Selasa, 31 Juli 2012

Brake Thermal Performance

Brakes are one of the most important safety features on an automobile for slowing down and stopping. Thermal testing and analysis of a braking system allows engineers to look for problems caused by excessive heating of areas on a brake pad.

Types

    Vehicle brakes are generally split between two types, which are drum and disc braking systems. One method for completing a thermal analysis of brakes is to simulate a downhill movement of a vehicle at a constant speed.

Heating

    The thermal performance of a braking system can be affected by the heating of small areas on the brake pad. The effects of irregular heating of a brake pad can be felt until all the brake components are heated to the same level or the brake is released.

Effects

    A braking system performing at the correct thermal level will allow a smooth slowing and stop of a vehicle. Irregular thermal heating of a brake can result in an irregular use of energy causing roughness of the brake pads and an uneven slowing of the vehicle.

Senin, 30 Juli 2012

How to Replace the Rear Window in a 1996 Saturn SL2

A broken piece of window glass can leave the interior of a vehicle open to weather elements in addition to being a safety hazard for travelers inside the vehicle. The window should be replaced at the first sign of damage to avoid any future problems. The rear window can be changed in a short amount of time by most backyard mechanics in a 1996 Saturn SL2 with simple hand tools after gaining access to the inside of the rear door.

Instructions

    1

    Place a towel behind the window crank and move it back-and-forth the detach the retainer behind the crank on models with manual windows, and remove the crank from the door.

    2

    Place a screwdriver behind the power window switch, pry it away from the door and disconnect the electrical connector from the back of the switch on models equipped with power windows.

    3

    Remove the retaining screw with a screwdriver just behind the inside door latch. Place a screwdriver behind the door latch trim, pry it away from the door and disconnect the electrical connection. Disconnect the control rod from the door handle with pliers.

    4

    Remove the armrest retaining screw and door trim panel retaining screws with a screwdriver.

    5

    Pull the door trim panel away from the door to disengage the trim panel from the hooks on the door.

    6

    Pull the plastic water shield from the door.

    7

    Pull the outside door handle out and push the center of the retaining clips into the retaining clip with a small screwdriver to detach the handle.

    8

    Pull out the outer sealing strip on the window glass opening.

    9

    Remove the outer door panel screws and remove the door panel.

    10

    Remove the retaining screws holding the window glass to the window lift with a screwdriver

    11

    Raise the window glass by hand through the window opening, tilt the top of the glass toward the outside of the vehicle and remove it.

    12

    Tilt the top of the new glass toward the outside of the vehicle, place it through the window opening and lower it onto the window lift.

    13

    Install the screws holding the window glass to the window lift with a screwdriver.

    14

    Place the outer door panel back onto the door and install the retaining screws with a screwdriver. Place thread-lock compound on the screws before installation.

    15

    Push the outer sealing strip onto the window glass opening.

    16

    Push the door handle back into place to engage the retaining pins.

    17

    Stick the plastic water shield onto the inner door.

    18

    Push the door trim panel onto the door to engage the trim panel to the hooks on the door.

    19

    Install the armrest retaining screw and door trim panel retaining screws with a screwdriver.

    20

    Connect the control rod to the back of the interior door handle with pliers. Connect the electrical connection, set the door handle trim piece back into the door trim panel and install the retaining screw with a screwdriver

    21

    Connect the electrical connection to the back of the power window switch and set the switch back into the door trim panel on models equipped with power windows.

    22

    Push the window crank onto the shaft on models equipped with manual windows.

How to Install 1995 Buick Skylark Brake Rotors

When you own a vehicle there is an expectation as to how long the brakes should last. Some brake pads last longer than others, but when you purchase a new vehicle you would think that the pad quality would be good. This was not the case for the 1995 Buick Skylark. GM had a technical service bulletin for the front brakes on this vehicle due to the short life span. The fix for this problem was to install new, higher quality, brake pads and rotors, which you can do yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Park your car on a flat, level surface. Set the parking brake. Put on your safety glasses and protective gloves. Loosen the lug nuts 1/4 turn counterclockwise. Jack up the front of the vehicle and place the jack stands under the jacking points. Finish removing the front wheels. Place the C-clamp over the back of the caliper with the adjustable side on the outer brake pad. Open the bleeder screw and compress the caliper piston with the C-clamp. Tighten the bleeder screw to 9 foot-pounds with the torque wrench.

    2

    Remove the caliper bolts at each end of the caliper using the appropriate allen-head socket. Do not remove the bolt at the end of the brake line. Use a piece of mechanic's wire or a coat hanger to hang the caliper from the coil spring so that there is slack on the brake line. Remove the outer brake pad from the caliper by prying on the mounting clip, and the inner pad by pulling it away from the piston. Remove the caliper bolts and replace them if they are corroded or pitted.

    3

    Remove the brake rotor. If the rotor will not easily slide off, reinstall the lug nuts by hand. Strike the rotor with your hammer between the lug studs until the rotor comes loose. Remove the lug nuts and the rotor. Clean the rotor mounting surface with the wire brush. Clean the new rotor thoroughly with spray brake cleaner. Install the new rotor and install one lug nut by hand to hold it in place.

    4

    Clean the caliper and the steering knuckle with a wire brush where they almost make contact. Apply a small amount of silicone lubricant to both surfaces. Apply a thin layer of silicone lubricant into the caliper bolt holes and to the back side of the brake pads. Push the bolts into the caliper. Install the brake pads by clipping them to the caliper with the wear sensors facing down. Install the caliper and torque the bolts to 38 foot-pounds. Remove the lug nut from the rotor.

    5

    Open the hood. Add brake fluid to the full line. Pump the brake pedal until it feels firm. Check the brake fluid again and fill if necessary. Install the wheels and snug the lug nuts. Lower the vehicle to the ground. Torque the lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds in a star pattern. Break in the brake pads by making several braking applications without coming to a full stop.

Buick LaCrosse Brake Problems

Buick LaCrosse Brake Problems

The LaCrosse brand was introduced by Buick during the 2005 model-year. The LaCrosse replaced two vehicles in the Buick lineup: the Century and Regal. During the 2010 model-year, the Buick LaCrosse was in its third generation. All three generations have been equipped with a braking system that, although reliable, can be prone to typical brake problems.

Recalls

    A recall was issued by General Motors, the parent company of Buick, on Apr. 15, 2005 for all LaCrosses produced that year. The brake pedal would not engage the brakes, which could result in a crash. The recall was issued by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) as Campaign Number 05V156000.

Floored Pedal

    If the brake pedal has little to no resistance and goes to the floor when depressed, this indicates either insufficient brake fluid in the system, a bad brake master cylinder or an air bubble in the braking system.

Soft Pedal

    If the brake pedal feels soft, spongy or loose, this may be caused by loose bolts on the brake master cylinder mount, a bad brake master cylinder or an air bubble in the braking system.

Squealing and Whining

    If you hear a squealing or whining noise when engaging the brakes in your Buick LaCrosse, this is most likely caused by a worn brake pad. If the noise is audible while driving but goes away when the brakes are depressed, this may be caused by the buildup of brake dust.

Pulling

    If the Buick LaCrosse pulls to one side during braking, this may be caused by incorrect tire pressure, poor wheel alignment, restricted brake lines or a malfunctioning brake caliper.

Pulsing

    Pulsations, during braking, can be caused by worn or warped brake rotors.

Minggu, 29 Juli 2012

What are Brake Shoes Made of?

Brake shoes play an important role in the brake system of a vehicle. The brake shoes are necessary to manipulate the brake and cause a vehicle to gradually slow down or stop abruptly for an emergency. The materials used to make brake shoes are important to the function of the shoe in relation to the braking system.

History

    Brake shoes and pads once were made of materials that contained asbestos. Because asbestos is known to cause cancer and other serious health conditions, manufacturers changed their designs. Some brake shoes and pads now contain traces of copper. Newer brake shoes are made with types of rubber that do not create harmful dusts.

Materials

    When a driver presses down on the brake pedal, the brake shoes on opposite tires are pressed down onto the tires to slow down the vehicle. The backing of the brake shoe and the stem and lever that help press the brake shoe against the tire are made of metal. The metal backing of the brake shoe is covered with a rubber padding to produce friction when applied to the tire.

Toxicity

    Traces of copper found in the rubber of brake shoes and pads are toxic to aquatic life. Copper traces wear off the brake pads and shoes and end up in waterways, creating a toxic pollutant. The dust created on tires and brake shoes when the pads and shoes wear down contains asbestos dust.

Time Frame

    Over time, the brake pads and shoes will wear down. If the metal backing becomes exposed and comes into contact with the tire, the tire may be punctured or worn down. This could result in a gradually flattening tire or a blowout when the brake pedal is pressed for an emergency stop or to simply slow down the vehicle. The period a brake shoe will last depends on how often the car is driven and how the driver treats the brakes of the vehicle. For safety purposes, the brake shoes and pads should be checked regularly for excessive wear.

Maintenance Checks

    Worn breaks make an unpleasant sound when the metal is allowed to rub against the tire. Brake systems in modern cars are set up with inspection holes to allow drivers and vehicle owners to easily check the brake shoes for wear. If you are unsure how to check your brakes, you can have a team of professionals at a car-maintenance shop or tire-change center check the brakes for you.

DIY Window Repair for a Dodge Nitro

DIY Window Repair for a Dodge Nitro

You can replace a damaged window in your Dodge Nitro in your driveway or garage. A power window can malfunction in many ways and sometimes requires replacement if it's cracked or smashed. The task requires simple hand tools.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood and disconnect the negative battery cable.

    2

    Pull out the window switch assembly. Take out the adapter plug at the back of the assembly.

    3

    Turn the inside door handle counterclockwise to allow you to remove the door paneling with greater ease. Undo the bolts that secure the armrest.

    4

    Pull off the door panel.

    5

    Unplug the wiring harness from the window motor and loosen the bolts that secure it.

    6

    Unscrew the two crimp bolts that secure the window glass. Lift the window glass out of the work area by pulling it up through the normal window area.

    7

    Place your replacement window glass into the place from which you removed the old window glass. Tighten the two crimp bolt to secure the new window glass.

    8

    Reconnect the plug in the window motor and mount the motor with the bolts you previously removed. Push the back (or rear) paneling against the metal to get the pop rivets in alignment. Tap them strongly to secure the connection.

    9

    Reattach the armrest and the interior door handle.

    10

    Reattach the wiring to the switch assembly and press the assembly back into place in the door panel.. Reattach the negative battery cable. Test the operation of the power window.

Sabtu, 28 Juli 2012

How Do I Fix a Rear Door Window in a 2000 Caddy DeVille?

How Do I Fix a Rear Door Window in a 2000 Caddy DeVille?

When your car has a cracked window, whether it be the windshield or a rear window, your visibility can decrease while the likelihood of an accident occurring can increase. Auto glass replacement shops can be expensive. With a cracked window on your 2000 General Motors Cadillac DeVille, you can rest assured that the repair job is a simple do-it-yourself task.

Instructions

    1

    Make your window washing solution. Stir mild detergent and warm water in a bucket with a soft cloth. Wash the window down, rinse it with water, and then dry it completely.

    2

    Attach the stabilizer to the window. Hold the suction cup over the cracked area, then push it down until the suction holds it in place.

    3

    Take the resin tube and insert it into the injector. Then place the injector into the stabilizer. There will be an open port specifically in place for the injector.

    4

    Remove the injector once in place, and then watch the resin flow out of the tube and into the cracks for a hands-free repair.

    5

    Allow the resin tube to empty, and then lift the stabilizer off the window. Lift it straight up so you do not smudge the resin.

    6

    Place strips of adhesive curing film on top of the resin. Remove the strips once the resin has cured and dried underneath, usually in less than an hour.

How to Use a Windshield Removal Kit

How to Use a Windshield Removal Kit

Removing windshields is sometimes difficult with little space between the dashboard and the glass to fit tools. Windshield removal kits are designed to make removal of vehicle windshields safe and reduce your chances of breaking the glass. Typically a windshield removal kit consists of heavy duty braided wire, an awl or hook tool to feed the wire through the glass and two T-handles with Allen screws and a wrench or a similar device to secure them.

Instructions

    1

    Ask someone to help you remove the windshield. Two people are required to use a windshield removal kit properly and to remove the windshield safely.

    2

    Check that the vehicle is parked with the emergency brake on and that you have plenty of light.

    3

    Lay a towel or small washcloth on the windshield and insert the trim removal tool under the trim covering the edge of the windshield. The cloth prevents the tool from scratching the glass as you work.

    4

    Pop off and remove all of the trim from the windshield.

    5

    Cut a 2-to-3-foot length of braided wire.

    6

    Insert the wire into the groove at the end of the hook tool so that enough wire is overhanging on one side that you can grab onto it and bend the wire at the center (where it lies in the groove).

    7

    Work from the outside of the vehicle and force the wire between the windshield and the frame it is glued to.

    8

    Pull out the hook tool, leaving the wire in place between the windshield and frame.

    9

    Move inside the vehicle and pull half the wire's length through.

    10

    Attach the T-handle grips to each end of the wire and push the T-handle attachment post to the opposite end of the handle to open.

    11

    Push the end of the wire into the attachment post and feed it into the grip hole. Push the attachment post back into the T-handle so it can't be pulled out.

    12

    Grab a handle grip and have your helper grab the other one. Work with one of you inside the vehicle and one outside the vehicle and pull the wire along the perimeter of the windshield to separate it from the frame and glue.

    13

    Lift the windshield when it separates and remove it from the vehicle. If the windshield is cracked, use care when lifting because it may shatter when lifted. Set it in where it won't fall or be accidentally bumped or shattered.

How to Seal a Mobile Home Bathroom Window

While they make not seem like much, little gaps and cracks around your bathroom windows can not only let in the elements, but also reduce your heating and cooling efficiency, making it more expensive to stay cool in the summer or warm in the winter. To eliminate these small drafts, especially in the bathroom, you need to seal your windows, both on the inside and around the frame.

Instructions

Sealing the Frame

    1

    Choose the proper sealant. When looking to seal your windows from the elements and air leaks, silicone sealant is best, as it is flexible and will often last for many years. The downside to silicone is that it cannot be painted. If you need to paint, choose a latex sealant.

    2

    Remove any old sealant or trim using a putty knife, carefully scraping off the old trim.

    3

    Seal around the edge of the window frame on both the inside and outside of the window. When working with a caulk gun, it is best to lay down a steady bead of caulk while moving around the edge of the window.

    4

    Allow the caulk to dry up to 24 hours.

Sealing the Sash

    5

    Remove the old weather-stripping. Take the window sash out of the frame and gently pry the old weather-stripping away with a flat head screwdriver.

    6

    Get replacement weather-stripping. Take a sample of your old weather-stripping to a mobile home parts supplier and get a replacement weather-stripping to match.

    7

    Install the new weather-stripping by sliding it into the slot in the window.

    8

    Replace the sash and make sure that the window can open and close smoothly.

Car Power Window Problems

When vehicles started having power windows built into them, it was considered an incredible convenience. Of course, like any other automobile convenience, it can become just another problem when they break. There are three big problems with power windows. Two of them are relatively easy to repair, while the third will have you reaching for your pocketbook.

Jamming

    Sometimes big problems can be caused by relatively small things. For example, power windows can be impeded from opening for many simple reasons, including a foreign object blocking the window from rising or lowering. This is especially common in the winter when ice buildup can lock a window in place. To fix this, all you really need to do is remove the blockage, which is most often found just inside the car door.

Burned-Out Motor

    Often in automobiles, the biggest problems are caused by minor issues. Sometimes, though, the worst thing that could go wrong actually does go wrong. In power windows, that's a motor burnout. There is almost no easy way to fix a motor burnout and, often, all that you can do is buy a new motor. A word of advice? Before you go to the mechanic and pay top dollar, try looking at junk yards or auto salvage depots to find a power window motor for cheap.

Blown Fuse

    When you go to open the window, do you find that there is no response? Not only does it not budge, but you don't even hear the motor running? If that is the case, odds are that you have a blown fuse -- pesky, but relatively simply to remedy. All you really have to do is pop open your car hood, locate your fuse box and replace the bad fuse. Of course, if you don't have your fuses labeled (a common issue with older vehicles), refer to your owner's manual to see which fuse controls what. If you don't have an owner's manual because you bought the car used, it's time to go to Google.

How to Install 1979 F150 Windshield

How to Install 1979 F150 Windshield

Installing a new windshield in your 1979 F150 is important to ensure that you have the best visibility when driving your vehicle. If you are upgrading your vehicle or replacing a previously damaged shield, installing a new windshield is a fairly simple process which can be completed with the help of another person. You can pick up the tools and equipment you will need from your local auto store.

Instructions

    1

    Place a thin layer of window sealant around the edges of the windshield. The sealant will allow you to securely fix the windshield in place within the windshield frame.

    2

    Attach the new gasket to the windshield so that the heavy part of the gasket is on the inside and the slit is on the outside.

    3

    Place a nylon cord around the outer groove of the windshield. This will provide extra support from inside the vehicle.

    4

    Lift the windshield in to place in the vehicle frame with the help of another person. Hold the windshield against the frame to allow a seal to set in place.

    5

    Pull the cord along the inside of the frame to allow the rubber lip to fix in place. Clean the windshield and the dashboard to ensure no debris or glass gets in to the vents.

How to Repair a Hairline Windshield

How to Repair a Hairline Windshield

Car windows are an amazing feat of technology. Windshields are constructed with two panes of very thin glass that is pressure-molded onto a clear piece of safety plastic. There is roughly 800 to 1,000 lbs. of atmospheric pressure that binds theses pieces of glass and plastic. Regardless of the technology used to make windshields, various types of road debris can often chip, crack or break windshield glass. There are a few simple things you can do to repair your windshield.

Instructions

    1

    Visit any hardware or car supplies store and purchase a car windshield repair kit. These are very affordable and easy to use. Because of the various brands available, ask a salesperson which is best for your car make and model.

    2

    Purchase a resin pack. Resin is a liquid solution you can inject into the crack and it will spread throughout until the crack is filled. The process will take just about an hour or so from start to finish. Some resin packs may require you to use some form of UV treatment to make the resin fuse with the windshield. Follow the instructions carefully.

    3

    Visit a car repair shop or local glazer. A glazer specializes in anything related to glass. Repairing a crack is an easy process for them. You also can contact a mobile repair company that will come to your home or office and use their own tools to make the repairs.

Jumat, 27 Juli 2012

How to Change the Brake Pads on a Ford 2001 F150

How to Change the Brake Pads on a Ford 2001 F150

The 2001 Ford F-150 was built for power, fuel efficiency, cargo space and towing. It was a well-built truck that included brakes that are supposed to last for 300,000 miles. If your brakes have started to squeal, grab, or lose pressure, then it is time to replace them. If you don't want to take the hassle of taking the truck to a repair shop, a brake job can be handled at home for a fraction of the cost.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lugs. The lugs nuts hold the tire to the wheel. Do not remove them completely but loosen them one to two full rotations with the tire iron. Place the wheel chocks in front of the tires you are not removing.

    2

    Raise the truck. Place the jack beneath a supportive section of the underside of the truck and jack it up enough so there is room to place the jack stands beneath the same supportive spot. Repeat for both sides of the car.

    3

    Remove the tires. Completely remove each of the lug nuts from the tires. Remove the tires from the truck.

    4

    Remove the brake caliper mount. The brake caliper mount is the metal bracket that encases the brake pads and sits on the rotor. The mount can be removed by removing the two bolts that hold it onto the rotor using the socket set. Once the caliper is removed, tie it up to the underside of the truck. You do not want the mount to hang as it will put damaging pressure on the brake line.

    5

    Remove the brake pads from the mount by slipping them out.

    6

    Compress the brake caliper. The brake caliper is the circular piston situated in the center of the mount. There are two ways to compress the caliper. You can either compress it by hand or use the C-clamp to compress it.

    7

    Install the new brake pads. The new brake pads will slip into the slots that the old ones were in. The two pads are universal, but make sure that the brake material, the black material, is facing inwards towards the rotor.

    8

    Reattach the mount onto the rotor. Rebolt the mount onto the rotor. Reattach the tire. Snug each lug nut to finger tightness. Lower the vehicle with the jack and then tighten each lug with the tire iron.

What Holds Brakes Pads?

What Holds Brakes Pads?

When driving down the road, you expect the vehicle to stop when you hit the brake pedal. This process involves hydraulics and friction to actually stop the vehicle. Creating the friction are brake pads; these pads need to be held in one position to function properly.

Caliper Bracket

    On nearly every brake system, there is a caliper bracket. This component's main function is to provide an area for the caliper to bolt onto. In most braking systems, this bracket also has a set of grooves that the brake pads sit in, keeping them from moving up or down as the rotor spins.

Pad Clips

    On braking systems that do not use caliper bracket to hold the brake pads in place, there are clips on the rear of each brake pad. The clips on the outboard pad wrap over the caliper body and clip into small grooves in the body. The inboard pad has three to four metal, finger-like clips that are inserted into the caliper piston to hold it in place.

Caliper

    The brake caliper itself has two functions. Its main purpose is to create the pressure needed to squeeze the pads against the rotor. The caliper also holds the brake pads and prevents them from separating from the rotor.

Kamis, 26 Juli 2012

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

You were told or can tell the front brake pads are low on your Suzuki Grand Vitara. The brake pads are affordable enough, but the estimate for labor to replace them from the dealership or repair shop is shocking. If you have some tools and have tinkered around the garage before, why not consider replacing the pads yourself?

Instructions

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

    1

    Park the Grand Vitara on a flat, level paved or concrete surface. Apply the parking brake and release the hood latch.

    2

    Place a wheel chock behind one of the rear tires.

    3

    Open the hood and suck out half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster. Discard the fluid properly.

    4

    Break the lug nuts loose on the left front tire using the 1/2 inch breaking bar and socket.

    5

    Lift the left front quarter of the Vitara and place a jack stand under the front left frame rail. Lower the floor jack and support the Vitara on the jack stand.

    6

    Remove the lug nuts and tire.

    7

    Remove the caliper bolts using a ratchet and socket. Hang the caliper onto the frame or spring using a bungee cord. Do not allow the caliper to hang from the brake hose.

    8

    Pry the old pads from the caliper anchor. Take note if wear sensor tabs are present and in what position they are located so you may reinstall the new pads in the same position.

    9

    Remove the caliper anchor. Use the wire brush to clean off the clip hardware on the caliper anchor that the pads sit against. Take your time and clean this as thoroughly as possible. Apply a liberal amount of silicone brake lubricant to the hardware.

    10

    Replace the caliper anchor and tighten thoroughly.

    11

    Place the new pads into the anchor.

    12

    Compress the piston of the caliper in using a C-clamp.

    13

    Clean the caliper bolts with the wire brush and add some silicone brake lubricant to the smooth areas of the bolts. Insert the bolts into the caliper and tighten properly.

    14

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts and tighten the lug nuts as tight as you can get them with the tire elevated.

    15

    Lower the vehicle and retighten the lug nuts using the adjustable torque wrench and a socket.

    16

    Repeat the procedure for the right side.

    17

    Pump the foot pedal 5 or 6 times until the hydraulic pressure is restored to the front caliper pistons and the foot brake pedal feels normal. Check and adjust the brake fluid in the master cylinder, but only add new DOT-approved brake fluid.

    18

    Remove the wheel chock, release the parking brake and test drive.

How to Remove Window Tint From Plexiglas

Many people enjoy tinting Plexiglas because it helps to block out some of the sun's harmful UV rays and can improve the appearance of their vehicle. But over time window tint can become damaged and warped, requiring owners to remove and replace it. Doing so is a simple task you can do in a few minutes as long as you have the right tools and the right method.

Instructions

    1

    Steam the edge of the Plexiglas for one minute with your steamer.

    2

    Use the plastic razor to pick at the window tint on the edge of the Plexiglas that you steamed. If it does not come up easily, continue to steam the edge until it does, and then pick at it with the plastic razor until you have pulled up enough tint to hold onto with your fingers.

    3

    Gently pull the window tint until you have pulled all of it off the Plexiglas.

    4

    Inspect the Plexiglas for any excess pieces of glue and use the steamer and the plastic razor to remove them.

    5

    Clean the Plexiglas with a multisurface cleaner and paper towels.

How to Glue a Button to a Rear View Mirror

Gluing the rear view mirror button can make the difference between keeping the mirror up during your commute and having the mirror fall during the drive. The rear view mirror button is an adhesive that connects the windshield to the actual mirror. The front of the button has a sticky adhesive while the back of the button needs some glue. Gluing your rear view mirror can make your trip a safe one.

Instructions

    1

    Use a safety razor to scrap off the residue from when the mirror fell. The thin sheet of old glue will come off easily.

    2

    Soften the back of the button by rubbing it against sandpaper. Use 100 or 150 grit sandpaper, because it can polish the back and not damage the button.

    3

    Apply two to three sprays of glass cleaner onto the windshield to begin cleaning the mirror. Three sprays will be enough to clean the whole mirror.

    4

    Wipe the mirror off with a dry wash cloth or paper towel. Let the mirror air dry, once you have dried the mirror. This will ensure that the mirror is completely dry. Applying glue to a wet mirror will cause the mirror to fall.

    5

    Apply two to three small drops of mirror adhesive glue onto the back of the button. Place the button in the middle of the windshield. The curved part of the button should face up.

    6

    Hold the button on the surface for 10 minutes or until it has completely stuck. Attach the entire mirror to complete the setup of the rear view mirror.

How to Repair the Rotors in a 2007 Chevy Impala

How to Repair the Rotors in a 2007 Chevy Impala

Damage to the rotors on your Impala most often happens from heat warping. This condition occurs readily in high-speed stop-and-go traffic. Every time that you apply the brakes to stop, this superheats the rotors. Without enough time to cool, the rotors begin to buckle and warp. Over extended periods of this repetition, you may experience brake fade and the car will seem like its harder to stop. The steering wheel will shake or when you press the brake pedal, the car will feel like its skipping. You can repair the rotors on the 2007 Chevy Impala at home. With a few basic tools, it should take no more than two hours to do.

Instructions

    1

    Engage the emergency brake and loosen the lug nuts on the front passenger-side tire of the Impala with a lug wrench 1/4 turn counterclockwise.

    2

    Raise the car on the passenger side with a hydraulic jack and then place a jack stand beneath the frame rail to help support the weight of the car.

    3

    Remove all of the tires lug nuts and slide the tire off the hub assembly. Put the lug nuts in a safe location to the side of your work area. Observe your brake caliper while its still mounted onto the rotor. The inner brake pad closest to the engine--if you look at the rear of it--has a round metal piston pushing against it. You have to compress the piston into its bore hole to take the caliper assembly off the rotor.

    4

    Place an 8-inch C-clamp around the body of the brake caliper. Begin winding the C-clamp shut until the screw on the clamp makes full contact with the surface of the outer brake pad. Wind the C-clamp shut (clockwise) slowly, until the piston is forced back down into its bore hole completely then take the C-clamp off the caliper.

    5

    Remove the two inner bolts holding the caliper mounting bracket in place with your socket wrench. Do not remove the calipers mounting bolts; they merely secure the caliper to the bracket. The mounting brackets bolts are just beneath each of the caliper bolts.

    6

    Place a five gallon bucket right next to the caliper/mounting bracket assembly within the wheel well. Grasp the assembly with both hands, pull it up, and off the rotor then set it down on top of the bucket.

    7

    Remove the rotor by pulling it off with both hands as well, toward you. If the rotor doesnt slide right off the hub studs, use a rubber mallet to tap around the rear circumference of the rotor.

    8

    Install the new passenger-side front rotor on your 2007 Chevy Impala by reversing all of the removal steps. Pump the brake pedal until it stiffens before you move on to the next rotor.

Rabu, 25 Juli 2012

How to Remove the Windshield From a '65 Corvette

How to Remove the Windshield From a '65 Corvette

You can remove the windshield from your 1965 Corvette from your home garage, saving a lot of money. The job can be completed with a few tools you can purchase from any auto parts retailer. You should always remove and replace your windshield when it has a significant crack or chip in it. Some chips can be repaired professionally, but it is always best to replace the windshield for your protection.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the retaining nuts from the windshield wipers, using a wrench.

    2

    Put on work gloves.

    3

    Pry off the rubber seal around the windshield using a pry tool. After it is loosened, pull it away from the windshield, using your hands. Discard the seal.

    4

    Run a windshield wire underneath the entire edge of the windshield to break the urethane seal.

    5

    Push out the windshield from inside the Corvette.

    6

    Lift the windshield off the Corvette from the outside and discard or salvage it.

    7

    Remove the urethane bead from the windshield opening on the Corvette, using a utility knife. You can leave some of it in place, but try to remove most of it.

How to Change Front Rotors

A vehicle's front end rotors are critical components of its braking system, and they should be closely monitored for evidence of cracking, pitting or rusting. With time, these rotors may become so damaged or worn that they will need to be replaced. Although the specific configuration of front end rotors varies slightly from one make and model to the next, the basic construction and replacement method is the same.

Instructions

    1

    Review the brake system diagram for your specific year, make and model in the appropriate service manual, if possible. There isn't much significant variation among the rotors, calipers and other brake elements of street-legal vehicles, but the slight variations can make a difference. It's best to be prepared for these before taking your car apart, and checking the manual may give you more insight into the specific range of tools you'll need for this job.

    2

    Park the car on a flat surface. Put it in "Park," but leave the emergency brake off. Deactivate all-wheel or four-wheel drive if that is an option, and make sure the steering wheel is not locked.

    3

    Place wheel chocks behind the rear tires, then slide a floor jack under a solid part of the front frame. Carefully jack the car up until it is high enough for you to be able to slide two jack stands under the front axle.

    4

    Place both jack stands under the front axle, with one on each side of the car. Gently lower the vehicle off the jack and onto the stands, then pull the jack away.

    5

    Use a tire iron to remove all of the lug nuts from both front wheels. Set the lug nuts aside, then pull off both wheels.

    6

    Take a close look at both front brake calipers. Check for a thin wire assembly that looks like a cage around the caliper assembly. If you see these, remove them with pliers.

    7

    Look for the bolts that hold the calipers onto the caliper mounts. Most calipers have two large bolts on the side closest to the center of the car, and these are typically removed with socket wrenches or Torx wrenches. Once you've located the bolts and chosen the appropriate tool, remove all of the bolts. Leave the calipers in place for just a moment, however.

    8

    Take each caliper one at a time and tie it to the undercarriage of the car using bungee cords, twist ties or nylon ties. This is important because the calipers will dangle by the brake lines otherwise, which can cause undetectable damage and make the car unsafe.

    9

    Pull both brake pads out of each caliper mount. If the pads are stuck to the rotors, pry them off using a flat head screwdriver.

    10

    Remove both caliper mounts. These are usually held on with two bolts of the same type as the caliper bolts. The bolts may be on either side of the rotor.

    11

    Pull both rotors off of the wheel spindles.

    12

    Slide the new rotors onto the spindles.

    13

    Reinstall both caliper mounts in the same places they were installed on the old rotors. Use the original bolts and tighten them down well.

    14

    Slide the brake pads back into the caliper mounts. If you're also replacing the brake pads during this process, slide the new ones in instead.

    15

    Untie each caliper and set it in place on top of the corresponding caliper mount. Reinsert the caliper bolts and tighten them down with the appropriate tool.

    16

    Replace both wheels, then tighten down all of the lug nuts on each side using a tire iron.

    17

    Slide the floor jack back under a solid part of the front end frame and jack it up until it lifts off of the stands. Pull out both stands, then gently lower the vehicle to the floor and take away the wheel chocks.

How to Remove Rear Brake Drums From a 1997 Ford Escort

How to Remove Rear Brake Drums From a 1997 Ford Escort

The 1997 Ford Escort was the start of the third generation for the domestic import and featured front disc brakes and rear drum brakes. To replace the rear brake shoes or perform any other rear brake repairs on the Escort, the rear drums need to be removed. The repairs that necessitate the removal of the drums will be much more complicated than the drum removal itself.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Escort on a hard, flat surface that is safe for lifting and supporting the weight of the vehicle.

    2

    Place a wheel wedge or block of wood in front of one of the front tires. This will prevent the Escort from slipping forward when the rear axle is lifted.

    3

    Crack the lug nuts loose 1/4 turn counterclockwise on the rear tires using the lug nut wrench.

    4

    Lift the rear of the Escort with a vehicle jack. Place the anvil of the jack beneath the rocker panel or the rear frame rail. Place a jack stand under the frame or rocker panel, then slowly lower the vehicle so it's supported on the stand and not the jack. Repeat for the other side.

    5

    Finish removing the lug nuts and then the tires.

    6

    Spray the center hub connection (where the center of the drum covers the protruding hub) with penetrating oil and allow it to soak in for a few minutes.

    7

    Place the impact screwdriver with the 2 Phillips head bit into one of the drum retaining screws located on the hub face of the drum. Turn the impact screwdriver counterclockwise until it locks into reverse position.

    8

    Strike the head of the impact screwdriver with the hammer, until the retaining screw breaks free, then remove it. Repeat the same procedure for the other screw.

    9

    Pull the brake drum off of the shoes and hub. If the drum is stuck on, spray penetrating oil into the drum screw holes opposite the retaining screw holes on the hub face of the drum. Allow the oil to penetrate a couple of minutes.

    10

    Insert the retaining screws into the other holes and tighten them alternately with the screwdriver until the drum breaks free from the hub. Remove the drum then remove the retaining screws. Repeat for the other side.

How to Change Rear Drum Brake Pads

How to Change Rear Drum Brake Pads

Today, nearly all automobiles use disc brakes on the front wheels; however, many inexpensive vehicles still use drum brakes on the rear wheels. The rear wheels only supply about 20 to 30 percent of the total vehicle stopping power, so the somewhat lower effectiveness of drum brakes does not seriously compromise the vehicle's overall braking capability when they are used in the rear position, especially where smaller and lighter vehicles are concerned. Changing the pads on drum brakes is a good DIY project for the vehicle owner.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle and block the front wheels to prevent movement. Do not set the parking brake. Loosen the lug nuts on both rear wheels about one full turn each. Jack up the rear end of the vehicle, set it securely on jack stands, and complete the removal of both rear wheels. If you are not familiar with drum brake maintenance, it's best to remove the drums from both rear wheels at the beginning of the job, so that an assembled brake can be used as a visual reference when working on the other brake.

    2

    Remove the drums from both rear wheels by simply pulling the drum off the hub. On some models, the drum will simply pull off. On others, there will be retaining screws or bolts that must be removed first. Many older models have a central hub nut that is held in place with a crenelated lock-nut and cotter pin. For these models, first use pliers to remove the cotter pin. Remove the crenelated lock-nut, taking care not to bend or brake the crenelations, and then remove the hub nut. Remove the drum carefully, as the wheel bearing will likely come off with the drum. Do not allow dirt to get into the wheel bearing. If the drum is seized to the hub or backing plate, tap it firmly on the outer shoulder a few times with a plastic or rubber mallet to loosen. With the drums off on both rear wheels you will now be able to see both brake mechanisms. From this point on, work on the brake on one side while using the assembled brake on the other side as a reminder of how things should look when properly assembled.

    3

    Remove the brake springs. Brake springs have hooked ends, and removal is accomplished by gripping one end of the spring with pliers and pulling to unhook it, and then unhooking the other end once the spring tension is released. First remove the large return springs that connect the two brake shoes, and then remove the smaller springs that provide tension for the self-adjusting mechanism and some of the operating levers.

    4

    Remove the brake self-adjuster mechanism from in between the brake shoes. With the springs removed, the self-adjuster will slide out from between the shoes. Some models also have a metal strut that connects the shoes. If a strut is present, slide it out from between the shoes.

    5

    Remove the brake shoe hold-down pins. There will be one pin for each brake shoe on smaller models, and two pins for each shoe on larger models. Some pin types are removed by depressing the pin with a hex key or large screwdriver and then rotating counterclockwise until the pin releases. Other models have spring clips on the ends of the pins, and these are removed by rotating the clip and the pin with pliers until the clip releases.

    6

    Remove the front brake shoe from the backing plate by pulling it off of the hold-down pin. Push the hold-down pin out through the back of the backing plate. Remove the retaining clip that holds the parking brake cable to the rear brake shoe by pulling the clip off with pliers. Slide the end of the cable out from its mount and then pull the shoe off the backing plate. Push the hold-down pin out through the back of the backing plate.

    7

    Clean the backing plate and all parts by spraying with brake cleaning fluid. Catch the used fluid in a catch pan. Use rags and a wire brush to remove stubborn dirt.

    8

    Lubricate the points on the backing plate that contact the brake shoes with brake grease. Do not use too much grease, or excess grease may find its way onto the shoe linings or drum friction surface. Unscrew the self-adjusting mechanism, pull out the push-rod end, and lubricate the threads and push-rod female end with brake grease before reassembling.

    9

    Reassemble the brake using new brake shoes by following the disassembly steps in the reverse order. Use the assembled brake as a visual guide. Be sure to set the self-adjuster mechanism to its shortest length so that the new brake shoes do not prevent the installation of the drum.

    10

    Repeat the procedure on the other brake. Replace the wheels and lower the car. Pump the brakes a few times to set the mechanism. Perform a few stops in reverse to set the self-adjusters. Test the brake operation before driving normally.

How to Replace the Rear Disc Brakes on a Dodge Caravan

How to Replace the Rear Disc Brakes on a Dodge Caravan

The Dodge Caravan features rear disc brakes primarily on the all-wheel-drive Grand Caravan. The rear pads are smaller than the front pads, providing about 25 percent of the minivan's braking capacity. While having to replace the rear brakes is inevitable, the front disc brakes will require more frequent service. The rear pads and rotors are widely available at aftermarket installation centers and auto parts stores at significant savings over the dealer price.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Caravan on a relatively flat and paved surface. Do not apply the parking brake.

    2

    Place the Caravan in gear and then place a wheel chock in front of one or both of the front tires.

    3

    Crack the lug nuts to both rear wheels loose 1/4 turn, with the tire iron.

    4

    Raise one rear panel with the jack, and then support the Caravan with a jack stand safely and securely. Do not use the jack as a support for the minivan. Repeat this step for the opposite side.

    5

    Remove the loosened lug nuts, and then remove the wheels.

    6

    Locate the caliper on top of the rotor. Remove the two caliper guide pins, using a ratchet and socket.

    7

    Pull the caliper off of the rotor, caliper bridge and pad assembly. Rest the caliper on top of the suspension.

    8

    Remove the pads from the caliper bridge, and then remove the caliper bridge bolts only if you're replacing the rotors. If not, proceed to Step 12.

    9

    Remove the rotor. It may be stuck onto the hub or internal parking brake shoes. If so, use a dead-blow mallet to shock it free and then remove it carefully.

    10

    Clean the new replacement rotor with brake clean spray, wipe it dry with a shop rag and then place it on the hub assembly.

    11

    Replace the caliper bridge and bridge bolts. Tighten the bolts using an appropriately sized socket and the torque wrench, set to 90 to 100 foot-pounds.

    12

    Apply a coat of brake silicone to the caliper bridge contact points where the backing plates of the pads are seated.

    13

    Place the shims (supplied inside the pad set) onto the backing plates of the pads, if applicable. Some pad sets may have the shims already staked on with external rivets.

    14

    Place the pads into the caliper bridge.

    15

    Compress the caliper piston, using a large set of channel locks, until the piston is completely seated inside the bore. Replace the caliper and align the guide pin bolts through the caliper and into the knuckle. Tighten the bolts, using an appropriately sized socket and the torque wrench, set at 50-foot pounds.

    16

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts snugly with the tire iron while holding the tire.

    17

    Repeat the procedure for the opposite side.

    18

    Lower the Caravan, and then re-tighten the lug nuts using an appropriately sized socket, and the torque wrench, set at 100-foot pounds. Tighten them in a star pattern and not in a circular pattern.

    19

    Pump the foot brake pedal to return the caliper pistons to their original position. This will seat the pads against the brake rotors.

How to Change Rear Brakes on a 1999 Ford Zx2

How to Change Rear Brakes on a 1999 Ford Zx2

The rear brakes on your Ford Focus ZX2 are drum brakes. This type of brake system uses a wheel cylinder that presses two brake shoes against a rotating brake drum to slow and stop the vehicle. The rear brakes also act as the parking brake for the car. The rear brake shoes won't require replacement as often as the front pads because they are used much more lightly than the front brakes. Replacing the brake shoes is a job you can do in approximately an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car on a firm and level surface. Don't set the parking brake. Place wheel chocks in front and behind of one front wheel. Loosen the lug nuts with the lug wrench by turning them counterclockwise.

    2

    Place the jack under the frame just in front of one rear wheel and lift the car until the wheel clears the ground. Place a jack stand under the frame just in front of the jack and carefully lower the vehicle onto it. Lower the jack and repeat this process on the other side so both rear wheels are off the ground. Remove the lug nuts and wheels.

    3

    Remove the two large retaining screws on the brake drums by turning them counterclockwise with the large Phillips screwdriver. Remove the brake drums and set them aside. If the drums won't come off, thread the screws in the two other holes in the drums to unseat the drums.

    4

    Remove the two shoe return springs by grasping one side with the wire cutters and pulling towards the shoe while pivoting the hook out of the opening in the shoes.

    5

    Remove the anti-rattle spring in the same manner as the return springs.

    6

    Grasp the sides of the retaining clips with the pliers, push down and turn 90 degrees to release the pin. Remove the pin and the clip. Repeat this on the other shoe.

    7

    Remove the shoes from the backing plate. Pivot the parking brake actuator out of the opening in the brake shoe.

    8

    Spray the whole backing plate with the brake cleaner while scrubbing all of the brake dust, dirt and grime from the backing plate. Liberally coat the backing plate to brake shoe contact pads with white lithium grease.

    9

    Hold the rear brake shoe in position on the backing plate and insert the hold down pin through the backing plate and brake shoe. Install the retaining clip over the pin, push down and turn 90 degrees to lock the clip on the pin.

    10

    Insert the parking brake actuator into the appropriate opening in the leading (front) brake shoe and place the shoe against the backing plate. Install the retaining pin and clip as in step 9. Grip the edge of the retaining clip with a pair of pliers to make this operation easier on your fingers.

    11

    Install the anti-rattle spring on the parking brake actuator and stretch the spring over to the trailing shoe and insert the hooked end into the appropriate opening using the wire cutters.

    12

    Insert one hooked end of the two return springs into one of the shoes and stretch the other end to the appropriate opening on the opposite shoe and press the hooked end into the opening. Grip the end of the return springs with the wire cutters.

    13

    Slide the brake drum over the lug nuts onto the hub and secure it to the hub by inserting the two retaining screws and turning them clockwise by hand. Tighten these screws to between 89 and 123 inch-pounds with the large Phillips screwdriver.

    14

    Insert the brake adjusting tool into the knurled area of the brake actuating lever and adjust the brake until you hear a constant dragging sound as you turn the brake drum.

    15

    Repeat steps 4 through 14 above on the other side.

    16

    Replace the wheels on the hubs and install the lug nuts by turning them clockwise by hand. Lift one side of the car with the jack and remove the stand. Lower the vehicle until the wheel makes contact with the ground,. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench to 95 foot-pounds. Lower the vehicle to the ground and repeat the process on the other side. Remove the wheel chocks.

Selasa, 24 Juli 2012

About Mobile Auto Glass Replacement

About Mobile Auto Glass Replacement

Auto glass replacement is an industry as old as cars themselves. Early in the Henry Ford era of car manufacturing, windows and windshields were made from the same glass found in houses. Modern technology has made auto glass safer and more convenient for car owners.

History of Auto Glass

    In 1917 the Henry Ford corporation was sued for their incredibly dangerous windshield glass which was subject to breaking into small shards during an accident. In addition to safety issues, this unenforced glass was impossible to repair and expensive to constantly replace if chipped or cracked. To curtail any further catastrophe, Ford began laminating all of their glass to eliminate uncontrollable shattering, a technology borrowed from the French in 1919.

Auto Glass Innovations

    Glass lamination was the earliest safety advancement in the auto glass industry. These new windshields were comprised of two layers of laminated glass separated by an inner cellulose layer which holds the glass in place if shattered during an accident. The durable nature of this style of glass also meant replacement was less necessary due to slight chips or cracks. Modern windshields are laminated with polyvinyl butyral, while side windows and mirrors are made with tempered glass.

Installation and Auto Glass Replacement

    Installation is a big factor in whether or not an auto glass replacement will be successful. Butyl is the bonding adhesive predominant in the auto glass industry until the 1970s. Due to a shift in car manufacturing towards lighter vehicles with weaker roof support, butyl was replaced with the significantly stronger urethane adhesive.

Mobile Auto Glass Replacement

    Mobile auto glass replacement is a growing trend in which companies will do installations and repairs on site or even come to the customer's home. Some cases of windshield damage can render a car immobile. This service provides an alternative to driving with a broken windshield or window to the repair shop under rainy or dangerous conditions.

How to Replace the Rear Window in a Chrysler Sebring Convertible

If your Chrysler Sebring Convertible rear window becomes damaged, it will cause your window to require a replacement. When replacing your rear window, you need to remove the caulking seal from around the window and install a new one. You can pick up a replacement rear window for your Chrysler Sebring from your local auto store. When carrying out the work, you should have some help at hand to help remove and insert the rear window.

Instructions

    1

    Use a sharp blade to cut away the black rubber weather stripping perimeter around the edge of the window. Begin by making an incision at the top of the perimeter and proceed to cut around the tape in a clockwise direction.

    2

    Enter the back seat side of the window, and carefully press the back window out of the window frame. Have someone on hand outside the vehicle to help take the weight of the window.

    3

    Use a cloth to clean away all of the adhesive around the edge of the windshield frame.

    4

    Use the caulk gun to insert a thin layer of urethane caulk around the edges of the window frame. Place a layer of window sealant around the edge of the rear window

    5

    Lift the new window and place it into the window frame. Press the edges against the frame to allow a seal to set in place. Leave the window and caulk to cure for 24 hours to allow an airtight seal, and to set the window firmly in place.

How to Remove a Chevrolet Brake Pedal Retaining Clip

The brake pedal on a Chevrolet connects to the brake booster via a push rod. This push rod is held in place by a wedge-shaped clip that secures the pedal, push rod and brake-light switch together. If you need to remove the brake booster, brake pedal or brake-light switch for repair, then the clip has to come off the pedal. This can be mildly frustrating to do, but you should be able to accomplish this in under 10 minutes. These steps relate to a 2006 Chevrolet Silverado, but the process is similar for other Chevy makes and models.

Instructions

    1

    Crawl under the dashboard and aim the flashlight on the top of the brake pedal where the brake booster push rod connects to the brake pedal itself.

    2

    Insert the blade of the flat-head screwdriver into the clip. Twist the handle of the screwdriver so that the clip spreads out.

    3

    Push the clip up until it pops free. Remove the clip from the brake pedal assembly.

Senin, 23 Juli 2012

How to Replace the Windshield in a 1992 Dodge

How to Replace the Windshield in a 1992 Dodge

If the windshield in your 1992 Dodge becomes cracked, scratched or damaged, you may have to replace the full windshield. Obtain help in removing and installing the windshield, as the size and weight of the glass makes this a difficult job for one person. Specialized tools and components are not required for this task, and most needed items are available in auto parts stores.

Instructions

    1

    Place covers on the hood of the vehicle to help protect the paint work while replacing the windshield.

    2

    Use a screwdriver to remove one of the two screws which secure the rearview wing-mirrors to each of their bases. This will allow you to slide the mirrors away from the bases.

    3

    Use a sharp blade to cut away the rubber seal around the edges of the windshield. Pull the seal away with your hand as you cut it.

    4

    Enter the vehicle, and carefully press the windshield out of the frame. Have someone on hand outside the vehicle to help support the weight of the windshield. Place a thin layer of sealant around the edges of the new windshield.

    5

    Attach the new gasket to the windshield; the heavy side should be on the inside and the slit on the outside. Tie a nylon cord around the outer groove of the windshield.

    6

    Position the new windshield in the frame. Press it in place for a few minutes to allow a seal to set. Pull the nylon cord along the frame inside the vehicle to allow the rubber lip to set in place. Clean the windshield and dashboard to prevent any debris from getting in the vents. Reattach the wing mirrors by sliding them onto their bases and reinstalling the previously removed screw.

How to Remove Rust From Glass

Rust deposits from metal window trim can leave rust marks and rust deposits on the surrounding glass edge of an automobile. This rust won't harm the glass, but it does look unsightly. Rust is caused by oxidation of metal. Many vehicles don't have metal window trim today, but if your automobile has it, the likelihood that the trim and surrounding glass has developed rust spots is high.

Instructions

    1

    Remove rust deposits with a razor blade. If there are any actual deposits on the glass, scrape these off with the razor blade. Automotive glass is typically not damaged by this technique as long as you keep the blade at a 45-degree angle with the surface of the glass.

    2

    Scrub the glass with a scouring pad. You may need to scrub hard to remove rust stains, but the glass should come clean.

    3

    Wash the window with hot, soapy, water.

    4

    Rinse the window with water and towel it dry.

How to Install a Windshield in a GTO

The windshield on a Pontiac GTO will need to be replaced if there is a stone chip or crack in the it that measures more than an inch in length. When you've removed the windshield, there is a special process that will need to be followed to install the windshield back into the GTO. If you don't install the windshield properly, the glass won't adhere to the frame.

Instructions

    1

    Apply urethane primer to the frit band on the outside of the windshield. The frit band is the black strip running around the perimeter of the windshield.

    2

    Seat the rubber molding around the edge of the windshield glass.

    3

    Clean the GTO windshield frame by trimming the remaining urethane on the frame down to 3 mm with a razor.

    4

    Clean the frame where the windshield will go with a cleaning brush.

    5

    Apply a bead of urethane sealant to the windshield window frame. Use an electric caulking gun for improved consistency over a manually operated gun.

    6

    Align the top, bottom and sides of the windshield to the windshield frame. Press the glass into place. You may need the help of an assistant for this part. When you align the windshield, set the bottom of the windshield in place first and have an assistant hold it at the bottom to keep it from sliding while you press the top in place. Allow the urethane to cure for 12 hours.

How to Repair the Back Window on a Buick Regal

Sometimes broken window glass or an electric window motor requires do-it-yourself repairs. You can replace a broken or cracked back door window on a Buick Regal with some ease. Buick Regal replacement glass is available at Buick dealers and auto glass dealers. Save some money by shopping at auto salvage yards. Salvage yards often have unbroken glass from junked vehicles. If the motor has stopped working, it too can be replaced in under an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect the battery cables to avoid accidental electrical shock from power door locks and power window electrical connections. Remove the ground (black) cable first, then remove the positive (red) cable from the battery. Make sure that the rear window to be replaced is in the "up" position.

    2

    Remove the inner door panel from the rear door where the window is malfunctioning or where the glass is broken. Put all the screws in a safe place so that they can be used to reattach the inner door panel.

    3

    Lift the broken or damaged glass out of the door. Lift the replacement glass and place in the top of the window frame inside the door. Use packing or duct tape to hold the glass in place by attaching tape to the inside of the glass and stretching the tape over the top of the door frame and attaching it to the other side of the glass.

    4

    Use a socket wrench to remove the bolts that hold the window motor and door mount. Unplug the wiring from the old motor. Plug the wiring into the new motor. Bolt the new window motor in the place where the old motor was bolted.

    5

    Remove the duct tape or packing tape that was used to hold the new window glass in place. Replace the inside door cover. Reattach the battery cables to your battery by attaching the ground (black) cable first then the positive (red) cable. Turn on the car and test the new window motor.

Windshield Replacement Problems

Windshield Replacement Problems

When a broken windshield is replaced, it's important to make sure it's done properly. Replacement problems could cause annoying noise or even something as severe as the windshield falling off while driving. Proper installation prevents these issues.

Leaks

    Water and air leaks usually happen when the adhesive is not properly applied. Some shops take shortcuts by not removing sealant from the old windshield, which can prevent new adhesive from properly adhering. Dirt on windshields that haven't been cleaned before installation and rust on the body of the vehicle can prevent adhesive from properly setting.

Alignment

    A rush job can keep a windshield from being correctly aligned. Windshields often have a rubber weather shield on their edges. Many vehicle models use this weather shield to seal doors, so improper alignment can allow water and air to enter through the door.

Driving Too Soon

    Different adhesives require varying times to set. The Best Glass website states it usually takes between 3 and 24 hours before the vehicle is safe to drive.

Minggu, 22 Juli 2012

How to Seal a Leaky Windshield

How to Seal a Leaky Windshield

A leak in a windshield can lead to an annoying whistling sound caused by the wind as you drive your vehicle. It can also mean that water is able to seep into the vehicle, potentially causing interior damage or electrical problems. The seal around a windshield is meant to hold it in place and keep it watertight. But time and exposure to the elements can dry out or crack this seal, meaning it will need to be repaired or replaced. In many cases you can seal the leak yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Find the leak in the windshield first by visually inspecting the rubber seal around the glass. Look for tears, cracks or areas where the rubber is separated from the glass or the outer frame. You may also use a toothpick and try to wedge between the glass and the seal. If the toothpick will go in more than a quarter inch, it's likely that water can get through the space too. If you are still unable to find the leak, get inside the vehicle and have someone else spray a water hose on the windshield until you can find where water begins to trickle in.

    2

    Clean the seal thoroughly before beginning repairs. Remove all debris that may have built up inside the cracks or crevices in the seal. Clean away dirt and other substances from cracks, and use a toothpick to scrape out any debris caught underneath a separated seal. You will likely be able to get a considerable amount of material out from underneath the bottom edge of the windshield with the toothpick as the wind forces it under the edges.

    3

    Bind any loose molding around the windshield with duct tape. This is an optional step only needed if the seal around the windshield is in a condition that causes a gap where water can enter. The tape holds the seal in place so a sealing substance can be put in place.

    4

    Squeeze a small amount of silicone made specifically for windshield repair into the cracks or other damaged areas of the leaky windshield seal. Just put enough of the material into the leaking area to fill it and then wipe away any extra that runs out. This is a light and runny substance that will have to be handled carefully to keep it from spilling onto paint or other unintended areas.

    5

    Leave the silicone on the leaky windshield overnight to completely dry. The following morning it should be sealed airtight. Remove any dried silicone that got onto the glass or the rubber seal. Use a razor blade to scrape it from the glass, and peel the silicone on the rubber off by hand carefully.

South Carolina Windshield Replacement Regulations

South Carolina Windshield Replacement Regulations

In South Carolina's Code of Laws, there are specific guidelines for auto safety glass. Residents of South Carolina who have 100 percent auto insurance coverage enjoy a benefit when it comes to windshield replacement. In general, South Carolina state laws require that auto safety glass be free of damage and clear.

Code of Laws

    Section 56-5-5000 of the South Carolina Code of Laws states that safety glass in vehicles must be unobstructed. A cracked or damaged windshield can be dangerous and can obstruct the driver's vision. The law requires you to fix or replace a broken windshield.

Insurance

    South Carolina is one of the few zero-deductible states when it comes to windshield replacements. When your windshield is damaged, if you have full insurance coverage, you can replace it without a deductible.

Type of Glass

    Auto Glass SC recommends purchasing a windshield that has a high-impact rating, meaning it won't break easily under the pressure of low-impact items. The glass should be laminated and multilayered. Ask about warranties when you get a windshield replacement.

Tinting

    South Carolina regulates the tinting of auto glass. Car owners can have tint on windows and windshields, but people outside of the vehicle must be able to see in.

How do I Compress Brake Pads in a 1995 Mercury Sable?

How do I Compress Brake Pads in a 1995 Mercury Sable?

The brake pads on the 1995 Mercury Sable is responsible for stopping the vehicle by applying friction to the brake rotors. The pads are housed inside of the brake caliper and every time the brake pedal is pushed in, the caliper pushes the brake pads to the inner and outer sides of the brake rotor. As the brake pads are sliding against the brake rotor, the friction from the pads stops the brake rotor from turning and in return stops the vehicle.

Instructions

    1

    Pull both front wheels off of the front of the 1995 Mercury Sable.

    2

    Move to the front driver side wheel and locate the two upper and lower guide bolts that connect the brake caliper to the caliper mounting bracket. Remove the two guide bolts with the ratchet and a socket.

    3

    Locate the access opening on the side of the driver side front brake rotor. Insert the end of the small pry bar into the opening and position the pry bar between the rotor and the outer brake pad. Pry the outer brake pad against the caliper cylinder until the caliper becomes loose enough to pull off the brake rotor.

    4

    Pull the caliper straight off the side of the rotor and hang the caliper to the steering knuckle behind the wheel hub assembly with a piece of rope.

    5

    Remove the inner brake pad from the caliper. Slide the c-clamp inside of the caliper with the adjustment rod facing the outer brake pad. Compress the outer brake pad against the caliper cylinder by turning the c-clamp clockwise. With each turn of the c-clamp, the outer brake pad will push the caliper cylinder inward. Continue to compress the cylinder until it is completely inside of the caliper. Then, reinstall the caliper back over the rotor and secure the wheel to the hub.

    6

    Move to the other side of the 1995 Mercury Sable and repeat the same exact procedure to compress the brake pads.

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 1996 Subaru Outback

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 1996 Subaru Outback

The 1996 Subaru Outback came in two different body designs. There was the Subaru Impreza Outback and the more common Subaru Legacy Outback. Despite the different body designs, all Subarus manufactured in 1996 employed a very standardized procedure to replace front (and rear when applicable) brake pads. These all-wheel drive vehicles featured front disc brake pads, but could either come equipped with rear drum brakes (which use brake shoes and drums) or rear disc brakes (which use brake pads and rotors).

Instructions

    1

    Park the Outback on a level surface and then place a tire wedge behind one rear tire (for front pads replacement) or in front of one of the front tires (for rear pads replacement). Apply the parking brake only if you're replacing the front brake pads.

    2

    Open the hood and using a brake fluid siphon, remove 1/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder. Dispose of the old fluid in accordance with EPA regulations of your town and then replace the cap to the master cylinder.

    3

    Loosen the wheel lug nuts on the two tires of the axle you're replacing the brake pads on. Use the lug nut wrench to crack the lug nuts loose no more than half a turn away from the rim.

    4

    Lift one side of the Outback at a time using a car jack and then place a jack stand under the frame rail (front) or pinch/rocker panel (rear). Lower the jack so the Outback is safely supported on the jack stand and then repeat for the opposite side.

    5

    Completely remove the lug nuts and then remove the wheels.

    6

    Place the large C-clamp over the caliper and pad assembly so the screw part of the clamp is resting against the outside pad plate. Tighten the clamp until the caliper piston is fully seated inside the caliper bore housing.

    7

    Remove the lower caliper retaining bolt with the ratchet and a metric socket (most often a 14 mm socket).

    8

    Pivot the caliper upward away from the caliper mount and brake pads and then use the two foot length of durable twine to tie the pivoted caliper housing to the coil spring or shock. This will keep the caliper out of your way while removing and replacing the brake pads.

    9

    Remove the outside and inside brake pads from the caliper mount. Use the straightedge screwdriver to force them out of the mount if necessary. Use the screwdriver to remove the upper and lower pad mounting clips and then clean off the brake dust and rust from the clips using the stiff wire brush and then replace them into the caliper mount.

    10

    Remove the new pads from the packaging and, if necessary, apply the stick-on brake shims to the pad's plates. Stick-on shims use a cut-out inner wrapper that needs to be removed before sticking them onto the plates of the pads. Higher quality brake pads may feature riveted (or "staked") shims already affixed to the plates.

    11

    Apply an even coat of anti-squeal brake pad compound or spray to the plates and shims.

    12

    Apply an even coat of silicone brake grease to the upper and lowers tabs on the pads that mate against the mounting clips and then insert the pads into the caliper mount.

    13

    Untie the twine and allow the caliper to pivot downward over the pads and caliper mount assembly. Replace the lower caliper retaining bolt and tighten it with the torque ratchet and a socket to 30-foot pounds (for front bolts) or 17-foot pounds (for rear bolts).

    14

    Repeat the brake pads replacement for the opposite wheel and then replace the wheels and the lug nuts. Use the lug nut wrench to tighten the lug nuts so they are flush to the wheel hubs. Employ a crisscross pattern when tightening the nuts with the lug nut wrench.

    15

    Lower the Outback to the ground using the jack and removing one jack stand at a time. Release the parking brake if applicable.

    16

    Apply the brake pedal in a pumping action to reset the caliper pistons. When the pedal feels firm, check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder and top it off to the full line with brake fluid only. Remove the tire wedge and then drive the Outback for proper braking response.

How to Replace an Astro Heater Core

How to Replace an Astro Heater Core

The heater core in the Chevy Astro van acts like a small radiator that the engine coolant passes through. If the van's heater has trouble working, you may need to replace the core. The good news is that you don't need to completely remove the instrument panel to reach the core like you do on most vehicles.

Instructions

    1

    Drain the van's engine coolant. With the engine cool and the parking brake applied, remove the radiator cap, place a large container under the radiator drain and remove the drain fitting. After draining the coolant at the radiator, move the container to the engine block and remove its drain plug to drain the remaining coolant.

    2

    Remove the coolant reservoir by disconnecting the overflow hose from the radiator filler neck, removing the fasteners for this reservoir and the windshield washer fluid reservoir, lifting both up and separating the coolant reservoir from the other one. This is needed if the van is a 1994 model or older. On newer models, disconnect the reservoir for the windshield washer fluid by removing its bolts and moving it aside.

    3

    Detach the heater hoses from the heater core tubes at the firewall by loosening their hose clamps. Plug the core tubes with rubber to prevent contaminants from entering.

    4

    Reach under the dashboard in the van's passenger compartment and remove the screws for the heater core cover to remove it--the cover should have a half-cylinder shape. Remove the two mounting screws at the rear of the heater core and lift the core out of its housing.

    5

    Insert the new heater core into the housing and fasten it with the mounting screws. Connect the core cover back in place.

    6

    Unplug and reconnect the hoses to the heater tubes with their clamps. Reconnect any components (like the washer fluid reservoir or coolant reservoir) that you disconnected to access the hoses.

    7

    Refill the coolant after replugging the drains at the radiator and engine block. Add the 50/50 mix of water and antifreeze to the radiator until it's full and the reservoir to the lower mark. Run the engine in a ventilated area with the radiator cap off until the upper radiator hose is hot, shut off the engine and let it cool, then add more coolant up to the reservoir's lower mark.

Sabtu, 21 Juli 2012

How to Fix a Broken Car Mirror

How to Fix a Broken Car Mirror

The side view mirrors on a car are delicate, and it doesn't take much to damage one. Professional auto repair shops might charge an arm and a leg to fix a broken mirror, but luckily ,it isn't hard to repair a car mirror on your own. With the proper tools, you can replace the glass in a few minutes and be on your way, and for much cheaper than you would have paid at the dealership.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase a new mirror designed for your car. There are a number of websites that offer a selection of car mirrors, such as DiscountAutoMirrors.com. You can also pick one up from a local junkyard or auto glass shop.

    2

    Use a flat tip screwdriver and a hairdryer, applying heat to the rest of the broken mirror in the frame then prying out the remaining shards. Make sure to scrape off all the glue and broken glass that you can, and use a vacuum cleaner to suck up any broken glass as you go.

    3

    Clean the frame and the new mirror with water. Wipe them down and allow them to dry briefly before applying the adhesive.

    4

    Squeeze a quarter-size amount of silicone adhesive into the center of the frame and smear it outward towards the four corners. Avoid spreading the adhesive beyond the edge of the frame.

    5

    Tape the mirror securely to the frame with painter's tape then wait 24 hours before driving the vehicle.

How to Change the Brake Pads & Rotors on a 1999 Avalon

How to Change the Brake Pads & Rotors on a 1999 Avalon

The brake rotors on the Toyota Avalon are made from cast iron. Brake pads are made of a variety of materials, depending on the grade that you buy. For instance, semi-metallic brake pads, called lifetime pads, will last much longer than standard pads. Regardless of whether they are lifetime pads or not, they still wear and you will eventually need to change them. They do, however, last much longer than the standard brake pads. If you are use your brakes a lot, the semi-metallic brakes may be the better value for you.

Instructions

    1

    Open the engine compartment and drain on-half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster. Put the fluid into the drain pan for recycling. Place some wheel chocks behind the rear wheels of the Toyota. Lift the car with the automobile jack on the side where you are starting. Place a jack stand under the car close to the jacking point and raise it to the frame.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Pull the tire away from the Toyota. Loosen the bolts that secure the caliper to the bracket using a socket and ratchet. Pull the caliper away from the bracket. Remove the brake pads from the caliper. Push the piston back inside the caliper housing. You can do this with your hands by pushing on the piston as you twist it back into the housing.

    3

    Secure the caliper to the strut using a wire tie. Do not allow the caliper to hang by the hose or you will stretch and damage it. Pull the brake rotor from the wheel hub. Clean the wheel hub using the wire brush. Make sure you clean it thoroughly, or it may cause uneven wear on the brake rotors. Put the new rotor on the wheel assembly. Cut the wire tie holding the caliper to the strut with the pliers.

    4

    Insert the new brake pads into the caliper. Reinstall any shims that may have been installed with the old brake pads as well. Place the brake caliper on the mounting bracket and tighten the retaining bolts with the socket and ratchet. Place the wheel back on the Toyota and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Avalon. Lower the vehicle to the ground. Repeat the procedure on the other wheel.

    5

    When the project is complete, add fresh brake fluid to the master cylinder as needed. Pump the brake pedal several times until the pedal is firm. This seats the brake pads on the rotors and ensures that the brakes are ready when you need to stop.

Jumat, 20 Juli 2012

How to Replace a Dodge Dakota Window

How to Replace a Dodge Dakota Window

If the one of the windows on your Dodge Dakota truck is cracked or broken, you need to replace it. If the window glass itself is intact but not rolling up or down properly, the problem is likely the regulator. If you need to replace the window glass and/or the regulator, you need to get inside the door by removing the inner trim panel. The exact process can differ depending on the year of the truck and whether or not the door has components like speakers installed.

Instructions

Removing the Door Panel

    1

    Pry off the controls for the power windows using a trim stick. If the Dakota has manual windows, work a cloth between the window crank and the door to disconnect its clip and remove the crank.

    2

    Remove the door panel's retaining screws with a screwdriver. Their main locations are along the panel's bottom edge and within the inner door handle.

    3

    Pull the door panel upward to release its hooks from the door, then raise it off the door. Disconnect all wiring harness connectors and the handle link rod.

    4

    Peel back the plastic water shield on the door and pry the inner weather seal out of the door glass opening.

    5

    Remove the door's speaker by removing its mounting screws, lifting it out and disconnecting the electrical connector.

Repairing the Window

    6

    Raise the window to where you can access the glass' retaining nuts, then remove the nuts with a wrench (they may require a Torx wrench).

    7

    Tilt the glass forward to remove it from the track and then lift it out of the door.

    8

    Remove the mounting fasteners for the window regulator, unplug the electrical connector and remove the regulator from the door.

    9

    Install the replacement regulator into the door, bolt it to the door and track and connect the electrical connector.

    10

    Slide the window glass into the door, fit it into the regulator and track and bolt it in place.

    11

    Reconnect the inner trim panel in the reverse order of removal.

How Can I Fix Moisture Getting Inside My Car?

How Can I Fix Moisture Getting Inside My Car?

There are many reasons why moisture gets on the inside of a vehicle. Most often the seal between a door panel and frame has deteriorated or a window is not rolled all the way up. Alternatively, an improperly installed windshield or door window can also cause moisture in a vehicle. Some instances can be fixed at home, while others require professional assistance.

Instructions

    1
    Clean along the door frame to remove dirt and debris that can create gaps in the seal and result in moisture getting inside the vehicle.
    Clean along the door frame to remove dirt and debris that can create gaps in the seal and result in moisture getting inside the vehicle.

    Clean the vehicle. Some leaks maybe caused by an excess buildup of dirt and grime on the inside panels of the car. Give the vehicle a thorough cleaning and detailing. This should include the door track, door latch and weatherstripping areas on all vehicle openings.

    2

    Determine where moisture is leaking in. While it may seem obvious by the spots in a vehicle, it is still beneficial to double check. There may be more than one point of entry for moisture. Moisture is most often experienced inside of a vehicle after a heavy rain or several inches of melting snow. To determine this, you will want to water down the vehicle with a hose. Have one person on the inside to indicate where the leak is coming from.

    3

    Cut weatherstripping in the section where leak is if this is the source of the leak. Weatherstripping is designed to keep moisture outside and warm or cool air inside of a vehicle. Over time this can deteriorate from road grime, dirt and some abrasive chemicals that are used during car cleaning. Using the X-Acto knife, cut a slit downward--to the car frame--at two ends of the strip. This is rather flexible, therefore it should be easy to pull the weatherstripping off of the frame of the vehicle.

    4

    Scrape adhesive residue from car frame. Using a plastic scrape, slowly remove the remaining adhesive from the car frame. Once this has been removed, use soap and water to thoroughly clean the area of any residue, dirt or debris.

    5

    Cut and apply new weatherstripping. Measure the space and cut a new piece of weather stripping to inch longer than the measured length. Apply adhesive to the vehicle frame and attach new weatherstripping. Tuck the extra edge into the old weatherstripping. This alleviates any gaps in protection.

    6

    Apply automotive protectant to the weatherstripping and vehicle frame. Protectant creates a coat that keeps weatherstripping flexible so that it will not crack or break.

How to Change the Rear Brakes on an 2006 Pontiac G6

How to Change the Rear Brakes on an 2006 Pontiac G6

The 2006 Pontiac G6 is equipped with hydraulically operated disc brake systems on both the front and rear tires. Disc brake pads must be replaced on both the front or both of the rear wheels at the same time; never replace just one brake pad, because the disc brakes automatically compensate for pad wear. Generally, the front brakes will be replaced more often since they account for 70 percent of the car's stopping power. The replacement procedure is the same for both front and back brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the cap from the brake fluid reservoir and remove about two-thirds of the brake fluid. Be careful not to spill the fluid, as it can damage the car's paint.

    2

    Loosen the wheel lug nuts, raise the end of the vehicle with the jack and support it on jack stands. Block the wheels on the opposite end of the car. Loosen the wheel lug nuts the rest of the way and remove the wheels.

    3

    Wash the brakes with brake cleaner before disassembling. Remove the lower caliper bolt and pivot the caliper up. Secure it into place with a piece of wire.

    4

    Push the piston into the caliper bore with a C-clamp to make space for the new brake pads. Verify the brake fluid in the master cylinder does not overflow as you depress the piston.

    5

    Remove the outer brake pad from the mounting bracket first; then remove the inner pad. Remove both pad support plates. Clean and inspect them prior to reinstalling the plates.

    6

    Remove the upper and lower guide pins from the caliper mounting bracket and clean the grease off. Lubricate the guide pins with high-temperature grease and reinstall them. Verify the guide pin seals are properly installed.

    7

    Lubricate the ends of the new brake pads with a small amount of high-temperature grease where they will come into contact with the anti-rattle clips.

    8

    Install the inner brake pad and then install the outer pad. Place the caliper over the new pads and back onto the mounting bracket. On rear calipers, align the notch in the piston with the pin on the back of the inner brake pad Install the caliper mounting bolts and tighten them to 26 ft-lbs. using a torque wrench.

    9

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts and tighten the lug nuts. Lower the vehicle and remove jack stands. Then fully tighten the lug nuts to 100 ft-lbs. using a torque wrench.

    10

    Firmly depress the brake pedal a few times to bring the brake pads into contact with the disc. If you replaced the rear brake pads, apply and release the parking brake at least four times. Add brake fluid to the reservoir to achieve the necessary level.

How to Replace Brake Pads on a 1996 Ford Explorer

How to Replace Brake Pads on a 1996 Ford Explorer

The Ford Explorer name originally belonged to high-end F-150 models in the late 1970s. The 1996 Ford Explorer was an SUV produced with the option of two different engines: the 4.0-liter V-6, and the 5.0-liter V-8. The 1996 Explorer was also available in a choice of three different drive train options: two-wheel drive, four-wheel drive and all-wheel drive. The front brake assemblies on the 1996 Ford Explorers were ventilated disc brakes, while the rear brakes were drum style.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the hood of the Explorer. Remove the brake fluid reservoir cap to allow for fluid expansion in the reservoir during this project. Loosen the front wheel lug nuts, using a tire iron.

    2

    Lift the front end of the Explorer using a jack with a 2-ton or greater capacity on the frame rails of the SUV. Place jack stands beneath the front frame rails, just inside of the lower control arm inner ends. Do not attempt this project with the vehicle supported solely on a jack, as this can result in the jack collapsing. Remove the wheel lug nuts completely from the vehicle with a tire iron and then remove the front two wheels.

    3

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts on one side of the Explorer, using a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket. Pry the caliper halfway off the rotor, using a small pry bar or large, flat-head screwdriver. Insert the pry bar end or flat-head screwdriver tip into the hole in the back of the caliper between the rotor and the back pad and pry the pad inside the caliper to compress the caliper piston. Continue prying until the caliper piston is completely compressed inside the caliper.

    4

    Remove the caliper from the rotor and brake assembly and set the caliper onto the lower control arm, which is directly behind the rotor and steering knuckle assembly. Do not let the caliper hang freely or you will damage the rubber hose between the back of the caliper and frame of the Explorer.

    5

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket, prying them free with a pry bar if necessary. Visually inspect the points of contact between the pads and the caliper bracket prior to removing the pads. Remember the points where the pads touch the caliper bracket. Remove the pads completely from the vehicle.

    6

    Install caliper grease onto the points where the pads make contact with the caliper bracket. Only a thin film is needed. Properly lubricating all of the brake components at contact points other than the one between the pad and rotor is essential to the smooth operation of the brakes. You will want to lubricate points like the shim plates or anti-rattle clips on the caliper brackets, as the pads slide back and forth in these grooves. Simply stick your finger in the grease and lubricate the parts.

    7

    Install the new brake pads onto the caliper bracket. Make sure that the wear indicator is on the back side of the brake rotor, as this pad tends to wear out faster than the outside pad does. The wear indicator is a 90-degree metal elbow that protrudes from the back of the pad and wraps around the pad. When the pads get to a low enough point, this indicator will make contact with the rotor. This is the cause of the squealing heard in brakes pads that are too worn-out to be safe anymore.

    8

    Lubricate the backside of the brake pads or the metal shim plates. Use your finger to apply caliper grease to the back of both the rear and outer brake pads. Install the caliper back over the rotor and pad assembly. Tighten the caliper mounting bolts back onto the brake assembly, using a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket.

    9

    Repeat steps 2 through 8 to complete the replacement of the pads on the second side of the Explorer. Spray the entire front brake system using aerosol brake cleaner spray. You want to remove any excess grease and especially fingerprints from the faces of the brake rotors. When you have completely sprayed both sides of the truck thoroughly, you should have used an entire 16-oz. can of brake spray.

    10

    Install the front wheels and lug nuts, only after you have thoroughly checked and ensured that you have tightened all of the caliper mounting bolts properly. Raise the truck with a 2-ton jack, then remove the jack stands. Lower the Explorer to the ground and tighten the wheel lug nuts between 90 and 110 foot-pounds of torque, using a certified torque wrench and wheel nut socket. Replace the brake fluid reservoir cap, and shut the hood on the Explorer.

    11

    Immediately proceed to the driver's seat of the Explorer. Without starting the vehicle at all, pump the brake pedal no less than 15 times. Pumping the brakes when the vehicle is off will ensure that the caliper expands and seats the brake pads onto the rotors properly. The vehicle is safe to use only after the brakes have been properly pumped up and reseated.