Sabtu, 31 Desember 2011

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Jeep Grand Cherokee

Make parking brake adjustment to your Jeep Cherokee easily at home to save you time and money by avoiding the mechanic. Adjust your parking brake when your vehicle starts to roll while parked on a hill. Use this procedure on Jeep Cherokee model years 1994 through 1998 or 1999 to 2005.

Instructions

Years 1994 to 1998

    1

    Raise your Jeep Cherokee rear wheels in the air using a jack and support the rear wheels with jack stands. Take off both rear tires using your tire iron to loosen and remove the lug nuts. Remove the tire from the bolts with your hands.

    2

    Release the adjuster nut with your pliers so the parking brake cables have slack in them. Locate the adjuster nut at the end of the parking brake lever rod underneath the vehicle. The rod attaches to an equalizer which holds both rear wheel parking brake cables.

    3

    Remove the rear wheel drums with a screwdriver. Look over the brakes for the correct installation and then inspect the cables for the correct placement.

    4

    Reinstall the rear wheel drums using your screwdriver. Reinstall the wheels using your tire iron to tighten the lug nuts. Press in on the parking brake with your foot until it reaches the lowest position to the floor.

    5

    Mark the parking brake lever cable 6.5mm from the equalizer. Tighten the adjusting nut with your pliers until the rod making moves into alignment with the equalizer.

    6

    Let the parking brake release. Test the rear wheels to make sure there is no tension when you spin them around.

    7

    Lower your Jeep Cherokee using the jack and remove the jack stand supports.

Years 1999 to 2005

    8

    Raise your vehicle in the air with your jack and support the rear wheels with the jack stand. Remove the rear wheels with your tire iron.

    9

    Remove the plug in each hole located underneath the vehicle in each wheel well. Loosen the parking brake cable until there is slack. Locate the parking brake cable underneath the vehicle in the middle.

    10

    Insert your screwdriver into the access hole and turn the star adjuster nut Turn the nut until a slight drag can be felt when turning the rear wheel. Back off the adjuster nut until the drag is removed.

    11

    Put the plugs back in, the wheels back on and lower your vehicle.

How to Unlock an Anti-Lock on a Cavalier

The Chevrolet Cavalier came with an Anti-Lock Break, or ABS system. The ABS system is a system installed on some cars which is meant to keep the brakes from locking or freezing up when they are applied suddenly or in wet or icy adverse road conditions. The ABS system on the Cavalier consists of wheel sensors which correlate information back to a central computer in the car's diagnostic system. In order to make certain repairs, like brake jobs or ball joint installation, the ABS system can be unlocked, or disabled.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the hood on the Chevy Cavalier and place the end of a wrench around the bolt holding the negative battery cable on. Turn the bolt to the left to loosen it and then pull it from the negative battery terminal.

    2

    Remove the plastic cover from the relay box, which is located neat the Cavalier's battery.

    3

    Flip the plastic relay panel lid over and locate the ABS relay on the relay schematic. The exact location of the ABS relay may very with different year Cavaliers so it is important to carefully read the schematic diagram printed on the inside of the lid. Pull the ABS relay out by hand and then put the plastic lid back on.

    4

    Slip the negative battery cable back on and tighten it with the wrench.

How to Diagnose the Speed Sensors on ABS Wheels

Wheel sensors relay the wheel speed to a car's ABS electrical braking computer. Once the computer determines the wheel speed, the ABS braking computer will relay the proper braking percentage to the wheels to prevent skids and uneven braking. Over time, excessive vibration and wear can keep the wheel sensors from working properly. Once that happens, the ABS computer can not relay the proper braking percentage to the wheels. Diagnose and repair any problems that may exist with the speed sensors.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts from the front wheels.

    2

    Jack the front of the vehicle up and place the jack stands under the proper jacking points. Lower the vehicle to the top of the stands and leave the jack in place.

    3

    Finish removing the lug nuts from the front wheels. Pull the front wheels off and place them down flat near each work area.

    4

    Move to the driver side front wheel hub and locate the access hole on the front of the brake caliper. Slide the flat end of a flathead screwdriver through the hole and between the brake rotor and the inside brake pad. Pry the inside brake pad away from the brake rotor about 1/8 of an inch.

    5

    Loosen and remove the brake caliper mounting bolts on the back of the brake caliper. Pull the brake caliper off of the rotor and hang the caliper on one of the suspension components behind the wheel hub with a bungee cord.

    6

    Locate the wheel sensor that sticks through the spindle backing plate. Use a flashlight if necessary. Inspect the distance from the end of the wheel sensor to the front of the start wheel that attaches to the brake rotor. The distance should measure between 1/16 of an inch and 1/8 of an inch. Use the measuring tape if necessary. Remove the single mounting bolt and the strap from the wheel sensor wiring harness.

    7

    Follow the wiring harness from the back of the wheel sensor and inspect the wires for any cracks, chafes or breaks. Unhook the plug that connects the wheel sensor and the wiring harness with your hands. Pull the wheel sensor through the back of the spindle and out through the wheel well.

    8

    Inspect the front of the wheel sensor surface for dirt, metal shavings and excessive wear. If the front of the sensor has a build up of dirt, brake dust, or metal shavings, clean the front of the sensor with a clean rag and brake cleaner. If the front of the sensor has excessive wear, it will not correctly relay the information back and forth to the computer and the sensor will require replacement. When the sensor gets pushed in fully through the spindle and the distance from the front of the sensor to the star wheel measures more than 1/8 of an inch, replace the sensor.

    9

    Inspect the wiring harness plug for any cracks or breaks. Reconnect the wiring plug from the harness to the wheel sensor wiring plug. Push the wheel sensor through the spindle and until the front of the sensor measures between 1/16 and 1/8 of an inch from the tip of the sensor to the front of the star wheel.

    10

    Clean the front of the star wheel and the brake rotor with brake cleaner. Use a clean rag to wipe away the excess brake cleaner. Reconnect the brake caliper over the brake rotor and screw the bolts in tightly. Torque the caliper mounting bolts down to 50 foot pounds.

    11

    Slide the wheel back onto the wheel hub and screw the lug nuts on tightly. Jack the vehicle up and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground and finish tightening the lug nuts.

    12

    Move to the passenger side front wheel and the rear wheels if necessary and repeat the same process as outlined in the steps above to properly troubleshoot and diagnose the ABS wheel sensors.

Jumat, 30 Desember 2011

How to Replace Brake Rotors in a Ford Aerostar

The brake rotors on an old Ford Aerostar van, which the brake calipers and pads press against, must have a smooth finish to work properly. If a brake rotor on the van has any deep grooves from worn out brakes and can't be refinished any lower, the rotor needs to be replaced. A rotor has the caliper mounted on it and the wheel in front of it, requiring you to remove both before removing and replacing the rotor.

Instructions

    1

    Raise and support the van's front end on jackstands. Remove the wheel from the rotor; loosening the lug nuts before raising the vehicle will make the wheel easier to remove. Siphon out part of the brake fluid from the master cylinder.

    2

    Disconnect and remove the brake caliper from the rotor. Compress the caliper piston into its bore with a C-clamp, then drive the caliper pins out with a hammer and caliper pin removal tool, starting with the upper pin. Remove the caliper and hang it somewhere secure from a strong wire--don't hang it by the brake hose.

    3

    Remove the cap in the center of the rotor hub with locking pliers. Remove the cotter pin from the spindle with large tweezers, pull out the castellated retainer and retaining nut, pry out the flat washer with a hooked tool and remove the outer hub bearings.

    4

    Pull the rotor off of the spindle, making sure you don't slide the inner bearings across the spindle threads.

    5

    Place the new hub and rotor on the spindle, keeping it centered on the spindle so you won't damage the spindle threads or retainer. Replace the washer and retaining nut, making sure the nut is tight enough to secure the rotor while still allowing it to spin, then replace the retainer, cotter pin and cap.

    6

    Reconnect the caliper to the rotor, wiping away any dirt on the mounting surfaces first. Use new caliper pins, positioning each pin between the caliper and spindle grooves and tapping them inward with a hammer until the pin's retention tabs touch the spindle face. Start with the upper pin.

    7

    Reinstall the wheel to the van, tightening the lug nuts to between 85 and 115 foot-pounds. Lower the van, fill the brake master cylinder if needed and test the brakes for proper operation.

How to Replace PT Cruiser Brake Pads

Through normal wear and tear, the brake pads on the Chrysler PT Cruiser will wear down and require replacement. While it is recommended to replace the rotors or have them machined when replacing the pads, there are occasions where replacing the pads is acceptable. All PT Cruisers feature front disk brakes, but some may also feature rear disk brakes, instead of rear drum brakes. Replacing the pads on the front or rear of the Cruiser employs a similar procedure.

Instructions

    1

    Remove 1/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using a brake fluid siphon. Discard the fluid and replace the master cylinder cover.

    2

    Crack the five lug nuts loose on one side using the tire iron. Lift the Cruiser using a hydraulic jack and place a jack stand under the frame rail to support the car. Finish removing the lug nuts and then remove the wheel.

    3

    Place the large C-clamp over the outboard pad and the rear caliper housing. Tighten the clamp to compress the caliper piston until the piston is seated inside the piston bore.

    4

    Remove the top and bottom caliper guide bolts using a metric wrench. Remove the caliper and pad assembly. Support the caliper to the front coil spring by bending a metal coat hanger into a makeshift hook. Do not allow the caliper to hang from the brake hose or damage to the hose can occur.

    5

    Pry the outboard pad retaining clips off of the caliper housing and then remove the pad. Pull the inboard pad from the caliper piston bore.

    6

    Clean the area of the caliper bridge where the backing plate tabs of the pads contact using emery cloth. Apply a light coat of silicone brake lubricant to the contact points. Install replacement pads--inboard pad first and then the outboard pad. Apply a light coat of silicone brake lubricant to the non-threaded area of the caliper guide bolts. Replace the caliper and pad assembly over the rotor and then replace and tighten the guide bolts.

    7

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts flush to the hub and then lower the Cruiser. Use a torque wrench and a 19mm socket to tighten the lug nuts properly to 100 foot pounds. Repeat the procedure for the other side.

    8

    Pump the foot brake pedal five to six times to seat the new pads to the rotor. When the pedal feels firm, recheck and adjust the brake fluid level in the master cylinder. Test drive the Cruiser to ensure the braking system is working properly.

Rabu, 28 Desember 2011

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Mercury Cougar

Make parking brake adjustments to your Mercury Cougar easily and you can save yourself time and money doing the repair at home. Adjust your Mercury Cougar parking brake when your car starts to slip down the slope you park it on. Use these directions for year models 1989 and 1990.

Instructions

    1

    Pull up on the parking brake until it reaches the highest position. Release the parking brake to the lowest position. Locate the parking brake between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat.

    2

    Put your Mercury Cougar in Neutral position or "N." Raise your car's rear wheels in the air using a jack and support the rear wheels with jack stands.

    3

    Get under your car and locate the threaded rod and parking brake mechanism holding the parking brake cables coming from each rear wheel.

    4

    Release the tension nut by rotating it away from the locking lever holding the threaded rod. There is a tensioner spring attached to each cable that will absorb the cable slack as you adjust the tension nut. This preloads the cables.

    5

    Rotate the locking lever forward on the threaded rod to make the cables secure.

    6

    Lower your Mercy Cougar with the jack and remove the jack stands from the rear wheels.

Selasa, 27 Desember 2011

Brake Rotor Removal for a 2004 Mitsubishi Lancer

Brake rotor damage is often the result of a poor brake pad replacement. High speeds, especially highway stop and go driving, can warp the brake rotor as well. When this happens, the car skips to a stop when the brake pedal is applied. The procedure for removing a brake rotor from the 2004 Lancer is the same whether you're removing one or all four rotors from the car.

Instructions

    1

    Apply the emergency brake fully on the car. Crack the lug nuts on the front driver tire with a lug wrench. Do not remove the lug nuts completely, only loosen them. This makes it easier to take the lug nuts off once the Lancer's jacked up.

    2

    Raise the car with a car jack. The bottom of the tire should measure 8 inches from the ground.

    3

    Slide a jack stand into position a few inches to the right of the car jack. Raise the support arm on the jack stand to equal the height of the car jack. Return the locking pin to the support arm on the jack stand to secure its height. Slightly rock the Lancer back and forth a bit to make sure that it's stable.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts from the tire one at a time. Support the tire with one hand while removing the final lug nut. This action stops the tire from falling onto and damaging the hub bolt threads.

    5

    Pull the tire off the hub using both hands, using care not to drag the tire across the threads of the hub bolts. Set the tire and its lug nuts to the side of the work area.

    6

    Remove the two bolts holding the brake caliper on its inner left and right side with a socket wrench. Place the bolts in your pocket for safe keeping.

    7

    Set a 5-gallon bucket on the right side of the brake caliper within the wheel well. Using both hands, carefully slide the brake caliper off the brake rotor and set it on top of the bucket. Do not disconnect or twist the brake line.

    8

    Remove the two small bolts on the face of the brake rotor. The bolts hold the brake rotor in place on the hub. Keep the bolts in a safe place.

    9

    Slowly slide the rotor off the hub bolts. If the brake rotor seems jammed or stuck, use a rubber mallet to tap around its rear circumference to release it.

How to Take Off Front Rotors on a 2001 Nissan Pathfinder

How to Take Off Front Rotors on a 2001 Nissan Pathfinder

The brake system on a 2001 Nissan Pathfinder makes use of a set of semi-metallic brake pads, which are pressed against a metal disc, called a rotor, to stop the vehicle. Over time, the friction created by the stopping of the SUV may wear out the rotors. When this occurs, the rotors must be replaced as soon as possible to prevent further damage. Driving on worn rotors causes the caliper to overextend in order to stop the vehicle, which can lead to complete brake failure.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the front lug nuts on the front wheels, do not remove them at this time. Raise the front of the Pathfinder, using a floor jack.

    2

    Support the SUV by placing jack stands beneath the frame rails and lowering the jack until the vehicles weight is solely on the jack stands. Remove the front lug nuts and pull the front wheels from the vehicle.

    3

    Loosen and remove the two bolts holding the caliper bracket, the metal component the caliper bolts to, using a ratchet and socket.

    4

    Pull the caliper bracket up an off of the vehicle, notice the caliper and brake pads come off with it. Attach the caliper bracket to a suspension component, using the bungee strap.

    5

    Grab the rotor, the metal disc, and pull it from the vehicle. Lightly hitting the rotor with a rubber mallet can help removal if the rotor is stuck to the hub.

    6

    Repeat steps 3 through 5 for the rotors on the other side of the Pathfinder.

Instructions for Changing Brake Pads in a 1999 Chevy Malibu

Instructions for Changing Brake Pads in a 1999 Chevy Malibu

The Chevrolet Malibu was originally introduced as a trim package for the Chevrolet Chevelle. The Malibu, named after the California city, was introduced individually in 1978. The 1999 Malibu's base model featured a 2.4-liter in-line four-cylinder engine, with a 3.1-liter V-6 available as an upgrade. The 1999 base-model Malibu has front disc brakes and rear drum brakes. The pads on the disc brakes wear out typically two or three times as fast as the rotors.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the front lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the front of the Malibu with a jack. Place jack stands beneath each front sub-frame rail, on either side of the engine. Lower the car onto the jack stands. Remove the wheel lug nuts, then remove the wheels completely.

    2

    Insert a small pry bar in the small viewing hole, and place the tip against the inboard brake pad. Press the brake pad toward the center of the car gently, using the brake rotor as a fulcrum point. Remove the caliper bolts with a ratchet and socket. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using the small pry bar if necessary. Hang the caliper from the front strut coil spring with a metal clothes hanger or rod.

    3

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper bracket. Inspect the outboard and inboard faces of the rotor for damage. If the rotor has severe pits or scoring, then it needs to be replaced. Measure across the topmost edge of the rotor to gauge the thickness of the rotor. If the rotor is less than 15/16 inches thick, then the rotor is too thin and needs to be discarded and replaced. Replace the rotor at this time if necessary.

    4

    Install the new brake pads onto the caliper mounting, making sure the pad with the wear indicator (metal "L" shaped protrusion) is mounted on the inboard side of the rotor. Add a thin layer of caliper grease to the backing plates on both brake pads.

    5

    Insert one of the old brake pads against the caliper piston, on the inside of the caliper. Install a C-clamp around the old brake pad and the rear of the caliper. Tighten the C-clamp slowly until the caliper piston is completely compressed into the piston. Remove the C-clamp and the old brake pad.

    6

    Remove the metal pins from inside the rubber boots, on the rear of the caliper. Lubricate these slide pins thoroughly with caliper grease, then reinsert them into the boots. Place the caliper onto the brake assembly, and tighten the caliper bolts to 35-foot-pounds with a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket.

    7

    Repeat Steps 2 through 6 to complete the brake pad replacement on the other side of the car. Install the front wheels back onto the car, and snug the lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the car off of the jack stands, and remove the stands from beneath the car. Lower the Malibu to the ground and tighten the lug nuts to 105-foot-pounds with the torque wrench and a socket.

    8

    Proceed immediately to the driver's seat of the Malibu. Pump the brake pedal no less than 10 to 15 times. If the brake pedal does not stiffen or exert excess force against your foot after five pumps, stop pumping and bleed the brakes.

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Ford Mustang

Make parking brake adjustments in your 2005 or newer Ford Mustang easily. Adjust the lever on the inside of the vehicle and avoid getting dirty. Save yourself time and money making the adjustment at home, instead of going to the mechanic. Gain a sense of accomplishment fixing your Ford Mustang. You need to adjust your parking brake when your car starts to slip down the slope it is parked on.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the center console cover around the parking brake lever. Locate this between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat.

    2

    Pull up on the parking brake lever until it reaches the fourth notch or click.

    3

    Turn the adjuster nut until it is loose. Locate the adjuster nut on the end of the parking brake cable rod. Make sure the adjuster nut does not come off the parking brake cable rod.

    4

    Put the parking brake handle on the lowest setting towards the floor. Turn the adjuster nut until it is closest to the parking brake lever on the parking brake cable rod.

    5

    Raise the parking brake lever to the highest position and lower it again to the floor. Do this four times to set the parking brake adjustments.

    6

    Test your parking brake adjustment by parking your Ford Mustang on a hill and use only the parking brake to hold it from sliding. If the parking brake does not hold the car in place, make another adjustment to your parking brake lever.

How to Replace Four-Wheel Drive Brake Rotors

How to Replace Four-Wheel Drive Brake Rotors

Four-wheel drive is a system that allows the transmission to drive all four wheels while still allowing the front wheels to steer the vehicle. There are many systems to allow the steering wheels to turn, from CV-style axles to wheel joints, similar in construction to universal joints. Manual, mechanical or electric hubs allow the selection of two- or four-wheel drive. There is a variety of methods to change four-wheel drive rotors, depending upon the drive system, but most of the procedure is common among all types.

Instructions

    1

    Jack the vehicle up on jack stands, ensuring that the parking brake is set. Block the rear wheels with wooden blocks or wheel chocks to keep the vehicle from rolling. Using the lug wrench, remove the wheel nuts and the front tire and set them aside.

    2

    Consult your manual and remove the outer four-wheel drive hub. These may be manual, mechanical or electric. Some four-wheel drives do not have this type of hub at all and may just have a bearing cap. Whatever the outer cap looks like, follow the directions in your specific manual and remove it.

    3

    Use the four-wheel drive socket to remove the nut and washer that hold in the hub. There are a few different styles of four-wheel drive sockets, a four-prong, a six-prong and a few others. These are often available through loan-a-tool programs at your local auto-parts store. Once the nut and washer have been removed, slide the hub off the axle, being careful to catch the outer bearing as the hub reaches the end of the spindle.

    4

    Using the appropriate socket, remove the caliper. Using a bungee cord or shot piece of rope, hang the caliper up and out of the way. Do not allow the caliper to hang by the rubber brake line.

    5

    Set the hub on a flat surface and using a large socket or an impact wrench, remove the bolts that hold the rotor to the hub. Typically there are five to eight bolts. Remove the old rotor and install the new one.

    6

    Remove the wheel seal and the inner bearings. Once you have installed the new rotor on the hub, you should have it turned by a machine shop or an auto-parts store. This will make the new rotor true to the hub, and will prevent brake pulse.

    7

    Reinstall the bearings and pack them with grease. Install a new wheel seal. Reinstall all parts using a torque wrench to tighten the bolts to the correct specification.

Minggu, 25 Desember 2011

How to Remove a Brake Rotor on a Scion XB

The brake rotors on a Scion xB are an important part of the braking system. The rotors wear down each time the brake pedal is applied and wear down unevenly because of inconsistencies in the brake pads. When the pads need to be changed, Scion recommends removing the brake rotors and either having them turned by a professional or replacing them entirely, depending on the remaining thickness of the part. Fortunately, removing the rotor is not a difficult process. You can do it in under an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the car with the jack, placing the jack stands underneath the jack points indicated by arrows in the corners of the chassis. Pull off the hubcap on the wheels, then remove the wheels with the tire iron.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper bracket from the knuckle with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Lift it off the rotor and hang the caliper and bracket from the spring with the bungee cord.

    3

    Thread the 8 mm bolts into the threaded holes in the center of the rotor by the wheels studs. Tighten them using the ratchet until the rotor pops off the knuckle.

How to Repair Subaru Rear Brakes

How to Repair Subaru Rear Brakes

The rear brakes on most Subraru vehicles were drum-style systems until rear disk brakes were applied to all late models. Both styles can have some parts resurfaced rather than replaced. Repair to either style as regular maintenance or to replace a damaged part can take the average backyard mechanic about an hour.

Instructions

Rear Drums

    1

    Lift the Subaru at the rear wheel by placing the head of the jack underneath a frame rail and pumping the lever until the wheel is in the air. Place a jack stand near the floor jack's position to support it. Remove the wheel by turning the lug nuts counterclockwise, then pulling the wheel from the hub. Place the wheel aside.

    2

    Remove the drum by turning the keeper screw counterclockwise, then pulling the drum from the brake assembly. Inspect the assembly for leaks or worn material on the wheel cylinder and brake shoes, respectively. Leaking wheel cylinder gaskets can cause a lack of pressure and could diminish the braking system to the point where it will not stop the car. Repair involves removing the two rear-mount nuts, pulling the wheel cylinder piston out and replacing the gaskets on either side.

    3

    Remove the brake shoes by disengaging the long retracting springs that hook into the top and bottom of each shoe. They can be levered off with a screwdriver, then set aside. Turn the primary spring nut in the center of each shoe counterclockwise and remove the shoe by pulling it directly away from the assembly.

    4

    Replace the shoes and springs, and resurface or replace the outer drum in the reverse order of the disassembly. Replace the wheel by turning the lug nuts clockwise, in an alternating pattern. Remove the jack stand and lower the car.

    5

    Repeat the entire procedure on the opposite brake.

Disk System

    6

    Lift the car, apply a jack stand and remove the wheel. Inspect the caliper and rotor for damage or debris. Check for leaks around the caliper, and look for pitting or grooves in the rotor surface.

    7

    Remove the caliper by turning the rear mount bolts counterclockwise, then sliding the caliper form the rotor. The pads will come with the caliper and can be pulled out or unfastened with a screwdriver. Check the caliper pistons for leaks and seal damage, which will require caliper replacement or advanced repairs. Pull the rotor free from the hub, after turning the spindle nut counterclockwise and removing it, if applicable. The rotor can be resurfaced repeatedly until the material is too thin to be safe; have it checked at a parts store for thickness. If the rotor cannot be resurfaced, use a new unit.

    8

    Replace the rotor by pressing it over the hub, and secure the spindle nut if necessary. Place new pads into the caliper and slide it over the rotor, locking the rear mount nuts into place. Reattach the wheel by turning the lug nuts in a counterclockwise direction, with an alternating pattern. Remove the jack stand and lower the car.

    9

    Repeat the entire procedure on the opposite brake.

Sabtu, 24 Desember 2011

How to Replace Brakes & Rotors

How to Replace Brakes & Rotors

Replace your own brake pads and rotors and you can save a lot of money. Generally, you can plan on saving about 50 percent of the cost of having the job done at a repair shop if you do it yourself. It's well worth the time it will take you to replace your own brake pads and rotors. You will need a few tools, but most are tools you likely have if you do some of your own repairs already.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a firm, level surface and remove the wheel covers.
    Use your lug wrench and loosen, but do not remove the lug nuts. Turn in a counterclockwise direction to loosen.

    2

    Jack the vehicle up until the tires are off the ground and support the vehicle securely on jack stands. Then remove the lug nuts and the tires.

    3

    Locate and remove the caliper bolts. Some Ford vehicles do not use bolts. They have two wedge-shaped caliper locks. If your vehicle has these locks, use a punch and hammer and slide them out of the channels they are in.

    4

    Remove the caliper. Do not allow the caliper to hang by its brake hose. Hang it with a temporary hanger from a suspension arm or the frame.

    5

    Locate and remove the caliper support bolts. Remove the caliper support. Note the orientation of the brake pads in the support and remove the pads.

    6

    Remove the brake rotor, which should simply slide off the hub at this point. It may be necessary to use some force to remove it. Some tapping with a hammer can be done, but be careful because too much hard hammering can damage the wheel bearings. In this photo, a screwdriver is inserted in the fins of the rotor to help pry the rotor off. In some rare cases, it may be necessary to rent and use a large 3-jaw puller to remove the rotor.

    7

    Spread a thin layer of grease or anti-seize compound on the hub and install the new rotor by sliding it on the hub. Screw one lug nut on to hold the rotor in place.

    8

    Place a drop of Loctite medium-strength thread locker on the caliper support bolts and install the caliper support.

    9

    Install the new brake pads in the caliper support in the same orientation as the pads that were removed. Place a light cost of grease on the ends of the pads where they rest on the caliper support..

    10

    Using one of the old brake pads as a bridge between the pistons in the caliper, press the pistons back into the caliper with a large C-clamp. Squeeze the pistons in until they are fully retracted.

    11

    Discard the old pads and apply a light coat of brake grease to the areas of the caliper which contact the brake pads. Slide the caliper down over the pads and replace the caliper bolts. Tighten securely. Reinstall the wheel and tighten the lug nuts.

    12

    Jack the vehicle and remove the jack stands. Recheck the lug nuts and replace the wheel covers.

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Honda Accord

When you need to adjust the parking brake on your Honda Accord, skip the mechanic with these simple instructions. Adjust your Honda Accord parking brake when the car starts to slip down the hill in park position. Gain a sense of accomplishment fixing your car. Raise the rear of your car to assist in the adjustment.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the center console cover around the parking brake lever located inside the car between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat.

    2

    Turn the adjuster nut with your wrench or pliers located at the end of the parking brake cable rod, to loosen the adjuster nut. Make sure it doesn't come off the end of the parking brake cable rod.

    3

    Raise your Honda Accord rear wheels in the air using your jack and support both rear wheels with your jack stands.

    4

    Pull up on the parking brake handle for two notches or clicks. Tighten the adjuster nut until there is a slight resistance on the rear wheels when they are spun.

    5

    Release the parking brake lever. Verify the rear wheels do not have resistance and are able to spin freely.

    6

    Pull up on the parking brake lever three to five notches and verify the rear wheels do not turn at all.

    7

    Lower your Honda Accord using the jack and remove the jack stands from the rear wheels.

How to Change Front Brakes on a 2005 BMW X5

In 2000, BMW released an its first SUV, the X5. The X5 was a near immediate success, as it became BMW's second highest-selling model in only its second year of production. The 2005 X5 came in three different trim levels: the 3.0i, 4.4i and 4.8i. With each trim level came a different engine: the 3.0i had a 3.0-liter in-line six-cylinder, the 4.4i had a 4.4-liter V-8 and the 4.8i had a 4.8-liter V-8. All trim levels came standard with four-wheel antilock disc brakes. Replacing the front brakes on the 2005 BMW X5 is slightly more complex than replacing brakes on a typical vehicle, but still only requires moderate automotive repair skill.

Instructions

    1

    Remove brake fluid from the brake master cylinder with a turkey baster until it is only half full. Transfer the removed fluid to a small container.

    2

    Loosen the X5's front lug nuts with a ratchet and socket.

    3

    Raise the front of the BMW with a floor jack and place jack stands beneath the frame rails. Lower the X5 until only the jack stands support its weight. Remove the lug nuts and pull the front wheels from the SUV.

    4

    Unplug the wiring harness that pluggs into the rear of the brake caliper.

    5

    Insert the blade of a flat-head screwdriver under the retaining spring holding the outer brake pad to the caliper and pry it away from the pad and caliper. Inspect the retaining spring for visible wear or bending. Discard and replace the retaining spring if bending or wear exist.

    6

    Pull the plastic plugs off the rear of the brake caliper, exposing the caliper bolts. Remove the caliper bolts with a ratchet and a hex-bit socket. Pull the caliper off the rotor and hang it from a nearby suspension component, using a bungee strap.

    7

    Pull the outer brake pad from the caliper. Insert the blade of a flat-head screwdriver under the inner brake pad and pry up until you can grab it. Pull the inner brake pad from the caliper -- notice that a metal clip goes into the caliper piston to hold the pad in place.

    8

    Remove the rotor by removing the screw in the center of the rotor with a ratchet and hex-bit socket and pulling the rotor off the X5.

    9

    Measure the thickness of the rotor's disc in four places with a micrometer. Compare the thickness of the rotor with the minimum thickness specification of 1.35 inches on a 13.1-by-1.4-inch rotor and 1.1 inches on a 13.1-by-1.2-inch rotor.

    10

    Discard the rotor and replace it with a new one if it is thinner than the minimum thickness or has any visual defects (grooves, hot spots or mirror-like shine), as you cannot machine the X5's rotors. Leave the rotor as is if it is thicker than the minimum thickness and no visual defects exist.

    11

    Place the new or original rotor back on the X5 and tighten the center screw to 12 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and a hex-bit socket.

    12

    Place BMW tool No. 34-1-050 (front caliper piston adjustment tool) so that the paddles are inside the caliper, positioned just like brake pads. Tighten the hand crank on the end of the tool until the internal caliper piston presses fully into the caliper.

    13

    Apply a thin coat of disc brake grease to the rear of the brake pads and the mating surfaces on the caliper and caliper bracket.

    14

    Place the inner brake pad so that the clip on the rear of the pad lines up with the hole in the brake caliper. Press the inner brake pad until it fully seats inside the caliper piston. Insert the outer brake pad on the caliper. The brake pads have either an "L" or an "R" stamped on them. Make certain to mount pads with the "R" stamped on them on the passenger's side of the X5 and the "L" pads on the driver's side.

    15

    Set the brake caliper back on the rotor and tighten the caliper bolts to 81 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and a hex-bit socket.

    16

    Install the new or old outer brake pad retainer and press the tabs of the retainer into the holes on the brake caliper.

    17

    Plug the wiring harness back into the rear of the brake caliper.

    18

    Reinstall the X5's front wheels and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Raise the SUV from the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the jack stands from under the BMW. Lower the vehicle to the ground.

    19

    Tighten the front wheels to 90 foot-pounds in a crisscross pattern, using a torque wrench and a socket.

    20

    Press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm. Check the fluid level in the brake master cylinder and add DOT 4 brake fluid until the level reaches "Max" on the master cylinder.

    21

    Insert the key in the X5's ignition and turn it to the "1" position. Leave the key in this position for at least 30 seconds to clear the brake pad lining light. Turn the ignition off and remove the key.

    22

    Take the old brake fluid to a used automotive fluid recycling center for proper disposal. Many auto parts stores perform this task free of charge.

Kamis, 22 Desember 2011

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Dodge Durango

Brake pads are an important part of your Dodge Durango's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a 1/4 inch, or risk damaging your Durango's brake discs.

Instructions

Remove the Rear Brake Pads

    1

    Park your car on a level surface. Set the parking brake. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

    2

    Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

    3

    Slide the caliper off of the disc brake and suspend it near the disc brake with a small bungee cord or coat hanger. Suspend the caliper housing so that you do not damage the brake hose.

    4

    Remove the inboard and outboard brake pads from the caliper. Also remove the top and bottom anti-rattle springs. Keep track of the springs because they are not interchangeable.

Install Rear Brake Pads

    5

    Use a C-clamp to bottom, or align, the piston with the caliper bore. Put a piece of wood or an old brake pad between the clamp and the piston. Remove the clamp and wood or brake pad.

    6

    Clean the caliper and the anti-rattle pins. Use brake grease to lubricate the springs.

    7

    Install the top and bottom anti-rattle springs. Remember that the springs are not interchangeable.

    8

    Place the inboard and outboard pad in the caliper. Replace the caliper on the adapter on the rotor.

    9

    Replace the wheel assembly (tire). Lower the car to the ground. Pump the brakes a few times to seat the brakes. Do this before trying to move your car.

    10

    Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder container. Add fluid to the container as needed.

Senin, 19 Desember 2011

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 2002 Camry

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 2002 Camry

The 2001 through 2006 Toyota Camry, Solara and Avalon all require the same procedure to replace the front and rear brake pads. While some models may feature rear drum brakes, they all have front disc brakes which use brake pads. Disc brakes and pads use a hydraulic piston in the brake caliper which extends then squeezes the brake pads on both sides of the disc (also known as a brake rotor). The friction between the pad and rotor surfaces slows the vehicle down when the brake pedal is applied.

Instructions

    1

    Park your 2002 Toyota Camry on a flat surface before applying the parking brake. Remove the hubcaps. Place a tire chock behind one of the front tires.

    2

    Loosen the front lug stud nuts with the lug wrench and locking lug nut key if so equipped, using the lug nut wrench. Break the lug nuts loose from the rim and tire assembly only by turning them counterclockwise.

    3

    Use a jack to lift one front quarter panel high enough to place a jack stand beneath the front frame rail then repeat this step for the other front quarter panel. Remove the lug nuts and the wheels.

    4

    Use a 14 mm box-end wrench to remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts from the inboard housing of the caliper (whichever side you start with).

    5

    Pry the caliper off of the anchor plate of the knuckle assembly using a prybar then use a bungee cord to support the caliper on the coil spring of the suspension. This will prevent damage to the brake hose.

    6

    Use a 12-inch pair of channel locks (or larger) to gently and slowly squeeze the piston of the caliper into its bore. This will make room for the new and thicker brake pads to be installed.

    7

    Remove the inboard and outboard brake pads from the anchor plate. Use the pry tool, if necessary, to pry them from the plate. Remove the pad springs, pad wear indicators (of not equipped with replacement pads) and the pad support plates. Again, use the pry tool to remove the upper and lower support plates if necessary.

    8

    Clean the support plates (if the replacement pad set does not include new ones) with a small, stiff-bristled wire brush. Remove any rust or brake dust from the plates, then reinstall them onto the upper and lower section of the anchor plate. Apply a light coat of brake lubricant to the section of the plates which mate to the tabs of the brake pads.

    9

    Apply the shims (supplied in the replacement brake pad set) to the backing plates of the pads (if not already staked by rivets). Spray an even coat of brake anti-squeal spray to the shims and backing plates of the brake pads. Allow the spray to become tacky before installing the pads.

    10

    Insert the pads into the anchor plate then replace the pad springs. Use the old ones if a new set is not supplied with the replacement pad set.

    11

    Remove the caliper from the bungee cord then place the caliper over the newly installed brake pads and existing rotor. Align the caliper mounting bolts through the inboard caliper housing and into the anchor plate and knuckle assembly. Tighten the bolts to 35 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and a 14 mm socket.

    12

    Replace the wheel and the lug nuts, then tighten the lug nuts with the wrench from the roadside emergency kit and the lug nut locking key (if so equipped) so the wheel is snug to the hub.

    13

    Repeat Steps 4 through 12 for the other front wheel to replace the brake pads.

    14

    Use the jack from the emergency roadside kit to lift the front quarter panel high enough to remove each jack stand--one at a time--then slowly lower the Camry to the ground.

    15

    Torque the lug nuts with the torque wrench and a 21 mm socket to 80 foot-pounds in a crisscross or star pattern.

    16

    Pump the brake pedal until it feels firm before releasing the parking brake, removing the tire wedge and then checking the brake fluid level in the master cylinder. Add DOT3 brake fluid to the master cylinder to the full mark if necessary.

Minggu, 18 Desember 2011

How to Remove a Rear Rotor From a Town & Country

Removing the rear brake rotors from your Chrysler Town and Country allows replacement or resurfacing of the rotors. The rotors do not wear as quickly as the brake pads, but they can wear, warp and crack over time. If the brake pads wear down too much, the metal rivets and wear indicators can gouge the surface of the rotor, leaving you with no other option than to replace them.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the rear of your van with a lug wrench, then raise the rear tires off the ground with a jack. Remove the tires from the rear of the van and set them aside. Position a set of jack stands under the rear suspension to stabilize and support the van while you work on it.

    2

    Locate the two retaining pins that secure the brake caliper to the mounting bracket. Remove the pins, working from the backside of the caliper. The heads are Allen heads, so you will need a large set of Allen wrenches or a set of Allen sockets for your ratchet.

    3

    Slide the pins out of the caliper, then lift it off the rotor and support it with a piece of wire or twine, tying it to the suspension. Do not allow the caliper to hang from the rubber brake hose; the weight will damage the hose.

    4

    Check the base of the wheel studs and verify that the rotor-retaining clips have been removed from the studs. If they are still in place, pry them off the wheel studs with a flat screwdriver and discard them.

    5

    Grasp the rotor with both hands and pull it straight off the wheel studs. Move to the opposite site of the van and repeat the process.

Sabtu, 17 Desember 2011

How to Change the Front Brakes of a 2000 Chevy Silverado

How to Change the Front Brakes of a 2000 Chevy Silverado

The 2000 Chevy Silverado comes in half-ton and three-quarter ton models in both light-duty and heavy-duty series. It also features two-wheel and four-wheel drive models. From 1999 to 2005, the braking system on the Silverado remained virtually unchanged. The front disc brake system employs hydraulic pistons in the calipers which squeeze the pads against the surface of the rotors in order to slow and stop the truck on demand.

Instructions

Brake Pads

    1

    Park the Silverado on a paved and level surface suitable for hoisting the truck and then apply the parking brake.

    2

    Open the hood and then remove the brake fluid master cylinder cap. Use the brake fluid suction baster to remove two-thirds of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir and then discard the fluid.

    3

    Remove the front center caps and then crack the front wheel nuts loose with the Silverado's lug nut wrench. Only crack them loose from the wheel rim; don't remove them entirely.

    4

    Hoist the front end of the truck with a jack and then place a jack stand under the front frame rail. Do one side at a time so the front axle is elevated when done. Remove the wheel nuts and then remove the tires from the truck.

    5

    Use the C-clamp to compress the dual caliper pistons inward. Place the top of the clamp over the inboard caliper housing and the drive of the clamp on the bottom of the outboard brake pad backing plate. Slowly tighten the clamp until the caliper pistons are fully retracted into the piston bores.

    6

    Remove the caliper guide pins with a ratchet and 3/8-inch hex-head socket bit. Bend a wire coat hanger and hang the caliper to the chassis with it in order to prevent damage from occurring to the hydraulic brake hose attached to it.

    7

    Remove the pads from the caliper anchor. Use the pry tool if necessary to free the pads from the anchor. Remove the brake pad retaining clips (upper and lower) from the caliper anchor and then clean off the corrosion of the clips using a bench grinder with a wire brush wheel (provided the replacement pad set does not supply new ones).

    8

    Reinstall the old or new upper and lower brake pad retaining clips to the caliper anchor and then apply an even layer of brake lubricant to the pad seats of the clips. Install the new brake pads into the clips (one wear sensor is the inner pad--two wear sensors is the outboard pad).

    9

    Clean off any traces of old threadlock compound on the threads of the caliper guide pins using the bench grinder with a wire brush wheel. Apply an even coat of new red threadlock compound to the threaded parts of the caliper guide pins. Remove the caliper from the coat hanger and align the pins into the caliper after placing it over the pads and rotor. Tighten the bolts to 74-ft-lbs. using the torque wrench and suitable socket or 3/8-inch hex-head socket bit.

    10

    Replace the wheels and wheel nuts. Tighten the wheel nuts as much as they will allow with the wheels elevated snug to the hub.

    11

    Raise the truck up slightly with the jack enough to remove each jack stand. Slowly lower the vehicle to the ground. Re-tighten the wheel nuts with the torque wrench and a 7/8-inch socket in a star pattern (some models may feature six to eight wheel nuts) to 120 to 140 ft-lbs. (depending on the model and its particular torque specifications).

    12

    Make sure the master cylinder cap is in place and then pump the foot brake pedal several times until the pedal feels firm. Remove the master cylinder cap again and top off the reservoir with new brake fluid. Replace the center caps and then release the parking brake before test-driving the truck.

Brake Rotors

    13

    Perform the steps above up to Step 7.

    14

    Remove the upper and lower caliper anchor bolts after removing the pads and clips. Remove the anchor.

    15

    Remove the rotor from the hub (on the heavy-duty models, you may need to remove the external hub from the rotor using a ratchet and an appropriate socket to remove the hub bolts). Use a large ball-peen hammer to knock the rotor off, striking it from the inside out and turning it a quarter-turn between blows until the rotor breaks free from the hub (if necessary).

    16

    Use brake/parts cleaner spray to clean off the rust-preventative solution on the replacement rotors and then wipe it off with a shop rag.

    17

    Install the new rotors (and hubs where applicable). Use red threadlock compound on the threaded sections of the hub and/or caliper anchor bolts and tighten them to 84 ft-lbs. with the torque wrench and a suitably sized socket. Repeat the remaining steps as noted above to complete the full-service front brake job.

How to Remove 2003 Ford F350 Dual Wheel Brake Rotors

The 2003 Ford F-350 pickup is a heavy-duty truck, with the dual rear wheels on each side of the axle to prove it. Because these trucks are capable of carrying or pulling a heavy load, the brakes are particularly important. The rear brakes not only act as parking brakes, but also help slow those heavy loads while going down the road. When the rotors wear down, as they will over time, they need to be removed so they can be resurfaced or replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Park the F-350 on a level surface, and put the wheel chocks around the front wheels. Put the heavy-duty jack underneath the rear axle, then lift it up so the rear wheels are off of the ground. Put the heavy-duty jack stands beneath the axle, and then remove the jack.

    2

    Unbolt the rear wheels from the axle using the tire iron. Take off first the outside wheel using both hands, then the inside wheel, until the rotors are visible.

    3

    Unbolt the brake caliper anchor plate from the rear axle with the 1/2-inch ratchet and socket. Pull off the plate, then hang the caliper and anchor plate from the frame or the inner fender with the j hook.

    4

    Attempt to pull the rear rotor off the axle. Use a flat-head screwdriver to adjust the brake shoe inward using the adjustment screw on the backside of the rotor. Pull the rotor off the axle.

Jumat, 16 Desember 2011

How to Remove the Front Rotors on a 4-Wheel Drive

How to Remove the Front Rotors on a 4-Wheel Drive

The brakes on a four-wheel-drive vehicle do some heavy work compared with their two-wheel-drive counterparts. That's because four-wheel-drive vehicles typically have larger wheels and tires, causing more rotational mass for the brakes to stop. When the brake pads are changed, the brake rotors will have to be removed so they can be resurfaced or replaced to function well with the new pads. In this case, the project vehicle is a 2002 Jeep Wrangler four-wheel-drive, but the process is similar for other four-wheel-drive vehicles.

Instructions

    1

    Set the head of the jack underneath the front crossmember of the Jeep. Lift up the head of the jack and pick the front wheels off the ground. Put the jack stands under the front of the frame, then lower the Jeep onto the stands. Take off the wheels using the tire iron.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper from the front axle using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Lift the caliper off the rotor and hang it from the bungee cord, then hang that from the frame, making sure the brake line is not kinked.

    3

    Remove the screws holding the rotor to the hub using the Phillips screwdriver. Take the rotor off the front hub using both hands.

    4

    Repeat Steps 1 to 3 for the other front wheel.

How to Remove the Brake Drums on a 1997 KIA Sephia

Removing the rear brake drums on your 1999 Kia Sephia will allow you to access the rear brake shoes, wheel cylinders and other brake components. Two large screws that thread in to the wheel hub from the face of the brake drum retain the brake drums on the Sephia. If you need to replace the drums themselves, replacements are available through a Kia dealer or many auto parts stores.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels of your Sephia using a lug wrench, but do not remove them from the studs yet. Raise the rear of the car with a jack until the wheels are off the ground. Place a set of jack stands under the rear suspension to support the car and lower the jack until the car is securely resting on the stands.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts from the wheel studs and put them somewhere safe. Pull the wheel off the wheels studs, revealing the brake drum underneath, then set it aside for now.

    3

    Locate the two retaining screws on the face of the brake drum. The screws are flush mounted, Phillips head screws positioned opposite of each other on the drum. Remove the two screws with a large Phillips head screwdriver, turning them counter-clockwise until they are free of the threads.

    4

    Remove the brake drum from the wheel hub and studs, grasping it on both sides then pulling it straight toward you. Repeat the process for the opposite brake drum if you are removing them both.

Rabu, 14 Desember 2011

Why Do Brake Calipers Fail?

Why Do Brake Calipers Fail?

Brake calipers are clamp-like devices that squeeze against a wheel's brake disc to slow or stop the car. Braking efficiency will be compromised if the brake caliper begins to leak brake fluid or if the caliper's pads are excessively worn.

How Do Brake Calipers Work?

    Stepping on the brake pedal puts brake fluid under pressure and pushes the fluid against pistons in the brake calipers. This force squeezes the calipers and pushes the brake pads onto the brake disc, slowing the car. This system is near-universal in all modern front braking systems and many cars also have disc brakes in the rear.

Leaking Brake Fluid

    Because brake calipers have moving parts, there is the risk that friction can cause the brake lines through which the brake fluid travels to wear excessively and break. If the calipers begin to leak brake fluid, they will not build up enough pressure to force the piston in the caliper against the brake pad to stop the car. Brake calipers must be rebuilt or replaced if they show signs of leaks.

Worn Brake Pads

    Brake calipers each have two pads that consist of a metal "shoe" with a lining riveted to it. If the lining on the pad wears through, the metal shoe will come into contact with the disc, or rotor, which can damage it and cause a loss of braking efficiency. A brake caliper's pads should be checked periodically for signs of wear.

Selasa, 13 Desember 2011

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Chrysler Town & Country

The Chrysler Town & Country rarely comes equipped with rear disc brakes. The few vans that have them were usually modified after purchase. If your Chrysler Town & Country has rear disc brakes, read further to learn how to replace them in a couple of hours or less.

Instructions

    1

    Use a syringe or suction gun to siphon 1/3 to 2/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir. Empty it into an approved sealed container and properly dispose of it according to your state's regulation.

    2

    Raise the rear of the Chrysler Town & Country from the ground with a car jack. Support the van on all sides with jack stands and keep children out of the vicinity when you replace the rear disc brakes.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts of the wheel assemblies with a torque wrench. Remove the wheel and tire assemblies and set them aside face up to prevent damage.

    4

    Remove the two caliper guide pin bolts. Rotate the top part of the caliper away from side of the brake rotor and secure it to the frame of the Town & Country with mechanical wire. Pry the outboard brake pad out of the caliper.

    5

    Compress the piston into the bore with a large C-clamp to prevent damage to it when removing the inboard brake pads. Pull the inboard brake pad away from the piston until the retainer clip pops free of the piston cavity.

    6

    Grease the caliper mating surface and the abutment surfaces with a brake grease. Cover the back of the new inboard and outboard brake pads with an anti-squeal lubricant. Install the new inboard brake pads followed by the outboard brake pads.

    7

    Lower the caliper back into position over the rotor. Install the guide pin bolts and torque to 17 foot/pound. Replace the wheels and torque the lug nuts to 100 foot/pound. Lower the Chrysler Town & Country to the ground.

Senin, 12 Desember 2011

How to Replace the Front Brakes on a 1999 Honda Passport

How to Replace the Front Brakes on a 1999 Honda Passport

The Passport is a sport utility vehicle manufactured by Honda. Originally designed in 1993 in cooperation with the Isuzu company, the Passport was redesigned in 1998 to include more interior room, increased passenger comfort and more power. The 1999 model includes the same power level and comfort standards as the '98, and the Passport continues to be a popular SUV on the market. SUVs are notoriously heavy and, as such, require greater stopping power than the average car, so ensuring that your brakes are working properly is crucial. Listen for squealing brakes and grinding metal, both signs of brake wear.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts with the tire iron. Loosen each lug two full rotations.

    2

    Place a floor jack underneath a support strut on the vehicle and raise it. Make sure there is enough clearance to remove the tires. Place jack stands underneath the same strut as the jack.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts completely then remove the tire. Place both off to the side.

    4

    Remove the brake caliper mounting bracket, secured by two bolts, using the socket wrench. Once removed, hang the bracket from the undercarriage with rope to prevent stress on the brake line.

    5

    Remove the brake pads by sliding them out of the bracket.

    6

    Compress the brake caliper (the cylinder in the middle of the bracket) using the C-clamp. Place the stable end of the clamp onto the rear of the bracket and place the rotating portion directly onto the caliper. If the clamp slips off, place one of the used brake pads between the clamp and the caliper.

    7

    Install the new pads where the old ones were. Only use one box of brake pads per wheel. Make sure that the black brake material is facing inwards so that the black material on each pad is facing the rotor.

    8

    Reattach the mounting bracket and the tire, then lower the vehicle.

Minggu, 11 Desember 2011

How to Replace 1999 Chevy Tahoe Brake Rotors

The 1999 Chevy Tahoe replaced the old full-sized Chevy Blazer. Smaller than a Suburban, the Tahoe features a front disc braking system and may have rear disc or rear drum brakes. When replacing the rotors, you should also consider replacing the pads and servicing the caliper. New pads would offer a friction composition to mate to the surface of the new rotor. Although machining the rotor may be an option to remove any warping or run-out, replacing the rotor is advised.

Instructions

    1

    Remove 1/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using a hand pump. Be sure the hand pump has never been used on a petroleum-based product before to avoid contaminating the hydraulic brake fluid; otherwise brake failure can occur. Discard the old fluid and replace the master cylinder cap.

    2

    Raise the front axle using a jack, and support the Tahoe onto jack stands. Never support the vehicle with a jack alone. Remove the front lug nuts using an impact gun and impact socket, then remove the wheels.

    3

    Place the C-clamp over the outboard pad and caliper, and then tighten to compress the caliper piston fully into the bore. Remove the clamp.

    4

    Remove the caliper and mounting bracket as an assembly if you're replacing the pads. To do so, the mounting bracket bolts need to be removed with a hand wrench or ratchet and socket, then the assembly needs to be removed from the brake rotor. Support the brake rotor to the suspension so it does not hang from the brake hose and cause damage to it.

    5

    Remove the rotor. If the rotor is rusted or corroded to the hub, spray penetrating oil along the hub and lug studs where the rotor and hub mate, and allow a few minutes to soak in. Insert the two 10-mm by 1.5-mm jack screws into the two small screw holes on the hub face of the rotor, then tighten them alternately a couple turns each using a ratchet and a socket until the rotor separates from the hub.

    6

    Clean the mating surface of the hub using an emery cloth to remove any rust or corrosion buildup. Clean the surface and vents of the new rotor with a spray brake clean solvent to remove the rust preventive coating. Allow it to air dry, or use a shop rag to wipe it dry. Be sure to spray both sides.

    7

    Place the new rotor onto the hub and the caliper assembly over the rotor. Hold the caliper assembly in place while aligning the caliper bracket bolts into their respective holes. Tighten the caliper brackets with a torque wrench and socket to 110 foot pounds.

    8

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts to 130 foot pounds using a torque wrench and socket. Repeat the procedure for the other side.

    9

    Once the wheels are replaced on the Tahoe and it is lowered to the ground, pump the foot brake several times until it is firm. Check and adjust the level of brake fluid in the master cylinder. Add brake fluid if necessary.

Brake Pads Replacement Instructions

Brake Pads Replacement Instructions

Replacing brake pads is a straight forward procedure that anyone with a set of basic tools can perform. All that a person needs is an hour, some attention to detail, and the right tools for the job. Follow these instructions and you'll be driving around on new brakes safely in no time.

Instructions

    1

    Apply the parking brake and chock the rear wheels with bricks or blocks. This prevents the vehicle from rolling backwards while you raise the vehicle. Using the lug wrench, loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels. Do not remove the lug nuts yet.

    2

    Position the jack in front of the vehicle and make sure that the jack will lift the vehicle by the frame. Raise the vehicle high enough to place the jack stands securely on a frame member. Remove the lug nuts and wheels from the vehicle.

    3

    Inspect the brake rotor for gouges or roughness. If you find gouges or roughness you will have to get the rotors machined or replaced at your local auto parts store. If the rotors look okay, use the wrench or ratchet set to loosen and remove the bolts holding the caliper to the caliper mounting bracket. Zip tie or wire the caliper to hang out of the way with the ABS wire and brake line slack.

    4

    Remove and inspect the brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket. The pads should have brake pad material on them with no signs of metal scraping. If there are signs of metal scraping you may need to have your rotors replaced.

    5

    Remove the sliding pins from the caliper mounting bracket and clean them with the shop rags or shop towels. Apply Anti-seize to the pins and reinstall them into the caliper mounting bracket.

    6

    Inspect the new pads to ensure that they are the same design of pads as the old pads. Lubricate the edges of the pads with Anti-Seize so they can slide smoothly in the caliper mounting bracket. Lubricate the back of the pads with Anti-Seize to minimize noise from the caliper.

    7

    Remove the zip ties or mechanic's wire and place one of the old pads in the caliper and, using the large c-clamp, compress the caliper piston into the caliper by tightening the c-clamp. You might see some brake fluid dripping from the master cylinder, this is normal. Once fully retracted, remove the c-clamp and the old brake pad from the caliper piston and install the caliper onto the caliper mounting bracket. Install the caliper bolts and tighten.

    8

    Reinstall the wheels and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts finger tight. Lift the vehicle enough to remove the jack stands, remove the jack stands, then lower the vehicle then tighten the lug nuts. If you have a torque wrench, torque the lug nuts to specifications.

    9

    Press on the brake pedal a few times to regain firmness in the pedal. Once you have firmness remove the wheel chocks and disengage the parking brake. Take the vehicle for a short test drive to ensure the brakes are working properly.

How to Replace Disc Brake Pads on the Rear of a 2001 Chrysler Van

How to Replace Disc Brake Pads on the Rear of a 2001 Chrysler Van

The 2001 Chrysler Town & Country minivan features rear disc brakes in some of the all-wheel drive models. Other all-wheel drive models may also feature rear drum brakes like all the front-wheel drive models do. The rear disc brake pads are about half the size of the front disc brakes and only account for about 25 percent of the braking power for the minivan. Therefore, replacing the rear brake pads will occur less often than the front.

Instructions

    1

    Place the wheel wedge in front of one of the front tires and kick it against the tread of the tire to "wedge" it in.

    2

    Open the hood and remove 1/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder with the brake fluid siphon and then discard the fluid. Replace the master cylinder cover.

    3

    Unscrew the lug nuts loose of both rear tires with the lug wrench. Turn the lug nuts one full turn only.

    4

    Lift one rear quarter panel of the minivan with the jack and place the jack stand under the rear axle -- repeat on the other rear quarter panel. Remove the lug nuts and wheels.

    5

    Remove the two inner caliper guide pins with the closed end of a combination wrench. The caliper is at the very top of the rotor. Pry the caliper and pads assembly from the rotor with the slotted screwdriver. Tie the caliper to the rear coil spring with mechanics wire so it does not dangle from the hydraulic brake hose, which is attached to the caliper.

    6

    Pry the outer pad spring attached to the backing plate of the pad off the outer caliper housing with the screwdriver. Unseat the two remaining pad clips to remove the outer pad from the caliper. Pull the inner pad out of the caliper piston.

    7

    Put the C-clamp onto the caliper so the top of the clamp is on the back of the caliper housing and the driving screw of the clamp is seated inside the caliper piston bore. Tighten the clamp until the piston is fully seated inside the caliper.

    8

    Clean the surface of the caliper and caliper bridge with a wire brush, and then apply a level coat of silicone brake grease to the cleaned areas.

    9

    Insert the inner brake pad and clip and push the clip into the caliper piston bore until its fully seated. Place the two clips of the outer brake pad onto the caliper housing. Pry the pad spring into place with the screwdriver.

    10

    Replace the caliper and pads assembly over the brake rotor, align the caliper guide pin holes to the anchor holes and replace the guide pins. Tighten snugly. Repeat the brake pad procedure for the other rear wheel.

    11

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts and tighten the lug nuts firmly. Lower the minivan to the ground and torque the rear lug nuts in a star pattern with the torque ratchet and a socket.

    12

    Pump the foot brake pedal until it feels firm. Recheck the brake fluid level in the master cylinder and add clean brake fluid if necessary to fill the cylinder to the "Full" mark. Close the hood, remove the wheel wedge and test drive the minivan.

How to Bleed the Brakes on a 2002 Trailblazer

How to Bleed the Brakes on a 2002 Trailblazer

The Chevrolet Trailblazer was introduced in 1998 as an upgraded version of the S-10 Blazer; 2002 was the first year the Trailblazer was separated from the S-10 Blazer. The 2002 Trailblazer featured a 4.2-liter in-line six-cylinder engine. The 2002 Trailblazer had front disc and rear drum brakes on the base model, but the 2002 Trailblazer LTZ model had four-wheel disc brakes. The bleeder screws on the rear of the truck are going to be mounted on the rear caliper on the LTZ, or on the inboard side of the backing plate for rear drum brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Trailblazer on a completely solid, level surface. Do not perform this project on any kind of an incline or slope, or on gravel or dirt. Open the hood of the Trailblazer. Check the fluid level in the brake fluid reservoir, and add fluid to the "Full" mark if necessary. Tighten the reservoir lid when you are done filling the reservoir.

    2

    Loosen the front wheel lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the Trailblazer front end up with a jack. Place jack stands beneath both front sub-frame members, just inward from the lower control arms. Set the truck down on the jack stands. Remove front wheel lug nuts, then remove the wheels from the car completely.

    3

    Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the back end of the Trailblazer one corner at a time, using the jack beneath the rear axle housing. Set jack stands beneath both ends of the axle housing, just inward from the rear wheels. Lower the truck onto the jack stands. Remove the rear wheel lug nuts, then the rear wheels completely from the SUV.

    4

    Spray all four bleeder screws with PB Blaster or similar penetrating spray. Do not spray any of the moving parts on the brakes such as pads, rotors, caliper or drums. Allow the penetrating spray to perform its function for no less than 5 to 10 minutes.

    5

    Place a drip pan beneath the passenger rear brake assembly, with the bulk of the pan toward the middle of the truck. Ask your assistant to sit in the driver's seat of the Trailblazer. Open the passenger rear bleeder screw on either the rear caliper, or inboard side of the backing plate. Use a line wrench or open-end wrench to turn the screw counterclockwise to open it.

    6

    Instruct your assistant to slowly push the brake pedal completely to the floor, and hold the pedal down. Close the bleeder screw by turning it clockwise until it is snug. Repeat this step two or three times to or until only brake fluid comes out of the bleeder screw, and not air.

    7

    Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir, and fill the reservoir to the "Full" mark. Tighten the reservoir lid.

    8

    Repeat Steps 5 through 7 to perform the preliminary cross-bleeding on all four brake assemblies. After bleeding the passenger rear, proceed to the driver's front caliper for bleeding. After the driver's front, proceed to the driver's rear for bleeding. Bleed the passenger front caliper last. Fill the reservoir after each bleeding point. Move the brake fluid pan to each point of the truck, to keep brake fluid from spilling on your driveway or working surface.

    9

    Ask your assistant to pump the brake pedal 10 to 15 times slowly. If the brake pedal does not stiffen after five or six pumps of the brakes, visually inspect the entire underside of the truck for a leak in the brake lines. Broken brake lines or fittings will need to be replaced prior to continuing. Instruct your assistant to hold his foot on the pedal once it stiffens and keep downward pressure on the pedal.

    10

    Place the drip pan back underneath the passenger rear brake assembly. Open the passenger rear bleeder screw with the wrench. Tell your assistant to push the pedal slowly to the floor and hold it down. If nothing but brake fluid exits the bleeder, tighten the bleeder snug with the wrench. No torque is needed on bleeder screws. If you hear an audible hissing sound, then there is still air in this line. Repeat this step until nothing but brake fluid exits the bleeder screw. Fill the brake fluid reservoir and reinsert the reservoir cap.

    11

    Repeat Steps 8 and 9 to complete the cross-bleeding of the entire Trailblazer. Use the same pattern of passenger rear, to driver's front, to driver's rear, to passenger front, in order to properly cross-bleed the brakes. Move the drip pan around with you to each point of the truck. Fill the brake fluid reservoir to the "Full" mark and install the cap. Shut the hood of the truck.

    12

    Install the rear tires and snug the lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the rear of the truck off of the jack stands one side at a time. Remove the jack stands from beneath the truck, and set each side on the ground. Install the front tire and snug the lug nuts with the tire iron. Raise the front of the truck off of the jack stands and remove the stands from beneath the truck. Set the truck on the ground.

    13

    Tighten the lug nuts on all four wheels immediately. Set the torque to 100 foot-pounds on a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench. Use the torque wrench and a 19 mm wheel nut socket to tighten the lug nuts.

Sabtu, 10 Desember 2011

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Toyota Highlander

Making parking brake adjustments in your Toyota Highlander are somewhat challenging for a beginner because the adjustment requires you to get underneath the Toyota Highlander. Save money and adjust the parking brake yourself at home instead of taking your truck to the mechanic. You do not need to raise the Highlander on a lift; a simple pair of pliers is all you need.

Instructions

    1

    Test the parking brake to see how much you need to adjust the cables. The parking brake should click five to seven times when your foot depresses the pedal to the floor of the Highlander.

    2

    Release the parking brake pedal and note the number of clicks your Highlander needs adjusted.

    3

    Get underneath the Highlander and locate the cable in a "U" shape in the middle of the underneath.

    4

    Rotate the long nut attached to the cable at the end of the "U" shape. Move it around one way and move the smaller nut next to it the opposite way with pliers.

    5

    Adjust the nut located at the curve of the "U" shape cable. This also makes the parking brake cable tighter.

    6

    Press in on the parking brake cable with your foot until you hear five to seven clicks to test the adjustment.

Kamis, 08 Desember 2011

How to Check Brake Rotors With a Magnetic Dial Indicator

How to Check Brake Rotors With a Magnetic Dial Indicator

The disk brakes on today's automobiles are very effective and reliable. From time to time, however, problems can occur. One such problem is a brake judder. This is a vibration in the brakes that is caused by a wobble in the brake rotor. This wobble, in turn, can have three possible causes. Either the disk is warped, the disk is not installed straight or there is thickness variation in the disk. The first two causes can be diagnosed by measuring the disk run-out, while thickness variation is determined with a brake disk micrometer.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle. Do not set the parking brake. Leave the transmission in neutral. If working on a front brake, securely block the rear wheels to prevent vehicle movement. Securely block the front wheels if working on a rear brake. Partially loosen the wheel lug nuts about one turn each and then jack up the vehicle. Place the vehicle securely on an axle stand. Finish removing the lug nuts and pull off the wheel.

    2

    Mark the disk at eight equally spaced points around its rim and number the points from one to eight.

    3

    Measure the thickness of the disk at each of the marked points, about 1/2 to 3/4 inches in from the disk rim. Record the measurements.

    4

    Set the dial indicator stand close to the front face of the brake disk. Then affix the dial indicator to the stand such that the indicator probe touches the disk at a point about 1/2 to 3/4 inches in from the rim. The probe should be perpendicular to the disk surface. Rotate the disk by hand until the indicator probe is at the first mark. Zero the indicator and record the measurement for the first mark as zero. Rotate the disk by hand until the probe is at the second mark and record the indicator reading. Continue until you have readings for all the marks. These are your disk run-out measurements.

    5

    Compare your readings to the manufacturer's specifications. The minimum allowable disk thickness is often stamped into the disk, either near the middle or somewhere around the rim. Otherwise, check the vehicle's shop manual or aftermarket repair manual. These are often available at the local public library. Typically, the difference between the maximum and minimum disk thickness measurements should be 0.008 inches at most and the smallest measurement should be above the allowable minimum thickness value. The difference between the maximum and minimum disk run-out measurements should be less than 0.002 inches for passenger vehicles and 0.003 inches for light trucks and large SUVs.

Rabu, 07 Desember 2011

How to Replace the Brake Lines in a '98 Sonoma

When replacing a brake line, it is important to consult with an auto parts dealer to ensure that you get replacement brake lines designed for your 1998 GMC Sonoma truck. New metal lines designed for the truck will already be bent in the shape you need in addition to being flared with the fittings installed. This will to make it easier to install a new line. The process is much like replacing a metal brake line on any other vehicle.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the Sonoma truck on the front or rear end--the end with the leaking, corroded or otherwise damaged brake line--and support that end on at least two jack stands. Remove the wheel for the corresponding brake line.

    2

    Clean away all dirt and dust from the brake line fittings using a rag and compressed air.

    3

    Loosen and disconnect the brake line fitting at the hose end near the wheel first and then at the other end; apply penetrating oil to the fittings if they are excessively rusted. Plug the open end at the chassis with a rubber plug.

    4

    Insert the replacement line into its brackets on the frame and make sure that there is clearance between the metal line and any hot or moving parts. Twist the new line's fittings into place and tighten the fittings with your wrench.

    5

    Connect a clear tube to the bleeder valve--the screw-like valve at the top of the brake caliper--and place the tube's other end into a small container partially filled with brake fluid.

    6

    Open the valve while another person pushes on the brake pedal; fluid and air should come out of the tube into the container. Close the valve and repeat until fluid flows out the tube with no air.

    7

    Reconnect the wheel and lower the truck off of the jack stands.

Selasa, 06 Desember 2011

How to Replace the Calipers in a 1993 Mazda 929

How to Replace the Calipers in a 1993 Mazda 929

Miles of service on the road can wear out the caliper cylinder and piston, causing a dangerous fluid leak. This not only compromises brake system functionality but your safety on the road. Fortunately, replacing a caliper in your 1993 Mazda 929 is not as complicated as you may think. If you work in an organized manner, you can install a new caliper in your garage on a Saturday morning using a few common tools.

Instructions

Removing the Old Caliper

    1

    Park your 929 on level ground. Release the parking brake and shift the transmission to neutral. Open the hood and disconnect the ground (black) battery cable with a wrench, if you are replacing a caliper on one of the rear wheels.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel with the caliper you are servicing. Use a lug wrench.

    3

    Lift the car off the ground using a floor jack and position a jack stand under the frame for support and lower the vehicle. Finish removing the wheel assembly and block the two front or rear tires that remained on the ground with a wooden block.

    4

    Remove any grime from the brake hose attached to the back of the caliper so that no dirt will get into the brake hydraulic system. Release the parking brake cable from the bracket with a wrench and release the cable from the lever with a pair of needle-nose pliers, if you are replacing a rear caliper.

    5

    Unfasten and remove the two mounting bolts from the back of the caliper. On the rear caliper, unfasten and remove the upper caliper mounting bolt. Use a six-point socket and ratchet.

    6

    Unfasten the bolt that secures the brake hose to the back of the caliper with a ratchet and six-point socket. Remove the bolt, hose and the two sealing washers, one on each side of the brake hose fitting. Cover the brake hose opening with a clean plastic sheet and a rubber band to keep the brake fluid from spilling onto the floor.

    7

    Pull the brake caliper off the bracket assembly. On the rear wheel assembly, swing the caliper downward and then slide the caliper off the guide pin to remove the caliper.

    8

    Spray brake parts cleaner around the brake assembly to remove any friction dust and wipe the assembly with lint-free towels.

Installing the New Caliper

    9

    Install the new caliper over the bracket assembly. On the rear wheel assembly, slide the lower mounting hole on the caliper over the guide pin and then swing the caliper over the caliper bracket.

    10

    Install the brake hose on the new caliper using two new sealing washers on the hose fitting. Install the brake hose mounting bolt finger tight and then tighten the bolt with the ratchet and six-point socket.

    11

    Replace the two caliper mounting bolts, or the single bolt on the rear assembly, finger tight and tighten the bolts with the six-pint socket and ratchet.

    12

    Replace the parking brake cable on the lever using the needle-nose pliers and secure the cable to the bracket with the wrench, if you are servicing a rear caliper.

    13

    Connect an 8-inch clear vinyl hose over the bleeder screw on top of the caliper you just installed and submerge the other end of the hose in brake fluid inside a clear container.

    14

    Ask an assistant to press and hold the brake pedal to the floor. Turn the bleeder screw about three-quarters of a turn counterclockwise with a small wrench. Ask your assistant to slowly pump the brake pedal. When you see brake fluid without air bubbles coming out the end of the hose submerged in the brake fluid, ask your assistant to hold the brake pedal to the floor. Tighten the bleeder screw and release the brake pedal.

    15

    Mount the wheel assembly on the wheel hub and thread the lug nuts snugly. Check the fluid level in the brake master cylinder reservoir and add new fluid, if necessary, to bring the level up to the "Full" mark.

    16

    Lower the wheel off the jack stand and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Reconnect the ground (black) battery cable with the wrench, if you replaced a caliper on one of the rear wheels, and close the hood.

Mercury Sable Brake Problems

Mercury Sable Brake Problems

Ford and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration issued recalls of Mercury Sable vehicles due to brake problems in 1994 and brake light problems in 2004. Both were due to safety-related manufacturing defects that could lead to accidents. Free repairs were offered by authorized dealers at the time of the recalls.

Brake Pedal Arm Defect

    On October 7, 1994, Ford and the NHTSA announced a recall of 1,500 Mercury Sables because the retainer clip holding the master cylinder push rod to the brake pedal arm was missing or incompletely installed. This can cause the push rod to detach from the brake pedal arm, which can cause the driver to lose the ability to brake and may lead to a crash.

Brake Light Defect

    On March 1, 2004, Ford and the NHTSA announced a recall of 938,789 2000-2003 model year Mercury Sable vehicles to repair a malfunctioning brake lamp switch and/or the wiring associated with the switch. Per the NHTSA, the defect could cause brake lights to stop working or to always remain on. If the brake lights remain on, speed control will not be activated. This could increase the risk of a crash and may also lead to a discharged battery.

Remedy

    Registered vehicle owners should have received notice of these brake-related recalls by mail from Ford, along with instruction on which authorized dealers to bring the cars to for repair. Free replacements were offered for Mercury Sables affected by the recall. Concerned drivers may contact NHTSA or Ford to determine whether their vehicles may have been affected, or visit the NHTSA website to search for recalls by make, model and year.

Senin, 05 Desember 2011

How to Change a Wheel Cylinder

How to Change a Wheel Cylinder

The hydraulic component in your vehicle's drum brake system is known as a wheel cylinder. It provides force to the brake shoes, causing them to contact the drum and slow the vehicle. Over time, the wheel cylinders in your drum brake system wear and begin to leak. Replacement of the leaking wheel cylinder will restore the proper function of the brake system. This repair project is well within the abilities of the home mechanic and can be completed in about 2 hours.

Instructions

    1

    Lift and support the vehicle with the floor jack and jack stands. Avoid working on the vehicle with only the floor jack supporting it's weight. Serious injury could result. Remove the wheel with the lug wrench, and place the wheel and lugnut out of the work area. Remove the drum. If the drum is stuck to the axle, a few blows with a hammer will break it loose.

    2

    Remove the two return springs that attach the brake shoes to the pivot pin at the top of the backing plate. Use the brake spring tool to do this. Avoid the use of diagonal cutters, pliers or screwdrivers to remove the springs, as these tools will damage the spring and cause nasty injuries to the hand.

    3

    Loosen the brake line with the line wrenches. Line wrenches are designed to spread the twisting force evenly around the nut and prevent damage to the brake line. Remove the wheel cylinder to backing plate bolts from the back side of the backing plate. Remove the brake line from the wheel cylinder and pull the cylinder out of the backing plate.

    4

    Insert the new wheel cylinder into the backing plate, and screw the brake line into the wheel cylinder. Do not tighten the fitting completely. Install and tighten the wheel cylinder to the backing plate bolts. Then tighten the brake line tightly with the line wrench. Reinstall the return springs and brake drum.

    5

    Bleed the brakes according to the manufacturer's bleeding sequence and procedure. This sequence and procedure varies by year, make and model, so consult your service manual for information specific to your vehicle.

    6

    Install the wheel, and lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the lugnuts one last time and test drive the vehicle to verify the repair.

How to Troubleshoot an ABS System

How to Troubleshoot an ABS System

An ABS system is an essential part of a car's safety equipment. The ABS--antilock brake system--helps to control and stop your car in emergency situations by preventing the wheels from locking and skidding. It's impossible to steer when you're tires are locked, and it takes longer for a skidding car to come to a stop. From time to time small problems may occur with an ABS system. A driver who is acquainted with the feel and sound of her car's ABS can quickly realize when something is not working correctly. The first step in correcting a problem is to locate the source of the problem. Troubleshooting your vehicle yourself can help to pinpoint ABS issues, some of which may be simple enough for you to correct without having to pay a mechanic.

Instructions

    1

    Replace your brake fluid if your brake pedal fades when you apply pressure to it. The brake fluid may be contaminated with water. It's possible, too, if you've had recent brake work done, that the brake fluid may not be the correct type for your vehicle. Replace old fluid with a fresh supply. Avoid getting air into the ABS controller when changing the brake fluid.

    2

    Determine whether your ABS warning light or your regular service brake warning light is on. The ABS light can come on for various reasons. You'll need to have the system scanned to identify the codes so that the problem can be determined. Your regular brakes will still function, but the ABS will be temporarily disabled.

    3

    Check for low brake fluid level or for leaks if a red brake warning light appears on your dashboard. Also, when the brake fluid becomes low, air will enter the system, causing poor braking conditions.

    4

    Determine if there are any unusual odors. If while driving you smell burning or smoke, there may be broken or loose parts inside your brakes. You'll need to repair the issue as soon as possible.

How to Remove the Front Brake Rotor on a 1997 Chevrolet Cavalier

How to Remove the Front Brake Rotor on a 1997 Chevrolet Cavalier

Every time you change the brake pads on your 1997 Chevrolet Cavalier you should change or turn the brake rotors at the same time. The brake rotor provides a smooth surface for the brake pads to adhere to, and over time, the rotors develop ridges in them. By turning or replacing the rotor, you give the pad a smooth surface to connect to, as opposed to the worn down surface that develops after braking for a long period of time. To turn or replace the rotors, you first have to remove them.

Instructions

    1

    Use the jack to lift up the front of the car and then set a pair of jack stands underneath the jack points on the sides of the car. Remove the front wheels using the tire iron.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper from the steering knuckle using the 3/8-inch ratchet and the hex-head sockets. Form a loop over the coil spring using the mechanics wire. Remove the caliper from the rotor, loop the wire through the caliper, and twist the two ends of the wire together using the pliers to support the caliper.

    3

    Lift the rotor off of the brake hub using both hands.

Minggu, 04 Desember 2011

How to Remove a Rear Disc Brake on a Ford Truck

In a Ford truck, the rear brakes only do anywhere from 20 to 40 percent of the actual braking when you come to a stop, so the rear pads and rotors don't need to be replaced very often. Most of their job is related to functioning as a parking brake, to hold the truck steady when parked on an incline. But when these brakes do start to fail, it's time to refresh the parts, and to do that, you have to take them off.

Instructions

    1

    Lift up the vehicle using the jack and place it on jack stands. Make sure the vehicle is secure before you crawl underneath it. Remove the rear wheels using the tire iron and place them to the side, out of the workspace.

    2

    Clamp the brake line clamps onto the rubber hose running into the caliper, and tighten it down until the line is flat. Then use the line wrench to disconnect the line running into the brake caliper.

    3

    Unbolt the brake caliper from the axle using a 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. You can unbolt the caliper at the bracket on the axle, instead of just the caliper bolts themselves, since the entire assembly is coming off. Set the caliper to the side.

    4

    Grab the rotor on both sides and pull it off of the axle shafts. Place it to the side so that it's out of the way.

Sabtu, 03 Desember 2011

Ford Brake Problems

The top complaint issued by owners of 2005 Ford Freestyles has to do with brake problems, according to CarComplaints.com. However, brake problems do not only plague the Ford Freestyle line. The 2000 Ford Focus and various models of Ford Escapes were other Ford vehicles known to have brake problems.

Wearing Out Prematurely

    The most common brake problem reported on the 2005 Ford Freestyle is that the rear brakes wear out prematurely. Worn brakes require owners to get them replaced, but they can be dangerous to drive in the meantime. Some owners had as low as 12,000 miles on their vehicles at the time their brakes wore out prematurely.

Rear Drum Brakes

    The 2000 Ford Focus, a subcompact car, was recalled due to potential problems with the rear drum brakes. The problem specifically had to do with how the rear drum brakes were assembled, and, as a result, 350,000 vehicles were recalled. Ford received 15 complaints of the rear drum brakes separating, which led to the recall.

Antilock Brake System

    The Ford Escape, a sport utility vehicle, has been linked with brake problems specific to their antilock brake systems. Missing or misassembled ABS connectors were associated with causing engine fires due to inner corrosion. Other times, ABS warning lights would activate unnecessarily, causing overheating. Accordingly, Ford Motor Company recalled Ford Escape models within the years 2001 to 2004.