complete brake failure. Sadly, there could be no signs of a problem until it's too late.

Solution

    Honda acknowledged the problem and offered to replace the faulty Odyssey brake hoses free of charge. With the proper hoses installed, any potential conflicts with the caliper bolt are eliminated.

History

    The 2005 model Honda Odysseys also experienced brake problems due to an issue with the brake pads. The wrong friction material was used to coat the pads. As a result, the front brakes would grind or growl when pressure was applied. The problem existed even when traveling at low speeds. The friction material was corrected in subsequent years, although complaints of grinding have persisted.

Warnings

    Honda Odyssey brake problems have been reported in vehicles other than the 2005 and 2009 models. The most common complaint is the brakes feel "soft," meaning they don't respond quickly enough to pressure. The brake pedal descends lower than normal and results in extended braking distance. At first, many owners chalk this up to not being familiar with the Odyssey's ABS braking system, but when the problem persists, it can be difficult finding a solution. The issue has driven many customers away from the Odyssey.

    The other most often-heard complaint still involves grinding from the front brakes. Addressing the friction material on the 2005 brake pads hasn't been enough to silence the growling noises. And the grinding, aside from its annoying sound, has impacted the performance of brake rotors, leading to frequent replacements and increased repair costs.

Problems After Windshield Replacement in a 2008 Lexus ES350

Problems After Windshield Replacement in a 2008 Lexus ES350

A windshield replacement is routine to those who replace hundreds of them each week, but the Lexus ES350 is not routine. Lexus ES350 style and power requires service technicians, certified by the Lexus Commitment to Perfection program, at the Lexus dealership. Lexus ES350 navigation integrates real-time weather conditions into its sensors and intelligence. The weather sensor on the windshield is calibrated to the Lexus windshield, and it activates the windshield wipers.

Upper Windshield Ticking Sound

    The creak, rattle or ticking sound from the top of the windshield might be because of stoppers bonded to the windshield. The Lexus ES350 has two stoppers at the top of the windshield. If the windshield was installed by a Lexus dealer, the repair is covered by a 48-month or 50,000-mile warranty. Some Lexus-supplied tools are better suited to replace a Lexus windshield, even though a generic windshield salesperson might have offered you a cheaper solution. Lexus luxury is partially because of the quality of the Lexus surface materials, the glaze, the sun visors or the windshield wipers. Applying too much pressure to the sun visors or the headliner, which holds them, will permanently crease the surface material. Both sun visors and garnishes must be lowered to gain access to the windshield stoppers. The stoppers are inside the passenger compartment near the metal roof opening. The tip of the plastic stopper needs to be cut off. The vehicle should be test-driven to ensure elimination of the noise before reassembling the windshield and sun visors.

Lower Windshield Ticking Noise

    The creak, rattle or ticking sound from the bottom of the Lexus ES350 windshield might be because of retainers bonded to the lower windshield. The Lexus ES350 has two retainers at the lower edge of the windshield. Some vehicles have only one retainer at the bottom of the windshield. If the windshield was installed by a Lexus dealer, the repair is covered by a 48-month or 50,000-mile warranty. The retainers, at the bottom of the windshield, are under the ventilator cover. The retainers are inside the car roughly 6 inches from the bottom of the windshield. The retainers are attached to the back of the windshield with double-sided cushioned tape. A mini-hacksaw with a fine-tooth 10-inch blade is required to cut the pin portion off of the retainer. Specialized Lexus tools are recommended for Lexus repairs. The dealer will test drive the car before installing the ventilator cover.

Rain Sensing Windshield Wipers Do Not Work

    Lexus ES350 windshield wipers turn on in response to rain on the windshield. Lexus rain sensors are based on the reflection of an infrared light beam on the windshield from the inside of the vehicle. The light is diminished if the glass is wet because less infrared light reaches the rain sensor. The windshield wipers turn on at a speed proportional to the amount of light received by the rain sensor. The rain sensor requires a specific Lexus windshield because the sensor uses the depth of the windshield in its calculations of the volume of rain on the windshield. The rain sensor must be attached precisely to the windshield to function properly.

How to Perform a Brake Job on a 1998 Cadillac STS

How to Perform a Brake Job on a 1998 Cadillac STS

The brake system on your 1998 Cadillac Seville STS consists of four main components: the master cylinder, calipers, rotors and pads. All of these components may wear out over time, but the brake pads wear out most frequently. Brake pads will typically need to be replaced every 20,000 to 30,000 miles on the front and 50,000 to 75,000 miles on the rear, depending on your driving style. The front brake pads wear out significantly quicker as they provide the primary stopping power.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen, but do not remove, the lug nuts on the front wheels with a tire iron. Raise the front of the vehicle with a jack and secure it on jack stands. Remove the lug nuts from the front wheels and pull the wheels off the vehicle.

    2

    Locate the two caliper bolts at the rear of the brake caliper, one upper and one lower. Loosen and remove the bolts with a ratchet and socket.

    3

    Pull the caliper from the brake system and hang it on the suspension with a bungee cord. This prevents damage to the brake hose.

    4

    Insert a flat head screwdriver beneath the metal clip holding the outboard brake pad to the caliper. Pry upward to release the clip from the caliper. Grasp the outboard brake pad and pull it from the brake caliper.

    5

    Place a C-clamp over the brake caliper so that the screw portion contacts the inboard brake pad and the fixed portion contacts the rear of the caliper body. Tighten the C-clamp until the brake pad stops moving. This compresses the internal caliper piston so there is clearance for the new, thicker brake pads.

    6

    Insert the screwdriver beneath the inboard brake pad and pry upwards until you can grasp it then pull it outward and away from the brake caliper. Take note of the metal fingers that go into the brake caliper piston and hold the inboard pad in place.

    7

    Guide the metal fingers of the new inboard brake pad into the caliper piston just as the old ones came out. Press the brake pad until it is fully seated on the caliper.

    8

    Place the outboard pad onto the brake caliper by guiding the metal clip on the rear over the body of the caliper. Slide the brake pad down until the clip seats into the groove on the caliper's body.

    9

    Remove the caliper from the bungee strap and place it back onto the brake assembly. Hand-tighten the upper and lower caliper bolts then tighten them fully with the ratchet and socket.

    10

    Repeat Steps 2 through 9 for the brake pads on the other side of the vehicle.

    11

    Remount the wheels onto the vehicle and hand-tighten the lug nuts.

    12

    Raise the car off the jack stands with the jack and lower it to the ground.

    13

    Tighten the lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and a socket. Press on the brake pedal repeatedly until it feels firm.

Installation of a Master Brake Cylinder in a 1995 Ford F-150

Before 1995, the F-150 maintained its no-frills attitude, making items like air conditioning, cassette player and power accessories only optional. The 1995 model year brought in the introduction of the Eddie Bauer edition F-150 that included all of the aforementioned features as standard, as well as alloy wheels and two-tone paint. Regardless of how luxurious your 1995 F-150 is, it still has the same brake system as the rest. Replacing the master cylinder on the 1995 F-150 is a straightforward task, but bleeding the system afterward is a little tricky.

Instructions

Master Cylinder Removal

    1

    Press and hold the brake pedal for about five seconds to bleed out any vacuum that may still be in the brake booster. Unscrew the cap from the master cylinder reservoir and siphon out as much fluid as you can, using a clean turkey baster.

    2

    Pry upward on the locking tab on the brake fluid level sensors wiring harness with a flat-head screwdriver and unplug the wiring harness.

    3

    Hold a small drain pan under the master cylinder. Loosen the fittings on the two brake lines leading into the brake master cylinder, using a flare wrench, and pull the lines from the master cylinder.

    4

    Remove the two master cylinder-to-brake booster nuts with a ratchet and socket, and pull the master cylinder from the brake booster.

Master Cylinder Bench Bleeding

    5

    Clamp the new master cylinder into a rubber jawed bench vice. Unscrew the cap from the master cylinder reservoir and add fresh DOT 3 brake fluid until the level reaches the Max line on the reservoir.

    6

    Pull the plastic plugs from the brake line portals on the master cylinder and thread bleeder hoses from a master cylinder bleeder kit into the ports. Tighten the hoses with a flare wrench. Bend the hoses so their ends are submerged in brake fluid.

    7

    Press and release the plunger on the rear of the master cylinder, using the metal dowel rod included in the bleeder kit, and watch the submerged ends of the bleeder hoses for air bubbles. Continue pressing and releasing the plunger until no air bubbles come from the bleeder hoses.

    8

    Remove the bleeder hoses, using a flare wrench, and press the plugs back into the brake line portals. Remove the master cylinder from the bench vice.

Master Cylinder Installation

    9

    Slide the master cylinder onto the mounting studs on the brake booster and hand-thread its retaining nuts. Tighten the nuts to between 13 and 25 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    10

    Pull the plugs from the brake line ports on the master cylinder. Insert the two brake lines into their respective ports in the master cylinder they are hard formed to prevent incorrect connection and thread their fittings into the master cylinder by hand. Torque the front brake line-to-master cylinder fitting to between 16 and 21 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and crows foot attachment. Tighten the rear brake line-to-master cylinder fitting to between 11 and 14 foot-pounds.

    11

    Plug the fluid level sensors wiring harness into the sensors receptacle.

Bleeding the Brake System

    12

    Raise the rear of the F-150 with a floor jack and slide jack stands under its frame rails. Lower the pickup on to the floor jacks.

    13

    Crawl under the right rear wheel until you are directly behind the right rear wheel. Find the 1/4-inch metal bleeder valve near the top of the drum brake backing plate.

    14

    Press a 1/4-inch-diameter rubber hose onto the bleeder valve and set the other end in a clean, clear container. Add new DOT 3 brake fluid to the container until the fluid submerges the end of the hose.

    15

    Open the bleeder valve by turning it three-quarters of a turn counter-clockwise with a combination wrench and instruct an assistant to slowly press the brake pedal to the floor. Watch the submerged end of the hose for air bubbles to appear. Close the bleeder valve. Repeat this step until no air bubbles come from the hose, then remove the hose from the bleeder valve.

    16

    Refill the master cylinder with new DOT 3 fluid, until the level reaches the Max line.

    17

    Repeat steps 2 through 5 to bleed the left rear wheel.

    18

    Raise the rear of the truck off the jack stands, using a floor jack, and remove the jack stands. Lower the rear of the truck to the ground.

    19

    Raise the front of the F-150 with a floor jack and slide jack stands under the frame rails. Lower the truck onto the jack stands.

    20

    Crawl under the drivers side of the F-150 until you are just under the firewall; look at the drivers side frame rail and find the hydraulic component bolted to the frame rail, this is the rear antilock brake system valve.

    21

    Find the bleeder valve near the rear of the RABS valve. Press a 1/4-inch-diameter rubber hose onto the bleeder valve and set the other end of the hose in the clean, clear container with brake fluid in it, so the fluid submerges the end of the hose.

    22

    Repeat steps 4 and 5 to bleed the RABS valve.

    23

    Move to the right front wheel and repeat steps 3 through 5 on the right front wheel, then the left front wheel.

    24

    Raise the rear of the F-150 off the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the truck to the ground. Repeat this step on the front of the truck.

How to Change the Brake Pads on a Ram 1500

How to Change the Brake Pads on a Ram 1500

You know how important it is to replace worn out brake pads on your Ram 1500 pickup truck, but may not feel confident doing a good job yourself, instead possibly ending up with a serious brake system problem. With some simple strategies and a few common tools, though, you can keep yourself from tearing the brake hose, damaging some other brake component and, most importantly, breathing dangerous lining dust.

Instructions

Removing the Brake Pads

    1

    Park your Ram pickup on a level surface.

    2

    Remove about half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using a hand siphon pump.

    3

    Shift the transmission to Neutral.

    4

    Unfasten the front wheel lug nuts using a lug wrench but do not remove them yet.

    5

    Lift the front of the vehicle using a floor jack and support it on jack stands.

    6

    Chock the rear wheels.

    7

    Finish removing the front wheels.

    8

    Work on one brake assembly at a time and detach the brake caliper from its mounting bracket by unfastening the two mounting pins using a 3/8-inch hex wrench or socket and ratchet.

    9

    Pull the caliper upward and off the bracket and brake rotor.

    10

    Lift one end of the outboard pad retaining spring with a screwdriver, just enough to rotate the pad to remove it from the caliper.

    11

    Seat the piston back into its caliper bore using a large C-clamp. Let the screw on the C-clamp push against the inboard pad to seat the piston. Then remove the clamp.

    12

    Pry the inboard pad off the caliper piston using the screwdriver. Be careful not to damage the piston and seal. Then remove the inboard pad from the caliper.

    13

    Tie the brake caliper to the coil spring or some other suitable suspension component with wire to prevent the caliper weight from damaging the brake hose attached to the caliper.

Installing the Brake Pads

    14

    Spray the brake assemblies with brake parts cleaner and wipe the surface with a clean, lint-free cloth to get rid of brake dust. Clean the caliper and steering knuckle sliding surfaces with a wire brush if necessary. James E. Duffy warns against blowing brake dust off the brake assembly. The dust may end up in your lungs. (See References 2)

    15

    Clean the caliper mounting pins of rust or corrosion with a piece of crocus cloth or replace the pins if necessary.

    16

    Set the new inboard pad in place and push the pad spring clip into the caliper piston until the pad is flush with the piston.

    17

    Install the outboard pad and be sure the retaining spring locks on the caliper-mounting surface.

    18

    Position the caliper on its mounting bracket and rotor.

    19

    Lubricate the sleeves of the caliper mounting pins with GE 661 silicone grease or equivalent and start the pins by hand to avoid stripping the threads.

    20

    Tighten the caliper pins with the 3/8-inch hex wrench or socket.

    21

    Replace the brake pads on the opposite brake assembly following Steps 8 from the first section through Step 7 of this section.

    22

    Mount the wheels on the hub assemblies and start the wheel lug nuts by hand. Then fasten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    23

    Lower the vehicle and finish tightening the lug nuts.

    24

    Pump the brake pedal several times to help the new pads seat on the brake rotor.

    25

    Check the master cylinder and add new brake fluid if necessary.

Rabu, 27 Februari 2013

How to Change the Brake Booster on a 97 GMC Sonoma

The brake booster on a 1997 GMC Sonoma is the main component that pushes the brake fluid to all of the braking components. When the brake pedal is pushed in, the brake booster pressurizes the master cylinder. The brake fluid then flows out of the master cylinder and into the brake calipers. If the brake booster ever loses its vacuum, it will not be able to stop the truck in a safe and efficient manner. Replace it immediately to prevent unsafe braking.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 1997 GMC Sonoma on a level surface and open the hood. Locate the 12-by-12 round brake booster mounted to the rear driver-side firewall. Pull the vacuum line out of the front of the brake booster with your hand.

    2

    Move back to the driver-side door. Look behind the brake pedal with the flashlight and locate the clip that secures the brake booster linkage to the brake pedal. Pry the clip out of the linkage with the flat-head screwdriver. Put the clip in a safe place.

    3

    Locate the master cylinder that is secured to the front of the brake booster. Loosen and remove the metric bolts from the master cylinder with an open-end metric wrench. Carefully pull the master cylinder straight off the brake booster and set it down on top of the engine compartment.

    4

    Loosen and remove all of the bolts from around the brake booster with a ratchet, extension and socket. Pull the brake booster straight off the firewall. Remove the old gasket from the brake booster or the firewall.

    5

    Position the new gasket over the back of the new brake booster. Put the new brake booster back over the firewall. Screw all of the bolts on and tighten them by hand. Tighten the bolts in a alternating sequence with the ratchet, extension and socket.

    6

    Slide the master cylinder back onto the front of the brake booster. Screw the bolts on and tighten them with the open-end wrench.

    7

    Connect the brake booster linkage to the back of the brake pedal. Push the clip back through to secure the linkage to the brake pedal.

    8

    Push the head of the vacuum line into the opening on the front of the new brake booster. Double-check all of the bolts and nuts for tightness.

How to Repair an Automobile Windshield

How to Repair an Automobile Windshield

A damaged windshield should always be promptly repaired, if not replaced. The windshield is actually a major structural component of your vehicle's cabin, and driving with a damaged or unstable windshield can be dangerous, especially if you encounter strong winds or are involved in a crash. Windshield work often requires professional help, but for the experienced practitioner, it is possible to repair your own.

Instructions

    1

    Acquire a thorough understanding of how to remove and install windshields by reading a good selection of auto repair manuals. You can obtain such manuals and reference materials from your car dealership or you can purchase windshield repair videos, either from your local bookstore or online. You should feel absolutely comfortable in repairing your car's windshield.

    2

    Wax down the windshield moldings until it is completely soaked, allowing you to easily remove the trim without damaging the windshield itself. If possible, repeat this process everyday for at least three days, especially if the trim is old and rusted. When the molding is completely soft, removing the trimmings should be almost automatic.

    3

    Slip the hooked trim removal tool underneath the trim so that the hook can connect with one of the clips. Release the clip by pulling the tool toward you or the middle of the window. Normally the trim will be connected with a snap on clip or a bolt on clip. Repeat this process for each clip along the windshield.

    4

    Cut the butyl window seal away from the windshield with a utility knife. Do this around the whole circumference of the windshield. This must be done with caution in order not to further damage the glass.

    5

    Use the cold knife to penetrate the butyl material. To do this, position the 90 degree blade of the cold knife into the channel between the windshield and metal frame. The blade should be in alignment with the frame of the windshield. Pulling the T-handle of the cold knife should allow it to penetrate the butyl material. The whole process of cutting through the butyl material should take no longer than six minutes.

    6

    Push out the windshield gently from inside the car. As you do this, the window will stay in place due to the factory rests attached to the cowl. Seek an assistant or two to hold the windshield up until you get out of the car. Once the windshield is removed, put it aside for repair and installation.

How to Replace a Caliper in an Oldsmobile Alero

With Oldsmobiles out of production, finding parts for an Alero can be hard. If you need to replace a brake caliper on your Alero, take it to your mechanic and find out what compatible parts will work with it (like the Pontiac Grand Am). Study as much as you can about this type of service before taking it on yourself.

Instructions

Removing the Old Caliper

    1

    Raise and secure the car on a jack stand. Drain two-thirds of the brake fluid from the master cylinder. Remove the tire and wheel to reach the caliper you need.

    2

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper by removing the fitting bolt. Discard the washers on the bolt. Plug the hose with a piece of rubber to prevent contaminating the brake fluid.

    3

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts and inspect their condition. They may need to be replaced, too. Lift and remove the caliper from the knuckle.

    4

    Take the brake pads off the caliper. They should probably be replaced as well.

    5

    Inspect the caliper support. Check for rust and corrosion that will hinder the caliper's travel.

Installing a New Caliper

    6

    Attach new brake pads to the replacement caliper. Install the caliper onto the steering knuckle. Connect the mounting bolts and torque them to about 23 foot pounds for the front calipers, 40 foot pounds for the rear.

    7

    Connect the brake hose to the caliper, using new copper washers with the mounting bolt. Torque the bolt to 35 foot pounds to 37 foot pounds.

    8

    Refill the master cylinder. Bleed the brake system by opening the bleeder valve and having an assistant press the brake pedal to remove air from the system.

    9

    Reinstall the wheel assembly and lower the car. Test the brakes' firmness and operation, first while stopped and then on the road.

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Ford F-Series

The Ford F-series consists of the F-150, F-250 Super Duty, F-350 Super Duty, F-450 Super Duty and F-550 Super Duty. All five of these different Ford trucks require the same procedure to replace their rear disc brakes, and none of them requires any specialized tools from the Ford dealership.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the F-Series truck off the ground using jacks. Support the vehicle on all sides with jack stands to prevent it from tipping over. Keep children and animals out of the vicinity while you replace the rear disc brakes.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels with a torque wrench. Remove the wheel and tire assembly and set aside, face up, to prevent damage.

    3

    Disconnect the caliper bolts and remove the brake caliper. Use mechanic's wire to fasten the caliper to your F-Series truck's side rail. Take out the outer disc brake pads followed by the inner pads.

    4

    Compress the piston into the caliper bore using a C-clamp. Replace the inner brake pads followed by the outer brake pads. Remove the C-clamp.

    5

    Remove the mechanic's wire from the caliper. Lay the caliper over the pads, fasten it down and tighten the caliper bolts with the torque wrench to 26 ft. lb.

    6

    Replace the wheels and lower the vehicle to the ground. Bleed the brakes if necessary and check the brake performance during a short test drive.

Abs Brake System Maintenance

The anti-lock brake system provides the ability to steer around objects while braking in slippery road conditions. When the system senses a wheel is about to lock up, the brake pressure is released from that wheel to help maintain directional control. The system requires little service and maintenance, but brake fluid replacement is still needed. Over time, the anti-corrosion properties of the brake fluid that protect delicate parts dissipate, and the fluid becomes slightly thicker. Routine fluid replacement restores the fluid to factory specs.

Fluid Maintanence

    Fluid replacement involves removing old fluid from the system and bleeding the brakes in the proper sequence. Most ABS systems do not require any special functions to bleed the system. However, certain systems, like the Delco ABS IV, do. A scan tool must be used to home the motor pack on this system before bleeding to remove the fluid that is in the ABS systemssystem. Most others home the solenoid valves a few seconds after the key is turned on. To replace the fluid, turn the key on and wait for the ABS warning light to go off and bleed according to sequence, as you would normally do during servicing of the standard brake system.

Wheel Speed Sensor Maintanence

    Check the wheel-bearing play as you would in a routine brake inspection. The gap between the exciter ring in the hub assembly and the wheel speed sensor is critical, and loose wheel bearings will cause inaccurate wheel speed signals to the ABS computer. Another area of routine maintenance is the wheel speed sensor. As the brake pads wear, the magnet in the wheel speed sensor will attract metal particles. These particles can coat the sensor tip and dampen the signal causing inaccurate readings. This is especially a concern if the brake pads have worn to the point that metal-to-metal contact has occurred. Remove the sensor from the hub assembly and remove these particles. Many times this will fix an ABS malfunction.

How to Repair a 1996 Plymouth Neon Window

How to Repair a 1996 Plymouth Neon Window

For an older vehicle such as a 1996 Plymouth Neon, maintenance and repairs are common. One thing you may not expect to creep up on you is a cracked window, but that is actually one of the easiest repairs to make. Gather your supplies and get the repair job done.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the damaged window with a solution of soap and water. Use soft cloths to both wash and dry.

    2

    Use the razor blade to remove any loose pieces of glass from within the cracks. Make sure you have your goggles on for safety purposes.

    3

    Place the injector into the stabilizer at the site dedicated for the injector.

    4

    Put the plastic resin tube into the injector and then remove the injector once the resin is in place. The resin will quickly flow out of the tube and into the cracks.

    5

    Remove the stabilizer once the tube has emptied and the cracks have been filled. Carefully lift it off the window so as not to smudge the repair.

    6

    Place the curing strip over the resin until it is dry.

Selasa, 26 Februari 2013

1967 Mustang Windshield Install

1967 Mustang Windshield Install

The Mustang was introduced by Ford in mid-1964 with very little competition from other automakers. By 1967, Chevrolet, Dodge and Plymouth offered their own pony cars, but Ford expected this and was ready with the first major makeover for the Mustang. Looks, ride, handling, power and interior appointments were all improved in the 1967 Mustang, but there was definitely a family resemblance to the original car. The windshields in 1965 to 1968 Mustangs are held in with a rubber gasket, not installed with adhesives as in modern cars.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the mating surface of the windshield frame with solvent and a rag. Avoid using scrapers, as these could scratch the painted surface around the windshield. Clean the replacement windshield glass on both sides with glass cleaner and paper towels.

    2

    Cut the tip off a tube of windshield sealer with a utility knife. Squeeze sealer in between the windshield molding clips and the windshield frame to prevent future leaks in this area.

    3

    Push a new rubber gasket into place on the windshield frame, making sure the outside groove in the gasket is fully seated on the inside edge of the windshield frame around its perimeter.

    4

    Install the bottom windshield molding to the base of the windshield frame by gently pushing it until it snaps into place. Do not use a rubber mallet as this could damage the molding and the windshield frame.

    5

    Apply windshield sealer to all four of the inside corners of the rubber gasket. Use a helper and lift the windshield. Lower the glass so that the bottom edge slides into the slit in the base of the rubber gasket. Gently tilt the glass back and let it lay on the gasket.

    6

    Start at one of the sides and insert a plastic windshield tool (available at auto parts stores) in between the glass and the rubber gasket. Slide the tool so that the front edge of the gasket pops over the edge of the windshield, holding it into place. Continue around the top and other side of the windshield until the front edge of the gasket is completely covering the edge of the glass.

    7

    Push the remaining windshield moldings until they snap into place. Clean any windshield sealer residue from the glass with a clean cloth.

How to Remove the Rotors on a 2005 Colorado

How to Remove the Rotors on a 2005 Colorado

The 2005 Chevrolet Colorado uses disc brakes in the front of the truck and drum brakes in the rear. The front brakes use a brake rotor, which is what the brake calipers clamp the brake pads against to stop the truck. When the brake pads need changing, the brake rotors should be removed as well. You will need the rotors resurfaced or replaced entirely if they are thinner than the manufacturer's specifications. Fortunately, this is not a difficult process, and it can be done in just a few hours.

Instructions

    1

    Place wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Lift the front of the truck with a jack and set it on jack stands. Take off the front wheels with a tire iron.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper from the steering knuckle with a ratchet. Slide the caliper off the rotor. Hang the caliper from the upper control arm with a bungee cord.

    3

    Remove the wheel hub and speed sensor assembly from the backside of the brake rotor with a 3/8-inch ratchet and socket.

    4

    Pull the brake rotor off of the wheel hub with both hands.

Types of Shipping Containers for Hazardous Materials

Types of Shipping Containers for Hazardous Materials

Hazardous materials refer to substances that can cause negative health effects to people, as well as damage to the environment. Hazardous waste and products containing toxic chemicals need special containers, which guarantee safe transportation. Such containers vary according to material and design, but should follow the United Nations and the U. S. Department of Transportation guidelines, which also include the correct labeling of the containers.

Type A and Type B Containers

    These containers are used to transport radioactive materials. While Type A is used to ship radioactive material, Type B containers are design to safely carry materials with the highest levels of radioactivity. Both containers must pass a series of security tests, including penetration, vibration, compression and free drop. Type B containers must withstand more rigorous tests, including temperatures above 1,000 degrees F for 30 minutes. According to the World Nuclear Association, there are more than 150 models of Type B packages. Some of these containers have a layer of polyurethane foam and a stainless-steal outer layer, protecting the inner vessel where the steel or lead drums containing radioactive material stay.

4G Fiberboard and Double Wall Containers

    The 4G fiberboard box is a shipping container made of corrugated fiberboard, configured to meet United Nations regulations on the transportation of hazardous materials. These boxes generally have a double wall of corrugated fiberboard or cardboard. To follow UN requirements, the outer surface must have a low water absorption when tested over a 30-minute period, according to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These containers can be used as single packaging for hazardous materials in solid state.

Medical Waste Containers

    Used sharps, clinical specimens and other medical waste is often disposed of in the hospital's incinerator. However, small hospitals and rural medical facilities often do not have waste incineration facilities on site, thus requiring shipping containers. Medical waste containers are often made of a single plastic vessel, but some types can contain an inner receptacle to keep the contaminated wastes, protected by an impact-resistant outer container. This type of double-layer container is leak-, impact- and puncture-resistant.

What Is Auto Glazing?

What Is Auto Glazing?

Auto glazing is a type of automotive window that is produced by injection molding a strong polycarbonate plastic. Also known as PC glazing, it can be used to create shapes that are impossible for glass to achieve.

Function

    Although vehicle headlamp covers have been made out of polycarbonate for more than a decade, it is because of recent advances in materials and machinery that the automotive industry is able to create auto glazing windows. Auto glazing can be used to fabricate windows almost as large as glass windows, with a weight savings of almost 50 percent.

Benefits

    Aside from the aforementioned weight savings, auto glazing can be used to create exciting new design concepts such as nonwindow transparent body panels and side windows with the rearview mirror built in rather than mounted on the side door. It is also easy and inexpensive to create things such as 3D window shapes and holes in the windows.

Potential

    In addition to the design innovations, automotive industry inventors are working on light-allowing and -blocking polycarbonate compounds, as well as antiscratch coatings. Also, auto glazing is light enough to potentially build a car with a large, panoramic roof.

How to Install 1969 Mustang Rear Windows

How to Install 1969 Mustang Rear Windows

Classic Mustangs manufactured prior to 1969 were built with a rubber gasket surrounding the windshield and rear window. This has caused a problem over the years for owners of the vintage car because the rubber gasket eventually deteriorates and leaks occur. Mustangs built after 1969 have a glued-in gasket that eliminates this problem. Despite this improvement, the rear windows on post-1969 Mustangs may still need to be replaced from time to time because of other damage.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the edge of the new window glass and the rim of the opening into which the glass will be fitted. The edges and seams must be completely clean and dust-free before you start to install the window to prevent debris from causing imperfections in the seal.

    2

    Pop out the old retaining clips that held the old window glass in place using a flat-edge screwdriver. Replace and discard the old clips.

    3

    Apply window sealer all the way around the rim of the rear window opening. Make sure all areas are covered not only to ensure the window adheres properly but also to eliminate air gaps that could allow water to leak through the window seal.

    4

    Set the rear window glass into position in the window frame.

    5

    Lift the edge of the rubber window gasket over the window carefully using a screwdriver. Begin at a bottom corner and gradually work your way around. Use the screwdriver carefully to avoid scratching the window or damaging the gasket.

    6

    Push gently on the window to seat the glass securely in position. Load sealant into the sealant gun and run a bead of sealant around the glass between the window and the rubber gasket.

    7

    Allow the sealant to dry. Remove any excess sealant with the razor blade.

Senin, 25 Februari 2013

How to Bench Bleed a Master Cylinder in a Chevy Silverado

The rough and tough Chevy Silverado line consists of the 1500, 2500 and 3500 models. When replacing the brake master cylinder in a Chevy Silverado, you should bench bleed the new one before you install it. It only takes about 10 minutes and will make sure there isn't any air in the system that can, in turn, get pumped into your brake lines. These instructions apply to any model year.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the old master cylinder before you bench bleed the new one. It sits prominently on the driver's side of the engine compartment to the right of the engine. You can clean and reuse the old reservoir or get a new one (some master cylinders come with one).

    2

    Set the new Chevy Silverado master cylinder in a vise on your work bench or table. Clamp it into place, ensuring that it's level; this helps make sure air pockets don't form during the process. Remove the supplies that came in your bleeder kit and set them out, so you can inventory what you have.

    3

    Install the reservoir onto the replacement cylinder, if it's not already done. Find the two fittings that came with your kit and screw them into the outlets on the side of the cylinder. Insert the two lengths of plastic tubing from the kit into the fittings, then bend them up so they aim into the brake fluid reservoir.

    4

    Cut the hoses so they stick halfway down into the reservoir. Clip the two tubes to the lip of the reservoir to keep them in place, so you don't end up allowing air into the system or spraying brake fluid everywhere.

    5

    Fill the Chevy Silverado's reservoir with fresh brake fluid. Put enough fluid into the reservoir to fill it just short of the maximum fill line. The hoses should extend down into the fluid to make a temporary hydraulic system.

    6

    Pump the piston on the master cylinder to push the brake fluid through it and into the hoses. Do this by inserting the screwdriver into the cylinder and pushing it against the piston to start pumping the fluid. The fluid will recycle back into the reservoir, but that's okay since you used fresh fluid.

    7

    Watch for the air bubbles coming out of the hoses and into the brake fluid in the reservoir. Keep pumping until all the air is out of the cylinder and bubbles no longer appear. If the hoses that came with your kit are black, you might want to buy clear ones to help you see the bubbles better.

    8

    Keep the hoses in the reservoir and remove the cylinder from the vise. Now you can install the primed master cylinder into your Chevy Silverado.

Minggu, 24 Februari 2013

How to Replace Drum Brake Shoes

How to Replace Drum Brake Shoes

Virtually all vehicles manufactured up to the mid-1970s used drum brakes on all four wheels. However, most modern vehicles use disc brakes on the front of the vehicle and drum brakes on the rear only. Drum brakes operate when the internal brake shoes press out against a drum that rotates with the wheel. The brake shoes on your drum brakes will eventually wear out and will need to be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the rear of the vehicle with a hydraulic jack. Place jack stands under each side of the rear axle. Lower the hydraulic jack so that the rear of the vehicle is supported by the jack stands.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts from the rear wheels with a lug wrench turned in a counterclockwise direction. Remove the rear wheels from the vehicle and set them aside. Slide the brake drums off of the rear wheel hubs and set them aside.

    3

    Work on one side of the vehicle at a time. Locate both brake shoes on the right and left side of the wheel hub. Locate the brake shoe return spring which connects the two brake shoes at the top of the wheel hub. Remove the brake shoe return spring by placing a pair of brake spring pliers over the end of the spring. Pull on the pliers to stretch the spring until it can be unhooked from the brake shoes. Remove the spring and set it aside.

    4

    Place a brake shoe removal tool over the circular brake shoe retainer clip, located at the center of each brake shoe. Push down on the tool and rotate it counterclockwise. Remove the tool, the retainer clip, and the spring behind the clip and set them aside. Repeat this step for both brake shoes.

    5

    Pull the brake shoes from the wheel hub and discard them. Place new brake shoes into the same position as the old shoes, making sure the pin the retainer clip attaches to protrudes through the mounting hole at the center of the brake shoes. Place the spring and retainer clip over the pin and place the brake shoe removal tool over the clip. Push down on the tool and rotate it clockwise until the clip locks into place.

    6

    Position the hook on one end of the return spring into the hole at the top of one of the brake shoes. Use the brake spring pliers to stretch the spring until the hook in the other end of the spring is positioned into the hole at the top of the other brake shoe. Slide the brake drum back over the hub.

    7

    Repeat the above steps for the other rear wheel. Replace the wheels and tighten the lug nuts with a lug wrench in a clockwise direction. Raise the rear of the vehicle with a hydraulic jack and remove the jack stands from under the vehicle. Lower the vehicle and remove the hydraulic jack.

How to Adjust Hyundai Rear Brakes

The rear brakes on Hyundai vehicles are self-adjusting. This means that the rear brakes will adjust over time as you use them. However, a manual adjustment can and should be done initially to ensure that the pads "bed in" or adhere to the rotor properly during braking. "Bedding in" is the process of adjusting the brakes so that some of the brake pad material coats the surface of the rotor and "sticks". Then, when you apply brake pedal pressure, the brake pads will have a better grip on the rotor surface.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the engine on and put the Hyundai in "Reverse."

    2

    Slowly back up and apply the brakes. Repeat this process several times. Each time you do this, the pedal pressure should become more and more firm. You should only need to do this three to four times.

    3

    Drive the Hyundai at 40 mph. Apply the brakes in a controlled and normal fashion until you slow down to 10 mph, but do not stop the vehicle.

    4

    Increase speed to 40 mph again and apply the brakes until you reach 10 mph. It is important that you do not come to a complete stop during the adjustment period or you may improperly bed the pads to the rotor surface.

    5

    Repeat Step 4 one more time. Your brakes should be properly adjusted at this point.

How to Replace the Master Cylinder on a 1994 Buick LeSabre

The master cylinder is the hydraulic pump for your vehicle's braking system. The brake pedal is mechanically connected to the piston in the master cylinder. When you press the brake pedal, it pushes the piston forward and pressurizes the brake system. When changing out the master cylinder, you must bleed the entire brake system to remove air from the brake lines.

Instructions

    1

    Put on the safety glasses. Disconnect all brake lines from the master cylinder with the line wrench set. Remove the two bolts that secure the master cylinder in place with the socket and ratchet set. Place the master cylinder on the work bench.

    2

    Remove the cotter pins securing the original brake fluid reservoir to the old master cylinder with the pliers. Remove the reservoir from the old master cylinder. Secure the new master cylinder in the vice and attach the reservoir. Bend the cotter pins with the pliers and fill the reservoir with brake fluid.

    3

    Attach the plastic bleeder fittings (included with the new master cylinder) and clear rubber line. Direct the clear line back into the reservoir and keep it submerged in brake fluid. Pump the piston on the master cylinder slowly with the screwdriver and continue doing so. The master cylinder will be properly bled when there are no air bubbles in the fluid that is traveling through the clear lines. Hold the clear lines under the fluid and do not remove the bleeder attachments until you are installing that particular brake line.

    4

    Mount the new master cylinder back into the vehicle and tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet set. Attach the new brake lines one at a time and tighten them until snug with the line wrench set.

    5

    Have a helper sit in the vehicle and pump the brakes. Bleed the rear brake assemblies and then the front. Replace any lost brake fluid after every wheel.

How to Replace the 2006 Volvo S40 Brakes

How to Replace the 2006 Volvo S40 Brakes

Replacing your brakes could mean the difference between stopping in time and colliding with the car in front of you. With a handful of basic tools and the right parts, you can replace the brakes on your 2006 Volvo S40 in less than two hours. By replacing your own brakes when they are worn you save money and ensure your safety while driving. You can purchase replacement brake parts from a Volvo dealer or from your an auto parts store.

Instructions

Remove the Wheel

    1

    Park the Volvo on a level surface and set the emergency brake. Work on one wheel and brake assembly at a time.

    2

    Loosen slightly the lug nuts of the first wheel, but do not remove them. Position the jack under the appropriate point of the vehicle's frame. Place the jack stand next to the jack, lower the Volvo onto the jack stand, then remove the jack and put it aside.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts all the way and place them aside. Do not throw them away. Remove the wheel and move it out of the way.

Removing the Brake Pads and Replacing Rotors

    4

    Remove the retaining spring located on the outside of the Volvo's brake caliper. Place it close by because you will need to reinstall it in a few minutes.

    5

    Remove the two rubber covers on the back of the brake caliper. Remove the bolts underneath them. Do not dispose of these parts.

    6

    Move the brake caliper out of the way. Remove the old brake pads. Unbolt and remove the brake pad bracket only if you have chosen to replace your brake rotors as well as the brake pads. Use metric sockets and a ratchet to unbolt the bracket.

    7

    Remove the old brake rotor and place it out of the way. The rotor should slide free of the steering hub. If it is rusted in place, hit it from the back with a hammer to break it free.

    8

    Position the new rotor and bolt it on the brake pad bracket. Spray the new rotor with brake parts cleaner.

Installing New Brake Pads

    9

    Apply a light coat of high-temperature grease to the two new brake pads only at the point at which they will contact the brake pad bracket. Wipe off the excess grease. If you get grease on the ceramic surface of the pads, spray them off with brake pad cleaner.

    10

    Slide the new pads into the bracket without touching any of the cleaned surfaces. If you do touch the ceramic surface of the pads or the rotor, spray the area you touched with brake parts cleaner.

    11

    Compress the brake caliper with the special compression tool. Slide the caliper over the new brake pads. Thoroughly grease the caliper retention bolts and bolt the caliper back into place. Reinstall the retaining spring.

    12

    Reinstall the wheel and tighten the lug nuts. The wheel may turn. This is acceptable as long as all of the lug nuts are as tight as you can get them. Place the jack under the same point from which you originally jacked up the vehicle and raise the vehicle off the jack stand.

    13

    Remove the jack stand and slowly lower the Volvo S40 to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts, being careful not to over-tighten them. Repeat all of the steps above for each wheel and brake assembly.

How to Install a 1970 Chevelle Windshield

The 1970 Chevelle features the curvier body and windshield that was introduced in the second-generation model in 1968. Unfortunately, years can take their toll on automotive window glass. A 40-year-old 1970 Chevelle windshield is likely to have its share of chips and cracks, but even if it doesn't, thousands of tiny pits in the surface of the glass contribute to decreased driver visibility, especially at night or when driving into the sun. Replacing the windshield on your 1970 Chevelle is a fairly major undertaking, but the results will be worth the effort when it comes to increased safety on the road.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the windshield frame thoroughly, using a razor blade or flat head screwdriver to remove any bits of old window sealant or other contaminants. Remove the old molding clips with a Phillips screwdriver and replace them with new ones.

    2

    Place the replacement windshield in the frame to check for fit. Make sure there are no bends or dents in the frame which would prevent the glass from sealing correctly. Use small blocks of wood or plastic as spacers to hold the windshield glass snugly in the frame while you check it.

    3

    Remove the glass, but leave the wood or plastic spacers in place. Apply a stripe of self-priming sealer around the edges of the inside of the windshield glass with the provided applicator brush. Apply a similar stripe around the windshield frame on the car.

    4

    Apply a bead of urethane windshield sealer all the way around the windshield frame with an applicator gun. This thick, plastic-like substance is a different product than the liquid self-priming sealer.

    5

    Place the windshield in position while the sealer is still tacky, using the wood or plastic spacers to ensure that it fits snugly in the right place. Be careful not to smear any of the sealer while you are handling the windshield.

    6

    Align the windshield carefully into its final position. Press the glass into the sealer to set it, applying pressure with your hands around the entire circumference of the frame.

    7

    Install the windshield molding. Start at one corner and press the molding into the new molding clips until it snaps into place. Work your way around the entire windshield piece by piece.

How to Cut Safety Glass

Throughout parts of the 20th century, car windows were mostly made of safety glass. Safety glass shatters upon impact instead of breaking into large pieces like regular glass. In a car accident, it is safer for glass to shatter than to break into large, jagged pieces.

Today, most manufacturers make car windows out of tempered safety glass. Tempered safety glass cannot be cut by hand without shattering it, but regular safety glass can be easily cut. Here's how.

Instructions

    1

    Hold the piece of plywood over the area the window is going to cover. Use the marker to trace around the opening, making sure to leave a few centimeters to allow for the part of the glass that fits into the rubber gasket.

    2

    Cut the plywood along the traced line.

    3

    Fit the plywood into the opening to ensure proper fit. If it is too big, you can sand down the plywood accordingly. If it is too small, you will need to repeat Steps 1 and 2.

    4

    Place the plywood on top of the safety glass and trace around it. Then turn the glass over and trace the plywood again, lining up the tracings on both sides.

    5

    Position the cutter over the tracing so that its angled surface is parallel with the surface of the safety glass. Press down firmly and slide the cutter away from you. The cutter should make a gentle hissing sound as it scores the glass.

    6

    The cutter can only cut in straight lines, so work around curves by cutting multiple straight lines and breaking off pieces of glass as you go.

    7

    Turn the glass over and score the other side.

    8

    Tap each side of the glass with the ball on the tail end of the cutter. This should crack the glass along the scored lines, leaving only the plastic membrane intact.

    9

    Drip the solvent into the crack to melt the membrane. Alternatively, drip some lighter fluid into the crack and light it. The plastic membrane will melt and you can pull the cut pieces apart.

    10

    Sand the edges of the glass with the emery paper to remove uneven surfaces and bumps.

Sabtu, 23 Februari 2013

What Kind of Impact Would Shatter a Rear Windshield?

What Kind of Impact Would Shatter a Rear Windshield?

The rear windshield glass is tempered to increase protection for people in the vehicle. Tempering the glass makes it about five to 10 times stronger than normal glass, meaning it can withstand impact and extreme temperatures.

Tempered

    The process of tempering reheats the glass to a temperature where it reaches a near-liquid state. The glass is then cooled and compresses, increasing its strength against impact.

Compression

    In order to shatter tempered glass, the impact would have to overcome the compression of the glass. When tempered glass is broken, the breakage pattern, also known as dicing, results in tiny pieces of glass rather than large shards, which could do considerably more damage to the individuals within the car.

Causes

    Some common causes of glass shatter includes acts of vandalism, when the windshield is smashed with blunt objects such as a baseball bat; rocks or other debris kicked up by other vehicles, especially on highways; and fallen tree branches.

Jumat, 22 Februari 2013

How to Replace a Caliper in a Lincoln Navigator

Owners of luxury SUVs like the Lincoln Navigator may not have much experience in personal vehicle maintenance. Therefore, if the brake calipers in your Lincoln Navigator need replacing, it's best to follow the instructions of your mechanic.

Instructions

Removing the Old Caliper

    1

    Shut off the power to the vehicle first, especially to the air suspension system. Disconnect the cable from the battery's negative terminal. You can now raise the vehicle on a jack stand.

    2

    Drain brake fluid from the aster cylinder reservoir until it's half full. Immediately wipe off any fluid that gets on the outer body as it can damage the paint.

    3

    Take off the tire and wheel assembly to reach the caliper you need. Remove the brake pads from the caliper assembly.

    4

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper at the bolt. Plug the hose with a piece of rubber to prevent losing or contaminating the fluid.

    5

    Remove the two brake slide pins from the caliper. Lift the caliper up off the anchor plate.

Installing the New Caliper

    6

    Make sure the new caliper's piston is completely bottomed in the bore. Compress it into the bore with a C-clamp if needed.

    7

    Place the caliper above the rotor and use a rotating motion to install it. Make sure both the inner and outer pads are positioned properly, the anti-rattle clips are correctly installed and the bleed screw is on top of the caliper.

    8

    Lubricate the pins and the insulators on the inside with silicone grease. Install the pins starting them in the steering knuckle attaching holes by hand.

    9

    Connect the brake hose onto the bolt. Use new washers with the bolt.

    10

    Fill the master cylinder with brake fluid as needed and bleed the system. Connect a drain tube to the opened bled screw, submerge the other end in a container with fluid and have another person use the pedal to remove air.

    11

    Reconnect the brake pads back on the caliper assembly. Reattach the wheel, lower the vehicle and reconnect the battery cable.

    12

    Test the brakes while stopped by pressing the pedal repeatedly until firm. Then test the brakes on the road.

How to Change the Window Glass in a Car Door

How to Change the Window Glass in a Car Door

Automobiles are manufactured today with a much sturdier glass than they were even 10 years ago. Despite this technological benefit, window safety glass is broken thousands of time per day in the United States. Unfortunately, the cost to repair this damage has risen dramatically over the same time period due to the complexities of modern automobile door construction. The average automobile enthusiast can still replace broken door glass provided they have a basic set of automotive hand tools and they follow some straightforward procedures. Doing so will result in hundreds of dollars in saving, as well as provide the opportunity to perform some routine maintenance on the door assembly.

Instructions

    1

    Put on eye protection and work gloves. Clean away all broken pieces of safety glass if door window is shattered. Remove big pieces of glass by hand, then vacuum up any remaining small pieces with a shop vacuum. Be sure to get all the small glass bits that are wedged in various places in the door and throughout the car. A shop vacuum with small odd shaped attachments is very helpful in doing this. Do not roll the window up or down yet; wait until you are sure all broken glass has been removed.

    2

    Remove the door access panels and screw hole covers. These are usually held in place with small Phillips screws. Remove any additional covers such as switch panel covers and remote switch covers as applicable. Many covers are held in place with clips, so that they just snap off when pressure is applied in the correct direction. The end result should be a bare door panel with no attachments (covers) remaining.

    3

    Vacuum any safety glass particles you come across as you disassemble the door. If you are unsure of proper placement of parts as they are removed, label them with masking tape and a pen. Lower the window so that it is 3/4 of the way open.

    4

    Remove any electrical connections from the door switches. Most connections will be of the plug type variety, which just pull free and can only be reattached in one position. These include window switches, power door locks, rear view mirror controls, etc. Mark each switch group with masking tape and a pen if you are unsure how they will be reassembled later.

    5

    Locate the door panel mounting bolts (or screws depending on manufacturer). Most door panels use a combination of screws and plastic push fasteners. After all fasteners have been located and removed gently pry up and out to remove the door panel. It may be necessary to twist and turn the panel as you pull it to clear any obstructions. Be sure to disengage any electrical connection clips that are intended to secure electrical wiring to the door panel before pulling too hard. Lay the door panel aside.

    6

    Peel back any weather (plastic) insulation. Remember how it was installed. Locate and remove any door strengthening support bars. These generally run vertically or horizontally across the interior side of the door frame, and are held in place with medium sized bolts. Vacuum carefully the entire interior of the door frame, and remove any stubborn glass pieces by hand.

    7

    Insert the new glass in the door via the largest access in the door frame, or via the glass channel in the top of the door (depending on manufacturer). Lay the glass in the proper position on the glass support arm. Carefully begin reassembling components in the reverse order of their removal. Apply lubrication (very small quantity) to any moving mechanical components such as sliding levers as a maintenance precaution.

    8

    Test the window for full operation before reassembling the door access panels and screw hole covers. If satisfactory, complete the reassembly.

What Will Cause Brakes to Smoke?

What Will Cause Brakes to Smoke?

The Problem

    You are driving in your car, and begin noticing the telltale odor of smoke. The smell increases, and you see smoke coming from the front or back of your vehicle. This can be a frightening experience, and the culprit is often your car's brake system. Smoking brakes are not uncommon and generally happen for a few simple reasons. If your brakes begin smoking, consider some of the possible causes and rule out the more common possibilities first.

Common Causes

    The most common reason for smoking brakes is a stuck caliper. If your car's brake system uses floating calipers, they are designed to slide around to function properly. Calipers sometimes become stuck, locking the brake into place. This creates enormous friction as you drive, creating smoke and a foul odor. Stuck calipers are usually caused by dirt or corrosion that hinder the caliper's movement.
    The car's wheel cylinder can also become stuck due to dirt or corrosion. A stuck wheel cylinder causes the brake shoes to continue pressing on the drum despite a release of the brake. The brakes will then smoke and emit a bad odor.
    Rarely, debris can become lodged in your brake system and cause your brakes to smoke. This situation is easily remedied and does not usually require a trip to the auto mechanic. Simply identify the foreign object and remove it from your brake system.

Solutions

    A certified car mechanic can fix a stuck caliper or wheel cylinder on your vehicle. The brakes will no longer smoke, and you will be able to drive your car as always. You should not attempt to fix a stuck wheel cylinder or caliper unless you are a certified auto mechanic, as it is quite easy to do serious damage to your car's brake system.

Kamis, 21 Februari 2013

Silverado Window Regulator Removal Procedures

Silverado Window Regulator Removal Procedures

The window regulator is what keeps the window glass in your Chevy Silverado's doors in place. If the regulator is malfunctioning at all, the window may not properly roll up and down and could become damaged. You need to remove the regulator so you can either re-install it in the right position or replace it. You'll have to open up the door's trim panel in order to remove the window and regulator.

Door Trim Panel

    If the truck uses power doors and/or windows, disconnect the truck's negative battery cable first. Then pry off the power switch assembly from the door using a flat-bladed trim tool. If it has manual windows, disconnect the window crank--insert a hooked tool behind the crank to disengage its clip, or rub a rag behind it to do the same.
    Use the trim tool to pry off all smaller trim panels on and surrounding the door--this can include the panel around the door handle and the one above the door panel behind the mirror. Remove all the mounting screws from the panel; some of them may be behind the smaller panels you removed.
    Pull the panel upward and away from the door to disengage it from these clips and disconnect all electrical connectors that are behind the panel. Peel back the watershield to gain access to everything within the door; make sure you don't tear it.

Removing the Regulator

    Remove the window glass from the regulator. The glass needs to be lowered enough so the glass track bolts are visible in the door openings. Remove the bolt on the front window glass channel first so the channel can move away from the glass, then remove the two bolts holding the glass to the regulator track. Carefully lift the glass up and out of the door through the opening at the top.
    Once the glass is out, remove the four mounting bolts for the window regulator. Push the two guides that make up the regulator together to collapse it together, allowing you to remove the regulator from the door. If the Silverado uses power windows, disconnect the electrical connector.

How to Replace a Broken Car Window

How to Replace a Broken Car Window

Broken car windows are unsightly, and depending on which window is broken, they can be dangerous, as well. A garbage bag taped over the hole can be a temporary fix, but you should replace the glass as soon as possible to ensure no one gets cut, nothing flies out of your car and no one tries to get into your vehicle when you're not around. Luckily, broken car windows are a fairly simple do-it-yourself project.

Instructions

    1

    Buy a new window specific to your vehicle. You can easily purchase a new window at the dealership. Alternatively, you can find a great bargain by visiting your local auto salvage yard.

    2

    Detach the inside panel on your car door. You will need to look and feel around the panel to find all the screws, and then use the screwdriver to undo them and pull the panel away from the door.

    3

    Remove all door handles and armrests. These are also screwed into place, and you must remove them in order to get the panel all the way off the door.

    4

    Peel back the plastic or waterproof sheath that was under the panel. If you do not see a plastic sheath, your car simply may not have one.

    5

    Clean out the existing window track and all other window components such as the weatherstripping in the door. Wipe down your new window. If the existing track and weatherstripping are still good, you can use them for the new window. This includes motorized windows.

    6

    Locate the small hole on the bottom of your new window, which will be at the rear of the window. There is a small clip located on the window track that slips into this hole and attaches the window to the door.

    7

    Slide the new window glass into the door from the top, set it in the track and attach the clip to the hole. Depending on the make and model of your vehicle, it may be difficult to slide the window down due to the shape of the brackets. The key is to maneuver the window patiently, removing any obstacles like additional clips or brackets that may be blocking the glass as you slide it.

    8

    Ensure your glass is supported in the track by any other brackets or clips. It should now roll up smoothly without getting caught or moving around in the track too much.

    9

    Replace the plastic sheath, door panel, handles and armrests. Ensure the window rolls smoothly, and tighten all the screws down.

How to Replace a Car's Windshield

Your car windshield does more than just block dust and bugs from hitting you while driving. It reduces your chance of being thrown from the car in a crash, keeps the roof from crushing if the car rolls over and even helps the airbag deploy properly. If your windshield needs to be replaced due to cracks, it must be done so precisely.

Instructions

Preparation

    1

    Remove the rear view mirror inside the car. Unscrew one of the mirror base's two screws. You can then slide the retaining block and mirror out.

    2

    Remove the windshield wipers. Lift them into the "cleaning position" so they will be easy to reinstall. Pry them up with a large flat screwdriver between the large nut and the arm while rocking the arm with your other hand.

    3

    Seal the interior heater vents with masking tape. This will prevent any flakes of broken glass from falling into the vents, which could blow into the car.

Windshield Removal

    4

    Check if the gasket is still good. If the rubber is no longer soft or has any cracks, you should replace it. This means you can cut it away and make the glass removal much easier.

    5

    Push a strong knife into the center of the rubber, making sure you don't hit the glass. Cut all the way around to remove the rubber. You can now push the glass out from the inside.

    6

    Remove the window more forcibly if the gasket can still be used. First, break the glass sealant applied by the manufacturer. Run a wooden stick along where the gasket and frame meet.

    7

    Gently push the glass out with your foot from the passenger seat. Don't kick the glass. Push it under the inside lip at the top with the wood stick to get the rubber started through the frame.

    8

    Have someone else on top of the car in front of the windshield. This person should catch the glass when it comes out.

Replace the Windshield

    9

    Prepare the frame for reinstallation. Wipe away all rust from the frame, clean the dashboard and remove all sealant from the new gasket. Leave the gasket in the sun to make it warmer and more flexible.

    10

    Fit the gasket on the windshield. Run a small bit of sealant along the gasket's bottom half channel. The heavy side goes to the inside and the side with the slit goes to the outside.

    11

    Rub petroleum jelly into the outer rubber groove, with a little extra at the top and bottom center. Run a heavy nylon cord around the outer groove starting at the bottom center, leaving two 2-foot-long ends out in the center.

    12

    Lay the windshield in place from the car's outside. Make sure the loose cords are in the car's inside.

    13

    Pull one cord out slowly across the frame, to pull the rubber lip in place. Someone else should press the rubber against the car to prevent the lip from slipping off.

    14

    Clean up any extra petroleum jelly from the frame. Reinstall the wipers and mirror.

How to Polish the Front Windshield

How to Polish the Front Windshield

A clear view through the front windshield of any vehicle is a necessity for safe driving. Still, any number of things commonly cause scratches and abrasions in the front windshield that inhibit the driver's view. These slight but consequential marks aren't removed with merely washing the windshield. Instead of replacing a costly windshield, some car owners use a polish designed specifically for clearing these marks away. This is not meant for repairing cracks, but for issues such as when the metal of a windshield wiper has scraped a mark.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the windshield thoroughly, inside and out. Allow it to dry completely.

    2

    Place masking tape on both sides of the scratch the width of the polishing bob on the inside of the windshield. This is your polishing guide.

    3

    Place protective covering over any of the vehicle's painted and non-glass surfaces that could potentially come into contact with polish. Secure the covering to the vehicle.

    4

    Soak the felt of the polishing bob in warm water for about a minute. Mix the polishing compound according to its directions. Cover the area to be polished with warm water.

    5

    Apply polishing compound to the glass. Stay within the lines of the masking tape.

    6

    Attach the polishing bob to the drill. Polish the area at a speed of about 400 to 600 rpm using the flat end of the polishing bob. Apply even pressure, use a back-and-forth motion and stay within the taped lines.

    7

    Use a sponge and water to remove any remaining polish. Clean the windshield with glass cleaner. Repeat polishing if necessary.

Rabu, 20 Februari 2013

How to Get Bubbles Out of Tint

How to Get Bubbles Out of Tint

Air and dirt on the surface of your car's glass can cause the tint on your vehicle to bubble up. While this causes no direct harm to your vehicle, it is unsightly and can be a dangerous distraction while driving. You can have a professional completely replace the tint on the affected window, or save yourself money by removing the bubbles using one of two methods.

Instructions

Puncture the Bubbles

    1

    Warm the tint on your vehicles windows by placing it in the sun or by using a hair dryer.

    2

    Spray a small amount of water onto the surface of the window tint. Apply only enough water to lightly dampen the surface.

    3

    Use the tip of a small sewing needle to puncture a hole in each air bubble. Do not move the needle in any direction, as doing so may cause the tint to rip.

    4

    Hold the plastic card at a 45-degree angle, and gently work your way over the surface of the tint, starting at a position that is below any bubbles. Work your way over the bubbled areas slowly so you do not risk tearing the tint.

    5

    Dry the surface of the window with a lint-free cloth. Inspect the tint to ensure the bubbles are gone and that no tearing occurred.

Remove the Tint

    6

    Dry the surface of the window completely with a lint-free cloth.

    7

    Melt the adhesive under your window tint by directing the warm air from a hair dryer over the affected area.

    8

    Gently peel back the corner of the window tint that is closest to the bubbled area. Make sure you remove enough tint that the bubbled area is no longer adhering to the glass.

    9

    Apply a thin layer of window tint adhesive to the back of the window tinting and place it back onto the surface of the glass.

    10

    Spray the surface of the window tint lightly with water. Use a squeegee to remove the water and any air under the surface of the tint.

    11

    Dry the window using a lint-free cloth. Inspect it for the appearance of any bubbles or other damage.

How to Fix the Brake Boosters on a Chevy Suburban

The brake booster also know as a power booster on a Chevrolet Suburban is a circular steel piece mounted on the firewall behind the master cylinder. The brake booster utilizes vacuum created by the engine to increase the amount of force generated when the driver presses on the brake pedal. The brake booster also lessens the distance the brake pedal must travel before the brakes are engaged. If you notice that the brakes on your Chevy Suburban's brakes lack the power they once had, or it feels like the brake pedal travels further before engaging the brakes, your brake booster might need to be replaced.

Instructions

Removing the Brake Booster

    1

    Locate the brake booster on the driver's side of the firewall inside the engine bay. It will be just behind the brake master cylinder.

    2

    Disconnect the vacuum line from the power booster by loosening the retaining clamp. Pull the line off the brake booster.

    3

    Remove the two bolts that connect the master cylinder to the power booster. Be careful not to put any stress on the brake lines connected to the master cylinder. Slide the master cylinder forward and secure the master cylinder so it is not resting on the brake lines.

    4

    Disconnect the brake pedal pushrod from the brake pedal (from inside the passenger compartment) by removing the retaining clip and disengaging the pushrod from the pedal.

    5

    Remove the four nuts and bolts that connect the brake power booster to the vehicle's firewall. Then remove the booster from the vehicle.

Installing a New Brake Booster

    6

    Place the new brake booster into position on the firewall. Carefully guide the brake booster pushrod through the hole in the firewall.

    7

    Reinstall the four nuts and bolts that secure the brake booster to the firewall.

    8

    Reconnect the brake pedal pushrod to the brake pedal. Reinstall the retaining clip that secures it.

    9

    Push the master cylinder back into position against the brake booster. Be careful not to stress the brake lines that are attached to the bottom of the master cylinder. Reinstall the two bolts that connect the master cylinder to the brake booster.

    10

    Reconnect the vacuum line to the brake booster by sliding the rubber hose over the input fitting. Reinstall the retaining clamp that holds the line on the fitting.

How to Bleed an ABS System

How to Bleed an ABS System

Anti-lock brake systems (ABS) are hydraulic pressure systems used in vehicles provide even braking pressure. When air bubbles form within a vehicle's ABS, however, braking reliability is reduced. Unlike brake fluid, air is compressible, which can cause the system to underperform. When this occurs, the vehicle's ABS must be bled to preserve operational integrity.

Instructions

How to Bleed an ABS System

    1

    Park the vehicle on a level surface and engage the parking brake.

    2

    Jack up one of the rear wheels. Using the lug wrench on the tire iron, remove the wheel that is off of the ground.

    3

    Open the hood and locate the brake fluid reservoir. Fill the reservoir with fluid, and replace the cap.

    4

    Locate the bleeder valve. Depending on the make of the vehicle, the valve may be on the caliper or wheel cylinder.

    5

    Place a small plastic hose on the bleeder valve. Place the other end of the hose into the plastic container. Fill the container with around two inches of brake fluid, to prevent air from re-entering the ABS while you are bleeding the line.

    6

    Ask an assistant to sit in the driver's seat. Instruct them to depress the brake pedal. Turn the bleeder valve a quarter of a turn. When the fluid stops flowing from the line, close the valve and instruct them to let pressure off of the pedal.

    7

    Repeat this process until clean fluid flows. Periodically the brake fluid level in the reservoir, ensuring that some remains at all times.

    8

    Repeat this process with the other rear bleeder valve, followed by the two front valves.

Power Window Tinting Tips

Power Window Tinting Tips

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 30,797 United States car crashes ended in a fatality in 2009. Driving with the sun shining directly through the passenger or driver's side windows is annoying and potentially dangerous. Tinting your power windows can help block out glare and UV rays.

Clean

    Dust and dirt can prevent tint from completely sticking to the window. Before applying tint to your power windows, use tinting application fluid and wipe with a lint-free cloth. Clean under the rubber window guards as well. Try to work in a dust-free environment.

Precision

    Cut the tinting sheet so it fits the window exactly. Leave 1/4 inch to 1/16 inch of tinting sheet overlap at the top. This will be covered by the door. Make sure your cutting tool is sharp.

Removing Moisture

    Apply tinting fluid to the window with a squeegee. Use a heating gun or blow dryer to help suck out the moisture after you've applied the tint.

Smooth

    Bubbles are a sign of a shoddy tinting job. Smooth out any bubbles by pushing them toward the edges of the window. Work in a well-lighted area.

How to Put Brake Pads on a 2001 Ford Escape

How to Put Brake Pads on a 2001 Ford Escape

The brake pads on a 2001 Ford Escape are designed like most other disk brake systems: once the material wears down to the backing plate, it will begin to squeal and will require replacement. The Ford Escape has four-wheel disk brakes, with an anti-locking mechanism to avoid lockup and loss of control. The average backyard mechanic can change all four sets of brake pads and bleed the lines in about an hour and a half.

Instructions

    1

    Jack up the Escape and remove the wheel of the brake pads to be changed. Place the vehicle on a jack stand and set the jack and wheel aside.

    2

    Unbolt and remove the caliper by turning the two rear bolts in a counterclockwise direction. The caliper will slide off of the rotor, and the pads will come out by hand as they are not secured. The caliper should be bound with the C-clamp or vice grips so that it does not expand.

    3

    Replace the pads by setting them into the caliper, then placing the caliper back into position on the rotor. The clamp will get in the way, so remove it a second or two before placing the caliper. Get the caliper on the rotor quickly, or it will expand too far and require force to push back in.

    4

    Secure the caliper by turning the rear bolts clockwise.

    5

    Release the bleeding nipple on the rear of the caliper by turning it counterclockwise. Brake fluid will leak out slowly. Pop the cap on the master cylinder and pour in brake fluid while pressing on the brake pedal. With the nipple open, fluid will drain out and will be continually replaced by the new fluid in the master cylinder. When there is no air in the lines, and the fluid coming out looks clean, twist the nipple in a clockwise direction to close the line. Fill the master cylinder to the full line and replace the cap. The brake line to that caliper is now "bled."

    6

    Apply a quick burst of anti-squeal spray to the back of the pad--never the front--through the holes in the caliper for this purpose. The spray is a light adhesive with graphite, and will hold the pads to the caliper to prevent dust from making noise.

    7

    Replace the wheel and lower the Escape down from the jack stands.

    8

    Repeat the procedure for the remaining brake pads.

Selasa, 19 Februari 2013

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a GMC 4-Wheel Drive

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a GMC 4-Wheel Drive

GMC has made many trucks over the years, and most of them have four-wheel drive available if it is not already standard to begin with. GMC is smart enough to make their vehicles similar enough that changing the brakes on one of their four-wheel drive pickups is the same process, regardless of year. All brakes need to be changed regularly, about every three to six years. If you notice brake grab, a squealing sound when you drive, or a grinding sound as you stop, it is time to change those brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen each of the lug nuts with the tire iron, two rotations counterclockwise. Place wood blocks in front of the front tires.

    2

    Place the floor jack underneath a stable portion of the undercarriage and raise the vehicle so that the tires are off of the ground. Place jack stands as directed in the owner's manual.

    3

    Remove the lugs nuts and the tire completely and set them aside.

    4

    Remove the bottom bolt from the caliper mounting bracket with the socket wrench. Hang the caliper bracket from the undercarriage with a bungee cord to prevent strain on the brake line.

    5

    Remove the brake pads from the bracket. They will easily slip out by hand.

    6

    Compress the caliper cylinder with the C-clamp. If the clamp slips, place an old brake pad between it and the cylinder. If your cylinder is solid and has a groove running across it, you will need to use the compression tool.

    7

    Install the new brake pads by hand. Make sure that the black brake material is facing inwards, towards the rotor.

    8

    Rebolt the mounting bracket onto the rotor. Set the tire back on and tighten each lug nut by hand in a clockwise pattern. Lower the vehicle then tighten each lug with the tire iron.

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a GMC Sierra

Make a parking brake adjustment to your GMC Sierra when the truck starts to roll with the parking brake on. Save yourself time and money by making this simple repair at home, all you need are a few tools and a place to raise your Sierra. Use this for all years of GMC Sierra trucks.

Instructions

Use the Pedal

    1

    Press in on the parking brake pedal with your foot until it reaches the floor. Locate the parking brake pedal inside the driver's side of the vehicle on the very left side.

    2

    Release the pedal by pressing the pedal downwards with your foot. This automatically adjusts the parking brake cables to eliminate the slack the cables have.

    3

    Repeat Steps 1 and 2 three times to successfully adjust your GMC Sierra's parking brakes.

Adjust the Parking Brake

    4

    Raise the rear end of your vehicle by placing it on a jack stand and then moving jacks underneath.

    5

    Locate the steel threaded cables coming out of each wheel well. These connect to an adjuster nut to form one cable.

    6

    Move the adjuster nut by hand slightly. Notice the cables tighten or loosen with the adjustment. Make more of an adjustment depending on how bad your parking brake was releasing.

    7

    Release your vehicle from the jack stands and test out your parking brake adjustment.

How to Change Automobile Brake Pads

How to Change Automobile Brake Pads

Replacing brake pads is a straight forward procedure that anyone with a set of basic tools can perform. All that you need is an hour, some attention to detail, and the right tools for the job. Replace the brakes on your car in no time following these instructions.

Instructions

    1

    Apply the parking brake and chock the rear wheels with bricks or blocks. This prevents the car from rolling backward while you jack it up. Using the lug wrench, loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels. Do not remove the lug nuts yet.

    2

    Slide the jack under the front of the car, positioning it under the front cross member. Jack the car up until you can place jack stands under the cross member, right by the control arm. Remove the lug nuts and wheels from the vehicle.

    3

    Use the large screwdriver to pry the brake pads away from the rotor. Then, still using the large screwdriver with the tip against the pad, pry the caliper piston into the caliper body. You will have to do this on the inboard and outboard pads. Brake fluid might drip from the master cylinder but this is normal.

    4

    Inspect the brake rotor for gouges. If you find gouges you replace the rotors. If the rotors look good, use the small flat-bladed screwdriver to remove the two clips from the slides that hold the pads in place. Slide the pins out carefully. Watch for the anti-rattle clips because they can fly out.

    5

    Remove and inspect the brake pads from the caliper. The pads should have brake pad material on them with no signs of rubbing against the rotor. If there are signs of rubbing you should replace your rotors.

    6

    Inspect the new pads to ensure that they are the same as the old pads. Put anti-seize compound on the sides of the pads to help them slide smoothly in the caliper. You should also put anti-seize on the back of the pad then install the shim and put anti-seize on the back of the shim. Put the anti-rattle clip on the top of the pad and put Anti-Seize in the curves where the slide pins will go.

    7

    Carefully slide the outboard pad, shim and anti-rattle clip into the caliper and put the two slide pins in. Then install the inboard pad, shim and anti-rattle clip and slide the slide pins all the way through the caliper. Make sure the brake material is facing the rotor. Once the caliper pins are fully seated, install the retaining clips.

    8

    Put the wheels and lug nuts back on the car. Tighten the lug nuts only finger tight at this point. Jack the car up enough to remove the jack stands, then lower it completely. Torque the lug nuts to specification. If you don't know the specification, read through your car's owner's manual, or ask a local auto parts store.

    9

    Press on the brake pedal a few times to regain firmness in the pedal. When the brake pedal is firm, remove the wheel chocks and disengage the parking brake. Take the car around the block for a short test drive to test the brakes to make sure they are working properly.

How to Remove an MGB Windshield

How to Remove an MGB Windshield

An MGB's windshield should be maintained to ensure that it does not pick up any unwanted cracks or scratches. If your windshield does become damaged, you should replace it as soon as possible. When removing a windshield, you should have someone to assist with the windshield's removal and insertion. You can purchase a replacement windshield from your local auto parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Place a sheet over the hood and dashboard of your vehicle to prevent any unwanted scratches to the car's finish while working on the windshield.

    2

    Remove the screws holding the rear-view wing mirrors in place, using a screwdriver. Slide the mirrors off, which will provide easier access to the windshield.

    3

    Cut away the rubber seal around the windshield, using a knife or other sharp-blade tool. Pull the seal away from the vehicle with your hand as you cut it. Discard the seal in the trash.

    4

    Enter the passenger compartment of your vehicle and carefully push the windshield out of its frame while the person assisting you holds its weight outside the car. Discard the windshield at a junkyard or recycling center.

    5

    Apply a thin layer of petroleum jelly around the edges of the new windshield. Attach the new gasket, placing the heavy part of the gasket at the bottom. Tie a cord around the edges of the windshield and move it into place on the MGB

    6

    Hold the windshield down from the outside to allow the seal around the edges to set in place. Fix the cord to the inside of the vehicle for added support. Clean the windshield to remove any dirt or fingerprints. Thoroughly clean the dashboard to prevent any glass or debris getting in to the electrical components or vents.

Sabtu, 16 Februari 2013

Parts of a Windshield

Parts of a Windshield

A windshield is the front window of a vehicle, such as a car, truck, bus, motorcycle, airplane or train. The glass protects people from the elements during travel and helps preserve the internal temperature of a vehicle. Windshields also help support the roof of some vehicles and can serve a critical role in rollover accidents.

Glass

    Windshields are generally made out of "laminated safety glass," a sealed combination of two pieces of glass with a layer of vinyl encased in between. Some windshields are designed to be more lightweight while maintaining a high impact quality, such as the acrylic plastic found on motorcycles. Other windshields need to withstand high levels of pressure, such as those found on submarines and space shuttles, and are made out of reinforced polycarbonate.

Frame

    A windshield is held in place by a metal piece of trim, a sticky seal, metal clips and a plastic or metal molding. This frame sits within the core structure of the vehicle and ensures that the glass doesn't slip or vibrate out of place.

Wiper

    Although the wiper is not attached to the windshield, it serves a key role in keeping the glass clean. The arm, blade and motor work together to sweep the windshield in an oscillating arc. When the blades wear out or the arm doesn't correctly press against the glass, streaks will form on the windshield that can limit visibility.

Jumat, 15 Februari 2013

How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a 1995 Buick Regal

How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a 1995 Buick Regal

The 1995 Buick Regal was produced as a Custom Coupe and a Gran Sport sedan. It was equipped with the choice of a 3.1-liter V-6 or a 3.8-liter V-6. The 1995 Regal came standard with four wheel anti-lock disc brakes, including ventilated front discs. The rear disc brakes on the 1995 Regal have calipers, pads, and rotors similar to the front disc brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the initial torque from the rear wheel lug nuts, using a tire iron. Do not remove the lug nuts completely, but turn them so they are unstuck (3/4 turn). Lift the rear of the Buick using a 2-ton jack or a jack with greater capacity. Set jack stands beneath the rear suspension arms or the rear axle beam, just inside the rear wheel assembly. Remove the lug nuts completely with a tire iron, then remove both rear wheels from the Regal.

    2

    Remove the rear caliper mounting bolts on one side of the Regal. Use a 3/8-inch ratchet to turn the caliper bolts counterclockwise until they are removed. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using a pry bar to gently pry the caliper off. Set the caliper on the suspension arm behind the brake assembly. Do not let the caliper hang freely or you can damage the fragile rubber brake hose.

    3

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket, using a pry bar to gently pry the pads off if necessary. Lubricate the portion of the caliper mounting bracket that touches the brake pads. This is the part of the mounting bracket that the tips of the brake pads slide into. Proper lubrication is essential in reinstalling the brakes, to ensure optimal performance and function of the new pads. Use caliper grease that is rated for disc brakes.

    4

    Install the new brake pads onto the caliper mounting bracket. Two of the brake pads have wear indicators. These pads go on the inside of the caliper bracket, behind the rotor. Do not place both pads with wear indicators on one side of the Regal. The wear indicators are small metal tongues on the end of the pads that have a 90-degree bend in them, and are the reason for the "squealing" noise when pads get low. Install the wear indicator-equipped pad behind the rotor, and the non-wear indicator pad on the front or outside of the caliper bracket.

    5

    Lubricate the backing plates or shim plates on the back side of both of the newly installed brake pads. Failure to lubricate the back of the pads can cause squeaking in the new brakes within a couple hours of installation and driving. Dab caliper grease on the back side of the pads to create a thin film on the pads.

    6

    Install a 6-inch extension onto a 3/8-inch drive ratchet. On the opposite end of the extension install a caliper brake tool. The caliper brake tool is a 6-sided cube that has different adapter teeth on each side for use on multiple different vehicles. The rear calipers of the Regal have oscillating or rotating pistons. As the piston expands when you hit the brake pedal, it also rotates in a screw-like motion. The brake tool is essential in working on the rear brakes of many vehicles, as there are many vehicles with rotating rear caliper pistons.

    7

    Insert the caliper tool onto the piston of the rear brake caliper. Hold the caliper in one hand, while holding the ratchet, extension, and tool in your other hand. Turn the ratchet clockwise while simultaneously applying pressure to the piston on the rear caliper. This turning and pushing movement will compress the rear caliper piston. Compress the piston until it is nearly flush with the inside back wall of the caliper. The piston does not compress completely flush.

    8

    Install the compressed rear rotor back onto the Regal with one hand. Start the caliper mounting bolts through the caliper and into the mounting bracket, by hand. Turn the bolts clockwise to start them until the caliper can stand freely without you holding it. Tighten the caliper bolts to between 60 and 80 foot-pounds of torque. You can approximate this without using a torque wrench by snugging the bolts with a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket, then turn the ratchet 1/2-turn farther once the bolts are snug -- but using a torque wrench is best.

    9

    Repeat Steps 2 through 8 to complete the second side of the rear pads on the Regal. Performing this project on one side of the vehicle at a time will provide a visual reference for how the brakes look when they are assembled. This is useful if you have any questions about how the brakes go back together.

    10

    Install the rear wheels on the Regal after you have installed and torqued both rear brake calipers on the vehicle. Snug the lug nuts onto the wheel studs, using a tire iron. Lift the rear of the Regal off of the jack stands, and remove the jack stands from beneath the Regal. Lower the vehicle and tighten the lug nuts between 90 and 110 foot-pounds of torque. Use a certified torque wrench and lug nut socket to properly torque the wheel nuts.