Minggu, 30 Desember 2012

How to Replace Jeep Grand Cherokee Front Brake Pads

You may have heard some squealing noises coming from the front brakes of your Jeep Grand Cherokee. That squealing may be a very good indication that the friction material of the pad has worn down and now the wear sensors are pressing against the surface of the rotor when you brake. Be glad you didn't start hearing a grinding noise first. Although it may be an annoying sound, replacing the pads can be relatively achievable in the comfort of your own driveway, provided you have some mechanical tools and a little technical savvy. The pads are fairly affordable, but the labor charges from the local repair shop will find a way to dig deep into your pockets. Give yourself a little bit of time, wait for some nice weather, grab your tools and save yourself a bunch of money by replacing the pads yourself.

Instructions

How to Replace Jeep Grand Cherokee Front Brake Pads

    1

    Park the Jeep Grand Cherokee on a flat, level paved or concrete surface. Apply the parking brake. Release the hood latch.

    2

    Place a wheel chock behind one of the rear tires.

    3

    Open the hood and suck out half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir using the turkey baster. Discard the fluid properly. Replace the cap securely onto the master cylinder.

    4

    Break the lug nuts loose on the left front tire. Do not loosen them too much and do not remove them.

    5

    Lift the left front quarter panel with the floor jack under the left control arm high enough to place a jack stand under the left front frame rail. Lower the floor jack and remove.

    6

    Remove the lug nuts and wheel.

    7

    Remove the caliper bolts using the ratchet and a socket. Some Grand Cherokee models have a support spring on the front brake caliper. Remove this by prying it off with the screwdriver. Pry the caliper off with the screwdriver and support the caliper to the vehicle with the bungee cord so you can extract the pads from it. Pry the pads off with the screwdriver.

    8

    Apply a coating of silicone-based brake lubricant to the areas on the caliper anchor where the backing plate of the pads will come in contact with it.

    9

    Compress the piston of the caliper in with the C-clamp.

    10

    Install and lock the new pads into place. Place the inboard pad first and press the hardware into the piston bore. Clip the outboard pad onto the caliper last. Use the screwdriver to convince the clips onto the caliper housing if need be. Replace the caliper over the rotor and anchor and tighten the caliper bolts. Replace the support spring if applicable. Convince that with the screwdriver as well.

    11

    Replace the tire and lug nuts and tighten the lug nuts as tight as you can get them with the wheel elevated.

    12

    Lower the Cherokee and retighten the lug nuts in an alternate fashion with the 1/2 inch drive adjustable torque wrench set at 100 foot pounds and a socket.

    13

    Repeat the procedure for the right side.

    14

    Pump the foot brake pedal when you're done. This will restore hydraulic pressure back to the compressed pistons of the front calipers. Failure to complete this step could be extremely hazardous. When the foot pedal feels normal, check and adjust the brake fluid level in the master cylinder. If you need to add some, only add DOT-approved brake fluid for your Jeep Grand Cherokee.

    15

    Remove the wheel chock, release the parking brake and test drive.

Sabtu, 29 Desember 2012

How to Install Parking Brake Shoes

The automotive parking brake is an independent brake mechanism that acts on the rear wheels of the vehicle. The Department of Transport stipulates that the brake mechanism must be designed so it will operate even if the main braking system fails. Many vehicles that are equipped with rear disc brakes incorporate a mini-drum brake design to act as a parking brake. If this brake is used only when parking then the shoes will often last for the life of the vehicle. From time to time the shoes will fail because of corrosion or a manufacturing defect, or they may wear out because of use. In these situations the vehicle owner can save money by replacing the parking brake shoes themselves.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on firm, level ground and securely block the front wheels to prevent accidental vehicle movement. Do not engage the parking brake. Place automatic transmissions in park and manual transmissions in first or reverse gear. Loosen the lug nuts on the two rear wheels about one full turn each and then jack up the rear of the vehicle. Place the vehicle securely on safety supports and then finish removing both rear wheels.

    2

    Remove the two caliper bolts. Firmly grasp the caliper and rock it back and forth a few times to separate the brake pads a little, then lift the caliper up and off the disc. Hang the caliper in an out of the way location using a bungee cord, wire hook, zip tie, or equal. Usually the suspension spring is a convenient place to hang the caliper. Repeat this step on the other rear wheel.

    3

    Remove the brake disc. On some models it will pull right off. On other models there may be retaining bolts or screws that must be removed before the disc can be released. If the disc is stubborn, firmly tap the center part of the disc a few times with a plastic or rubber mallet to loosen it. Repeat this step on the other rear wheel. You will not be able to see the emergency brake mechanism on both wheels. Use the assembled mechanism as a visual guide as to how the pieces fit together.

    4

    Remove the brake shoe return springs. There may be one or two of these springs connecting the two brake shoes. The return springs have hooked ends. To remove them, grab one end of the spring with pliers and pull to unhook it, and then with the spring tension released it is easy to unhook the other end.

    5

    Remove the hold-down pins on each shoe by depressing the spring and retainer and turning the pin clockwise until it releases. Some pins will require a hex key while others can be turned with a large screwdriver or pliers. On some vehicles spring clips are used to hold the shoes rather than a pin and spring arrangement. If clips are present then depress outside part of the clip, rotate the pin until it releases, and pull the clip out with pliers.

    6

    Remove the parking brake cable by first removing the retaining clip with pliers and then slipping the cable end from its mount. Remove the self-adjuster mechanism from between the brake shoes, if present. Note that some low-end models do not have self-adjusters, but use a fixed metal strut between the brake shoes to keep them in position. If a strut is present, remove it from between the brake shoes. Pull the brake shoes off the baking plate.

    7

    Clean all parts thoroughly with brake cleaning fluid and wipe everything down with rags. If a self-adjuster is present, disassemble the mechanism before cleaning and lubricate it well with brake grease before reassembling. Use a wire brush to remove stubborn dirt and deposits from the backing plate and brake components. Catch the used brake fluid in a metal catch pan and dispose of it properly. Work in a well ventilated area and avoid inhaling brake cleaning fluid fumes or brake dust.

    8

    Lubricate the backing plate with brake grease at the points where the brake shoes contact the plate. Also lubricate the pivot points at the hold-down pins and the pivot points for any operating levers in the brake mechanism.

    9

    Reassemble the brake with new brake shoes by following the steps in reverse order. Use the assembled brake on the other wheel as a guide. Also inspect the brake springs prior to reassembly and replace any that are damaged or heavily corroded. Adjust the length of the self-adjuster, or position the metal strut so the brake shoes just barely clears the inside of the disc when the disc is remounted. This may take some trial-and-error to get it right.

    10

    Repeat the process on the other wheel. Remount the wheels and lower the vehicle. Test the brake operation before driving the vehicle normally.

How to Lubricate Backing Plates in Rear Brakes of 2003 Caravans

How to Lubricate Backing Plates in Rear Brakes of 2003 Caravans

No matter how well you maintain the exterior of your Dodge Caravan, perception is reality --- and if your Caravan lets out a shrill squeal every time you apply the brakes, anyone within earshot will likely consider your vehicle to be poorly maintained. The good news is that an image upgrade is just a little brake grease away. When properly applied to the backing plates and brake pads, a small amount of lubricant can leave your Dodge Caravan running as smoothly and silently as the latest models.

Instructions

    1

    Park your Caravan on a paved, level surface. Wedge wheel chocks or wood blocks under the other three wheels to prevent the vehicle from rolling.

    2

    Loosen the wheel's lug nuts with a lug nut wrench or tire iron.

    3

    Raise the rear end of your Caravan with a floor jack, leaving just enough clearance to safely remove the tire.

    4
    The calipers store the brake pads and backing plates.
    The calipers store the brake pads and backing plates.

    Remove the lug nuts and take off the tire. Doing so will reveal the caliper assembly, which houses the brake pads and the backing plates.

    5

    Remove the caliper bolts, which hold the assembly in place, with a socket wrench.

    6

    Lift off the caliper. Because the caliper will remain attached to your Caravan by means of the brake line, don't attempt to set it down or you'll risk damaging the line or its connections.

    7
    Use a bungee cord or rope to hang the caliper while you're working on it.
    Use a bungee cord or rope to hang the caliper while you're working on it.

    Hang the caliper from the inside of the wheel well or the shock absorber with a rope or bungee cord.

    8

    Remove the brake pads and backing plates from the caliper.

    9

    Smear a small amount of grease on the sides of the brake pads that come into contact with the backing plates. If any lubricant gets on the sides that touch the rotor, clean it off with brake cleaner.

    10

    Place the brake pads and backing plates back into their original positions in the caliper.

    11
    Use a socket wrench to secure the caliper bolts.
    Use a socket wrench to secure the caliper bolts.

    Remove the caliper from the rope or bungee cord and put it back into position around the rotor. Replace the caliper bolts and tighten with a socket wrench.

    12

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Lower the vehicle and remove the jack.

    13

    Repeat the procedure for the other rear caliper.

Tools to Remove a Car Window

Tools to Remove a Car Window

In most states, law enforcement officers will issue fix-it tickets if your car windshield is badly chipped or cracked. It will have to be removed and replaced. With restoration of older cars, such as the Ford Mustang, the only way to achieve a perfect paint job around the windows is to remove the glass. There are several tools on the market specifically for car window removal.

Windshield Knives

    Windshield knives are used to remove glass that is held in place by adhesive. Work the windshield knife under the glass and draw it towards you to remove the car's windshield. These cutters come in different sizes and shapes, along with an assortment of blades.

Equalizer Stingray

    The Equalizer Stingray is one of the many power tool versions of the windshield knife. The benefit of using a power tool is that you don't need to apply force to cut the window as you would with a conventional knife. Applying manual force often leads to injuries as the knife slips easily on the glass. The Equalizer Stingray allows for easy cutting and features suction cups to get an extra grip on the glass. A set of blades can be purchased with the power tool to cut at different angles.

Wire Kits

    A cheaper alternative to a windshield knife is a wire kit which comes with a windshield wire and a pair of grips. The windshield wire is inserted into the middle of each grip and tightened with a screw. This way the wire is securely bound and able to resist strong tugging. The wire is then worked under the weatherstripping and all around the edge of the car's windshield. When the wire is in place, the grips are used to lift the windshield and remove it from the car.

Wire Starter

    A wire starter is usually not supplied with a wire kit but can be separately purchased to assist you when using the kit. The wire starter consists of a hollow, stainless steel tube that will help you get the wire in the correct position to remove the glass.

Caulk Getter

    A caulk getter has a blade which is sharpened on one end at both sides. Place the blade in the gasket and pull it towards you to clean glass and old sealant out of the gasket.

Windshield Removal Tool

    A windshield removal tool is designed specifically for General Motors and Chrysler vehicles. This tool cuts the adhesive caulking compound around car windows with tempered steel blades.

Weatherstripping Remover

    This simple tool quickly removes weatherstripping without damage to the window or the protective stripping.

Do You Need to Resurface Brake Rotors?

Automotive brake jobs often include rotor resurfacing. Only precise measurements of the rotor thickness, however, can establish a genuine need for this procedure, according to AA1 Car.

Purpose

    Automotive technicians and brake repair specialists resurface brake rotors to remove any unevenness that may develop through wear. Resurfacing can restore a smooth rotor surface that makes firm, uniform contact with brake pads for safe, quiet braking.

Considerations

    Auto repair technicians must evaluate the thickness and condition of a rotor before deciding whether to resurface or replace it. AA1 Car recommends making a direct comparison to an identical rotor in new condition, weighing both rotors and using a micrometer to check thickness. Significant differences in weight or thickness call for replacing the rotor instead of resurfacing it.

Frequency

    Many auto shops automatically replace a car's rotors every time they replace brake pads. General Motors, however, states that rotor resurfacing should occur only in cases of extreme scoring, corrosion or thickness variations. AA1 Car recommends measuring the rotor thickness with each brake pad replacement to determine the need for resurfacing.

Jumat, 28 Desember 2012

How to Replace the Window on a 2002 GMC Sonoma

How to Replace the Window on a 2002 GMC Sonoma

Replacing the window on your 2002 GMC Sonoma might seem like a job for a professional, but if you have some basic tools, you can do the job yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Buy the right kind of replacement glass for your 2002 GMC Sonoma. You must know the exact year and model to choose the compatible kind of glass. Before going to the next step, also be sure that all the broken glass is removed from your working area.

    2

    Prepare the working area. Gather your tools near the car and wash the part of the car you will be working on. Check again for debris, glass and other particles. Place a tarp on the ground below the car door so you can later gather any possible debris and make the clean-up easier. Open the car door where the new glass should be installed and if needed, remove the rubber frame of the broken window. It should slide right off. You can use a screwdriver to gently pry off the rubber if need be.

    3

    Remove the inside panel of the door by carefully removing screws with a flat head screwdriver. If your window is electronic, simply make sure to remove all the screws, including the ones below the car door handle. Keep the screws close for later. Now detach the weatherproof barrier sheet from the panel. With the sheet gone, look inside the panel and check if there are any glass leftovers. Remove them.

    4

    Take off the black weather strip from the base of the window, and then remove the slips from the inside of the door panel. If you bought a glass without a rubber frame, now is the time to put the rubber on your new window. It's possible to do this without using a tool, but you can use a plastic spatula to get the work done more quickly.

    5

    Slide the replacement glass into the door very carefully, making sure that it slips into its slot. It is best to start from the lower divider and standing outside the door. Once you put the glass securely in its place, put the bracket back, tighten the bolts and secure the new glass with clips. While the clips shouldn't be loose, make sure not to make it too tight so you don't break your new window.

    6

    Replace the black weather strip back at the base of the window and reattach the weather barrier sheet to the door panel. Then use screws to put the door panel back.

How to Tune a Yamaha YZ250

The Yamaha YZ250 is an off-road motorcycle that was initially introduced by Yamaha in the 1970s. Since that time, it has become popular with motorcyclists. Tuning up your Yamaha YZ250 is a regular part of maintenance right along with regular oil changes. Purchase replacement spark plugs at your local Yamaha dealership to ensure you get the right plugs for your bike. It will take you approximately 30 minutes to gap your new plug and install it.

Instructions

    1

    Remove your new spark plug from its package. Gently pry open the wire on top of the spark plug. Set the spark plug gauge's gap at exactly .050 inches. This is the correct gap size for your Yamaha YZ250's plug.

    2

    Set the tip of the spark plug gauge inside the wire and then squeeze it closed. This will set your new plug's gap accordingly. One you have gapped your new plug, set it on the side.

    3

    Remove the spark plug wire from your old plug and inspect if for any damages.

    4

    Use your spark plug wrench to remove the old plug. Turn the wrench counterclockwise to loosen and remove the plug.

    5

    Sit the end of the new plug in the spark plug hole and turn it clockwise by hand. Tighten it with your plug wrench. Replace the spark plug wire once the new plug is completely installed.

Kamis, 27 Desember 2012

How to Replace a 2000 Dodge Dakota Master Cylinder

Prior to the 1921 introduction of hydraulic brakes to the automotive world, a vehicles stopping distance depended on how hard you could push. The 2000 Dodge Dakota uses four-wheel hydraulic brakes, as do all modern vehicles. At the heart of the hydraulic system is a pump, known as the master cylinder, which creates the pressure needed to stop the vehicle at roughly the same rate again and again. Replacing the master cylinder in the 2000 Dakota is not overly difficult, but it does require two bleeding processes one before installing the master cylinder and one after.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Open the master cylinder cap and siphon out all of the brake fluid with a clean turkey baster. Transfer this fluid to a small container.

    2

    Position the small container under one brake line fitting where it connects to the master cylinder and loosen the brake-line-to-master-cylinder fitting with a line wrench. Allow all of the fluid to drain into the small container, and pull the line from the master cylinder. Repeat this step on the second brake line.

    3

    Remove the nuts securing the master cylinder to the brake booster with a ratchet and socket, then pull the master cylinder off the booster and out of the Dakota.

Bench Bleeding

    4

    Set the new master cylinder in a bench vise with rubber jaw protectors. Tighten the vise until the master cylinder is held in place do not over-tighten the vise, or you might break the master cylinder.

    5

    Remove the plastic caps sealing the brake hose portals in the master cylinder. Screw the hoses from the master cylinder bleeder kit into the portals by hand, then snug them with a line wrench.

    6

    Unscrew the lid from the master cylinder and route the hoses into the master cylinder reservoir. Fill the master cylinder reservoir with fresh DOT 3 brake fluid until the hoses in the fluid submerge the bleeder lines in the reservoir.

    7

    Press and release the plunger on the booster side of the master cylinder with a wooden dowel rod and watch for air to come from the hoses in the reservoir. Repeat this step until no air comes from the lines.

    8

    Unscrew the bleeder lines from the master cylinder and reinsert the caps into the brake line ports.

Installation

    9

    Bleed the master cylinder using the process outlined in the section titled Bench Bleeding.

    10

    Set the master cylinder on the mounting studs on the brake booster. Hand-tighten the master cylinder-retaining nuts, then torque them to 13 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    11

    Position a small container under the rearmost brake line port and pull the rubber cap from the port. Hand-thread the rear brake line into the port the brake lines are molded, so you cannot confuse them. Tighten the brake line fitting to 14 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and crows foot attachment. Repeat this step for the front brake line.

    12

    Proceed to the section titled "Bleeding the Brakes" to eliminate any remaining air in the brake system.

Bleeding the Brakes

    13

    Raise the front of the pickup with a floor jack and slide jack stands beneath it. Lower the front of the truck onto the jack stands. Raise the rear of the Dakota with a floor jack and slide jack stands under the rear of the frame rails. Lower the rear of the truck onto the jack stands.

    14

    Crawl beneath the right rear wheel and find the brake bleeder valve the -inch metal valve on the top of the caliper or drum backing plate. Press the end of a -inch-diamenter rubber hose onto the end of the bleeder valve; set the other end of the hose in a clean, clear container. Fill the container with DOT 3 brake fluid until fluid submerges the hose.

    15

    Turn the bleeder valve about a half turn counterclockwise with a combination wrench to open it. Immediately instruct an assistant to press the brake pedal to the floor and hold it watch the end of the hose in the container a look for bubbles coming from it. Close the bleeder valve. Repeat this step until no bubbles come from the end of the hose.

    16

    Repeat Steps 2 and 3 to bleed the remaining three wheels in the following order: left rear, right front and left front. Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder after bleeding each wheel and refill it to the Max line allowing the master cylinder to run dry will introduce air into the system.

    17

    Raise the rear of the truck off the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the Dakota to the ground. Raise the front of the Dodge off the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the front of the truck to the ground.

The Best Brake Pads for an F-350

The Best Brake Pads for an F-350

Brake pads come in all different types and qualities. Some shoppers will walk into a parts store and simply look for the cheapest pads, while others may always ask for the most expensive pads. However, determining the best pad for your vehicle depends on what the vehicle is used for. This rings true especially for a multi-use vehicle such as the Ford F-350. For an F-350, there are three types of brake pads available: ceramic, semi-metallic and organic.

Ceramic Pads

    Ceramic brake pads use a mixture of organic materials and ceramic fibers. These pads have a few advantages over most other pads. One advantage is that they dissipate heat at a faster rate and therefore resist transferring their friction material to the rotor, which creates a "warped" feeling in the brakes. Ceramic pads also are a cleaner pad, meaning that they leave less dust on your F-350's rims, and they do not create a lot of noise. Ceramic pads are typically more expensive than other pads. These pads are best for anyone who performs a lot of heavy towing or has a special trim package F-350 with custom rims.

Semi-Metallic Pads

    Semi-Metallic pads are made from organic materials with metallic fibers throughout. This metallic fibers create a better grip on the rotor when the brakes are applied. There are a few downsides to semi-metallic brake pads. The biggest downside is that they can become very noisy over time. They also do not dissipate heat as well as ceramic pads, causing some material to transfer to the rotor creating a "warped" rotor feeling. Semi-metallic pads also create more brake dust than ceramic pads, and your wheels may need occasional cleaning. Semi-metallic pads are great for an older F-350 that does occasional towing.

Organic Pads

    Organic pads are made up of only non-asbestos, organic materials. These pads are typically the least expensive pads on the shelves. There are a great deal of downsides to these types of brake pads. The biggest downside is that they wear out quickly on a large truck like the F-350. They also make the most noise and transfer more material to the rotor than any other pad. However, these pads are fine for an F-350 that is only used as a farm truck and is rarely used for heavy towing or stop-and-go traffic.

How to Repair a Windshield Dent

How to Repair a Windshield Dent

It happens to everyone from time to time: an errant rock hits your windshield on the highway and suddenly you've got a nasty little chip in your windshield. You may worry that a costly repair is in your future, but there are several consumer products available in any auto parts store to help you fix minor windshield dents and chips without spending a fortune. Be sure to perform the repair as soon as possible after the damage occurs, since waiting will only cause the problem to grow.

Instructions

Identify the Damage and Prepare the Car

    1

    Only certain types of windshield damage can be repaired at home. Simple pits and chips can generally be fixed with a do-it-yourself kit, but if there are any cracks radiating from the chip a home kit is not appropriate.

    2

    Windshield repair kits require a completely clean and dry surface to bond. Clean the damaged part of the windshield and the surrounding area carefully and thoroughly with a glass cleaner and towels, being careful not to leave any lint in the crack.

    3

    Allow the windshield to dry completely. If the weather is poor, park your vehicle inside and use a hair dryer to remove moisture.

Choose Your Kit

    4

    Visit an auto parts store or the automotive department of a large retail store. Repair kits typically come in one-part adhesive or two-part adhesive varieties.

    5

    Read the package to see what type of damage each kit is best for. Buy the kit that is best for your specific type of windshield damage.

    6

    Read the directions thoroughly before beginning the repair.

Repair Your Windshield

    7

    Prepare the adhesive according to the package directions.

    8

    Adhere the adhesive piece to the windshield over the damage in the manner indicated on the kit's packaging.

    9

    Carefully attach the syringe to the adapter on the adhesive piece, taking extra care not to spill any adhesive on the car's paint.

    10

    Follow the package instructions for creating a vacuum and injecting adhesive into the damaged part of the glass.

    11

    Remove the syringe and adhesive piece, then let the adhesive cure for the time indicated in the kit's instructions.

After-Care

    12

    Remove excess cured adhesive with a sharp razor blade.

    13

    If the repair does not fix the damage, or if the chip develops cracks later, take the car to a glass repair professional.

    14

    The repaired section of the windshield can be washed as normal after the adhesive has cured.

Rabu, 26 Desember 2012

Instructions for Front Brakes on a 2001 Ford Ranger

It is not difficult to replace the front brakes on the 2001 Ford Ranger. How often you need to replace the brake pads depends on how much you use the brakes. Replacing the front brakes will take about 30 minutes for each wheel. The procedure is the same for both two- and four-wheel-drive Rangers. When you are replacing the brake pads, check your rotors to be sure that they are in good condition. If they aren't and you don't replace them, you will prematurely wear out your new brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the hood of the Ranger and prop it open. Remove half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster as a siphon. Place the fluid in the drain pan for recycling. Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels of the Ranger. Raise the truck using the jack. Place a jack stand under the truck near the jacking point and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Pull the wheel off the truck.

    2

    Loosen the retaining pins on the brake caliper with the socket and ratchet. Pull the brake pads out of the caliper and discard them. Insert the piston tool into the caliper and turn it in until the piston seats itself into the caliper housing.

    3

    Install the new brake pads on the caliper. Place the caliper on the mounting bracket and tighten the pins with the socket and ratchet. Remount the wheel on the truck and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Ranger and lower the truck to the ground. Repeat the procedure on the other wheel.

    4

    Add brake fluid as needed to the master cylinder. Pump the brakes several times until the pedal is firm.

How to Repair a Honda Accord Rear Window

How to Repair a Honda Accord Rear Window

Car windows were made to withstand intense pressure and force. However, they can still crack due to road debris, weather damage or malicious mischief. Of course, this damage needs to be repaired immediately. If you notice a crack in the rear windshield of your Honda Accord, a simple liquid resin is the only component needed to fill in the crack.

Instructions

    1

    Combine warm water and dish washing detergent in a bucket. Soak a cloth in the mixture then wash the rear window. Allow it to air-dry.

    2

    Dampen a cloth with denatured alcohol then wipe it over the cracked area. Allow it to air-dry.

    3

    Uncap a bottle of liquid adhesive resin, place the syringe tip inside then draw back on the syringe end until it is full. Tap it a few times to release any air bubbles and allow the resin to settle towards the tip.

    4

    Fill the windshield crack with the resin, pushing the adhesive all the way into the damaged area. Wait a few hours for the resin to dry completely.

    5

    Use the edge of a razor blade to scrape the hardened resin off of the window surface for a clean-looking repair.

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Toyota Camry

Brake pads are an important part of your Toyota Camry's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a quarter inch or risk damaging your Camry's brake discs.

Instructions

Remove the old Brake Pads

    1

    Park your car on a level surface. If you have a stick shift car make sure the car is in gear. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

    2

    Open the hood of your car and locate the master cylinder If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid in the plastic container and dispose of it the way you dispose of motor oil.

    3

    Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

    4

    Use the socket wrench to remove the caliper mounting bolts. Slide the caliper off of the disc rotor and hang it in the wheel well with a small bungee cord or wire hanger. Do not let the caliper hang from the brake hose.

    5

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper. Also remove any shims, springs, wear indicators and support plates from the caliper.

Install the new Brake Pads

    6

    Return the support plates to the caliper bracket. Place the wear indicators from the old brake pads on the new brake pads making sure the arrow on the indicator plate points in the direction the tire rotates. Place the shims on the outside of each brake pad and insert the pads into the caliper bracket.

    7

    Use the recommended piston caliper tool to turn the caliper piston clockwise while pressing it into the caliper bore. Place the caliper over the brake pads. Insert and tighten the caliper mounting bolts.

    8

    Replace the wheel assembly (tire). Lower the car to the ground.

    9

    Pump the brake pedal a few times to seat the brake pads. Do this before trying to move your car.

    10

    Add fluid to the master cylinder container to replace any you removed before you removed the old brake pads.

    11

    Season the brake pads by making only gentle stops when you are driving for the first week after you install the new brake pads. Try not to do any hard stopping when you are seasoning the brakes.

How to Change the Disc Brakes on Anti-lock/Traction Vehicles

How to Change the Disc Brakes on Anti-lock/Traction Vehicles

The brakes on a vehicle equipped with an anti-lock braking system, or ABS, and traction control work a little differently than non-ABS vehicles. Anti-lock braking prevents wheel lock-up during hard braking, while traction control helps avoid wheel spin during acceleration and hard turning. Over time, the brake pads in your vehicle will wear down and a small metal tab will scrape against the brake rotor. This will indicate that the brake pads need to be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Jack up on your vehicle's front and rear main jack points using a floor jack and place jack stands under the frame of the vehicle or the proper jack supports. Then lower the vehicle onto the jack stands.

    2

    Unbolt the lug nuts using an impact wrench and pull the wheel off of the wheel hub assembly.

    3

    Inspect the brake rotor for damage. Scored brake rotors need to be replaced or they will cause premature damage and wear to the new brake pads.

    4

    Wrap a c-clamp around the brake caliper so that the screw end of the c-clamp is pressing against the visible portion of the outboard brake pad and the back of the clamp is pressing against the back of the caliper.

    5

    Tighten the c-clamp to push the caliper piston (which is not visible yet) back into the caliper. A gap between the outboard brake pad and the caliper bracket will begin to appear. This is what you want to see. When you can no longer tighten the c-clamp, the piston will have bottomed out inside the caliper. At this point, remove the c-clamp.

    6

    Unbolt the caliper pin bolt on the bottom of the caliper. This bolt will be the bottom-most bolt on the back side of the caliper.

    7

    Unbolt the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts and pull the caliper off of the rotor.

    8

    Zip tie the caliper to the suspension if you are changing the brake rotor. The brake rotor is probably held in place by rust, since rotors are made of iron. To remove the rotor, rethread the lug nuts into the wheel studs. You don't need to tighten the lug nuts; just cover them to prevent the ends of the studs from becoming damaged. Then hit the center of the brake rotor with a hammer to knock the studs loose. If you miss and accidentally hit a lug nut, you will have to replace your lug nuts, but it's much cheaper than replacing the wheel studs. When the rotor pops off of the wheel hub, remove the rotor and replace it with a new one.

    9

    Open the caliper and remove the old brake pads. Note the orientation of the existing pads so that you get the proper orientation when installing the new ones.

    10

    Place a small dab of brake grease on the back of the new pads and install them into the caliper. Then close the caliper.

    11

    Place a dab of thread locker onto the threads of the caliper mounting bolts and thread and tighten the caliper mounting bolts and the pin bolt to the torque specifications listed in your vehicle's service manual with torque wrench. Then spray the brakes with brake parts cleaner to remove any residual dust or grease that has gotten onto the rotors or brake pads. The rest of the installation is the reverse of removal. When the vehicle is on the ground again, verify that the ABS system and traction control are working by starting the vehicle. If you don't see any warning lights on the dashboard, your system is working fine. Pump the brakes a few times before driving to restore full brake pressure to the system.

How to Remove the Front Brake Rotor in a 2002 Mercury Villager

How to Remove the Front Brake Rotor in a 2002 Mercury Villager

Replacing the rotors on a 2002 Mercury Villager is necessary if the rotors become warped (out of round or excessive runout) or have physical scores, rust pits or grooves. Because the rotor is the surface the brake pads use to apply friction in order to slow the front-wheel-drive van down, any of the above symptoms can create a pulsation, annoying squeals or premature brake pad wear.

Instructions

    1

    Apply the parking brake lever on the Mercury Villager after parking the van on a paved, even surface.

    2

    Loosen the front lug nuts on the front tire(s) by turning them 1/4 turn counterclockwise with a wheel nut wrench.

    3

    Use a bottle or scissors jack to raise the front of the Villager (one side at a time if removing both rotors), then rest the van onto jack stands under the front frame rails to support it safely.

    4

    Remove the wheel nuts and tires.

    5

    Use a ratchet and T-40 Torx head bit to remove the upper and lower caliper bolts.

    6

    Pry the caliper and pad assembly off the rotor and integral knuckle. Use the caliper hanger to hang the assembly from the front coil spring.

    7

    Remove the rotor from the wheel hub. If the rotor is stuck, apply lubricant spray to the mating surface of the front center hole in the rotor to the hub and allow it to soak for a few minutes. Strike the front hub face of the rotor with a dead-blow rubber mallet until the rotor breaks free from the hub.

How to Remove Dual Wheels to Repair Rear Brakes

Removing the rear wheels of a one-ton dually pickup truck is a lot easier then performing the brake repair. There are a couple things to pay attention to when reinstalling the wheels. Lining up the wheels in the fashion they were removed is also a helpful hint for reinstallation. There will be special tools involved to do this safely and efficiently, so if you do not have these tools, perhaps it's better left up to qualified technicians.

Instructions

    1

    Park the truck on a flat paved or concrete surface. Place the wheel chocks in front of each front wheel.

    2

    Break the lug nuts loose on the rear tires using the breaking bar, extension and appropriate size socket. For leverage, you could add a 3-foot-long pipe to the end of the breaking bar. Find a pipe that fits the shaft of the breaking bar snugly but not too tight.

    3

    Lift the rear of the truck using the truck jack placed under the rear axle by the lower shock mount.

    4

    Place the heavy-duty jack stand as close to the wheel as possible under the axle. Repeat the procedure for the other side to elevate the rear axle.

    5

    Remove the lug nuts.

    6

    Remove the wheels (outside first, then inside). In some cases, the wheels are stuck to the hub and may need to be shocked off or broken free from the large hub of the rear axle. This is a challenging task with a truck only raised a few inches off the ground. Spraying a lubricant around the hub-to-rim connection and striking the tire (on the rubber sidewall near the rim) with a large hammer or heavy bar will help. Diligence and tenacity will pay off.

    7

    Take note that the outside wheel rim contours inward and the interior wheel rim contours outward. There also may be a small pin on the hub of the interior rim that would inset into a hole on the hub of the outside rim. This is not always the case on dual rear-wheel trucks, but if they're present and you try to reinstall the tires without lining them up properly, you're going to incur damage to the lug studs, rims and hub.

    8

    Place the interior wheel next to the outside wheel in such a way that you know which is which when it comes time for reinstallation. Repeat the procedure for the other side.

Selasa, 25 Desember 2012

How to Repair a Chipped Windscreen

How to Repair a Chipped Windscreen

A chip on your windscreen occurs when it is struck by a rock or other debris. These chips can turn into cracks if not repaired immediately, which causes problems later and will require that the entire windscreen be replaced. Fixing a chipped windscreen yourself is easy with a windshield repair kit. They are available at any hardware store. This will save you money on a mechanic, and you can do it in your driveway.

Instructions

    1

    Clean around the chipped area with glass cleaner and paper towel. Let the area completely dry.

    2

    Punch out the hole in the center of the adhesive disc that comes with the windshield repair kit. Peel off the side of the adhesive backing facing the glass, and place the hole directly over the chipped area.

    3

    Peel off the side of adhesive facing out, and place the pedestal that comes with the windshield repair kit on it.

    4

    Insert the tip of the syringe that comes with the windshield repair kit into the pedestal. Twist it in, until it sits firmly in the pedestal.

    5

    Pull the plunger out from the syringe to suck any air from the chip. Push the plunger back down, slowly, to release the epoxy compound into the chip. Repeat this process 10 times.

    6

    Leave the plunger in the pedestal, and wait for 30 minutes for the epoxy compound to dry.

    7

    Remove the tip of the syringe from the pedestal. Cut the pedestal and the adhesive disc from the windscreen with a razor blade. Clean the area with glass cleaner.

Senin, 24 Desember 2012

DIY: Windshield Replacement

A cracked or broken windshield needs to be replaced immediately. There are two basic ways your windshield glass could be attached to the car. It could be sealed onto the frame underneath an outer trim, or it might be held in place with a rubber gasket. It's always a good idea to check with a mechanic or other expert to see how your car's windshield is installed and what method is needed to replace it.

Preparation

    Any objects that are attached to or near the window must be removed beforehand. This mainly includes the wipers and the rearview mirror. The mirror is usually screwed onto the glass from the inside, requiring a hex or allen wrench to disconnect it. The wipers usually require a standard flathead wrench for removal; you may also need to rock the wipers back and forth to disconnect them. You will naturally reinstall these after the new glass is in place.

Glass With Sealant

    To remove the outer trim surrounding the glass, you need a special tool designed for this task that most auto supply shops should have. Insert the forked end of the tool under the trim and carefully disengage the clips underneath so they can be used again. Once the trim is removed, cut away the seal affixing the glass to the frame. Another special tool is designed for this, which requires you to insert its blade underneath the glass and slowly cut away at the sealant, making sure you don't break the glass. There are two ways you can remove the glass from the windshield frame: Pull it out from the outside with a large suction cup, or push it from inside with your foot and a large stick--don't kick the glass. Have another person available to catch the glass. Scrape away the remaining sealant with a chisel and sand away any rust along the frame. Attach the outer trim to the new glass first using the clips. Apply new sealant to the windshield frame, applying it in a V- or triangle-shaped pattern. Carefully lower the glass onto the frame, making sure it is properly centered in the frame. The sealant should take a full day to harden; tape down the glass with strong masking tape while you wait for it to harden.

Glass With a Gasket

    Inspect the gasket's condition; if it isn't dry and/or hardened, you could use it again. Otherwise, cut it away with a carpet knife or similar blade. Plunge the blade into the rubber gasket, making sure you don't hit the glass, and carefully cut along the circumference of the glass. You can now remove the glass by pushing it out from inside the car with your foot and a large stick; have someone catch the glass from outside. After cleaning away any rust and debris from the frame, apply sealant to the inner edge of the gasket and attach the gasket onto the new glass. If you're using a new gasket, let it sit in the sun for up to an hour to soften; if the weather outside is cold, let it sit inside in a warm room and just make sure it is pliable. Apply petroleum jelly to the gasket's outer edge and run a nylon rope around that edge, making the rope ends meet at the bottom. Have your assistant lower the glass onto the frame and press on the gasket while you grab the rope ends from inside the car and pull on them, pulling the gasket's inner lip inside the car.

How to Replace the Master Cylinder on 1996-2000 Dodge Caravans

How to Replace the Master Cylinder on 1996-2000 Dodge Caravans

The master cylinder in your Dodge Caravan is responsible for forcing fluid pressure to the four wheels when you apply the brakes. The master cylinder is also the main storage vessel for brake fluid. If the seals inside your master cylinder develop leaks, you will lose brake pressure internally. This could cause problems for the brake booster, as well as causing the brake pedal to sink to the floor when you press the pedal. The master cylinder can be replaced in about 30 minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Press the brake pedal a few times until you have a firm pedal.

    2

    Open the hood and prop it up with the hood support rod. Locate the master cylinder, which is mounted to the brake booster on the bulkhead between the engine and passenger compartments, just in front of the driver. Spray the top area of the master cylinder liberally with brake cleaner. Push down lightly on the master cylinder filler tube and turn it counterclockwise to remove it.

    3

    Locate the fluid-level sensor connector(s). There may be one or two sensors on your vehicle and they appear as wires, in a plastic housing, plugged into the side of the master cylinder. Remove each connector by depressing the locking clip and pulling straight out from the master cylinder.

    4

    Remove the brake lines from the master cylinder by turning the fittings counterclockwise with the flare nut wrench. Gently pull the brake lines away from the master cylinder.

    5

    Remove the bolts securing the master cylinder to the brake booster by turning the nuts counterclockwise with a socket and ratchet. Pull the master cylinder straight out, being careful to avoid spilling brake fluid on your vehicle's painted surfaces.

    6

    Verify that the rubber O-ring seal is in place on the new master cylinder and then slide the master cylinder in place over the mounting studs. Thread the nuts onto the studs by turning them clockwise. Tighten the nuts to 18 foot-pounds. You may have to hold the booster actuator rod in position as you install the master cylinder.

    7

    Fill the master cylinder with new brake fluid and thread the bleeder fittings into the brake line ports by turning them clockwise by hand. Install the rubber tubes onto the fittings and secure the tube ends in the master cylinder filler opening. Make sure the ends of the tubes are completely submerged.

    8

    Depress the brake pedal a number of times, slowly and evenly, while a helper watches to ensure that no more air escapes from the bleeder tubes. Remove the bleeder fittings by turning them counterclockwise and carefully set them aside. Reconnect the electrical fittings by firmly pushing straight in until they click.

    9

    Thread the brake lines into the proper ports by turning them clockwise by hand. Tighten the fittings to approximately 13 foot-pounds with the flare nut wrench. Have your helper press the brake pedal slowly and evenly five times and then hold it. Slowly crack open the front fitting by turning it a quarter-turn with the flare nut wrench and allow the brake pedal to fall to the floor. Have your helper hold the pedal on the floor as you tighten the fitting. Repeat this process until no more air bubbles appear. Repeat this process on the rear port.

    Retighten the fittings to 13 foot-pounds. Install the filler tube by placing it on the filler opening and turning it clockwise. Refill the master cylinder to the "Fill" mark or 1/4-inch from the top.

How to Hide a Crack in a Windshield for Cheap

How to Hide a Crack in a Windshield for Cheap

A crack in your windshield can spread quickly so it's critical to repair it as soon as you notice it. The crack can occur due to any number of reasons, such as rocks and sticks blown up from the road or another vehicle. Rather than taking your car in for repairs and paying more than you may need to, you can do the job yourself. All you need are a few supplies, most of which you may already have at home.

Instructions

    1

    Put on safety goggles to prevent glass shards from flying into your eyes. Mix mild dish soap with water in a bucket, then soak a shop cloth in the solution.

    2

    Place the corner of a razor blade into the crack, gently and slowly lifting out any loose pieces of glass.

    3

    Rinse the windshield with the soapy solution then dry it off.

    4

    Fill a syringe with liquid resin. Place the tip of the syringe into the bottle, draw back on the plastic end then tap it with your fingers to remove any air bubbles.

    5

    Place a small amount of resin into the crack. Do not add too much. Let the resin spread throughout the crack. Allow it to cure for five hours.

    6

    Scrape off any excess resin, once it has dried, using the flat edge of the razor blade.

How to Replace Brake Pads on an Aveo

The braking system on the Chevrolet Aveo consists of the brake fluid, master cylinder, brake caliper, brake pads and rotors. When the driver pushes the brake pedal down, the fluid travels through the brake lines and pressurizes the cylinder inside of the brake caliper. The cylinder then compresses the outer brake pad against the rotor. This tightens the caliper around the brake rotor, which stops the car. When the brake pads wear down to the wear indicators inside each pad, the pads need to be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car on a level surface and engage the emergency brake.

    2

    Loosen the front driver side and front passenger side wheels with the lug wrench.

    3

    Slide the jack up under the front and jack the car up from a safe spot, such as the cross frame below the engine. Position the jack stands under the front jack points on both sides of the Aveo. Lower the car so that it is sitting on the stands. Leave the jack under the car in the upright position as an extra safety measure.

    4

    Unscrew the lug nuts from the front driver side and front passenger side wheels. Pull the wheels off and set them to the side.

    5

    Move back to the front passenger side and remove the two mounting bolts from the back side of the brake caliper with the ratchet. Turn the bolts counterclockwise and remove them.

    6

    Slide the tip of the flathead screwdriver into the top of the brake caliper. Pry the caliper back and forth to loosen it.

    7

    Pull the brake caliper off of the rotor. Place the caliper onto the lower control arm on the back side of the wheel.

    8

    Pull the inner brake pad out of the caliper. Insert the C-clamp and compress the outer brake pad toward the caliper cylinder. Continue to turn the clamp until the caliper cylinder is completely inside the brake caliper. Remove the clamp and the outer brake pad. Remove any other brake pad parts, such as clips and shims.

    9

    Put the new brake pads with the new accessories into the brake caliper. Put the brake caliper back onto the rotor. Screw the bolts back in place and tighten the bolts with the ratchet and socket. Put the wheel back on, along with the lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    10

    Lower the car. Crank the engine and push the brake pedal in and out five or six times to match the new brake pads up with the brake rotors.

How do I Remove the Front Window Trim From a 2006 Toyota Corolla?

How do I Remove the Front Window Trim From a 2006 Toyota Corolla?

If you wish to replace the windshield in your 2006 Toyota Corolla you will first have to remove the front window trim from around the window frame. The process is fairly simple and can be completed in a matter of minutes. You can pick up all the tools and components which you will need for the job from your local auto store.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the engine off and engage the parking brake. This will prevent the vehicle from moving at all while you carry out the work.

    2

    Use a screwdriver to remove the rear-view wing mirror. Remove the mounting screws which attach the mirrors to their casing and slide them away from the frame.

    3

    Unclip the windshield wipers from their metal frames. Press in the small tab on the back on the windshield wiper and slide it away from the frame. Removing both the windshield wipers and rear-view mirrors will give you better access to the front window trim.

    4

    Locate the rubber window trim around the edges of the windshield. Use a sharp blade to carefully cut the trim away. Ensure you do not scratch your windshield. As you cut away the rubber trim carefully pull it away from the windshield with your hand.

    5

    Place sealant around the windshield if you wish to insert a new windshield. To reattach the windshield wipers and rear-view wing mirrors follow the removal steps in reverse.

Minggu, 23 Desember 2012

How to Remove 2000 Jeep Rotors

How to Remove 2000 Jeep Rotors

When the disc brakes on your Jeep start to go out, the brake pads' wear indicators will start to squeak. Don't just change the pads to stop the squeal; you also need to replace or turn the rotors. This will give your new pads a fresh, flat surface to contact, making pads and rotors work in harmony. In this case, the project vehicle is a 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee, but the process is similar for other Jeep vehicles, and removing the rotors to replace them or turn them isn't difficult.

Instructions

    1

    Use the jack to lift the front of the vehicle, then set it on the jack stands. Make sure the vehicle is completely and solidly on the stands before you work on it. Remove the front wheels, using the tire iron, and set them aside from your workspace. Only the front wheels of the Grand Cherokee have disc brakes.

    2

    Disconnect the two bolts securing the brake caliper to the front steering knuckle with the socket wrench, then use the heavy-duty wire to suspend the brake caliper from the front suspension so there is no tension on the brake line.

    3

    Pry off the dust cap on the center of the brake rotor, using the flat-head screwdriver. Flatten the cotter pin in the middle of the rotor with the pliers, and pull it out of the castle nut on the brake rotor with the cotter-pin puller.

    4

    Unbolt the center bolt on the brake rotor with the socket wrench. Grip the rotor on both sides with your hands, and pull it off the hub.

    5

    Replace or turn the rotor as recommended, then repeat the process for other rotor.

Glass Repair for Cars

Glass Repair for Cars

A cracked windshield isn't just bothersome; if it obstructs your view, it can also be dangerous and illegal. Have your cracked windshield repaired as soon as possible to avoid these pitfalls.

Significance

    Auto glass plays an important role in a vehicle's makeup. In car crashes, a windshield can keep you from being tossed completely out of the vehicle. Auto glass also provides protection from foreign objects that could strike your vehicle at any given time.

Costs

    Many businesses provide auto glass repair. You can have small cracks in your vehicle's glass repaired for about $20. Larger cracks more than a foot long may cost more than $60 to repair.

Considerations

    Advances in technology allows auto glass repairs deemed impossible in the past. However, even the best repair shop can't save severely damaged glass. These cases call for total glass replacement instead.

How to Repair a Car Window Chip

How to Repair a Car Window Chip

A piece of gravel or stone striking your windshield at high speeds can nick or chip the glass. The jostling of your car can change that nick into a spreading crack. A nick or crack impairs your vision and is therefore a safety issue. Most small chips can be repaired without removing or replacing the glass. The fix is a quick one but requires specialized equipment.

Instructions

Repairing a Car Window Chip

    1

    Spray the damaged windshield with a non-abrasive window cleaner that will not scratch the glass. Wipe dry with a lint free cloth in order to keep fabric fibers from contaminating the damaged surface.

    2

    Place the specialized nozzle over the chipped area and turn on the vacuum switch. In order to create a good seal, all the air must be removed. While keeping the nozzle in place, add liquid resin to the vacuum tank by reversing the switch and allowing the resin to flood the damaged area. Remove the nozzle.

    3

    Hold an ultraviolet heat lamp 6 inches above the repair site for approximately 3 minutes, allowing the liquid resin to solidify. Maintain this optimal distance and time frame to avoid any glass melt around the repair site.

    4

    Allow the resin to cool to room temperature. Clean the repair immediately with window cleaner and a lint free cloth to remove any excess residue and allow for a seamless repair. Letting the resin harden further on its own, without cleaning the surface of the glass, may make it difficult to remove imperfections later.

    5

    Attach a gentle polishing pad to the disc of your rotary polisher. A 2-inch diameter disc and pad should be sufficient for most small repairs. Place a small amount of creamy polish, rated for use on glass, in an X- shaped pattern on the buffer pad. Polish the area with soft, sweeping, side-to-side strokes for approximately 2 minutes or until the polish is dry.

How to Repair a Windshield Spider Crack

How to Repair a Windshield Spider Crack

Repairing a windshield used to mean making an appointment to take the car in to the dealership, getting an estimate, approving the quote, waiting again for the repairs to begin and finally paying a large bill for labor, service and parts. Now, there are several types of windshield repair kits that are easy to use without the assistance of a professional mechanic. These kits can be found in most auto parts stores. Each kit also comes with a set of easy-to-follow directions.

Instructions

    1

    Remove any glass fragments left in the crack with the razor blade supplied in the kit. Scrape over every line crack to ensure no glass remains. Wash the windshield with water and wipe it off with a paper towel.

    2

    Remove the suction cups from the windshield repair kit and place them over the crack. The center area between the cups should be just above the spider crack. Press the four suction cups onto the windshield to affix them in place.

    3

    Screw the supplied repair tube into the center of the suction cup apparatus. Continue to screw the tube until it is firmly against the center of the crack. Sit inside of the car to get a clear view of the tube. Ensure the tube is in the center of the crack. Reposition the tube as necessary.

    4

    Remove the center screw of the repair tube by unscrewing it. The open end of the repair tube will remain in place on top of the crack. Remove the top of the provided repair resin and slowly drip five to six drops into the center of the fixed repair tube.

    5

    Reinsert the center screw into the repair tube and tighten it until it touches the windshield. Tighten the screw more to force the resin into the crack. Unscrew it briefly to remove any trapped air then retighten the screw to the windshield. Keep the screw tightly in place for at least two minutes.

    6

    Unscrew the fixed repair tube and place a sheet of the provided plexiglass over the wet resin. Firmly press the plexiglass against the windshield. Firmly scrape the plexiglass over the lines and the crack it covers with the razor blade. Wait for the plexiglass and resin to set for at least one to two hours.

    7

    Peel the plexiglass strip gently away from the crack. Scrape any remaining plexiglass away with the razor blade. The crack should now be filled.

Sabtu, 22 Desember 2012

How Often Should Brake Pads Be Changed?

It is essential to keep your brake system in tiptop shape to avoid brake failure. The least expensive part of the brake system to replace is the brake pads. Brake pads do not wear out in a given amount of time since many factors play a part in the wear, including stop and go traffic and car usage in general. The rule of thumb for replacing brake pads is to regularly check your brake pads and replace them when they wear to a certain thickness. Schedule routine brake inspections monthly.

Visual Inspection

    There are two ways to know if your brake pads need to be changed. First, you can look at them to see if they are worn. In many cars, you can see the brake pads when you stand by the front tire. Look through the wheel rim openings to see the brake pads (see "Resources" for picture). Look at the thickness of the brake pad. If it is less than 1/4 inch, you need to replace the brake pad soon. If it is less than 1/8 inch, replace it now. If it is greater than 1/4 inch, you do not need to replace the brake pad.
    If you cannot see the brake pad by looking through the rims, then you will have to remove the wheel to see the brake assembly system. Jack up the car and take the wheel off or take your car to the auto shop and ask the mechanic to check your brake pads. The mechanic will tell you if you need brake pads and can perform the task for you as well.

Listening

    The second way to tell if you need brake pads is by listening to your car when you apply the brakes while driving. Brake pads have a security system built into their design; they make a sound when they get thin enough that you need to replace them. This sound is a high-pitched squeal that you hear only when you apply the brakes. If you hear this sound for the first time, you have a few weeks to replace your pads. However, sooner is better so replace the brakes as soon as possible when you begin to hear the brake pad squeal to avoid more expensive damage to the brake system.

Jumat, 21 Desember 2012

How to Repair a 1966 Dodge Quarter Window

How to Repair a 1966 Dodge Quarter Window

Unexpected damages occur to vehicles all the time, and it is best to be prepared when something happens. For instance, if one of the quarter windows on your 1996 Dodge becomes cracked for any reason, a quick repair is less painful then replacing the window altogether. Gather your materials and set some time aside for the fix.

Instructions

    1

    Wash the window with water and detergent. Rinse the window off and dry it.

    2

    Put on your safety goggles to protect yourself from flying glass. Pick out any leftover glass shards that may be lingering in the cracks with the razor blade. Wipe the area with a towel.

    3

    Affix the stabilizer to the window, being sure to encompass the entire crack or as much of it as possible underneath the suction cup.

    4

    Put the injector into its slot inside the stabilizer, then put the resin tube into the injector.

    5

    Pull the injector out. The resin will fill the crack and leave the tube due to the suction.

    6

    Wait for the resin tube to empty, and then gently remove the stabilizer from the window.

    7

    Cut adhesive curing film strips and lay them on top of the wet resin. Peel off the strips a few hours later.

How do I Operate a Brake Lathe?

How do I Operate a Brake Lathe?

Brake lathes have become a staple machine in all automotive repair facilities. A brake lathe is designed to remove a thin layer of the brake rotor or drum, leaving a new surface for the brake pads to grip. This process is known as machining or "turning" rotors.

Instructions

    1

    Select a proper centering cone from the ones provided with the brake lathe. The cone goes into the rear of the rotor. You want the cone to only go about 1/2 to 1 inch into the hole in the center of the rotor.

    2

    Turn the crank that adjusts the cutting arm until the arm is extended away from the axle of the lathe.

    3

    Put the cone on the axle of the brake lathe; make certain that the spring is on the axle before putting the cone on. Put the rotor over the cone and place the rotor cup over the front of the rotor. This cup holds the rotor on the cone.

    4

    Place the lead nut on the axle threads. Make certain to have the non-threaded side going on first. Hand-tighten the nut, then tighten it 1/4 of a turn using the lathe wrench.

    5

    Turn the arm adjusting crank until the cutting blades are over the rotor.

    6

    Loosen the nuts on the end of the cutting arm and adjust the position of the arm so that there is equal space between the two blades and the rotor. Tighten the nuts with the lathe wrench.

    7

    Loosen the screws on the blades and turn the adjustment knobs, at the end of the arm, until the blades are touching the rotor. Tighten the locking screws using your hand.

    8

    Turn the power switch to the "on" position. Turn the adjuster knob until you hear the cutting bits touch the rotor. Turn the gauge on the adjusting knob so that the indicator is pointing to zero.

    9

    Turn the arm adjusting knob until you reach the center hub of the rotor. Do not touch the center hub.

    10

    Turn the blade adjustment knob until the gauge reaches .0005 and pull the lever that begins the movement of the blades. Keep the speed set to the slowest speed for the best cut.

    11

    Repeat steps 8 and 9, turn the blade adjustment knobs to add an additional .0005.

    12

    Repeat step 11 until the rotor is completely resurfaced.

Tools for Windshield Installation

Tools for Windshield Installation

Replace your car windshield at home using a variety of windshield installation tools to save money and time. It's an easily learned skill that is especially useful for owners of classic or older cars, who tend to know their autos better than windshield replacement specialists. Doing the job yourself also allows you to see any areas of rust that may require attention.

Caulking Gun

    A caulking gun is a common sealing tool that consists of an empty barrel to receive the sealant, a trigger to put pressure on the canister of sealant and a holder for the canister's nozzle, which dispenses the sealant. Some models also have integral cutters and nozzle-clearing wires. To choose a caulking gun, test the action by pushing the trigger in. Superior models deliver a smooth and even pressure with no jerks or catches. Use a caulking gun when applying sealant to the glass channel while installing a new windshield. Flow-grade butyl sealer provides a water-proof seal.

Windshield Locking Strip Tool

    A windshield locking strip tool is a small, inexpensive hand tool that eases installation of the rubber strip that fits into the rubber windshield surround. The tool features two holes into which trim is threaded and is especially useful on the corners that require considerable force to bed-in properly. Once the trim is threaded correctly, with the rounded side facing upwards and outwards, the tool pushes into the channel and spreads the rubber windshield surround apart.

Glass Vacuum Lifting Tool

    Glass vacuum cups, also known as suction cups, are larger versions of the similar dent removal tools. These heavy-duty lifting tools are used in the glass industry to lift items like large sheets of glass. A set comprises of two cups that attach to the clean, oil-free windshield by suction on either side of your new windshield. Cups leave no marks on the windshield, but the strength required to lift the weight of a windshield is considerable, and a sole worker may need a second pair of hands to steadily guide the glass into place from the interior of the vehicle.

Kamis, 20 Desember 2012

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a 2001 Silverado

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a 2001 Silverado

The 2001 Chevy Silverado uses brake pads and shoes on the rear brakes. The brake pads need to be inspected and possibly changed at the same time that you change the front ones. The pads and calipers are larger than those on most other vehicles, so make sure that you get the correct size for the replacement pads. There are some slight differences in replacing the brakes for the 2002 model Silverado trucks, mainly depending on the size of the truck.

Instructions

Removal Procedure

    1

    Open the hood of the truck and remove two-thirds of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir, using a turkey baster, syringe or other suction tool that has never been used for anything else.

    2

    Block the front wheels with wheel chocks, raise the rear end, support it on jack stands and remove the rear wheels.

    3

    Wash off the brake disc assembly with aerosol and brake cleaner, using a drain pan under the assembly to catch any residue. Wait for the disc assembly to dry.

    4

    Compress each of the caliper pistons into the caliper, using a C-clamp. Watch the brake fluid level in the mater cylinder as you slowly compress the piston, and make sure the fluid doesn't overflow.

    5

    Remove the caliper's lower mounting bolt with a wrench, then pivot the caliper upward to access the brake pads. On a 1500 model, hold the slide pin with an open-ended wrench while removing the bolt with a flare-nut wrench.

    6

    Remove the inner and outer brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket.

Installation Procedure

    7

    Apply anti-squeal compound to the backing plates on the replacement pads. Apply the compound in circles that will match the edges of the caliper pistons.

    8

    Install the inner and outer pads into the caliper mounting bracket.

    9

    Lubricate the caliper mounting bolt with high-temperature brake grease. Pivot the caliper downward and install the mounting bolt with the wrench. Tighten the bolt to 31 foot-pounds for a 1500 truck, or 80 foot-pounds for a 2500 truck.

    10

    Reconnect the wheels after changing the brakes for both wheels, then lower the truck off the jack stands.

    11

    Refill the master cylinder with fresh DOT 3 brake fluid.

    12

    Press the brake pedal several times to seat the pads.

Rabu, 19 Desember 2012

DIY Master Cylinder

One of the main components of an automobile's hydraulic braking system is the master cylinder, which is usually located in a vehicle's engine compartment. When you depress the brake pedal, a push rod activates a piston in the master cylinder, which sends brake fluid to all four wheels. A problem with the master cylinder could mean total loss of braking power for the vehicle. Most backyard mechanics can replace the master cylinder on their own with the right tools and know-how.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood and locate the brake master cylinder, which is usually mounted on the driver's side of the firewall. Remove the master cylinder reservoir cap. Remove the brake fluid from the reservoir with a syringe.

    2

    Remove the electrical connector from the master cylinder (if your vehicle is so equipped) by pressing in on the release tabs and pulling the connector straight out. Loosen the brake line retaining nuts at the base of the master cylinder with a tubing wrench.

    3

    Loosen and remove the master cylinder retaining nuts at the firewall or brake booster with a socket and ratchet. Lift the master cylinder straight up from the engine bay.

    4

    Place a replacement master cylinder in a bench vise with the reservoir opening facing up. Fill the master cylinder reservoir with brake fluid, but do not replace the cap.

    5

    Obtain a master cylinder brake bleeding kit, which is available at auto parts stores. Thread the short hoses that came with the bleeder into the brake line fittings at the base of the master cylinder and tighten them with a tubing wrench. Place the other end of each hose into the master cylinder reservoir.

    6

    Push the master cylinder piston in with a wooden dowel several times until no air bubbles can be seen escaping from the ends of the short hoses. Keep the ends of the hoses submerged in the reservoir. Refill the reservoir as needed during this procedure to keep the level at the full mark.

    7

    Remove the short hoses from the master cylinder with a tubing wrench. Remove the master cylinder from the vise and place it into position in the engine bay. Tighten the mounting nuts with a socket and ratchet.

    8

    Push the wiring connector (if equipped) back into place on the master cylinder until it snaps into place. Tighten the brake line retaining nuts onto the base of the master cylinder with a tubing wrench. Refill the reservoir with brake fluid until the level reaches the full line, if necessary. Replace the reservoir cap and close the hood. Push the brake pedal to test the operation of the brakes before driving the vehicle.

Selasa, 18 Desember 2012

How Do I Remove Light But Obvious Scratches From My Car Window?

How Do I Remove Light But Obvious Scratches From My Car Window?

A car is prone to wear and tear plus damage over time. This damage can come in the form of scratches in your window glass. Scratches not only obscure your vision while driving, but they are ugly to the eye as well. Light scratches can be removed without a visit to the shop and with the help of regular household items.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the entire surface of the window with glass cleaner and a micro fiber hand towel, cleaning the scratched area meticulously.

    2

    Combine and mix three parts baking soda-based toothpaste and one part powder baking soda until it becomes a paste.

    3

    Apply the paste on the scratch with a micro fiber hand towel. Let the paste set in for about 4 minutes before proceeding.

    4

    Rub the paste into the scratch with the micro fiber hand towel, gently, utilizing a circular motion. As you buff, apply more pressure until the scratch has disappeared.

    5

    Remove the paste debris from the window with water. Repeat the process if the scratch is still present until it is gone.

How to Remove Econoline Rear Brake Drums

The Ford Econoline van series, also known as the E-Series van, is featured in three different sizes; half-ton, three-quarter ton and 1 ton. Rear drum brakes used to come standard on the older vans, but now they may feature rear disc brakes as well. No matter what the size of the Econoline van, removing the rear drum employs the same procedure, however, the size of the drums will be smaller for the half-ton and larger for the three-quarter and 1-ton vans.

Instructions

    1

    Do not apply the parking brake as this will lock the brake shoes to the rear drums and prevent the removal of the drums.

    2

    Crack the rear lug nuts loose a quarter using the lug nut wrench before lifting the van.

    3

    Raise the rear axle with a car jack and support the axle onto two jack stands on either side of the differential.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts from the lug studs and then remove the rear wheels.

    5

    Try to pull the drums off the shoes first by hand. If the drum is stuck to the wheel hub by rust and corrosion, spray penetrating lubricant around the circumference of the drum-to-hub connection and allow it to soak in for 10 minutes or so.

    6

    Use the dead-blow hammer to strike the drum between the lug studs. Be careful not to accidentally hit the studs and mar the threads. Spin the drum and continue striking it until it shocks free from the hub.

    7

    Try to pull the drum off by hand again once the drum is free from the hub. If it does not want to come off, it's most likely due to the shoes being hung up on an inside lip or ridge of the drum.

    8

    Locate the adjustment portal on the backside of the backing plate at the bottom. Remove the rubber plug (if applicable) and insert a screwdriver to move the brake shoe adjusting lever off the brake adjuster screw.

    9

    Use the brake adjusting spoon to turn the star-wheel adjuster screw. It will turn both ways, so you'll have to feel if the drum(s) are getting tighter or looser and then record which way on each side so you can reverse the procedure when it comes time to replace the drums. Adjust the brakes by turning the star-wheel adjuster until it allows you to remove the drum.

Senin, 17 Desember 2012

How to Change the Drum Brakes on a 2001 Cavalier

How to Change the Drum Brakes on a 2001 Cavalier

The 2001 Chevy Cavalier came equipped with a front disc brake system and rear drum brake system. The rear drum brakes are responsible for about 20 percent of the braking force supplied by the entire brake system. As a result, the rear brakes wear at a significantly slower rate than the front brakes. When the rear brake shoes wear, the clearance between the drum and the brake shoes increases and results in a low brake pedal and impaired parking brake function.

Instructions

    1

    Secure the front wheels using the wheel chocks and release the parking brake. Position the floor jack under the rear axle and lift the rear of the Cavalier until the wheels are almost off the ground. Loosen the rear lug nuts, and raise the wheels off the ground. Remove the rear wheels.

    2

    Slide the brake drums off of the rear brake shoes. If the drums are stuck, a few sharp blows with a hammer will break them free of any corrosion around the rear hub. Clean the brake shoes with brake parts cleaner to remove the dust from the brake system. The dust in the brake system should never be removed with compressed air. It is harmful to breath the dust created by car brake systems.

    3

    Remove the return springs that attached to the pivot pin at the top of the brake system using a return spring tool, from the set, to pry them over the pivot pin. Use a screwdriver to pry the spring from the lower edge of the self-adjuster arm and remove the rod that attaches the adjuster arm to the pivot pin. Remove the parking brake strut that is located below the wheel cylinder and connects the parking brake lever on one side to the brake shoe on the other side of the set.

    4

    Pull the lower edges of the brake shoes apart and allow the self adjuster to drop out of the shoes. Remove the self adjuster spring from the lower ends of the shoes. Remove the hold-down springs using the hold-down spring tool from the set. Pull the brake shoes from the backing plate. Clean and lubricate the backing plate using brake parts cleaner and silicon brake grease.

    5

    Install the parking brake lever from the old shoes onto the new shoes. Position the new shoes onto the backing plate and attach them to the backing plate with the hold down springs. Slip the parking brake strut into place between the lever and the shoes. Place the adjuster rod onto the adjuster lever and pivot pin, and attach the shoes to the pivot pin using the return springs.

    6

    Install the spring on the lower edge of the adjuster lever. Install the lower spring on the lower ends of the brake shoes. Pull the brake shoes apart and slip the self adjuster into place between the lower ends of the shoes. Slide the drum onto the shoes to check the fit. Adjust the shoes by rotating the self adjuster until the drum just fits onto the shoes.

    7

    Repeat the process for the opposite side of the brake system. Reinstall the wheels. Torque the lug nuts to 80 ft-lbs. using a torque wrench. Lower the car from the jack stands and test drive to check the function of the brake system.

How to Repair the Rear Window on a Nissan Titan

How to Repair the Rear Window on a Nissan Titan

Window repairs for your Nissan Titan can be simple and quick. Fixing a rear window that is cracked, for example, only requires a handful of supplies for the repair. You can purchase everything you need from an auto store, and you should get the repair job done as soon as possible to prevent the damage from increasing.

Instructions

    1

    Make the soapy water solution with warm water and a mild detergent. Be sure to rinse the window off with clean water and dry it before moving on.

    2

    Set the stabilizer in place by pushing it down onto the window with the cracked surface underneath. Pushing it on correctly will provide the suction needed for the repair to form between the stabilizer and the window.

    3

    Take the injector cartridge and put it into the open port within the stabilizer that is specified for the injector.

    4

    Put the resin tube into the injector. Once all is in place, pull the injector out to release the resin into the cracks with the natural suction.

    5

    Remove the stabilizer carefully. Apply the adhesive curing strips to the resin without smudging the repair. Remove the strips within a few hours.

How to Troubleshoot a GMC ABS Brake System

The ABS brake system in a GMC vehicle uses a sophisticated ABS module to sense wheel speed. If the vehicle's wheels stop moving while brake pressure is being applied, but the vehicle itself is still moving, the system identifies this as a skid and automatically releases brake pressure to prevent the brake system from locking up. Instead, the ABS system will pump the brakes to provide better control over the vehicle for the driver. If you suspect you are having trouble with the GMC ABS brake system, you should troubleshoot the problem to verify whether there is a failure in the system.

Instructions

    1

    Open the fuse panel underneath the dash.

    2

    Remove the fuse for the ABS system with the fuse puller located on the dash panel lid. Inspect the fuse. If the fuse is popped, then you'll need to replace it. If it is not popped, then put the fuse back into the ABS fuse slot.

    3

    Turn the steering wheel all the way to the right.

    4

    Check behind the wheels on the ground with a flashlight. Check to make sure that the wires running to the wheel hub assembly (these are the ABS wires) are not damaged in any way.

    5

    Turn the ignition to the "II" position and check the ABS dash light. If the ABS dash light comes on and stays lit, and none of the ABS wires are damaged, it is likely that there is a partial failure in the ABS sensor.

How to Troubleshoot Why Brakes Squeal After Changing Pads

How to Troubleshoot Why Brakes Squeal After Changing Pads

A vehicle's brake system consists of the brake pads, rotors and calipers. Each is crucial to the performance of the vehicle. When brake pads need to be changed, there are several warning signs: the brake light will remain on, the steering wheel will shake or the brakes may squeal when you use them. Occasionally, even after replacing the brake pads, they will continue to make noise. The source of the noise can be tricky to find.

Instructions

    1

    Check for grease. After changing your brake pads, it is important to put grease or a silicone substance between the pads and the calipers. The calipers press the brake pads down onto the rotors. Metal rubbing against metal will produce a squealing or scratching noise if the metal is not lubricated. To check for grease on the brake pads, you will need to jack up the car and then place jack stands underneath it and lower it down to rest on the jack stands. Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels using the tire iron, and remove the tire and inspect the pads.

    2

    Examine the rotor. To do this, you will also have to remove the tires. If the metal on the rotor is damaged or worn, it will cause noise when the brake pads contact it. The rotor may need to be shaved down so it is smooth. If it is extremely worn, it is best to purchase a new rotor. A mechanic will be able to determine if your current rotors should be replaced.

    3

    Determine what type of metal your brake pads are made of. Some smaller car models frequently have brakes that make noise simply because of the type of metal on the brake pads. Cars like these usually have semi-metallic brakes which are better at stopping the car, but can produce unwanted noise.

Minggu, 16 Desember 2012

How to Remove a Drum Brake Spring

As more and more cars use disc brakes exclusively, drum brakes are increasingly rare. Maintenance on disc brakes is much easier, as there are fewer parts and a much simpler brake assembly. Removing a drum brake spring can be daunting on your first try, but using the right tool makes repairing or replacing drum brakes something well within the abilities of the novice mechanic.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the spring by using soap and water or a specialized brake cleaning product. This is only necessary if you cannot get a good grip on the spring with the pliers.

    2

    Take the needle-nose pliers and pull the spring away from the center of the wheel to unhook it from its mount.

    3

    Unhook the other side of the spring, now that the tension is released, to remove the drum spring completely.

Brake Change Tutorial

Brakes must be changed every 50,000 to 60,000 miles. Usually, a vehicle uses brake discs in the front and brake drums in the back. The discs use brake pads while the brake drums use shoes. Both of these types of brakes require very different methods of changing. Whether changing the front or rear brakes, you must always change them on both sides so they will always be equal.

Removing Disc Brake Pads

    The brake pads are contained within the calipers and their mounting brackets. Raise the front end of the vehicle and remove the wheels to reach the calipers. You only need to remove one of the two bolts holding the caliper in place, so remove the bottom one with a torque wrench and pivot the caliper upward. There is a pad on each side of the rotor; pull them both out of the bracket and discard them. Remove the shims and clips that held the pads in place as well.

Installing Disc Brake Pads

    Clean off the shims and retaining clip with brake cleaner, then apply an anti-squeal compound onto the shims' backing plates to aid the new pads before placing them and the clips back within the bracket. Before inserting the new pads, compress the caliper's piston back into its bore with a C-clamp (this will force fluid back into the master cylinder, so siphoning out fluid from the reservoir at the start is a good idea). After you place the new pads within the shims, pivot the caliper back down and bolt it back into place. Once the pads are changed on both wheels, place both wheels back on the car and lower it. Seat the new brakes by repeatedly pressing down on the brake pedal until it feels firm.

Removing Drum Brake Shoes

    Because you are working on the rear wheels with the parking brake released, block the front wheels before raising the rear end and releasing the brake. The brake drums need to be installed in their exact position on the axle, so place marks on the drum with washable paint or chalk before removing them. (If pressed washers hold the drum in place, cut them off with a metal cutting tool; you won't need to replace them.) There is a brake shoe on the front and rear side of the drum. They will both be easier to remove by unbolting and removing the the hub and bearing assembly. Disconnect the actuator and retractor springs from the adjuster level and the shoes. Disconnect the adjuster screw assembly next and you can then remove the front (leading) shoe. Disconnect the parking brake lever from the rear (trailing) shoe to remove it.

Installing Drum Brake Shoes

    Use a high-temperature grease to lubricate the backing plates where the shoes were on the drum. Installation is in reverse order of disassembly. Place the new trailing shoe on the drum and connect the parking brake lever and the adjuster screw assembly to it. Now install the new leading shoe and make sure it connects with the adjuster screw assembly. Connect the retractor springs and the adjuster level spring. Connect the retractor spring to the back shoe and the actuator spring to the front shoe, then stretch the actuator spring to connect it to the adjuster level. Now, slip the drum back onto the rotor; turn the star on the adjuster screw level so the drum slips onto the new brake shoes without rubbing on them. Once the shoes on both brake drums are changed and the vehicle is lowered, these brakes also need to be seated with the pedal.

Sabtu, 15 Desember 2012

How to Fix a Rear Window in a Jeep Wrangler

How to Fix a Rear Window in a Jeep Wrangler

Your Jeep Wrangler was built for riding through rough terrain and high grounds. This creates the possibility that one or more of the windows will be cracked by rocks and other flying objects. The window will not need to be removed for the repair, and assistance is not usually required.

Instructions

    1

    Combine warm water and mild dish detergent in the bucket for your cleaning solution. Wash the window thoroughly to remove all the dirt and build-up.

    2

    Remove any loose shards of glass from within the crack. Put on your goggles and begin picking out the pieces using the corner of the razor blade.

    3

    Hold the stabilizer above the crack. Push down firmly to create suction.

    4

    Place the resin-filled tube into the injector. Place the injector into its port within the suction stabilizer.

    5

    Pull out the injector. The natural suction will begin pulling the resin into the cracks. This may happen slowly.

    6

    Remove the suction cup stabilizer and place a strip of curing film across the entire repair. Remove it in a few hours after the resin has dried.

How to Remove Disc Brake Calipers

How to Remove Disc Brake Calipers

A vehicle's brake calipers press the brake pads against the rotor using an internal piston. The friction created by the pads pressing against the rotors brings the vehicle to a stop. Over time, the calipers can suffer wear and tear and begin leaking or not properly retracting. This can lead to the brakes locking up or dragging against the rotor. Calipers can be replaced or rebuilt, depending on your preference. Either way, you must remove the calipers first.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen, but do not remove, the lug nuts from the appropriate wheel.

    2

    Raise the front or rear of the vehicle, depending on the caliper being removed, using the floor jack.

    3

    Place the jack stands beneath a secure part of the vehicle. Lower the jack until the vehicle's weight is supported only by the jack stands.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheels from the vehicle.

    5

    Trace the rubber brake hose coming from the rear of the brake caliper. Wrap the clean shop rag around the brake line, about halfway up the hose. Place the locking pliers over the shop rag and clamp them down, sealing the hose to prevent leakage when removed.

    6

    Loosen and remove the bolt holding the brake hose to the rear of the caliper, using a ratchet and socket. Pull the hose from the caliper and discard the brass washers that come off with the hose.

    7

    Loosen and remove the upper and lower bolts on the rear of the caliper, using a ratchet and socket.

    8

    Pull the brake caliper up and off of the brake system.

Installation Instructions for a Honda Civic Clutch

The clutch in a vehicle is made up of multiple components that are connected as an assembly. Installing a clutch in your Honda Civic means installing the clutch to the manual transaxle while it is off the car and connecting the transaxle to the car. The parts themselves can be relatively inexpensive versus the time it will take for complete installation. The process can also vary depending on the year of your Civic. Consult with your mechanic before taking on a project of this magnitude.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the car and support it on jack stands with an engine hoist supporting the engine from above.

    2

    Place the clutch plate and the pressure plate against the crankshaft's flywheel and hold the clutch in place using a clutch alignment tool in the center. Tighten bolts for the plate and flywheel finger-tight.

    3

    Insert the alignment tool and make sure it extends through the splined hub and into the crankshaft's pilot bearing. Wiggle the tool in whatever direction is needed to center the clutch disc.

    4

    Tighten the bolts connecting the pressure plate to the flywheel with your wrench, tightening them a little at a time in a crisscross pattern.

    5

    Lubricate the clutch release bearing's inner groove using high-temperature grease. Place small amounts of grease on the contact areas of the release lever and the transaxle input shaft's bearing retainer.

    6

    Connect the release lever and bearing onto the input shaft with with the release fork and slide them to the ball stud.

    7

    Raise the transaxle into position behind the engine, with it chained to the jack, and slide the transaxle dowel pins into the holes in the engine block, making sure the input shaft slides into the clutch plate hub splines.

    8

    Bolt the transaxle into place with your wrench and then remove the chain from the transaxle.

    9

    Connect the sub-frame to the car, raising it into position with a couple of floor jacks, and bolt the engine and transaxle mounts into place.

    10

    Connect all the other parts needed to the car with their mounting bolts -- this can include the control arms to the steering knuckles and the stabilizer bar links, the exhaust pipes, the engine splash shield and any emissions hoses, vacuum lines and wiring harnesses.

    11

    Connect the clutch release cylinder with its hydraulic line to the transaxle with its bolts.

    12

    Remove the engine from the hoist and lower the car off the jacks.