Sabtu, 30 Juni 2012

How to Use Krazy Glue for a Cracked Windshield

How to Use Krazy Glue for a Cracked Windshield

Sometimes gravel flies when a vehicle travels down a road, and if your windshield gets hit with even the smallest pebble, it can cause a crack in the windshield. It is just as important to repair a small crack or chip as it is a larger crack. Driving along and bumping over a pot hole can make an unrepaired small crack into a huge crack instantly. Using Krazy Glue can be a temporary fix until you can get to a professional windshield repair shop.

Instructions

Wash the Windshield

    1

    Wash the vehicle's entire windshield by rinsing it with water both inside and outside. Fill a bucket will water and cleanser.

    2

    Place a sponge in the bucket then lift it out and squeeze out the excess water. Wipe the area gently with the sponge.

    3

    Dump out the dirty water and fill the bucket again with water. Put a clean sponge into the bucket water then lift the sponge out of the water and squeeze out excess water. Rinse the windshield by gently going over the windshield with the sponge.

    4

    Dry the windshield completely with paper towels. The windshield should be dry before progressing to the next section. Spray and wipe dry with window cleaner, if desired.

Repair a Windshield Crack

    5

    Open your Krazy Glue container carefully. If it has not been previously used, cut off the tip using a scissors. Take care not to get any glue on your hands.

    6

    Align the tip along the crack and softly squeeze out the glue moving down the entire crack from top to bottom. Use only a small amount of glue. It can be reapplied, if needed.

    7

    Use a cotton swab to avoid skin touching the glue to put the glue into the crack.

    8

    Repeat Steps 1 through 3 on the outside of the windshield crack as well to secure it.

How to Replace the Brake Lines on a F150

The brake lines on your Ford F150's brake system can puncture, or become damaged or corroded, leading to a loss of brake fluid. You need to replace these damaged lines quickly to avoid an impact on vehicle performance. Each brake assembly has its own line and hose that connects it to the rest of the system. When you remove and replace a line, it lets air into the system that you need to bleed out once the installation is complete. Keep in mind that this step requires an assistant.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the F150 truck with a floor jack and support it on jack stands. Remove the wheel for the brake line you are changing.

    2

    Inspect the condition of the flexible hoses connecting the brake line to the caliper. You'll need to replace the hose if it is worn or has deteriorated.

    3

    Disconnect the brake line at the junction block that links it to the flexible brake hose and at the other end where it connects to the rest of the brake system. Use a flare-nut wrench on the fittings.

    4

    Connect the replacement brake line to both fittings. Use a prefabricated brake line that is already bent into the shape needed and is flared with the fittings attached at both ends. Tighten the fittings.

    5

    Open the master cylinder in the engine compartment and top it off with brake fluid. Press the brake pedal several times to remove vacuum from the booster.

    6

    Fill a small bottle or similar container about a quarter full with brake fluid. Loosen the bleeder screw on the brake caliper slightly with a wrench and connect a clear tube to the screw fitting, submerging the tube's other end in the container.

    7

    Open the bleeder screw while a second person holds down on the brake pedal and look for air and fluid to enter the container. Tighten the screw when the fluid begins to slow. Repeat until only fluid comes out the tube.

    8

    Reconnect the wheel and lower the truck.

How to Repair a Toyota Corolla Power Window

How to Repair a Toyota Corolla Power Window

Repairing a malfunctioning power window in your Toyota Corolla depends primarily on the year of your model. The window itself is comprised of the main components -- the glass, regulator, wiring and switch -- but their exact installation depends on the year it was made. Some parts may not be easily accessible on some models. Check with your mechanic to see how easilyyou can perform work on your own windows.

Instructions

    1

    Pry the control switch for the window out of the door trim panel using a trim stick or a similar flat tool. The switch plate is normally located on the armrest.

    2

    Remove all small trim panels near or on the main panel -- this can include the mirror panel, door handle and armrest panels -- and then unscrew the door panel with your screwdriver and pry the panel off the door with a putty knife or similar tool.

    3

    Remove the door access plate that covers the access hole if needed. There are usually three screws in a triangular pattern.

    4

    Reconnect the power switch to its electrical connector and lower the window, if needed, to access the window glass bolts. Remove the bolts with your wrench and push/slide the glass out the door.

    5

    Inspect the wiring; disconnect it from the regulator, feed it out the door and replace it if the wiring is damaged.

    6

    Unbolt and remove the window regulator from the door. On many newer models since 2003, the regulator is a more permanent fixture in the door and will require professional assistance.

Installation

    7

    Install the replacement window regulator in the door using its bolts. Connect the electrical connector to the regulator.

    8

    Slide the glass (old or replacement) through the slot into the door and within the regulator channels and bolt it in place.

    9

    Reconnect the access plate to the door with its screws if needed.

    10

    Connect the door trim panel with its clips and screws and then reconnect the other trim panels. Reconnect the switch plate with its electrical connector.

How to Remove the Rear Drum on a 2002 Ford Focus

How to Remove the Rear Drum on a 2002 Ford Focus

Ford Motor Co. introduced the Focus as its new entry-level small car in 2000. The Focus comes standard with front disc brakes, and depending on the model year and trim level, either rear drum or disc brakes. The drum brake design adopted by Ford for the Focus is somewhat different than many other vehicles. In particular, removal of the drum assembly is more complicated than on many other small cars. Armed with a little knowledge and a little perseverance, the amateur mechanic can remove the drum and perform his own drum brake service.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a firm and level surface. Put automatic transmissions in park and put manual transmissions in first or reverse gear. Do not set the emergency brake. Securely block the front wheels to prevent movement of the car. Loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheel one full turn and then jack the car up. Place the car securely on an axle stand. Completely remove the lug nuts and pull the wheel off.

    2

    Remove the four retaining bolts that secure the drum and hub assembly. The bolts are accessed from the rear of the brake, and can be best reached with a socket wrench, swivel adapter and extension. If you do not have a swivel adapter, then remove the retaining bolt that secures the lower end of the strut and swing the strut out of the way to give clear access to the drum assembly retaining bolts. If the vehicle is equipped with ABS brakes, then disconnect the ABS wire by pulling the plug out of the receptacle on the brake backing plate. Pull the drum and hub off the axle spindle. If the drum is difficult to remove, first be sure the parking brake is fully disengaged. Firmly tap the outside shoulder of the drum with a rubber or plastic mallet to loosen the drum. This is the drum-removal procedure as recommended in the Focus shop manual.

    3

    An alternative drum-removal procedure is to remove the hub nut that holds the drum to the hub and then pull the drum straight off the hub. To access the hub nut, first pry off the hub nut cap. Be careful not to damage the cap so that it can be reused during reassembly. Use a large socket and breaker bar to remove the hub nut. If the drum is difficult to remove, first be sure the parking brake is fully disengaged. Firmly tap the outside shoulder of the drum with rubber or plastic mallet to loosen the drum.

Jumat, 29 Juni 2012

How to Replace a Window Regulator on 2001 Jetta

How to Replace a Window Regulator on 2001 Jetta

The window regulators in the Volkswagen Jetta are hard to replace because they are permanently built into the plastic inner door carrier. The regulator can't be separated from the carrier and replaced by itself. If any individual components like the manual window winder or power window motor are the problem, they can be replaced. If you must replace the regulator, you'll need to replace the entire plastic carrier; consult your mechanic first.

Instructions

Removing the Trim Panel

    1

    Disconnect the Jetta's negative battery cable.

    2

    Pry the switch bezel out with a small screwdriver if you're working on the driver's side door and it has power windows. If you're working on any door with manual windows, slide the window crank's spacer away from the knob end of the handle to remove it.

    3

    Disconnect the pull handle grip on a driver's door or pry off the door pull cover on a passenger door. Remove the screws behind the part you just removed along with the screws at the bottom edge of the door trim panel.

    4

    Disengage the door panel from its clips by prying it off along the edges with a trim stick. Lift the door sharply upward and disconnect the inner lock rod from the door handle and all electrical connectors.

Power Window Motor

    5

    Remove the power window motor by removing the fasteners at the front end of the carrier. You don't need to remove the carrier in this case.

    6

    Mount the replacement motor in place at the carrier's front end and install the mounting bolts.

    7

    Reconnect the door trim panel.

Window Regulator/Winder

    8

    Loosen the window glass track bolts through the holes near the top of the carrier; you need to remove the rubber plugs in the carrier and use a socket wrench with an extension. Release the glass by separating the clamps.

    9

    Tape down the glass to keep it in its current position and lower the regulator all the way down. Tilt the glass' rear end upward and out of the door to remove it.

    10

    Unscrew the 10 bolts holding the plastic carrier in place on the door and lift it up and toward the door's inner edge. Disconnect the electrical connector for the door lock solenoid at the rear of the carrier.

    11

    Disconnect the window winder from the carrier by removing the fasteners that are accessible from the back.

    12

    Connect the replacement window winder to the carrier or the current winder to the replacement carrier.

    13

    Fasten the carrier back in place on the door, then raise the regulator until the bolts for the glass are accessible through the carrier holes near the top.

    14

    Lower the window glass into the door, starting with the front end, tilt it into position until the clamps fit a round it and tighten the bolts.

    15

    Connect the door's inner trim panel.

Kamis, 28 Juni 2012

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Mitsubishi Eclipse

Make parking brake adjustments in your Mitsubishi Eclipse easily to save you time and money, avoiding the mechanic shop and making the adjustment at home. Adjust the parking brake when your car starts to slip when parked on a slope. Use these instructions for models from 1990 to 1994.

Instructions

    1

    Start your Mitsubishi Eclipse engine. Press down on the brake pedal five or six times.

    2

    Pull up on the parking brake lever. Locate the parking brake lever between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat. Note how many clicks it takes to get to the upward position with the parking brake lever. Normal clicks are five to seven.

    3

    Remove the carpet on the floor around the parking brake lever. Turn the adjuster nut with your pliers or wrench until the parking brake lever is at five to seven clicks when pulling up.

    4

    Rotate the lock nut toward the adjuster nut with your pliers or wrench. This holds the adjuster nut in place.

    5

    Raise your Mitsubishi Eclipse rear wheels in the air using the jack. Support the rear wheels with the jack stands. Verify the rear wheels turn freely while the parking brake lever releases. Continue to adjust the parking brake adjuster nut if the rear wheels do not turn freely.

How to Change Rear Disc Brakes on a 2000 Volkswagen Jetta

The 2000 Volkswagen Jetta had a wide array of options to fit nearly any type of buyer. The most impressive of its options was its array of engines. The standard engine was a 115-horsepower, 2.0-liter four-cylinder. It also had a 150-horsepower, 1.8-liter turbocharged engine, a 90-horsepower 1.9-liter diesel engine and a high-output, 174-horsepower, 2.8-liter V-6. Despite its numerous engine options, it only had one rear brake configuration. Replacing the 2000 Jettas rear brakes is straightforward, once you disconnect the parking brake cable.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the Jettas ignition to the Off position, then press and release the brake pedal 25 to 35 times to relive any pressure stored in the ABS hydraulic modulator.

    2

    Unscrew the lid from the brake master cylinder and siphon out about half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir with a clean turkey baster. Transfer this fluid to a small container for later disposal.

    3

    Loosen the rear wheel bolts with a ratchet and socket, and raise the rear of the Jetta with a floor jack. Slide jack stands under the lower suspension arm and lower the Jetta onto the jack stands. Remove the wheel bolts and remove the rear wheels.

    4

    Look on the rear of the caliper and find where the parking brake cable the semi-rigid cabling connects to the brake caliper. Grab the parking brake cable-retaining clip the clip holding the caliper in place on the caliper with needle-nose pliers and pull the clip from the caliper. Pivot the parking brake lever on the caliper downward and remove the end of the parking brake cable from the lever. Set the parking brake cable and clip aside.

    5

    Remove the caliper bolts with a ratchet and socket, while holding each caliper guide pin steady with a combination wrench. Pull the caliper upward and off the caliper bracket. Hang the caliper from the rear coil spring with a bungee cord or coat hanger never let the caliper hang by its rubber hose.

    6

    Pull the brake pads off the caliper bracket and remove the pad slippers the thin, metal shims above and below the brake pads from the caliper bracket.

    7

    Remove the two caliper bracket bolts with a ratchet and socket, and pull the caliper bracket off the rear hub. Remove the two screws securing the rotor to the rear hub with a Phillips screwdriver. If the screws do not loosen easily, lightly tap the head of each screw with a hammer to free it. Pull the rotor off the hub lightly strike the rear of the rotor with a rubber mallet if it doesnt pull off easily.

    8

    Inspect the rotor for visible defects, including deep grooves, hot spots, signs of grinding or a mirror-like shine. Replace the rotor with a new one if any defects exist.

    9

    Set the rotor on the Jettas rear hub, lining up the screw holes in the rotor with those in the hub. Tighten the rotor-retaining screw with a Phillips screwdriver.

    10

    Position the caliper bracket back into place on the rear hub and hand-tighten its retaining bolts. Torque the caliper bracket retaining bolts to 70 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. Press new pad slippers included with new brake pads into the caliper bracket. Slide new brake pads into the caliper bracket.

    11

    Press the caliper piston into the caliper using a caliper piston tool. The exact process varies, depending on the type of tool used, but the basic concept is to turn the piston clockwise as you press it into the caliper. Refer to the tools instructions for specifics.

    12

    Set the caliper in place on the caliper bracket and hand-tighten its retaining bolts. Tighten each caliper bolt to 26 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket as you hold its respective caliper pin with a combination wrench.

    13

    Reinsert the parking brake cable into its mounting bracket in the rear caliper and press the clip through the slot in the cables bracket to lock it into place. Pivot the parking brake lever downward and slide the end of the cable into the end of the lever. Allow the parking brake lever to pivot upward until the end of the cable seats into the lever.

    14

    Repeat Steps 4 through 13 to replace the brake pads on the other side of the Jetta.

    15

    Set the rear wheels on the Jettas rear hubs and line up the bolt holes in the wheels with those in the hub. Hand-tighten the rear wheel bolts. Raise the rear of the Jetta off the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the Jetta to the ground. Tighten the wheel bolts, in a crisscross pattern, to 89 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    16

    Press and release the brake pedal about 40 times to seat the rear caliper piston onto the rear pads. Check the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir and add DOT 4 brake fluid until the level reaches the Max line, if needed. Tighten the lid onto the master cylinder reservoir.

    17

    Take the old brake fluid to a nearby used-automotive-fluid-recycling-center for disposal. Some auto parts stores take brake fluid free of charge.

How to Replace the Rotor in a Pontiac Grand Prix

The Pontiac Grand Prix utilizes four brake rotors, also known as brake discs, to keep your car braking safely. Rotors tend to last for quite a while before they need to be changed, but if they become warped or worn down and can't be resurfaced, then it's time to replace them. The process is pretty easy and you can do it in your own garage.

Instructions

    1

    Drain half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder to prevent overflow. Next, raise your Grand Prix using a jack and jack stands to support your vehicle. Block the wheels to keep your car from rolling while you work. Remove the first tire and wheel assembly.

    2

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts. Use a c-clamp over the caliper to compress the pistons into the caliper bore to give you enough clearance to slide the caliper off of the rotor. The caliper must remain connected to the brake hose through the installation, so hang the caliper from the undercarriage of your Grand Prix while you work.

    3

    Pull off the old rotor and then clean the area with a damp cloth. Slide the new rotor into position on the hub.

    4

    Discard the wire and then replace the caliper and brake line to its original position. Tighten and torque the caliper mounting bolts. Replace the wheel assembly and tire.

    5

    Repeat this process for each additional rotor. Then, lower your Pontiac, tighten and torque the lug nuts and refill the master cylinder with new brake fluid. Pump the brake until you get a firm pedal and then road test your car to make sure the new rotors are working correctly.

How to Replace the Rear Brake Line in a Saturn

If the brake line on a Saturn develops a kink or a hole, a replacement is required. If you try to straighten a kink in the line, it will simply break. Attempting to plug a hole risks the danger of the plugging material falling off or plugging the line completely. Changing a brake line does not take very long and you may complete the task in your driveway or garage.

Instructions

    1

    Place a set of wheel chocks in front of the front tires of the Saturn. Open the engine compartment and locate the master cylinder on the back firewall on the driver side of the car. Unsnap the lid and drain the brake fluid using the turkey baster. Place the fluid in the drain pan for recycling. Raise the rear end of the Saturn using a jack.

    2

    Place a jack stand under the Saturn near the jacking point and raise it to the frame. Remove the wheel by loosening the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Crawl under the Saturn and locate the affected brake line. Clean the fittings thoroughly using a wire brush. They must be clean before you disconnect the fittings to prevent contaminating the brake lines.

    3

    Loosen the brake line fittings using a wrench. You may have to hold the connector with another wrench to keep it from turning when you loosen the fittings. Disconnect one side at a time so you can catch any remaining brake fluid in the drain pan. Unsnap the brake line from the retaining clips and pull it from under the Saturn.

    4

    Put the new brake line in place and snap it into the retaining clips. Connect the brake line fittings and tighten them with a wrench. Replace the wheel on the Saturn and tighten the lug nuts with a lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Saturn. Lower the car to the ground. Add fresh brake fluid to bring the master cylinder to the full mark.

    5

    Bleed the air out of the brake lines by having a helper pump and hold the brakes while you open the bleeder valve with a wrench to let the air out of the lines. Continue this procedure until all air is gone from the brake lines. You may have to add more brake fluid during the process.

How to Replace a Ford Ranger Slider Window

How to Replace a Ford Ranger Slider Window

The slider window on a Ford Ranger pickup is actually composed of four glass panes inside the rear window assembly. The larger panes on the left and right sides are fixed. The center third of the rear window assembly is comprised of two sliding panes that can be spread apart or locked together to secure the vehicle. If one of the window panes has been damaged, the entire rear window assembly must be removed from the vehicle for the broken pane to be replaced.

Instructions

Removing the Window From the Cab

    1

    Unscrew the screws that secure the plastic interior mounding around the rear window using a Phillips screwdriver.

    2

    Pull away any interior molding surrounding the window assembly.

    3

    Ask an assistant to stand in the bed of the truck and support the window.

    4

    Pull the weatherstripping on the inside of the window assembly, away from the vehicles body using your hand.

    5

    Push the window assembly out through the rear of the cab using your hand. Make sure your assistant is there to support it.

    6

    Clean the window opening in the cab using soap and water.

Removing the Slider Windows

    7

    Open the window.

    8

    Unscrew the screws that secure the division bar on the left fixed window pane to the window frame, using a Phillips screwdriver.

    9

    Unscrew the screws that secure the division bar on the right fixed window pane to the window frame, using a Phillips screwdriver.

    10

    Pull both division bars from the window frame.

    11

    Pull the left slider window towards the right until it is centered between both fixed panels.

    12

    Spread the top and the bottom of the frame apart slightly by pulling them with your hands.

    13

    Lift the left slider window out of the window frame.

    14

    Pull the right slider window towards the left until it is centered between both fixed panels.

    15

    Spread the top and the bottom of the frame apart slightly by pulling them with your hands.

    16

    Lift the right slider window out of the frame with your hands.

Installing Slider Windows

    17

    Spread the window frame apart by pulling on the top and bottom of the frame with your hands.

    18

    Lay the right slider window into the frame and slide it all the way to the right.

    19

    Lay the left slider window into the frame and slide it all the way to the right.

    20

    Lay the division bars into position against the fixed window panes on each side of the frame.

    21

    Screw in the screws that secure the division bars to the frame, using a phillips screwdriver.

Reinstalling the Window in the Cab

    22

    Press a length of cord or rope into the flange crevice that surrounds the window frame. The flange crevice is where the weatherstripping secures to the steel window mounting flange on the cab.

    23

    Pull tight on both sides of the cord so that the interior side of the weatherstripping spreads away from the exterior side.

    24

    Guide the window frame into position from the bed of the vehicle. Have an assistant working inside the cab, make sure the interior side of the weatherstripping slides over the window mounting flange.

    25

    Pull the cord from the window frame.

    26

    Pull on the interior weatherstripping, while having your assistant press with the palm of his hand against the window. Continue around the window until it is pressed into position.

Rabu, 27 Juni 2012

Removing the Back Brake Pads on a 1999 Chevy Lumina

Introduced in 1990, Lumina may never have been the most beautiful Chevy ever sold, but it was among the most popular. Throughout Lumina's entire production life, Chevrolet focused on functionality and price, the latter being a large reason for its success. The 1999 Lumina came standard with rear drum brakes, but a customer could opt for the increased stability and braking performance of rear disc brakes. Replacing the rear brake pads on the Lumina is a straightforward process that most do-it-yourself mechanics can perform.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the rear lug nuts with a ratchet and socket. Raise the rear of the Lumina with a floor jack and position jack stands under the rear crossmember. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stands. Remove the rear lug nuts and pull the rear wheels from the vehicle.

    2

    Remove the lower caliper bolt with a ratchet and socket. Pivot the caliper upward so it clears the brake pads and rotor. Press the rotor inward to slide the calipers upper pin from the caliper bracket. Hang the caliper from a nearby suspension component with a bungee cord or zip tie.

    3

    Slide the brake pads from the caliper bracket and pull the anti-rattle clips, the shims above and below the pads, from the caliper bracket.

    4

    Remove the two bolts securing the caliper bracket, using a ratchet and socket. Pull the bracket from the rear hub.

    5

    Pull the rotor from the rear hub. If the rotor does not pull off easily, lightly tap around the rear perimeter of the rotor with a rubber mallet until it releases.

    6

    Inspect the rotor for defects, including cracking, excessive rust, mirrorlike shine or grinding marks. If any defects exist, replace the rotor with a new one.

    7

    Set the rotor on the rear hub. Reinstall the caliper bracket and hand-thread its retaining bolts. Tighten the caliper bracket bolts to 81 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. Press new anti-rattle clips inside the caliper bracket. These clips are asymmetrical, so they can mount facing only one direction.

    8

    Slide new brake pads into the caliper bracket. Apply a thin coat of disc brake grease to the rear of the brake pads.

    9

    Set a drain pan under the caliper. Position the old inner brake pad in the caliper so it contacts the caliper piston. Place an 8-inch C-clamp over the caliper so its fixed part touches the rear of the caliper and its screw part touches the inner brake pad. Open the calipers bleeder valve with a combination wrench and immediately tighten the C-clamp until it stops moving. Immediately tighten the bleeder valve and remove the C-clamp.

    10

    Align the calipers upper pin with the upper hole in the caliper bracket and press the caliper outward until the upper pin inserts fully into the caliper bracket. Pivot the caliper downward to align its lower bolt hole with that of its bracket, then hand-thread the lower caliper bolt. Tighten the lower caliper bolt to 33 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    11

    Repeat steps 2 through 10 to replace the pads on the other side of the Lumina.

    12

    Reinstall the rear wheels onto the Luminas rear hubs and hand-tighten the rear lug nuts. Raise the rear of the vehicle off the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the Chevy to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts, in a crisscross pattern, to 100 foot-pounds.

    13

    Press and release the brake pedal repeatedly until it feels firm. Check the brake fluid in the master cylinder reservoir and add fresh DOT brake 3 fluid until the fluid level reaches the Max line on the reservoir. Close the master cylinder cap.

    14

    Take any old brake fluid in the drain pan to a nearby automotive fluid recycling center. Many auto parts stores take the old fluid free of charge.

How to Remove Front Rotors on a 1999 Monte Carlo

How to Remove Front Rotors on a 1999 Monte Carlo

Chevy brought the Monte Carlo back to life in 1995, this time with the racing slicks mounted on the front wheels, because the Monte Carlo was now a front-wheel drive car. The front rotors on the 1999 Chevy Monte Carlo are rotor hats, meaning they fit over the hub's lug studs like a hat fits on a head. A rear-wheel drive car, in contrast, integrates the brake rotor with the wheel hub and bearings.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car on a solid level surface, with the transmission in gear or park, if it is an automatic transmission. Insert blocks behind the rear wheels so the car cannot roll backwards. Break loose all the lug nuts, but don't remove them until the car is jacked up and supported by jack stands.

    2

    Loosen the master cylinder lid to allow for fluid expansion when the clamp pushes the piston back into caliper, but don't completely remove the lid. The master cylinder is located under the hood, mounted on the firewall; it's the place where the brake fluid goes.

    3

    Center a floor jack under the Monte Carlo's front frame and jack it up. Insert two jack stands, one near each wheel under the car's frame. Remove the lug nuts and both front wheels.

    4

    Saddle a C-clamp over the caliper and squeeze the caliper piston back into the caliper.

    5

    Remove the two bolts from the brake caliper, lift the caliper off the spindle. Move the caliper out of the way, taking care not to damage the hydraulic brake line.

    6

    Remove the brake rotor from the wheel hub. Some brake rotors may be secured to the hub by a small C-clip over the lug stud; the clip must be removed to remove the rotor. Use a screwdriver or snap-ring pliers to remove the clip.

How to Replace the Glass in the Door of a 93 Lumina

How to Replace the Glass in the Door of a 93 Lumina

If the window glass in your old Chevy Lumina is cracked or broken, you need to replace it. Use extreme caution and use protective gear when replacing broken glass. The glass in a 1993 Lumina is more difficult to remove and replace than on newer Chevy models because rivets are used to mount the glass within the door. This will require other tools that you must also use caution with while using.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Disconnect the negative battery cable if the door has power windows or locks.

    2

    Pry off the power lock and window controls from the door (if the car is equipped with them) using a trim tool and disconnect the electrical connectors. Or, unclip and remove the door handle with a special tool or by rubbing a rag behind the handle.

    3

    Remove the door-handle bezel and then remove the fasteners in the lower panel and armrest with a screwdriver. Detach the electrical connectors, if any, and feed them through the door panel.

    4

    Unfasten all the trim-panel retainers and then pry the panel carefully at the window seal to detach it from the door.

    5

    Remove the front and rear garnish moldings from the door. Unscrew and remove the lower run channel with a wrench or screwdriver. Pull the outer sealing strip out of the top of the door.

    6

    Drill out the rivet for the window run channel and remove it from the door. Drop the glass out of the rear run channel and then pull it up and out of the door.

Installation

    7

    Install the window within the door frame. Bolt the window run channel in place with a small bolt and wrench, or rivet it in place with a rivet gun.

    8

    Re-install the lower run channel with its screws, the outer window sealing strip and the garnish moldings.

    9

    Attach the trim panel to the door; place the window seal part over the door frame. Apply the fasteners in the lower panel and armrest.

    10

    Clip and install the door-handle bezel and the window handle or the power lock and window controls.

    11

    Reconnect the negative battery cable if needed.

Selasa, 26 Juni 2012

How to Install Brakes on a Dodge Ram 2500

The brake assembly on a Dodge Ram 2500 full-size truck is comprised of multiple parts. The brake pads are within the caliper, which is mounted on a bracket connected to the brake disc that is installed on the axle rotor. If you need to install any parts on the brake assembly, it goes in this order: Brake disc, hub and bearing assembly, caliper mounting bracket and caliper with brake pads installed within. If you are immediately replacing any parts, you must remove the old ones first.

Instructions

    1

    Raise and support one full end of the Ram truck on jack stands - either the front or rear end. Make sure the parking brake is applied and remove the wheels. Loosening the lug nuts before raising the truck will make wheel removal easier.

    2

    Install a brake disc on the rotor that has been smoothly finished, making sure it is at least as thick as the minimum thickness that is cast along the edge of the disc. Measure this thickness with a micrometer, wipe any glaze off the disc with sandpaper or an emory cloth and then bolt the disc to the hub.

    3

    Connect the hub and bearing assembly to the disc. Insert the axle shaft into the axle housing and attach the brake dust shield to the steering knuckle. Place the hub bearing on the steering knuckle and axle shaft and tighten the bearing-to-knuckle bolts to 125 foot-pounds. Install the axleshaft washer and nut to 263 foot-pounds, line the nut up with the next cotter pin hole and install a cotter pin in that hole

    4

    Attach the caliper mounting bracket to the disc, tightening its retaining bolts to 250 foot-pounds for front brakes and 145 for rear brakes. If the Ram is older than a 2005 model, tighten the front bracket bolts to 210 foot pounds.

    5

    Insert fresh brake pads into the brake caliper, starting with the inner pads and then the outer ones, making sure the pads are seated in their grooves and retaining clips. If the caliper piston isn't completely within its bore, compress it with a C-clamp before installing the pads.

    6

    Place the caliper on its mounting bracket and tighten its bolts to 24 foot-pounds for front brakes and 22 for rear brakes (on a Ram 2500 older than 2005, tighten the rear caliper bolts to 24 foot-pounds). Connect the brake hose to the caliper and tighten the banjo bolt to 30 foot pounds.

    7

    Fill the brake master cylinder with brake fluid after all new brakes are installed and bleed the system. Loosen the caliper's bleeder screw, place a length of clear tubing on the screw fitting, and place the tube's other end in a container of fluid. Open the bleeder screw while another person presses the brake pedal until no more air bubbles leave the system.

How to Repair a Window in a Lincoln Town Car

How to Repair a Window in a Lincoln Town Car

When it comes to auto repairs, there may be no repair easier than fixing a cracked or chipped window. Since the windows are made of a glass and resin combination, you can use liquid resin to fill in the cracks. With a few supplies in hand, the job won't take long and may save you money in the end.

Instructions

    1

    Wash the window with mild soap and water, rinsing with clean water and drying it with a cloth before moving on.

    2

    Take the suction cup stabilizer unit and place it on the window. Be sure that the cracked or chipped areas are underneath the suction cup. Push down on it to create suction that will hold it against the window properly.

    3

    With the injector and resin tube in hand, place the resin tube into the injector.

    4

    Slide the injector into the stabilizer unit. Once in place, pull out the injector, leaving the resin tube behind. The resin will flow from the tube and fill the cracked and chipped areas.

    5

    Wait roughly 15 or 20 minutes before removing the stabilizer from the window to allow all of the resin to drain from the tube. Remove the stabilizer.

    6

    Cut the adhesive curing strips and carefully lay them over the wet resin to help the resin harden quicker without dripping out of place. Remove the strips after an hour.

Senin, 25 Juni 2012

How do I Replace a Lexus Passenger Window?

Replacing the passenger window on your Lexus is pretty much the same process as replacing the window on any other vehicle. If your window has become damaged or broken it can pose a danger to your passengers. It could also put your vehicle at risk of being stolen. If this occurs you should pick up a replacement window from your local auto store and install it in your Lexus.

Instructions

    1

    Open up the door of your Lexus which contains the damaged passenger window. Find the screws which hold the door panel in place. Some may be covered by plastic covers. Pry the covers off with a flat head screwdriver and use a phillips-head screwdriver to remove the panel. Lift the panel away from the door.

    2

    Remove the screws which are fixed to the door handle trim. Pull the door handle away from the door. Unhook the two door handle linkage arms and remove them from the door.

    3

    Use the screwdriver to remove the screws which are fixed to the speakers in the door. Pull the wiring out of the back of the speakers and remove them from the door.

    4

    Lower the window regulator to its lowest point within the door panel. Use a wrench to remove the mounting bolts which connect the window regulator to the pane of glass. Lift the glass out of the door frame. If the glass is broken take care that you do not cut your hands on the shards.

    5

    Place the new window in to the door frame of the Lexus. Reattach the mounting bolts which connect the window to the window regulator. Reattach the rest of the door assembly by following the removal steps in reverse.

How to Install 1999 Cavalier Brake Rotors

How to Install 1999 Cavalier Brake Rotors

The brake rotors on the 1999 Cavalier should be inspected for signs of damage every 7,500 miles as General Motors recommends. Over time, the rotors wear down and their ability to effectively stop your car decreases as a result. Environmental conditions such as high humidity, snow and rain eventually cause the rotors to rust out. Storing your Cavalier for long periods of time will also cause the rotors to rust. Installing new rotors on your front wheels can be done one at a time, right at home. With a few minor tools, the repair should take 90 minutes or less.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Apply the Cavalier's emergency brake, and loosen the lug nuts on the front passenger tire slightly with your lug wrench, but don't remove them.

    2

    Raise the car with a car jack, and position a jack stand on the left, 3 inches from the car jack. Lift the support arm on the jack stand until it makes full contact with the jacking point, and then return the locking pin to the arm to secure its height.

    3

    Remove all of your tire's lug nuts and slide the tire off the hub. Place three lug nuts back on the wheel studs to hold the rotor in place temporarily.

    4

    Wind the C-clamp completely open and then place it around your brake caliper. Begin slowly winding the C-clamp closed until it makes contact with the outer brake pad's surface. Continue slowly closing the C-clamp around the brake caliper until you see the caliper's piston go completely down. Do not use a lot of force to do this. Once the piston is down, remove the C-clamp.

    5

    Attach the 3/8-inch hex stud to your socket wrench, and remove the two caliper securing bolts completely. Set the 5-gallon bucket next to the rotor and slide the brake caliper off the rotor using both hands, then set it down on the bucket. Remove the three lug nuts, and then slide the rotor off the hub carefully.

Installation

    6

    Place your new rotor back on the hub exactly as you removed the old one. Reinstall the three lug nuts temporarily to hold the rotor in place.

    7

    Lift the brake caliper off the bucket with both hands and slide it back over the new rotor. Start both of the brake caliper's securing bolts by hand to ensure they thread correctly. Set your 3/8-inch drive torque wrench to 40 foot-pounds, attach the 3/8-inch hex stud to it and completely secure both caliper bolts.

    8

    Remove the three lug nuts holding the rotor and remount your tire on the hub. Install and tighten each of the lug nuts until they're snug. Remove the jack stand and lower the Cavalier until the tire contacts the ground, but not completely. Set the 3/8-inch drive torque wrench to 100 foot-pounds and completely secure each of the tire's lug nuts.

    9

    Lower the car completely and remove the car jack. Pump the brake pedal slowly until you feel it firm up, then repeat this entire process to install the rotor on the front driver's side.

How to Adjust the Rear Drum Brakes on a '98 Mercury Conture

The rear drum brake system used in the Ford Contour is a non-servo type system that features a ratcheting adjuster to help keep the brake shoes adjusted properly. This system is activated by the parking brake, and the rear brakes may become mis-adjusted if the parking brake is not used regularly. Re-adjusting the brake shoes can be done by the average home mechanic in about an hour to restore proper brake pedal height and parking brake lever function.

Instructions

    1

    Block the front wheel on the opposite side of the rear wheel you will be working on using wheel chocks. Raise the rear wheel off the ground with the floor jack, and place a jack stand under the rear axle for added support. Lower the car onto the stand, and remove the jack. Remove the lug nuts using a lug wrench, and lay the wheel aside.

    2

    Remove the dust cover in the center of the brake drum using a screwdriver to pry it out of the drum. Remove the axle nut located behind the cover using a large socket and ratchet. Slide the drum toward you, and pull it off the axle and brake shoes. Lay the drum aside with the friction surface facing up.

    3

    Loosen the thumb screw on the center of the brake drum adjusting gauge. Adjust the size of the smaller side of the brake drum adjusting gauge to fits snugly inside the brake drum. Tighten the thumb screw on the adjusting gauge.

    4

    Slip the large end of the adjusting gauge over the brake shoes. Rotate the serrated cam, located in the spreader bar below the wheel cylinder, in toward the center of the Contour until there is a slight drag on the tool when it is passed over the brake shoes.

    5

    Reinstall the brake drum over the shoes, and tighten the axle nut tightly with the socket and ratchet. Reinstall the wheel and torque the lug nuts on the Contour to 65 foot-lbs. using a torque wrench. Repeat the procedure for the remaining side.

Minggu, 24 Juni 2012

How to Repair Jeep Wrangler Windows

How to Repair Jeep Wrangler Windows

If you use your jeep wrangler to ride through rough terrain and dirt-covered roads, you may know how easy it is to damage your vehicle. With rocks and other objects flying up onto the vehicle, you can easily crack one of your windows. If that happens, be sure to repair it immediately so the damage does not spread across the glass.

Instructions

    1

    Pull out shards of glass from within the crack by flicking them out with the corner of the blade. Be sure to have your goggles on.

    2

    Wash the window with water and detergent using a sponge. Rinse with water and dry it with a soft cloth.

    3

    Place the suction cup stabilizer onto the window. Stick it onto the glass firmly to create the suction between both objects.

    4

    Place the resin-filled tube inside of the plastic injector. Put the injector into the open port inside the stabilizer. Once all pieces are properly in place, pull the injector out of the stabilizer.

    5

    Watch the resin draw out of the tube and into the cracks. Wait until the tube has emptied, and then remove the stabilizer.

    6

    Cut a strip of adhesive curing film and place it over the repair. Leave it there for a few hours until the resin has dried, then carefully remove it.

What to Do With a Cracked Car Windshield?

What to Do With a Cracked Car Windshield?

When you have a crack in your windshield, whether it is large or small, safety reasons should impel you to take care of it immediately. There are several options for rectifying the situation so you can drive without fear of a glass-related accident.

Self-Repair

    If your crack is small, such as the kind caused by a pebble or other tiny object, it is possible to repair it yourself with a kit that can be bought online or at an auto parts store. These generally include a resin-injection system as well as epoxy to seal your windshield.

Mechanic Shop and Windshield Repair Service

    When a crack has become too large to mend by yourself, you need to take it to a shop or call a service that specializes in windshield repair. Many of these companies now come to your home or business to fix the crack, using similar methods as home repair but with stronger materials. These include a glazing technique that is hardened by ultraviolet light, a process that renders the crack nearly imperceptible.

Replacement

    If a windshield specialist deems that the crack is too large or too close to shattering the entire glass, you need to have the windshield replaced. This can also be done by a mechanic or specialist service, often within the same day that you bring your car in. Many insurance companies will reimburse you for the cost of having your windshield repaired if it is covered in your plan.

How to Repair Minor Windshield Damage

How to Repair Minor Windshield Damage

There are various ways and several products available for both professionals and do-it-yourselfers to repair minor windshield damage. Resins, such as epoxy, are used to fill in minor chips and cracks. Auto repair kits can be purchased, usually for $15 to $30, and contain rubbing compounds and other items such as a suction cup, syringes and resin-based glue. The tools you'll need depend on the type of damage to your windshield. Small chips and cracks, variously referred to as bullseyes, half-moons and star cracks, usually can be handled by a DIYer. Major damage should be repaired by professionals.

Instructions

Using a Repair Kit

    1

    Remove any debris or chipped glass from the damaged area. Clean the windshield with soap and water and let it dry thoroughly. Don't try to repair a chip larger than a half-inch or a crack longer than two inches.

    2

    Apply the suction cup to the inside of the window directly over the chip to provide stability.

    3

    Lay the plastic or rubber disc over the damaged area on the outside of the window (remove the plastic backing first).

    4

    Punch a hole in the disc with the cone that's provided in the kit.

    5

    Insert the resin-filled syringe into the disc and slowly pull out the plunger to create an air seal. (You may have to add the resin to the syringe with some kits.)

    6

    Push the plunger back in to administer the resin. Watch the damaged area closely to ensure you don't over-fill the area. It's easier to add more resin than to try to remove excess glue.

    7

    Leave the equipment in place and allow the resin to dry for 10 minutes (or per the manufacturer's directions). Check for air bubbles in the resin. If any bubbles exist, smooth them out or remove the resin and begin again. Remove the plunger, disc and suction cup and allow the windshield to dry for at least four hours.

    8

    Clean the area around the repaired area with a razor blade. Use nail polish remover if necessary, then clean the windshield with glass cleaner.

Using Epoxy

    9

    Clean the windshield as instructed in the Repair Kit method.

    10

    Mix together the contents of the two tubes of epoxy per the instructions on the product. You need to mix the epoxies using the proper ratio.

    11

    Spread the epoxy into the chip or crack using a putty knife. Use the epoxy sparingly to avoid excess cleanup. Work the epoxy into the damaged area with the putty knife, smoothing and removing any excess epoxy. Wipe excess glue from the windshield with a rag soaked in nail polish remover or mineral spirits. Don't wipe directly over the chip. You can address any buildup with a razor blade when the epoxy dries.

    12

    Allow the epoxy to cure according to the manufacturer's directions, usually overnight.

    13

    Remove excess epoxy with a razor blade after it dries. Clean the windshield with glass cleaner and inspect the repair from both outside and inside the vehicle.

How to Mount a Mirror on a Grand Marquis

Driving without a rear-view mirror is unsafe; in some states it is simply illegal. If your rear-view mirror has fallen off the windshield, or if you need to replace it because of damage, mounting the mirror back onto the glass is a fairly easy endeavor. Once you have the supplies you will need, be prepared to take your time. Doing a rush job on a mirror replacement could lead to injury or a cracked windshield.

Instructions

    1

    Take the crayon and make an outline on the outside of the windshield where the mirror was originally mounted. If the old mirror is still in place, simply outline the mount. If the mirror is missing, mark where the residual glue has been left behind.

    2

    Get into the car and carefully take the razor blade and scrape the remaining glue away from the windshield. If the old mirror is still in place, carefully work the blade around the edges of the mount, inserting the blade between the mount and the glass carefully until you have cut through the glue. Coming at the glue from all sides will allow you to cut the glue away in the shortest amount of time.

    3

    Use the alcohol rub that comes with the mirror replacement kit to clean the area where the mirror will be mounted. If the mount is not connected to the new mirror, insert it into the mirror's base before proceeding to Step 4. Most mounts are held in place with an Allen bolt or set screw that you can tighten with the screwdriver or Allen wrench.

    4

    Follow the instructions on the mirror replacement kit for adding the adhesive to the mount and the windshield. Place the mount against the windshield, lining it up with the mark you made earlier.

    5

    Hold pressure onto the mount for the time stated in the replacement kit's instructions. Don't push too hard--you can crack the windshield by applying too much pressure on such a small area.

    6

    Wipe the crayon mark off the outside of the windshield with window cleaner and a rag.

How to Remove Windshield Molding

Windshield molding helps to hold the windshield in place on modern production vehicles. In the event of an auto collision, the windshield glass is designed to break into small pieces to avoid cutting the passengers inside. Cracks in the windshield, however, pose a serious risk. Besides spreading over time, they can hinder visibility. For this reason, if your windshield has a crack in it that is more than one inch long, you should consider replacing it. The first step is to remove the windshield molding.

Instructions

    1

    Pry the plastic trim molding away from the windshield using a flat tip screwdriver. Take your time with the trim pieces as they might not be easy to remove.

    2

    Starting on the top, cut the molding down the driver's side of the window. Molding is made from urethane, but it is flexible. Urethane gives the molding strength so the glass does not move (and subsequently break) during normal driving. Removing the molding may take several minutes or several hours depending on your vehicle.

    3

    Scrape off any residual molding from the surface of the vehicle with a razor blade. Be sure that you do not scratch the outside (where the metal is exposed to the elements) of your vehicle's paint.

Sabtu, 23 Juni 2012

How to Change the Brakes on a 2002 Ford Super Duty

How to Change the Brakes on a 2002 Ford Super Duty

The brakes are one of the most important parts of your vehicle. The Ford F-250 Super Duty is a large, heavy truck which means the brakes have a lot of work to do and their importance means you need to keep them in good condition. If you can hear squeaking or grinding, then your brake pads need to be replaced. You can save some money by replacing the brakes yourself, rather than taking an expensive trip to the dealer or a repair shop.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug bolts but do not remove them. Jack the vehicle up and place it on jack stands. Undo the lug bolts the rest of the way and remove the wheel and tire.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper. There is one bolt holding it in place. Once this bolt is removed the caliper will swing back away from the rotor. Slide the pads off the caliper. Pull firmly if they are stuck in place.

    3

    Open the caliper with a caliper compression tool so you can insert the pad behind it. Place the tool on the caliper and use the lever or screw to open the caliper up.

    4

    Replace the brake pad with a new one. Apply high-heat grease to the back of the brake pad and slide the pad onto the caliper.

    5

    Unscrew the caliper compression tool and allow the caliper to slide back into place over the rotor.

    6

    Replace the single bolt holding the caliper in place and torque it to its correct specifications. The torque varies between brake packages, but should be at least 166 foot-pounds.

    7

    Replace the wheel and hand tighten the lug bolts. Lower the vehicle from the jack and torque the lug bolts to their correct specifications. Torque specifications vary depending on the wheels and style of the F-250. Consult your owners manual for details.

How to Rebuild an ATV Master Brake Cylinder

How to Rebuild an ATV Master Brake Cylinder

An ATV's brake master cylinder is responsible for generating the hydraulic pressure that closes the brake pads around the wheel's brake discs. The master cylinder relies heavily on the various seals that prevent the hydraulic brake fluid from leaking out of its housing. Over time, these seals can become brittle and crack, allowing the fluid to escape and reducing braking power in the process. Internal contamination can also foul the seals and damage the cylinder's pressure-generating piston. To prevent problems, a leaking or seized master cylinder can be rebuilt with new parts and basic tools.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the master cylinder's fluid container cover, either by hand or with a Phillips head screwdriver to remove the cover's bolts. Pull the rubber diaphragm out of the fluid container. Suck the brake fluid out of the container with a siphon.

    2

    Unscrew the master cylinder's handlebar perch bolts with a socket wrench. Lift the master cylinder off of the handlebar. Wrap a towel around the master cylinder and remove the brake line bolt from the end of the cylinder with the socket wrench. Sop up any remaining brake fluid with a towel. Set the master cylinder on a clean work space.

    3

    Remove the brake lever's nut from the bottom of the master cylinder with the socket wrench. Unscrew the lever's pivot bolt with a flat head screwdriver. Pull the lever away from the master cylinder to access the piston.

    4

    Pull the rubber dust cover off of the master cylinder's piston. Pry out the piston's circlip with needle-nose pliers. Pull the piston and the piston spring out of the master cylinder.

    5

    Clean the master cylinder's fluid container and fluid passages with isopropyl alcohol. Blow compressed air through the master cylinder to dislodge any trapped sediment or debris.

    6

    Inspect the master cylinder housing and the piston's chamber for cracks, scratches or pitting. Replace the master cylinder if it is damaged in any way.

    7

    Coat the new piston and piston spring with clean brake fluid. Slip the piston spring into the master cylinder's piston chamber then place the piston over it. Insert a new circlip over the piston with needle-nose pliers. Push a new rubber dust boot over the end of the piston.

    8

    Reinstall the master cylinder onto the handlebar and reattach the brake lever, following the reverse method of removal. Screw the brake line bolt into place on the end of the master cylinder with the socket wrench.

    9

    Fill the master cylinder's fluid container with fresh brake fluid. Place a new rubber diaphragm over the fluid container. Screw the container's cover into place, either by hand or with the Phillips head screwdriver to tighten the cover's bolts.

How to Fix the Window on a 1998 Honda Civic

A broken window in your 1998 Honda Civic not only damages the look of your vehicle, but can also put it at risk for becoming further damaged by weather or by potential thieves. To prevent this you should look to fix the window as soon as possible by removing the window pane and inserting a new one.

Instructions

    1

    Open up the door that contains the window you are looking to replace. Use a Phillips-head screwdriver to remove the mounting screws attached to the door panel. Pull the door panel away from the door.

    2

    Take the screws from the door handle and remove the handle from the door. Unhook the linkage arm within the door handle and remove the rest of the door handle assembly.

    3

    Move the window regulator to its lowest position within the access panel. Use a hex wrench to remove the hex bolts that connect the window to the regulator.

    4

    Pull the window from the frame. Take care not to further damage the window or hurt yourself on any of the pieces of glass as you remove them.

    5

    Insert a new pane of glass into the window frame. Attach the window to the regulator with the hex bolts. Reattach the door assembly by following the removal steps in reverse.

Jumat, 22 Juni 2012

How to Polish Pits Out of Windshields

How to Polish Pits Out of Windshields

Rocks and other flying debris that hit a windshield will make pits or small concave holes in the glass. Repeatedly parking a car under some types of trees enables saps to drip on windshields and form pits over time. Using automobile glass pit polish and a sander fills the holes to the surface level and smooths them for a seamless repair job.

Instructions

    1

    Turn a garden hose on and spray the windshield to rinse any loose debris off the surface.

    2

    Squirt car wash soap into a bucket and add water from the garden hose to make a soapy mix.

    3

    Dip a car wash sponge into the mix and thoroughly clean the windshield. Spray the car wash off with the garden hose.

    4

    Let the windshield dry.

    5

    Place a glass-sanding disc on an orbital sander. Press the disc onto the sander so the Velcro adheres to the sander guard.

    6

    Squirt auto glass pit polish onto the center of the sanding disc.

    7

    Turn the sander on and place it on the pits in the windshield. Move the sander in a circular motion over the glass pits. The polish will fill the pits so they are not noticeable.

    8

    Turn the sander off and feel the pits with a fingertip. Continue using the sander until the surface where the pits were is completely filled with pit polish and level with the rest of the windshield.

Brake System Information

Brake System Information

The automotive brake system is a complex set of parts that work together to provide a car with braking ability. In 2010, a typical brake system consists of disk brakes on the front wheels and either disk or drum brakes on the rear.

Parts

    The parts of a standard brake system include tubes, hoses, lines, a master cylinder, brake fluid, brake lines, valves, rotors, calipers and brake pads. Each part has an important role in the braking process.

Function

    Disks or drums are contained in a vehicle's front and rear wheels, and are connected to a master cylinder by a series of hoses and tubes. The master cylinder is connected directly to the brake pedal on the driver's side of the vehicle and, when pressure is applied, activates a plunger that pushes brake fluid through the hoses and tubes to each brake pad or drum. The brake fluid then is forced into a caliper that presses against a piston, which squeezes the disk pads together, causing the wheel's rotation to slow or stop.

Other Braking Systems

    Other braking systems that are connected to a standard braking system include anti-lock brake systems, parking brakes and power brake boosters. In 2010, most vehicles are equipped with anti-lock braking systems.

How to Replace a 1970 Chevy Truck Windshield

How to Replace a 1970 Chevy Truck Windshield

The windshield on a vehicle may need to be replaced due to breakage or other damage. The windshield on a 1970 Chevy truck can be replaced by the owner to save money, especially if the owner's insurance does not cover that type of damage. It is recommended that two people help with the installation of the windshield to prevent damage to the glass.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the windshield wiper arms by lifting that arms up and away from the windshield. Using a flat-head screwdriver, press the tab that secures the arm in place. Lift up and pull the arm from the slot.

    2

    Using a screwdriver, remove the weatherstripping from the old windshield. Be careful not to scratch the paint of the truck.

    3

    Cut the old windshield from the truck using a razor blade knife. Slice through the windshield gasket and adhesive around the entire perimeter of the windshield.

    4

    Remove the old windshield using a crowbar to pry it from the truck. Use a gasket scraper and sandpaper to remove any adhesive that remains on the truck.

    5

    Clean the area to remove any dirt and debris. A clean surface will create a good seal.

    6

    Apply a thin bead of windshield bonding agent to the windshield and truck frame. Only apply the agent to the areas where the two meet.

    7

    Press the new windshield into place.

    8

    Apply a uniform bead of silicone caulk to the truck frame using a caulk gun. It should be applied to the same area as the bonding agent.

    9

    Check the windshield for proper placement and a good seal. Remove the windshield and add more silicone caulk, if needed. A good seal is important for preventing water leakage and outside noise.

    10

    Using a gasket scraper, remove any excess caulk that may have squeezed out.

    11

    Install the weatherstripping by pressing it around the entire perimeter of the windshield.

    12

    Reinstall the windshield wiper arms.

How to Change Disc Brake Pads on an Eclipse

The Mitsubishi Eclipse has been around since 1990. The vehicle features front disc brakes and may feature either rear disc brakes or rear drum brakes, depending on the series of the model. After normal wear and tear, the composition of the brake linings wear down, being softer then the discs they contact to stop the vehicle. Depending on your driving style and braking habits, the front pads can last between 20,000 to 35,000 miles on average. Since the rear pads are smaller and thinner, they too can wear within that mileage interval.

Instructions

    1

    Remove half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using a brake fluid siphon and then discard the fluid and replace the cap to the master cylinder.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts to the wheel you're replacing the pads on 1/4 turn using the lug wrench before lifting the Eclipse. Lift the Eclipse using the car jack and support it onto a jack stand. If desired, lift the entire axle and support it onto two jacks stands, but one at a time will suffice as well.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts and then remove the wheel(s).

    4

    Remove the two caliper lock pins from the caliper using a ratchet and appropriate-sized socket. Size may vary depending on year and model series. Remove the caliper by pulling it off of the rotor and then support it to the suspension with a length of wire. Allowing it to dangle from the brake hose can damage the hose.

    5

    Compress the caliper piston(s). Some Eclipses feature dual piston calipers on the front disc brakes. Remove one of the brake pads from the caliper bracket and place it against the piston(s). Use a 6-inch C-clamp against the brake pad and the back housing of the caliper to compress the piston(s). Some Eclipse model series feature screw-in caliper pistons on the rear calipers. If so, find the appropriate adapter, place it in the caliper piston tool, and turn the piston clockwise to retract it into the bore.

    6

    Remove the pads and spring clips from the caliper bracket. If wear sensors are integrated on the pads, take note of their position in order to reinstall the new pads correctly.

    7

    Apply a light coat of anti-seize compound to the spring clip seats on the caliper bracket. Replace the clips and add another light coat of the compound to the top of the clips.

    8

    Apply the shims to the pad replacements if applicable. Some pad sets may feature staked-on shims, but other will employ a stick-on shim. Stick-on shims require removing the inner plastic cover of the shim and then aligning it onto the pad. Place the pads into the caliper bracket.

    9

    Replace the caliper over the pads and rotor. Apply a light coat of anti-seize compound to the non-threaded section of the lock pins and then align them into the caliper. Tighten the pins snugly and then use the ratcheting torque wrench and appropriate sized socket to tighten the front caliper pins to 54-foot pounds and/or the rear caliper pins to 20 foot-pounds.

    10

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts snugly with the lug wrench and then lower the Eclipse to the ground. Retighten the lug nuts in a star pattern using the torque wrench and an appropriate-sized socket to 80 foot-pounds. Repeat the procedure for the opposite wheel on the same axle.

    11

    Pump the foot brake pedal five to six times or until the pedal feels firm. Recheck the brake fluid in the master cylinder and top it off with new brake fluid. Test-drive the Eclipse to check for braking operation.

Convertible Rear Window Repair

Convertible Rear Window Repair

There aren't too many things that are more fun for a car lover than putting down the top of their convertible. Unfortunately, your rear plastic window doesn't feel the same way. Constant exposure to the sun can make the window become cloudy and opaque over time. The constant motion of the canvas top moving up and down makes the plastic brittle. When this happens, you have to replace the window. This is an easy task if you have a canvas top with a zipper for quick removal. If not, you'll need to grab a thread and needle.

Instructions

Rear Plastic Window Repair

    1

    Remove the canvass top from the car. To do so, unscrew the frame from the top of the car using the screwdriver and possibly a wrench. Designate a safe spot for all the loose nuts and bolts so you don't lose any.

    2

    Find the threading on the canvas top near the rear window. This is usually somewhere beneath the plastic window.

    3

    Cut along the threading to create a hole in the canvas top. The threading is actually holding two pieces of canvas together with the plastic window between the two pieces.

    4

    Remove the old plastic window and insert the new one, making sure that it is centered.

    5

    Use the thread and needle to sew up the threading you had cut into. Make sure to sew it strong enough to hold the plastic window in place.

    6

    Attach the canvas top back to the convertible.

Rabu, 20 Juni 2012

How to Clean Brake Calipers

There was a day when calipers were rebuilt by mechanics and labor charges were applied to the customer in order to do so. Now, remanufacturing companies rebuild calipers, which has brought the price of calipers down significantly. In many cases, if a caliper piston is seized, it is more financially smart to replace the caliper then it is to pay the technician to rebuild it. Calipers have many lubrication points, and often, the fingers of the pads' backing plates can seize against the metal housing of the calipers. Calipers should be serviced and cleaned at every brake pad replacement or when they fail due to lack of lubrication.

Instructions

    1

    Put on the breathing mask and safety glasses. Lift the vehicle to waist level. Remove the hubcap(s). Remove the lug nuts or studs with the impact gun and socket. Remove the wheel.

    2

    Place a caliper hose crimp on the brake hose snugly. Place a drain pan beneath the wheel and then remove the banjo bolt of the brake hose from the caliper. Some brake fluid will drain into the pan, but the crimp will help with brake fluid loss if placed securely enough on the brake hose.

    3

    Disassemble the caliper from the wheel. Remove the two caliper bolts using a ratchet and socket or compatible hand wrench. Certain calipers may combine the caliper bolt as the caliper slide. This style will have a long, smooth shaft and be threaded on the end where it screws into the caliper bridge. Other types of calipers use smaller threaded bolts and the slides are separate components. Set the bolts or bolts/slides aside.

    4

    Pry the caliper off of the rotor with a pry bar. Place the caliper into the drain pan so the position of the brake hose connection is low so the brake fluid will drain from it. Some style calipers will have the brake pads clipped to them while others leave the pads behind in the caliper bridge. For pads that are clipped onto the calipers, remove the pads prior to placing the caliper into the drain pan.

    5

    Use an impact gun and a socket to remove the two caliper bridge bolts from the knuckle. Remove the pads if applicable. Remove the pads' rattle clip hardware from the caliper bridge if applicable. This hardware clip should be replaced for extreme caliper services where the pads were stuck/seized in the bridge. It will take less time and offer the pads a new, smooth surface to move against.

    6

    Clean the surface of the caliper where the hardware was just removed from (in the absence of rattle clips, clean the pads contact points of the caliper) using a die grinder with a coarse reconditioning disc until the surface of the area is smooth and clean. This removes rust and corrosion buildup.

    7

    Apply a light coat of antiseize lubricant or silicone based brake lubricant to the area of the bridge cleaned with the die grinder. Install the new brake hardware rattle clips (if applicable) and then apply another light coat of lubricant on the entire surface of the clips. Set the bridge aside.

    8

    Bring the drain pan and caliper to the bench vise. Place the pan beneath the bench vise and place the caliper into the vise. Compress the caliper piston(s) using a caliper piston tool. The remaining brake fluid will purge from the brake hose banjo bolt hose and into the drain pan. Reposition the rubber boots of the pistons if necessary. If the boots are torn, they should be replaced (see References) or if the pistons are not allowing you to compress them, the caliper should be replaced.

    9

    Remove the protective caliper slide rubber boots from the caliper. These boots should also be replaced if cracks or tears are present on them. Caliper hardware kits sometimes include new slide boots and if this is the case, replace them regardless. Spray brake cleaner into the slide cavity holes. Use a caliper honing tool to the caliper slide cavities to clean out brake dust, rust, and other corrosion buildup.

    10

    Return to the caliper slides and bring them to the bench grinder. Clean the smooth surface of the slides on the wire brush wheel thoroughly until smooth and shiny.

    11

    Replace the protective rubber boot slides onto the caliper. Apply a liberal coat of antiseize lubricant or silicone based brake lubricant to the caliper slides. In applications that combine the slide and bolt, do not place the lubricant on the threads of the bolt and set them aside. In applications that use separate slides and bolts, insert the slides into the caliper and make sure they move smoothly back and forth.

    12

    Replace the caliper bridge and bolts. Torque the bolts to specifications required for the vehicle with the torque wrench and a socket. Replace the pads in the bridge if applicable.

    13

    Place the caliper over the pads and rotor. In applications where the pads clip to the caliper, install the pads first; inboard pad into the caliper piston bore, and then the outboard pad.

    14

    Replace the caliper bolts and tighten to torque specifications for the vehicle.

    15

    Replace the brake hose and the banjo bolt. It is recommended to replace the copper washers on both sides of the banjo bolt. Tighten the bolt according to torque specifications for the vehicle. Remove the brake hose crimp. Repeat steps 2-15 for the other caliper(s). Bleed the brake system when complete.

    16

    Replace the wheel(s), lug nuts or studs, and hubcap(s). Be sure to torque the lug nuts or studs to proper specifications for the vehicle. Lower the vehicle and test drive.

Selasa, 19 Juni 2012

How to Replace 2003 Buick Century Disk Brakes

You must check the brake pads and rotors on the Buick Century regularly to ensure they are in good working order. The brake pads wear much faster than the rotors. If you allow them to wear beyond the recommended minimum thickness, they will cause damage to the rotors, which could mean a much more expensive repair. You can complete this project in your driveway and it will take you about 30 minutes to do each wheel.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car on a level surface and turn of its ignition. Open and secure the engine compartment of the Buick Century and drain about one-half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder, using the turkey baster. Place the fluid in the drain pan for later recycling.

    2

    Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Raise the Buick with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the car and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts from the wheel using the lug wrench and pull the wheel off the car.

    3

    Remove the brake caliper using a socket and ratchet to loosen the bolts. Remove the front brake pad. Place the caliper and the back brake pad between the jaws of the C-clamp and spin it until it closes. This will push the caliper piston back in the housing. Loosen the C-clamp and pull the brake pad off the caliper.

    4

    Install the new brake pads in the caliper. Place the caliper back on the wheel assembly. Tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet. Place the wheel on the car and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    5

    Repeat the process on the other wheel. Remove the jack stand from under the Buick. Lower the car to the ground with the car jack.

    6

    Add brake fluid to the master cylinder, as needed. Pump the brakes several times until the brake pads settle against the brake rotors.

How to Drain Brake Fluid

Clean brake fluid is necessary if your vehicle's brake system is to operate safely and properly. Here's how to drain and replace dirty or contaminated brake fluid yourself, to save money.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood and disengage your vehicle's level warning switch harness and the negative battery cable.

    2

    Locate the master cylinder, remove the cap and drain the brake fluid from the reservoir with a turkey baster or syringe. Place the drained fluid in a plastic container and discard in a safe location.

    3

    Disconnect the brake tubes from the master cylinder with a line wrench. Drain the fluid from the brake lines and place in the same container you used in Step 2.

    4

    Plug the brake lines to keep any fluid from leaking onto or damaging any painted surfaces and to prevent any moisture from entering your brake system.

    5

    Unplug the connector from the brake fluid reservoir.

    6

    Eliminate the three nuts attaching the master cylinder and 3-way union to the brake booster. Take the master cylinder off the booster studs then take out and discard the old gasket.

    7

    Dispose of the used brake fluid and gaskets properly.

    8

    Clean the master cylinder and surrounding area. Add new brake fluid to the reservoir.

How to Replace a Window in a Jeep Cherokee

Sometimes, accidents will happen. Having a broken window on your Jeep Cherokee is usually an unexpected and unwelcome surprise. Broken windows are the No. 1 claim for most insurance companies, leading to higher premiums. But replacing a broken window yourself is relatively simple and cost-effective.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect the negative (black) power cable from the vehicle battery using a wrench.

    2

    Remove the armrest and door handle assemblies using a screwdriver. Place aside with loose screws.

    3

    Insert a flat-head screwdriver between the door trim panel and the door. Pry the door off by disengaging the plastic retainers with the screwdriver. Work around the outer edges until the panel is free and set aside.

    4

    Manually lower the window glass by pushing downward little by little.

    5

    Remove the glass channel (piece of metal that separates the main side window from the small triangular window vent piece) bottom screw using a Torx head screwdriver.

    6

    Remove the two vent window frame screws using a screwdriver. They are located at the bottom of the vent window. Tilt the vent window back towards you and remove it.

    7

    Remove the door glass retaining stud nut and spring washer using a wrench. The stud nut is actually attached to the window. Once the stud nut is removed, pull the window glass up and out of the door.

    8

    Install new replacement glass and securely tighten the stud nut with a wrench.

    9

    Replace the vent window and tighten the vent window frame screws using a screwdriver.

    10

    Replace the glass channel into place and tighten bottom screw using a Torx head screwdriver.

    11

    Replace the door trim panel by popping back onto plastic fasteners and tightening the screws with a screwdriver.

    12

    Replace the negative (black) power cable on the vehicle battery and tighten with a wrench.

How to Troubleshoot an ABS Warning Light in a 1999 Honda Accord

How to Troubleshoot an ABS Warning Light in a 1999 Honda Accord

Determining why the ABS warning light is on in your Honda Accord only takes a few minutes, but it requires a special tester. Many auto part shops will allow you to borrow or rent their tester. Once you&039;ve read the code, it is easy to look up what part of the ABS brake system needs work.

Instructions

    1

    Plug the PGM tester into the port behind the kick panel on the driver&039;s side.

    2

    Pick "SCS" on the display.

    3

    Press "Yes" when the prompt reads "Service Check Signal."

    4

    Turn the key to the on position. Watch the ABS warning light. It will come on for two seconds and rest for 3.6 seconds. A series of 1.3 second flashes will be followed by a series of .4 second flashes. The number of long flashes is the major diagnostic code and the number of short flashes is the minor code. The code will repeat after a few seconds.

    5

    Interpret the code. The wheel associated with the minor code is listed next to the error code. RF stands for right-front.

    1-1(RF), 1-3(LF), 1-5(RR), 1-7(LR): The wheel sensor is open or shorted.
    1-2(RF), 1-4(LF), 1-6(RR), 1-8(LR): There is electrical noise in the wheel sensor or its connection.
    2-1(RF), 2-2(LF), 2-3(RR), 2-4(LR): There is a problem with the pulser gear.
    3-1(RF), 3-3(LF), 3-5(RR), 3-7(LR): The inner solenoid is faulty.
    3-2(RF), 3-4(LF), 3-6(RR), 3-8(LR): The outer solenoid is faulty.
    4-1(RF), 4-2(LF), 4-3(RR), 4-4(LR): The brake is dragging.
    5-1: The motor modular unit should be replaced.
    5-2: The motor is stuck on.
    5-3: The motor is stuck off.
    6-1, 6-2: The ignition voltage is wrong.
    7-1: Not all tires are the same diameter.
    8-1: The ABS computer failed its self-test.

    6

    Reset the light after repairs are complete. Plug the PGM tester in and select "SCS" and press "Yes." Hold down the brake pedal while turning the key to the on position. Release the brake. The light will turn off then on. Press the pedal and hold it down until the light blinks twice. Turn off the ignition and unplug the tester.

How to Install C5 Corvette Brakes

The brakes on a C5 Corvette use a caliper and brake pad design for improved clamping force and better braking. The brake caliper squeezes the brake rotor by forcing two brake pads, called "brake lining," against the surface of the rotor. An outboard pad and an inboard pad surround the rotor on both sides. When both the outboard and inboard pad surfaces wear down, you'll need to replace them. You can usually tell when they need to be replaced because you will feel a shimmy in the steering wheel while applying the brake pedal. You'll also notice decreased brake performance. After you have the brakes off the Corvette, however, know how to install new brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Pull the old rotor off the wheel hub. It should slide right off.

    2

    Slide a new rotor onto the wheel hub.

    3

    Place the face of one of the old brake pads against the caliper piston.

    4

    Slide the c-clamp over the brake caliper and piston assembly in such a way that when you tighten the clamp, the brake pad will force the piston back into the caliper housing. One side of the c-clamp will hold onto the caliper, while the other side will push against the back of the pad and, subsequently, the piston. Turn the c-clamp handle so that the piston is forced into the caliper housing. Make sure that the piston and piston boot fold straight back into the housing. The protective caliper piston boot should fold "accordion style" back into the caliper housing.

    5

    Insert the new brake pads. The curved ends of the brake pads should be facing inward on the caliper. Slide the top and bottom tabs on the brake pads into the retaining clips on the caliper.

    6

    Slide the brake caliper back over the top of the brake rotor and put a small dab of lock-tite thread locker on all caliper mounting bolt threads.

    7

    Tighten the brake caliper mounting bolts to 37 lbs-ft with a torque wrench. Set the dial on the torque wrench to 37 lbs-ft and tighten the caliper mounting bolts until the wrench clicks, indicating the correct torque value has been reached.

    8

    Spray all brake parts down with brake parts cleaner.

How To Replace Auto Glass on a Kia

How To Replace Auto Glass on a Kia

When a side window of your Kia is damaged in an accident, or cracked by a stone or other object, it is time for it to be replaced. Instead of taking it to an auto repair shop, you can replace the auto glass yourself in a few short steps if you have basic auto repair knowledge and a few common shop tools. Contact your local Kia manufacturer to order a replacement side window that fits your model.

Instructions

    1

    Wear safety glasses and utility gloves for protection against glass hazards. Remove the door panel screws that secure the window crank and speakers in place using a Philips-head screwdriver. Slide a putty knife or trim tool underneath the edge of the panel to remove the corner fasteners.

    2

    Peel back the black strip that secures the weatherproofing shield inside the panel, carefully remove the shield from the door and set aside.

    3

    If the side glass is still intact, remove it from the regular by unfastening the bolts. Remove all pieces of glass from inside the frame with a vacuum cleaner.

    4

    Use an adjustable wrench to remove the bolt that is inside the window crank threshold. Position the new glass into the window regulator bracket. Use the adjustable wrench to reattach the window crank clip and nut bolt back into place.

    5

    Replace the weatherproofing strip if needed. Place a thin bead of urethane sealant onto the weatherproofing strip so that it adheres to the pane.

    6

    Reattach all of the door panel internal components, including the weatherproofing shield. Reinstall four fasteners in their slots along the panel edge.

Senin, 18 Juni 2012

How to Change the Rear Disc Brakes on a 2005 Malibu

How to Change the Rear Disc Brakes on a 2005 Malibu

Chevrolet equipped the 2005 model-year Malibu with all-around disc brakes to control vehicle speed. The master cylinder generates hydraulic pressure used by the caliper piston to apply pressure to the inner brake pad. The pressure on the inner pads draws the outer pads into the brake rotor and clamps the rotor with evenly distributed pressure, slowing the wheels. Brake pads are made from composite materials that withstand the heat build-up from braking but wear out over time from the friction. Pads must be changed before they wear out completely to avoid causing rotor damage.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Wipe the master cylinder reservoir cap with a clean cloth. Remove the reservoir cap and inspect the fluid level. Remove fluid from the reservoir if the level is higher than half-way between the minimum and maximum level lines.

    2

    Block the front wheels with wood blocks. Raise the rear of the vehicle with a jack and secure the vehicle with a pair of jack stands.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts from the rear wheels with a lug-nut wrench. Pull the wheels off the vehicle.

    4

    Install a large C-clamp over the caliper from the outer brake pad to the back of the caliper piston housing. Tighten the C-clamp until the caliper piston is forced most of the way back into the caliper. Remove the C-clamp.

    5

    Remove the lower caliper bolt with a wrench. Rotate the caliper up and off of the rotor using the upper caliper bolt as a pivot. Support the weight of the caliper with a bungee cord or length of wire.

    6

    Slide the brake pads out of the bracket. Remove the brake-pad retainer clips from the bracket by hand.

Installation

    7

    Place an old brake pad over the caliper piston. Install the C-clamp over the caliper and compress the piston fully into the caliper cylinder. Remove the C-clamp.

    8

    Snap the brake-pad retainer clips into position in the caliper bracket. Slide the new brake pads into the bracket and clips.

    9

    Rotate the caliper down into position over the rotor. Install the caliper bolt and torque it to 26 pound-feet with a torque wrench and socket.

    10

    Install the wheels back onto the vehicle. Install and torque the lug nuts using a star pattern to 100 pound-feet of torque with a torque wrench and socket.

    11

    Remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground.

    12

    Slowly apply the brakes with the engine off until the brake pedal is about two-thirds of the way through its travel. Hold this position for 15 seconds and slowly release the pressure. Repeat this process until the brake pedal becomes firm.

    13

    Add fluid to the reservoir up to the maximum full line. Reinstall the reservoir cap.

    14

    Start the vehicle and accelerate up to 30 miles per hour. Apply moderate brake pressure to bring the vehicle to a complete stop. Allow the brakes to cool for a short period. Repeat this process about 20 times to burnish the new pads.

How to Change the Brakes on a 2006 Town & Country

How to Change the Brakes on a 2006 Town & Country

The Town and Country is the top-tier minivan produced by the Chrysler Corp. The vehicle has implemented many luxurious add-ons since its introduction in 1990, including wood-grain interior, four-wheel disc brakes and, more recently, navigation systems and three-zone climate control. With its introduction of four-wheel disc brakes in 1993, doing replacement maintenance is much easier than with drum brake systems. Nevertheless, automotive experience is recommended before attempting to change the brakes on a 2006 Town and Country.

Instructions

    1

    Place the wheel blocks under the tires opposite of the end that the vehicle will be lifted. Break loose the lug notes on the wheel that will be serviced using the 1/2-inch ratchet wrench and the appropriate-sized lug socket. Do not remove the lugs entirely, just loosen them.

    2

    Place the hydraulic lift under the vehicle and lift at a structure point. Put the jack stands under the lower control arms (or rear axle) and lower the lift until the weight of the vehicle is distributed between the lift and the jack stands. Remove the lugs from the wheel and place them until the rim assembly. Slide the wheel underneath the vehicle as close to the work area as possible.

    3

    Locate and remove the metal caliper clip connecting the caliber to the wheel assembly. Push the slotted screwdriver in the open groove on the face of the caliper and pry the clip off. Use the appropriate-sized Allen wrench to remove the two caliper retention bolts located on the face of the caliper.

    4

    Use a rubber mallet to gently tap the caliper out of place to remove it from the rotor. Replace the brake pads by prying them away from the caliper piston plate with a slotted screwdriver. Discard the old pads and place the new ones in the same orientation. Push down with force until the pads click into place.

    5

    Replace the rotor by grabbing the plate on both sides and gently pulling it away and off the wheel hub. Discard the old rotor. Place the new one on by lining up the rotor holes with the lug bolts and sliding the unit firmly into place.

    6

    Reinstall the caliper by securely tightening the caliper retainer bolts. Clip the caliper plate on by aligning the grooves to the caliper notches and firmly pressing down until the clip snaps securely into place.

    7

    Slide the wheel from underneath the vehicle and remove the lugs. Place the wheel back onto the lug bolts and hand thread the lugs to the wheel. Raise the hydraulic lift and remove the jack stands, then lower and remove the hydraulic lift. Secure the lugs by tightening them according to torque specifications. Repeat Steps 1 through 7 on the remaining three wheels. Remove the wheel blocks once completed.

Minggu, 17 Juni 2012

Comparison of Auto Brake Pads

Comparison of Auto Brake Pads

Brakes are one of the most essential parts of a vehicle. There are several types of brake pads available, each offering pros and cons in certain areas of performance. A comparison between auto brake pads can provide quality information to a vehicle owner.

Metallic Type

    Semi-metallic pads are made with up to 65 percent metal, while low-metallic pads have smaller amounts never reaching above 30 percent. Metallic brake pads are known for their durability; however, the noise factor can be an issue with these types of brakes.

Organic Type

    Glass and rubber are two materials that can make up the contents of organic brake pads. These would be the brakes to choose for anyone looking to create as little noise as possible while braking. A down side to organic brake pads is that they tend to wear out quicker than other types.

Ceramic Type

    The brake pads that cost the most are the ceramic brakes. This is in part because they not only provide clean, quiet braking, but they do it without causing heavy wear to your brake's rotors. They are made of ceramic fibers, and could also contain slight traces of metal as well.

How to Replace Brake Pads on a 2003 Bonneville

How to Replace Brake Pads on a 2003 Bonneville

The 2003 Pontiac Bonneville features front disc brakes with brake pads. It may also feature rear disc brakes with brake pads or rear drum brakes with brake shoes. No matter which set of brake pads you need to replace (front or rear), the procedure to change them is quite similar; the illustrated procedure will work on either axle. Inspecting your brake pads and replacing them before they get too low will help save other components, such as the rotors and calipers.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Bonneville on a paved, level surface. Apply the parking brake if you're replacing the front brake pads. Release the primary hood release latch from inside the car before exiting it.

    2

    Open the hood and locate the master cylinder on the driver's side firewall of the engine compartment. Remove the cap and suck out enough brake fluid with a baster so that the master cylinder is only half full. Dispose of the fluid, then replace the cap. Pivot the hood in the down position without actually closing it so the hood light does not drain the battery.

    3

    Place the wheel block behind a rear tire if replacing front pads or in front of one of the front tires if replacing rear pads.

    4

    Remove the hubcaps (if applicable), then crack the lug nuts loose with the tire iron 1/4 turn (only) counterclockwise.

    5

    Lift the axle (one side at a time) with the hydraulic or scissors jack, then support each side onto a jack stand.

    6

    Remove the lug nuts and wheels.

    7

    Place a large C-clamp over the caliper body so the top of the clamp is on the inboard side and the drive of the clamp is against the backing plate of the outboard pad. Tighten the clamp slowly to compress the caliper piston into the bore. Once fully seated, remove the clamp.

    8

    Remove the lower caliper brake pin bolt with a box wrench. Pivot the caliper upward and tie a length of string around the caliper to support it to the coil spring or other chassis component so it's out of the way.

    9

    Remove the inboard and outboard pads from the caliper bracket. Remove the brake pad clips from the upper and lower bracket seats. Use a screwdriver if necessary to gently pry them out. Some replacement pad sets may feature new clips, but check first because you may need to reuse the old ones. If so, clean off the brake dust, rust and other residue on the clips with a stiff wire brush.

    10

    Install the new clips (or cleaned ones) back onto the caliper bracket, then apply a coat of brake silicone lubricant (anti-seize compound would also work) to the pad tabs contact points. Be careful not to get any on the rotor, but if you do, spin the rotor away from the bracket and wipe it off with a shop rag.

    11

    Untie the string and pivot the caliper down over the pads and rotor. If the caliper does not fit, you may need to drive the piston of the caliper in a little deeper with the C-clamp. Use an old pad as an anchor against the piston if this step is necessary.

    12

    Replace the lower caliper brake pin bolt and tighten. Replace the pads on the opposite side of the same axle applying the same procedure.

    13

    Replace the wheels and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts firm to the wheel hub and then lower the Bonneville to the ground by reversing the lifting procedure.

    14

    Tighten the lug nuts in an alternate pattern (not sequential) with a torque wrench set to 100 foot-pounds and a socket. Replace the hubcaps (if applicable).

    15

    Press the brake pedal down about 2/3 of the way and then release it slowly. Wait 15 seconds and repeat this until the brake pedal feels firm.

    16

    Lift the hood and check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder. If necessary, top it off with new brake fluid (only). Replace the cap, close the hood, remove the wheel block and release the parking brake (if applicable) before test driving for braking performance.