Selasa, 29 November 2011

How to Remove a Brake Booster on a Chevy Truck

In the 1950s and 1960s, most cars were equipped with manual brakes, and braking was quite a chore. Then the brake booster was introduced, using vacuum from the engine to provide extra power to the pedal, decreasing the amount of pressure that the driver has to exert. If there is a vacuum leak in your booster, or it's not performing well, you'll need to remove it. This should take about a half-hour. The project vehicle is a 2001 Chevrolet Silverado. The process is similar for other vehicles.

Instructions

    1

    Pop the hood and unbolt the master cylinder from the brake booster using the open-end wrench set. The master cylinder is the portion which has all of the brake lines running into it. Once it's unbolted, pull it forward off of the booster and let it hang.

    2

    Crawl underneath the dashboard and use the flashlight to light up the top of the brake pedal. Follow the pedal vertically into the dashboard with the light. You'll see a clip that holds together the brake light switch and the connection to the booster. Use the flathead screwdriver to pry off this clip, then place it to the side. Once it's off, you can disconnect the linkage and brake light switch by pulling them off the pedal.

    3

    Use the 3/8-inch ratchet, extension and sockets to remove the four bolts that hold the brake booster to the firewall. You may need a 3/8-inch universal joint on the end of the ratchet to get into some of the tighter spaces.

    4

    Go under the hood again and pull the brake booster out from the firewall, using your hands. The booster is now freed from the vehicle.

How to Install Front Brakes on a 97 Honda Accord

Installing the brake pads on a 1997 Honda Accord is a relatively straightforward process. However, before you can install the pads, you need to force the caliper piston back into the caliper. This critical step is almost always overlooked. If you do not do this, the new pads will never fit.

Instructions

    1

    Place the screw-end of the C-clamp against the caliper piston.

    2

    Place the other side of the clamp against the back of the brake caliper.

    3

    Turn the handle on the C-clamp clockwise to tighten the clamp and force the piston back into the caliper.

    4

    Install the brake pads so that the curved end of the pad is facing inward towards the caliper.

    5

    Align the caliper mounting hole and the caliper pin bolt. Thread the pin bolt and tighten it to close and "lock" the caliper.

    6

    Slide the caliper over the rotor assembly and tighten the caliper mounting bolts.

How to Remove the Rotor in a '97 QX4

How to Remove the Rotor in a '97 QX4

The rotors on your Infiniti QX4 with proper brake system maintenance should last through three sets of brake pads. Damage to the rotors most often occurs from a poor brake pad replacement. Letting the pads wear down to the point that they begin to grind against the rotors causes irreversible damage in the form of scarring to the rotor's surface as well. You can remove the rotors for inspection or replacement on the '97 QX4 right at home. With a few tools, it should take you about 40 minutes to complete.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front driver's side tire with a lug wrench a quarter turn. If you have recently driven the truck, wait one hour for the lug nuts to cool. Trying to remove them when they're hot will cause the lug nut stud to bend or break off.

    2

    Raise the truck just behind the tire with a hydraulic jack. Place a jack stand beneath the frame rail to help support the truck's weight.

    3

    Remove all of the lug nuts. Slide the tire off the studs using both hands. Set the tire to the side of your work area. Place the lug nuts in a safe place free of dirt and debris.

    4

    Place an 8-inch C-clamp around the body of the brake caliper. Wind the C-clamp's screw down until it makes contact with the surface of the outer brake pad. If you look at the rear of the inner brake pad, you will see two round pistons pushing against it. You have to compress both pistons back down into their bore holes on the brake caliper.

    5

    Begin winding the C-clamp shut slowly and evenly until you see that both of the pistons have retracted completely. Take the C-clamp off.

    6

    Loosen and remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bracket bolts with a socket wrench. Do not remove the brake caliper's bolts; they mount to the bracket. Only remove the mounting bracket's bolts.

    7

    Set a 5-gallon bucket down within the wheel well next to the caliper/bracket assembly. Using both hands, pull the assembly off the rotor and set it down on top of the bucket.

    8

    Remove the rotor by pulling it straight off in an outward motion. If the rotor seems stuck, use a rubber mallet to lightly tap around the rear surface of the rotor to remove it.

Senin, 28 November 2011

How to Check Rear Drum Brakes

How to Check Rear Drum Brakes

In times gone by, drum brake systems were the dominant brake technology in the automotive world. With the advent of superior disc braking technology, together with the associated power-braking technology needed to make disc brakes practical, drum brakes are now found mostly on the rear wheels of less expensive vehicles. Given that many households keep an inexpensive vehicle as a second car, this means that drum brakes are still frequently encountered, and the DIY mechanic can benefit from learning how to check drum brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a firm and level surface. Put automatic transmissions in park, and put manual transmissions in first or reverse gear. Do not engage the parking brake. Securely block the front wheels to prevent vehicle movement.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on both rear wheels about one turn each. Jack up the rear of the vehicle, and set it securely on jack stands. Completely remove the lug nuts, and pull the wheels off both sides.

    3

    Remove the drums from both rear brakes in such a manner that the brake not being serviced can serve as a visual reference. For some brake designs, the drum can be pulled right off the hub. For other designs, the drum might be fastened to the hub assembly by retaining screws or bolts. If so, remove the retaining fasteners before pulling the drum off. Sometimes the drum is secured with a single large hub nut that must be removed before removing the drum. If the drum is seized, firmly tap the outer shoulder of the drum with a rubber or plastic mallet to loosen it. Sometimes the brake shoes may be pressing on the inside of the drum and preventing its removal. If this is the case, be sure that the parking brake is not engaged. Next, look for a port on the backing plate with a rubber cover. Remove the cover to reveal the brake self-adjuster wheel. Reach inside with a small screwdriver, and rotate the self-adjuster to release tension on the brake shoes. This will back the shoes away from the drum.

    4

    Measure the thickness of the linings on the brake shoes with a finely-graduated ruler. Compare the measurement to the manufacturer's specified minimum thickness, which can be found in the vehicle's shop manual or aftermarket repair manual. These can usually be found at the local library. Check the brake shoe linings for damage or uneven wear. If the linings are damaged or worn out they should be replaced.

    5

    Measure the inside diameter of the brake drum in several different directions with the brake drum micrometer. If the drum is round, the diameter will be the same in all directions. Compare the measured diameter to the manufacturer's specified maximum diameter, which is usually stamped into the metal on the outside of the drum. Check the drum for cracks, deep scores, or other damage. If the drum diameter exceeds the allowable maximum, or if the drum is irreparably damaged, it should be replaced. Minor drum damage can be repaired by having the drum machined at an auto parts store.

    6

    Check the general condition of the brake springs, the self-adjuster mechanism, and the brake cylinder. Replace parts as needed.

    7

    Reassemble the brake by following the steps in reverse order. Repeat the procedure for the brake on the other side of the vehicle.

    8

    Lower the vehicle. Start the engine and gently push the brake pedal a few times to extend the cylinders. Try a few stops in reverse to be sure the self-adjusters are properly set. Carefully test the brake operation before driving normally.

How to Replace the Drum Brakes in a 2002 Kia Spectra GS

How to Replace the Drum Brakes in a 2002 Kia Spectra GS

The Spectra was introduced in the U.S. by Kia Motors in the 2000 model-year. Despite a substantial redesign in 2004, the Spectra was unable to shake its reputation for below average workmanship and pedestrian styling, and the model was finally discontinued in 2009 in favor of the more refined Rio lineup. Most Spectra models were fitted with rear drum brakes, and Spectra owners can save time and money by learning to service these brakes themselves.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on both rear wheels with a lug nut wrench. Raise the back of the car with a jack and support it on jack stands. Remove both rear wheels.

    2

    Remove the two mounting bolts that hold the drum to the hub assembly then pull the drum straight off the hub. If the drum is seized, insert two 8 mm bolts into the threaded jacking holes on the drum face and tighten them evenly to jack the drum off of the brake assembly. It is a good idea to remove the wheels and drums from both rear wheels so that the wheel not being worked on can be used as a reference for how the parts should fit together.

    3

    Use pliers to grasp one end of the top return spring and unhook it from the brake shoe. Unhook the other end and set the spring aside.

    4

    Remove the primary (front) and secondary (rear) brake shoe spring clips by grasping them with pliers and pulling them off the shoe. Remove the primary and secondary shoe hold-down pins by pushing them back through the backing plate.

    5

    Use pliers to remove the anti-rattle spring by grasping the end of the spring and unhooking it from the secondary brake shoe. Unhook the other end from the operating lever assembly and set the spring aside. Remove the adjuster spring by grasping the end of the spring with pliers and unhooking it from the primary brake shoe. Unhook the other end from the primary brake shoe and set the spring aside.

    6

    Note the position of the operating lever assembly where it holds the primary shoe. Slip the operating lever assembly out from between the two shoes and set it aside. Remove the bottom return spring by firmly grasping one end of the spring with pliers and unhooking it from the brake shoe. Unhook the other end and set the spring aside.

    7

    Remove the clip and washer from the end of the parking brake cable with the pliers and disconnect the parking brake cable from the secondary brake shoe. Pull the two brake shoes off of the backing plate.

    8

    Measure the inside diameter of the brake drum with a drum micrometer. The drum should be round, meaning that the diameter should be the same no matter which direction the diameter is measured. The interior surface of the drum should not have any deep grooves or cracks. The maximum specified diameter for the drum is 7.87 inches. If the drum diameter is greater, then it is worn out and must be replaced. Measure the thickness of the brake shoe linings. If the thickness is less than 0.04 of an inch at any point, then the shoes are worn out and must be replaced.

    9

    Clean all parts with brake cleaning fluid. Apply fluid liberally to all parts and wipe with rags. Use a wire brush to remove stubborn dirt and corrosion. Use a drip pan to catch excess fluid and dispose of the used fluid in accordance with local regulations. Also apply brake grease to the points where the brake shoes contact the backing plate.

    10

    Lubricate all contact points and pivot points with high-temperature brake grease. Lubricate the points where the brake shoes contact the backing plate, the points where the cylinder contacts the brake shoes, the contact point between the brake shoes and hold-down pins, and the operating lever contact points.

    11

    Reassemble the brake with the new brake shoes by reversing the above steps. Use the wheel on the opposite side, as a reference, to help you remember where all the parts should go. Remount the wheel. Start the car and pump the brakes a few times to set the mechanism. Repeat the procedure on the opposite wheel to complete the job then lower the vehicle off the jack stands with the jack.

Minggu, 27 November 2011

How to Remove an Emergency Brake Cable From a Caliper

The rear disc brakes on some vehicles have an emergency brake integrated into the caliper to aid in additional braking power, potentially avoiding an accident. When the rear calipers start to fail, they will need to be removed and either rebuilt or replaced. Part of the removal process is taking off the emergency brake cable, which should take about 15 minutes per side to do.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the rear end of the vehicle using a jack then place it on jack stands. Unbolt the rear wheel lugs using the tire iron and take the wheels off of the vehicle.

    2

    Locate the rear brake caliper. Look around the backside of the caliper to find the emergency brake cable connection, which will go through a large spring and hook onto a bracket. Pry the ring on the end of the emergency brake cable off of the hook on the bracket using a flat head screwdriver.

    3

    Hold down the locking tabs on the emergency brake cable using a flat head screwdriver then pull the cable out of the emergency brake bracket.

Sabtu, 26 November 2011

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 1996 Jeep Cherokee

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 1996 Jeep Cherokee

Your 1996 Jeep Cherokee uses brake pads in the calipers on the front end to provide approximately 70 percent of the stopping power for the Jeep. As a result, the front pads wear much faster than the rear shoes. Inspection and replacement of the pads needs to be done more often on the front end. If you let them go too long, the result will be damage to the rotor or other brake components on the front of your Jeep.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels of your Jeep using a lug wrench. Do not take the lug nuts off the wheel studs yet. Position a jack under the front axle of the Jeep and raise it until the front tires are completely off the ground. Place a set of jack stands under the axle tube and lower the jack until the Jeep is resting securely on the stands.

    2

    Remove the wheels. Locate the brake caliper on the ends of the axles then locate the two mounting bolts that run through from the back of the caliper to the caliper mounting bracket. Remove the mounting bolts with a 13mm socket and ratchet then lift the caliper off the bracket.

    3

    Turn the caliper over so the pads and opening are facing up. Remove the outboard pad by sliding it toward the center of the caliper, then lift it out. Discard the old pad. Push the inboard pad into the center of the caliper, releasing the spring clip that retains it to the caliper piston, then lift it out of the caliper.

    4

    Slide a C-clamp over the body of the caliper with the moving section of the clamp inside the caliper. Place a small piece of wood on the caliper piston, then tighten the C-clamp, pushing the piston back into its bore. Remove the clamp and wood, then install the new brake pads starting with the inboard pad first.

    5

    Drop the pad into the caliper, then slide it in toward the piston, snapping the spring clip on the back of the pad into the caliper piston. Install the outboard pad into the caliper and push it toward the outside of the caliper, snapping the clips on the back of the pad into the caliper.

    6

    Slide the caliper over the brake rotor and reinstall the two mounting bolts through the caliper and into the mounting bracket. Tighten the bolts with a 13mm socket and ratchet. Move to the opposite side of the Jeep and repeat the process to change the pads.

    7

    Reinstall the wheels on both sides of the Jeep and install the lug nuts on the wheel studs. Lift the Jeep off the jack stands with your jack and remove them from under the truck. Lower the Jeep to the ground, remove the jack and tighten the lug nuts with a lug wrench.

Consequences of Bad Rotors

A rotor is a bumped disc sandwiched between the brake pads of your car. When you slow or stop, brake fluid exerts hydraulic pressure that causes the brake pads to grab on to the rotor. Usually, this system goes off without a hitch but, as rotors age, problems can arise. Bad rotors may endanger your vehicle and cause other undesirable consequences.

Extended Stopping Distances

    For best results in your braking system, your pads and rotor need to work well as a team. When they connect, abrasive or adherent friction causes your wheels to slow down and stop your vehicle. However, wear and tear reduce the ability for the pads and rotor to make and sustain contact. As a result, it takes longer for your vehicle to come to a stop. Obviously, the inability to brake quickly increases the chance of hurting yourself, your car, or others.

Vibrations

    After significant use, expansion or contraction due to extended exposure to water, or old brake pads, rotors may warp. As a result, the pads will come in contact with the warped rotor when you apply the brakes. The pads pulsate, causing the wheels to shimmy and vibrate. You will feel these vibrations inside the car, especially in the steering wheel. These vibrations will be especially pronounced when making a sudden stop at a high speed but also will be noticeable at a routine stoplight.

Brake System Damage

    A bad rotor will increase the wear and tear upon the overall braking system. It also may cause the anti-lock braking system to malfunction. As a result, the vehicle has a greater chance of locking up in a dangerous situation such as a skid or a deer caught in the headlights.

Other Consequences

    Additional problems caused by bad rotors include loss of torque at one wheel, loss of pressure at two wheels, reduced steering response, and even unattended steering input (for example, your car will drift leftward for no reason). Faulty rotors may also have difficulty dissipating heat that can lead to thermal stresses that reduce the rotors' own structural integrity and jeopardize the brake system as a whole.

Rabu, 23 November 2011

How to Bleed the Brake Fluid in a Chevy Silverado

How to Bleed the Brake Fluid in a Chevy Silverado

If you have changed a brake line, brake master cylinder or caliper in your Chevy Silverado, then chances are you have introduced air into the brake system. Air in the brake system causes a mushy brake pedal and an increased braking time that can lead to an accident. The reason for this is because air is compressible while brake fluid isn't, which makes it a good candidate for transferring energy from one section of the brake system to another. Bleeding the brake fluid will ensure that your Chevy Silverado is safe to drive.

Instructions

    1

    Jack up the Silverado and place it on jack stands.

    2

    Remove the wheels with a lug nut wrench and set them aside.

    3

    Instruct your helper to start at the wheel that is farthest from the master cylinder then go to each subsequent wheel that is closer until the wheel on the side of the master cylinder is reached.

    4

    Push down on the brake pedal and, while pushing down, count, "1, 2, 3" and on 3 say, "holding." This will inform your helper when the brake pedal is fully depressed.

    5

    Instruct the helper to attach a clear rubber tube to the brake caliper bleeder and use an 8 mm wrench to open it when the brake pedal is depressed. The helper will start opening the bleeder at count 1 and close shortly after the brake pedal is fully depressed.

    6

    Repeat Steps 4 and 5 until you don't see any bubbles of air going through the clear rubber hose. At that point you should feel the brake pedal to be a little harder to press down than before.

    7

    Check the level of the brake fluid in the master cylinder and top off if necessary. Do not let the master cylinder run out of brake fluid or else air will enter the brake system, and you will have to start the brake bleeding process over again.

    8

    Continue bleeding the other three corners of the truck. The brake pedal should be very firm at this point, and all air should be purged out of the system. If the pedal remains mushy, repeat the process again.

How to Replace Brake Pads in a 2001 Chevy Silverado

Chevy designed the 2001 Silverado -ton pickup with four-wheel disc brakes for improved brake system performance over earlier disc/drum brake combinations. The self-adjusting brake calipers vastly improve the brake-lining service life. However, disc brake pads still wear out over time as part of their design functionality and require replacement. Inspect the brakes at every tire rotation interval and replace them immediately if they're less than 3 mm thick. If you're someone with basic auto-repair experience, you can perform this job yourself in about four hours.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the Silverado's front lug nuts counterclockwise until they're hand tight. Chock one of the rear wheels to prevent the Chevy from rolling.

    2

    Lift the Silverado's front end with a floor jack and support it on jack stands, positioned under the frame as far forward as possible.

    3

    Remove the Chevy's front lug nuts and wheels by hand to expose the front disc brakes.

    4

    Put the drop pan under the left-front brakes and wash the brake dust off the rotor and caliper with brake cleaner. Unbolt the Silverado's left-front brake caliper with your socket set. Pull the caliper out of the mount and remove the old brake pads by hand.

    5

    Clean the caliper pistons and slide pins with brake cleaner to remove the road dirt and brake dust. Force the pistons back into the caliper with the caliper tool.

    6

    Insert the new brake pads by hand. Lower the caliper into the mount by hand. Bolt it in with the socket set.

    7

    Scoot over to the Silverado's right-front and repeat steps 4 through 6. Put the wheels back on by hand. Reinstall the lug nuts manually.

    8

    Lower the Silverado off the jack stands, move the wheel chocks to one of the front wheels and then perform steps 1 through 7 on the rear of the Chevy.

    9

    Put the Silverado back on the ground with the floor jack. Tighten the front and rear lug nuts to 140 foot-pounds using a torque wrench.

Selasa, 22 November 2011

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Toyota Corolla

In order to replace the rear disc brakes on a Toyota Corolla you need to purchase a special tool from the dealership. The tool's item number is SST 09719-14020 and rotates the piston clockwise into the bore. With this tool and these instructions, you can replace your rear disc brakes and still have plenty of time left in your day.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the Corolla from the ground using a car jack to remove the wheels and access the rear disc brakes. Support the vehicle on all sides to prevent falling. Watch for children and animals that may crawl under the car.

    2

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts by loosening them with a torque wrench. Remove the bolts followed by the caliper assembly. Move the brake line aside without disconnecting it.

    3

    Slip out the brake pads. Take out the shims, springs, pad wear indicators and pad support plates at the same time.

    4

    Replace the pad support plates on the torque plate. Attach the pad wear indicators to the brake pads, making certain the arrow on the indicator points in the direction the wheel rotates.

    5

    Attach the shims to the brake pads. Fasten each completed assembly to the torque plate.

    6

    Push the caliper piston into the bore. Use tool SST 09719-14020 to turn the piston clockwise while pushing it into the bore until you hear a clicking noise. Lay the caliper across the pads and tighten the mounting bolts.

    7

    Reassemble the wheels. Lower the Toyota Corolla to the ground and then verify the brake fluid level.

How to Measure Brake Pads

How to Measure Brake Pads

Brake pad linings wear down with each depression of the brake pedal. Unattended lining wear leaves the metal parts beneath to rub together and damage the brake system. The brakes work most efficiently with a certain amount of lining remaining on the brake pads. The pads should be replaced once the lining thickness falls below the recommend service height. Measure your brake pads regularly, or ask a qualified mechanic to check them for you to ensure the quality of the brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Set the parking brake and raise the car at one corner with a jack. Remove any present hubcap and loosen the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Take the tire and rim off.

    2

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper by loosening the mounting bolts with an open end wrench, or by tapping out the retainer pins on disc brakes with a hammer.

    3

    Measure the linings by visually comparing them to the thickness of the plates backing them. Take a precise measurement with vernier calipers if the linings are thinner than the backing plates.

    4

    Measure the exact thickness of brake pad linings with vernier calipers. Close the jaws of the calipers onto the linings in several places to see if they fall below the minimum safe thickness at any point. Manufacturers specify safe pad thickness, but in general at least 3/16 of an inch is needed for responsive braking.

Senin, 21 November 2011

What Are Brake Pads Made From?

The exact materials used to make brake pads vary by manufacturer, and manufacturers often keep their formulas a secret. Generally, brake pads are made from either a mixture of metallic shavings or nonmetallic, organic materials.

Identification

    Most brake pads use a semi-metallic material that contains shavings of steel wool, copper and brass, which are held together with resin.

History

    Brake pads were originally made from carbon and asbestos until asbestos was banned by the government for health reasons.

Types

    Some vehicles are still designed for nonmetallic brake pads. The current nonmetallic pads are made with Kevlar instead of asbestos.

Warning

    Metallic brakes have a higher chance of making grinding sounds because the metal shavings constantly grind against the steel brake rotors. Some third-party manufacturers claim to make pads that are quieter.

Prevention/Solution

    Some brake pads are made with special shims that intentionally make grinding sounds as they wear down to warn the driver when to replace them.

How to Replace the Rotor in a Ford Focus

If you can feel pulsing and vibrating through the brake pedal when you're slowing down in your Ford Focus, but you know that your brake pads are fine, chances are that it's time to replace the rotors. Rotors only need to be changed if they become warped or worn down, but the process is the same across all model years with only a slight difference for the Focus SVT.

Instructions

For the Ford Focus excluding the SVT

    1

    Jack up your Ford Focus. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the tire and wheel assembly and set aside.

    2

    Remove the outer brake pad retaining clip and the brake hose from its support bracket. Use a c-clamp if necessary or pull the caliper outward to release the piston. Suspend the caliper and attached brake line with mechanic's wire.

    3

    Pull off the old rotor and clean any dirt or corrosion off with a damp cloth. Install the new rotor and tighten the holding screws. Discard the mechanic's wire and mount the brake line and caliper back into place. Tighten the caliper bolts with a torque wrench to 21 ft. lbs. (28 Nm).

    4

    Replace the outer brake pad retaining clip and install the wheel assembly and tire. Repeat this process for each additional rotor, lower the vehicle and tighten the tire lug nuts with a torque wrench or an air ratchet with an appropriate adapter. Test drive your Ford Focus to make sure that the rotor installation was successful.

For the SVT

    5

    Raise your Focus SVT using jacks and jack stands. Block the wheels to keep your car from rolling while you work. Disconnect the negative battery cable before you start.

    6

    Remove the tire and wheel assembly. Next, remove the caliper mounting bolts and slide the caliper off of the brake disc (rotor). Suspend the caliper and connected brake line with mechanic's wire.

    7

    Pull off the old rotor. Clean the area with a damp cloth to remove any dust or corrosion. Slide the new rotor into position and replace the caliper and brake hose to their proper positions. Mount the caliper bolts with a torque wrench to 98 ft. lbs. (133 Nm).

    8

    Replace the wheel assembly, tire and lug nuts. Repeat for each additional wheel and lower the vehicle, tighten the lug nuts with a torque wrench and test drive your Ford Focus SVT to make sure that everything is working properly.

Minggu, 20 November 2011

How to Adjust the Parking Brake on a 2000 Chevy Suburban

If your 2000 Chevy Suburban's parking brake won't keep the vehicle in place when you engage it, it's time for an adjustment. It's a fairly simple adjustment that you can do right in your home driveway or garage. This will save you from spending money to have a mechanic do it. The great thing about this repair is that it requires no tools. The Suburban has an automatic cable equalizer that takes up the slack in the cable when you do the adjustment.

Instructions

    1

    Position the Suburban on a hill in a downward-facing direction, but do not put it into park. Hold the suburban in place on the hill using the regular brake pedal. Engage the parking brake by stepping down on it, then release the main brake. Make sure there is nothing in front of your Suburban. If the Suburban starts to slip forward, put your foot on the main brake and disengage the parking brake.

    2

    Drive to flat ground and put the vehicle into park.

    3

    Locate the parking brake pedal--it's the pedal on the far left side of the driver's side foot well. It's likely higher than the other pedals. Press down on the pedal to engage the parking brake.

    4

    Disengage the parking brake by stepping down on the pedal again with your foot.

    5

    Repeat the above steps three times to allow the equalizer to tighten up the slack in the cable.

Sabtu, 19 November 2011

How to Replace the Front Brakes on a Chevrolet S-10

How to Replace the Front Brakes on a Chevrolet S-10

The Chevrolet S-10 series pickup trucks and its variants have a front disk braking braking system with rotors, calipers and braking pads. The rotors and pads are easily replaceable, and should take the average backyard mechanic about 30 minutes per wheel.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the wheel to expose the brakes. Loosen the nuts with the tire iron, then jack up the wheel and remove it completely. There will be a rotor visible, with the caliper holding the pads off to one side.

    2

    Remove the brake caliper's bolts with the sized socket. They are located on the rear of the caliper, one on each end. Once they are removed, slide the caliper halfway off of the rotor and attach a C-clamp so that the pad does not come off and the caliper is not allowed to expand. The other pad can also be held this way, but only one is required to prevent the caliper from expanding.

    3

    Remove the caliper by sliding it off of the rotor. The caliper can be positioned onto the control arm so that it does not dangle from the rubber brake lines, which could damage them.

    4

    Remove the rotor by pulling it away from the hub. Without the wheel and caliper holding it in place, it is free to slide out. On some models it is necessary to remove the wheel bearing cap before the rotor will be completely freed.

    5

    Replace the rotor by sliding it back over the hub assembly and replacing the wheel bearing cap. This is a good time to check the wheel bearing grease level, if applicable.

    6

    Replace the brake pads on the caliper. Unfasten the clamps and quickly swap out the pads, placing the caliper with new pads onto the rotor before the caliper expands. It pushes out slowly, but after about 10 or 15 seconds, it will be too tight to fit onto the rotor, taking considerable effort to press back in.

    7

    Bolt the caliper into place, then apply brake squeal spray onto the back side of each brake pad. Do not apply this spray to the rotor; apply it only to the rear of the pads where they meet the caliper.

    8

    Bleed the brake line. Uncap the master cylinder and pour DOT-3 fluid into it as someone pushes on the brakes with the bleeder nipple unscrewed. This will clear the brake line of air and replace bad fluid as well.

    9

    Replace the wheel and tighten the lug nuts with the tire iron.

How to Replace the Rotor in a Nissan Maxima

The Nissan Maxima has been around since 1976. The Maxima as we know it today is actually the seventh generation successor of the original Nissan Maxima. If you own a Maxima built after 1989 and need to replace the rotors, the process is pretty much the same across all model years and is fairly simple to do in your own garage.

Instructions

    1

    Buy new rotors at the auto parts store or order them online for your Nissan Maxima. Plan on replacing all of the rotors at once for the best braking performance. It might also be a good idea to install new brake pads at the same time to extend the life of the new rotors.

    2

    Raise your Nissan using jacks and jack stands. Block the wheels to prevent the car from rolling while you work and then disconnect the battery. Next, drain the brake fluid from the master cylinder before you start working. Remove the lug nuts, tires and wheel assembly to get to the calipers.

    3

    Remove the bolts holding the caliper in place and then slide off the caliper. Remove the old rotor and then use a damp cloth to clean any corrosion or debris around the hub.

    4

    Slide the new rotor into position on the hub and tighten any holding screws if necessary. Replace the caliper and tighten the bolts with a torque wrench. Make sure that the brake line and union bolt are properly connected as well.

    5

    Replace the wheel assembly, tire and lug nuts. Repeat this process to replace each additional rotor. Refill the brake fluid reservoir with new brake fluid. Reconnect the battery, lower the vehicle and then tighten the lug nuts on each tire and torque down using a torque wrench.

    6

    Bleed the brakes to get any air that may be stuck in the brake line. Pump the brakes until the pedal is firm and then road test your Nissan Maxima to make sure that the new rotor installation was successful.

Jumat, 18 November 2011

How to Check Rotors

How to Check Rotors

The condition of the brake rotors on your car is just as important as the condition of the brake pads. If the rotors are not in good condition, they are likely to fail, and you will have a difficult time stopping the car. It is a good idea to inspect the brake rotors at least as often as you change the brakes; but if you are able to inspect them more often, then do so. The brake rotors are subject to a great deal of stress due to their design as they use friction to stop the car. They are, therefore, subject to excessive heat at times. Because of that heat, they are at risk of warping. Additionally, they are subject to damage if you allow the brake pads to wear beyond their recommended levels. The procedure for inspecting brake rotors is similar for all automobiles that use disc brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Place wheel chocks behind the rear tires of your automobile. Raise the vehicle with an automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the car near the jacking point and raise it up to the frame of the vehicle for added safety.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts on the wheel with a lug wrench then remove the wheel.

    3

    Inspect the surface of the brake rotor. It should be smooth with no damage or nicks. Make sure the rotor is not warped.

    4

    Measure the thickness of the rotor by closing the jaws of a micrometer over the rotor. Note the measurement and check it against the figure stamped on the rotor. The number on the rotor is the minimum thickness required for safety. If the rotor is thinner than the minimum requirement, you must replace it.

    5

    Perform the same inspection on the backside of the rotor, checking for surface damage. Remount the wheel on the car, tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench then remove the jack stand. Lower the vehicle to the ground with the jack. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

Kamis, 17 November 2011

How to Change the Front Brake Hose on a Mustang II

Over time, the rubber in the front brake hose on your Mustang II will begin to deteriorate and crack. The hose may also split, causing a severe leak and brake-system failure. Faulty brake hoses can also cause premature wear of the brake pads and overheating of the brake rotors. Replacement of the front brake hoses in your Mustang can be accomplished in an afternoon and will restore the function of the brake system. A few special tools may be needed, but they are available at your local auto-parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Raise and support the front of the Mustang by placing the floor jack under the front sub-frame and lifting the car until the wheels are off the ground and placing jack stands under the sub-frame. Lower the jack until the car is supported by the jack stands. Remove the front wheels and store them to prevent tripping and loss of the lug nuts.

    2

    Disconnect the rubber brake hose from the steel brake line, at the point where the hose and line are attached to the frame, using a 7/16-inch line wrench. The line wrench is designed to loosen the fitting without damage to the fitting or line. If the fitting is rusted, or difficult to remove, spray a liberal amount of penetrating oil on the fitting threads and tap the fitting with a small hammer. Allow the penetrating oil to soak in for a few minutes and try again to loosen the rusted fitting.

    3

    Remove the clip that attaches the brake hose to the frame, using a pair of needle-nose pliers. Remove the 7/16-inch bolt that attaches the hose to the caliper. Discard the hose and the copper washers from the caliper fitting.

    4

    Position the new hose in the frame bracket, and start threading the fitting on the steel line into the hose. Do not tighten it at this time. Attach the other end of the hose to the caliper using the original bolt, and new copper washers supplied with the hose. Tighten the bolt securely. Slip the frame end of the hose into the bracket and tap the retaining clip into place with a small hammer. Tighten the fitting on the steel line securely to the hose.

    5

    Fill the master cylinder with clean brake fluid, and bleed the front brakes by opening the calipers and allowing the fluid coming into the caliper to push the air out of the caliper. Then have a helper push the brake pedal while you open the bleeder screw to let the final bit of air out. Start with the passenger side and end with the driver side. Apply the brake pedal a few times. If the pedal is still low after bleeding the front brakes, bleed the entire system, starting with the wheel farthest from the master cylinder and ending with the wheel closest to the master cylinder. Lower the vehicle off the jack stands and test-drive to verify the repair.

Selasa, 15 November 2011

Removing the Rear Brake Drums in a 1996 Grand Am

Removing the Rear Brake Drums in a 1996 Grand Am

To access the rear brake shoes or wheel cylinder for the drum brakes on the 1996 Pontiac Grand Am requires the removal of the drum first. This task is easier said than done considering the age of the Grand Am and how long the drums have been on the vehicle. Rust and road debris contaminate the slight space between the center of the drum hole and the hub it sits on.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Grand Am on a level surface suitable for lifting and supporting the vehicle. Do not apply the parking brake or the rear brakes will prohibit you from removing the drums.

    2

    Place a tire wedge in front of one of the front tires.

    3

    Loosen the rear lug nuts 1/4 turn with the lug wrench.

    4

    Lift one rear quarter of the Grand Am with a jack and then support it safely onto a jack stand. Repeat this step for the other side to raise the rear axle of the vehicle.

    5

    Spin the rear tires by hand to make sure the parking brake mechanism is not locking them up. If so, recheck to make sure the parking brake is not engaged.

    6

    Fully remove the lug nuts and then the tires.

    7

    Draw a mark on one of the studs and then on the drum that corresponds with the stud with a grease pencil. This step only needs to be done if you're not replacing the drums. This will allow you to install the drum back onto the hub in the same location it was removed from.

    8

    Try to pull the drums off by hand. If they're stuck onto the hub, spray a copious amount of penetrating lubricant on the mating surface of the drum's center hole and wheel hub. Allow the lubricant to soak in for a few minutes.

    9

    Strike the front of the drum near the edge with a dead-blow rubber mallet sharply to shock the rust and corrosion free. If necessary, spin the drum 1/4 turn and strike it again in a different location around the front facing of the drum.

    10

    Apply a drum-puller if necessary to remove the drum. The three-legged puller will grab the rear lip of the drum and as you tighten the center with a ratchet and socket, it will pull the drum off of the hub.

How to Check a Brake Rotor

How to Check a Brake Rotor

Brake rotors should be checked at least as often as you change the brake pads and more often, if possible. Checking the brake rotors is not hard to do, but it's not something that you can do with the wheel on your vehicle. Consult the rotor specs in your vehicle owner's manual to determine the minimum thickness for your rotors. The brake rotors will have different requirements based on type and the function of the automobile.

Instructions

    1

    Park your vehicle on a level surface and turn of the ignition. Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Raise the vehicle with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the vehicle and raise it up to the frame.

    2

    Remove the wheel from the car using the lug wrench to remove the lug nuts.

    3

    Check the front surface of the rotor for grooves, nicks, cracks or any other damage. Repeat your inspection on the back of the rotor.

    4

    Place the micrometer on the rotor and squeeze the jaws shut on the rotor. Note you measurement to determine if it falls within the vehicle manufacturer's guidelines. Measure the diameter of the rotor from top to bottom to determine if it falls within the manufacturer's specifications.

    5

    Place the wheel on the car and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the vehicle and lower the vehicle back to the ground with the jack. Repeat the process on the next wheel.

How to Test Brake Boosters

Power brakes represent one of the greatest advances in automotive braking technology. Not only do power brakes make it easier for the driver to stop the vehicle, but without the assistance of the power booster it would be practically impossible for disc brakes to be effectively used on automobiles. Any deficiencies in the performance of a power booster can seriously impair braking effectiveness, and it is important to be sure the booster is operating properly at all times. Testing the booster is a simple job that every driver can do.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the vehicle engine off and pump the brake pedal a few times to deplete any remaining vacuum in the power booster. Push and hold the brake pedal down with light but steady pressure. Start the engine. The brake pedal should drop slightly, indicating that the booster is working properly.

    2

    Allow the engine to run at idle for a minute or two. Turn the engine off and slowly pump the brake pedal five or six times. The brake pedal should stop at a higher position with each pump, indicating that the booster is not leaking and the check valve is working properly.

    3

    Start the engine and allow it to run at idle for a minute or two. Push and hold the brake pedal down with light but steady pressure, and turn the engine off. Continue holding the pedal down for 30 seconds or so. If the pedal does not rise it indicates that the booster is not leaking and the check valve is working properly.

    4

    Test the vacuum booster check valve. Locate the vacuum booster. It is a dome shaped assembly mounted at the rear of the engine compartment on the driver's side. Now locate the flexible vacuum hose that runs from the engine intake manifold to the vacuum booster. Remove any retaining clips that hold the hose to the intake manifold connection, and slip the hose off the connection. Try to blow into the hose. If the check valve is working properly the air will not flow into the booster. Now try to suck air out of the hose. If the check valve is working properly air will flow out of the booster.

    5

    Connect an engine vacuum test gauge to the connection on the engine intake manifold. Start the engine and let it run for a minute or two. Check the test gauge vacuum reading. The vacuum should be at least 18 inches.

Senin, 14 November 2011

How to Change the Rotors on a 1998 Nissan Pathfinder

How to Change the Rotors on a 1998 Nissan Pathfinder

The Nissan Pathfinder brake rotors work with the brake pads to slow and stop your vehicle through hydraulics. As you depress the brake pedal, brake fluid flows through the brake lines to the calipers. The calipers have a piston the pushes against the back brake pad. The pressure forces the caliper to go back a little, and the brake pads squeeze the rotors to slow and stop the Pathfinder. It will take you about 30 minutes per wheel to complete the project.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Pathfinder on a level surface and turn off the ignition. Place wheel chock behind the appropriate wheels. Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel you will be working on with the lug wrench, turning counterclockwise. Raise the vehicle up with the automobile jack and place a jack stand under it, near the jacking point. Raise the jack stand up to the frame.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts from the wheel using the lug wrench. Pull the wheel off the Pathfinder. Remove the brake caliper from the wheel assembly using a socket and ratchet. Secure the caliper to the strut using a wire tie. Pull the brake rotor off the wheel assembly.

    3

    Install the new rotor on the wheel assembly. Cut the wire tie holding the brake caliper to the strut with the pliers and place it on the mounting bracket.

    4

    Tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet. Replace the wheel on the Pathfinder and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Repeat the process on the other wheels.

    5

    Remove the jack stand from under the Pathfinder and lower the vehicle to the ground.

How to Replace Integra Brake Pads

How to Replace Integra Brake Pads

The Acura Integra's brake pads can typically endure 25,000 to 35,000 miles of driving before needing replacement. The pads have a metal backing with a semi-metallic material making up the pad's lining. When the pad's lining wears down and the metal backing becomes exposed, this can create more problems. For this reason, periodic inspection of the brake pads is needed. Running on worn out brake pads can cause rotor wear, caliper leakage or even complete brake failure. Luckily, the brake pads on the Acura Integra are relatively easy to replace.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen, but do not remove, the front lug nuts, using the ratchet and a socket.

    2

    Raise the front of the vehicle with the floor jack and secure it with jack stands.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts and pull the front wheels from the Integra.

    4

    Look on the rear of the brake caliper and locate the upper and lower caliper bolt.

    5

    Loosen, but do not remove, the upper caliper bolt, using the ratchet and socket.

    6

    Loosen and remove the upper caliper bolt, using the ratchet and socket.

    7

    Pivot the caliper upward, using the upper caliper bolt as the pivot point.

    8

    Grasp the inner and outer brake pads and pull them from the brake assembly. Make note of how the old pads came off, as the new ones must be installed in the same fashion.

    9

    Place the new brake pads on the brake assembly, just as the old ones came off. Make certain the metal tab -- the wear indicator -- is positioned upward on the inner pad.

    10

    Position the c-clamp over the brake caliper so that the fixed portion is contacting the rear of the caliper and the screw portion is contacting the caliper's piston, the metal, cylindrical object inside the caliper.

    11

    Tighten the c-clamp and observe as the piston compresses into the caliper body. Continue tightening the c-clamp until the piston is completely inside the caliper and stops moving.

    12

    Loosen and remove the c-clamp from the caliper.

    13

    Pivot the caliper downward and cover the new brake pads.

    14

    Hand-tighten the upper and lower caliper bolts.

    15

    Tighten the upper and lower caliper bolts to 24 foot-pounds, using the torque wrench and a socket.

    16

    Repeat steps 4 through 14 for the pads on the other side of the Integra.

    17

    Place the front wheels back on the vehicle and hand-tighten the lug nuts.

    18

    Remove the jack stands from under the vehicle and slowly lower it to the ground.

    19

    Tighten the lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds, using the torque wrench and a socket.

    20

    Press and release the brake pedal repeatedly, until it feels firm.

How to Change Rear Disc Brakes Without A Brake Piston Wrench

How to Change Rear Disc Brakes Without A Brake Piston Wrench

Disc braking technology has supplanted the drum brake as the dominant type of brake used on automobiles, and with good reason. Disc brakes perform better, and the simplicity of disc brake design makes them easier to service as well. On the rear brakes, however, there remains the problem of how to incorporate the emergency brake system, and this problem has been addressed in different ways. Some models incorporate a dedicated drum brake mechanism. Others employ a mechanism in the disc brake piston, and this brings additional complications when retracting the piston during servicing. With a little ingenuity, however, this task can be accomplished without the use of expensive special tools.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a firm and level surface. Put automatic transmissions in the "park" setting and put manual transmissions in either first or reverse gear. Leave the parking brake off. Securely block the front wheels to prevent accidental vehicle rolling. Loosen the lug nuts of the rear wheel to be serviced about one full turn each and jack the car up. Support the car securely on an axle stand. Completely remove the lug nuts and pull the wheel off.

    2

    Remove the two caliper retaining bolts. Grip the caliper and rock it back and forth a few times to spread the brake pads slightly and then lift the caliper up and off the disk. Hang the caliper out of the way using a wire or bungee cord, taking care not to stretch or kink the flexible brake hose.

    3

    Slide the brake pads out of the caliper. If retaining clips are present, these can be pried off the caliper bracket with a screw driver or pulled off with pliers. Take care not to damage clips during removal so that they can be reused during reassembly.

    4

    Screw the piston back into the cylinder. First place the spindle swivel of a large "C" clamp on the face of the piston and hook the frame end of the clamp on the back of the caliper. Tighten the clamp to put firm pressure on the piston, but do not attempt to force the piston back into the cylinder. Grip the outside of the protruding piston with channel lock pliers and rotate the piston clockwise to screw it back into the cylinder. Be careful not to pinch or damage the rubber piston seal. Retighten the C-clamp after every rotation of the piston in order to keep firm pressure on the piston face. Continue rotating the piston in this manner until you can no longer get a good grip on the piston with the channel lock pliers.

    5

    Measure the thickness of the brake pad linings with a finely graduated ruler. Replace the pads of the lining thickness is less than the manufacturer's specified minimum, or if the linings are damaged or unevenly worn. Measure the thickness of the brake disc about one half to three quarters of an inch from the rim, at eight points equally spaced around the disc. Replace the disc if the thickness is less than the manufacturer's specified minimum, or if the disc is cracked, deeply scored, glazed, or otherwise irreparably damaged. Minor damage can be repaired by having the disc machined at your local auto parts store.

    6

    Remove any retaining screws or bolts from the disc and pull the disc straight off the hub. If the disc is seized, tap the center part of the disc firmly with a hammer or mallet, taking care not to hit the braking surface or outer rim of the disc. Some discs have threaded holes near the center. Bolts can be threaded into these holes and tightened to jack a stubborn disc off the hub. Of course if the old disc is in good shape there is no need to remove it.

    7

    Clean all parts with brake cleaning fluid. Be sure to catch all used fluid in a catch pan and dispose of used fluid in accordance with local regulations. Install a new disc if needed, taking care to thoroughly clean the hub before installing the new disc. Liberally lubricate the caliper bolts with brake grease and then reassemble the caliper with new pads and shims if needed and reinstall the caliper. Reinstall the wheel and lower the car.

    8

    Repeat the procedure on the other rear wheel. Start the car and pump the brakes a few times to reset the pistons and parking brake adjusters. Test the brake operation before driving.

Minggu, 13 November 2011

How to Get a Car's Brakes to Stop Squeaking

How to Get a Car's Brakes to Stop Squeaking

When parts are not working their best, a car's first signal to you is usually noise. The noise you hear coming from under the hood may be attributed to bearings and belts that are worn and need to be replaced. When the noise you hear comes from the brakes, it may be a long squeak or squeal as you come to a stop. Discover what parts are creating the sounds quickly, because you should take immediate action to diagnose the problem. How to get a car's brakes to stop squeaking involves a visual inspection and a few simple steps to correct the reason for the noise. When squeaking to a stop has you thinking something is wrong with your brakes, take advantage of these steps to fix the problem of noisy brake rotors and pads.

Instructions

    1

    Get a car's brake to stop squealing by diagnosing and correcting the damaged, worn brake pad or warped and scarred disc brake rotor. Place the vehicle on a flat surface without the parking brake engaged. Lift the wheel and tire assembly that makes the noise using a hydraulic floor jack and a jack stand to support the weight while you inspect and fix the problem. Place a wood block behind the rear wheel(s) for extra security while the vehicle is lifted.

    2

    Remove the wheel and tire that covers the disc brake assembly that is making the squeal. Visually inspect the rotors and pads for signs of wear and tear. Look for rotors that are scarred or worn in waves showing that a rotor might be warped. Look inside the caliper to see if there is brake pad left. Are the brake pads worn down so far that they are ineffective? Spray and wipe down the exposed rotor and brake caliper to remove and built up brake pad dust prior to separating the brake assembly.

    3

    Use an Allen wrench to separate the caliper from around the disc brake rotor. Two Allen head bolts are securing the caliper onto a mounting bracket from the backside of the caliper. You will have to reach around the caliper with the Allen head wrench to loosen and remove these two fasteners. Turn each bolt counter-clockwise to loosen before removing one bolt at a time. Clean the bolts with brake cleaner and then wipe down with WD-40 squirted into a rag. Lubricating and cleaning the brake assembly parts is one way to get rid of squealing from a perfect pair of brake pads and rotors.

    4

    Pull the caliper off of the rotor and remove the two brake pads inside the caliper. The pads have a small retainer clip that secures each pad into the caliper plunger. Pull the pad out of the plunger and the clip will come out with it. Retain the clip. Inspect each pad for hot spots or wear. Either condition will require you to replace the brake pads with new ones if you want to get a car's brake to stop squealing. Clean the inside of the brake caliper with brake cleaner and wipe with a rag with WD-40 on it.

    5

    Insert a new pair of brake pads using the retainer clips clipped onto the back of the pads and inserted into the caliper's plungers. It may be necessary to depress a caliper's plunger to insert and install a new pair of brake shoes and caliper over the width of the disc brake rotor. Use a C-clamp and an old brake shoe to depress the plunger.

    6

    Clean and inspect the rotor for wear and damage. A squeal can come from the small grooves that can be present on the faces of a disc brake rotor from brake pads that have worn down. A warped rotor is harder to define if the rotor shows that there is more contact with the brake pad on one side over the other, replacement is necessary. Tap the back of the disc brake rotor to remove it from the spindle.

    7

    Install a new or machined rotor onto the spindle and tap into place with a mallet. Slide the caliper and new brake pads over the rotor and position so that the two retaining bolts can be secured. The new brake pads and rotor can be cleaned again with brake cleaner before bleeding the brake line.

    8

    Pour some DOT3 brake fluid into a cup or jar. Push the end of a plastic tube over the bleeder fitting located on the caliper. Place the other end of the tube into the fluid in the cup. Have a helper sit in the driver's seat to depress the brake pedal when you ask him/her. Loosen the bleeder valve by turning counter-clockwise until it is loose, and have your helper depress the brake pedal completely. When the brake pedal is depressed brake fluid will be pushed into the cup through the tube. Tighten the bleeder fitting while the brake pedal is depressed. Have the helper release the brake pedal and depress the pedal as you loosen and tighten the bleeder valve each time. This pushes air out and increases the responsiveness of brakes that have a small amount of air in the lines.

    9

    Remove the cap of the master cylinder and fill the cylinder with brake fluid until full. Replace the cover then return the wheel and tire assembly onto the axle. Remove the jack stand using the floor jack and lower the vehicle onto the ground for a test. Your squeaky brakes will be fixed with this service.

How to Install Brake Pads on a 2007 Sonata

How to Install Brake Pads on a 2007 Sonata

The 2007 Hyundai Sonata was available in a four-door model, in the SE, GLS, and Limited trim packages. The SE and the Limited models touted an XM satellite radio, and a 3.3-liter 234-horsepower V-6 engine. The GLS was equipped with a smaller 2.4-liter in-line four-cylinder that produced 162 horsepower. The replacement of brake pads is the same for all three trim levels of the 2007 Sonata.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the front wheel lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the front of the car with a jack, and place jack stands beneath the front frame rails. Do not place jacks beneath the lower control arms. Lower the Sonata onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and then remove the front wheels. Replace pads on one side of the car at a time, so you'll always have a complete assembly as a visual reference.

    2

    Insert an open-end wrench onto the caliper slide pin head, on the inboard side of the caliper mounting bracket. Install a ratchet and socket onto the caliper bolt. Remove the bolt, while holding the open-end wrench, so that the caliper slide pin does not spin. Repeat this process to remove the second caliper bolt.

    3

    Remove the caliper from the front brake assembly. Use a pry bar to assist you if needed. Hang the caliper from the front strut coil spring with a metal coat hanger or a bungee cord. Do not let the caliper hang from the rubber brake hose. Remove the brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket, and place one pad against the caliper piston inside the caliper. Install a C-clamp around the brake pad and the rear of the caliper, and tighten the clamp to completely compress the caliper piston.

    4

    Remove the C-clamp and the brake pad, and discard both brake pads. Measure the thickness of the front brake rotor across the top of the rotor, using a tape measure. If the rotor measurement is less than 1-3/8-inches (1.040-inches) for the 3.3-liter engine models, or less than 15/16-inches (0.096-inches) for the 2.4-liter engine models, or if the rotors are scored or pitted, you must replace the rotors.

    5

    Remove the brake pad retainer shims form the caliper bracket by hand, and check them for integrity. If they are rusted through, or simply too loose to hang on the caliper bracket, then replace the shims. Install the retainer shims, and add a light film of grease to the outer lips of the shims. This will allow the outer tips of the brake pads to slide back and forth more easily.

    6

    Install the new brake pads onto the caliper bracket. Install the pad with the "L" shaped metal protrusion on the inboard side of the rotor. Add a thin coat of grease to the metal backs of both pads. Spray the entire outboard and inboard faces of the rotor with aerosol brake cleaner, to remove any oily fingerprints you may have put on the rotors during installation or measurement.

    7

    Install the brake caliper loosely over the new brake pads. Pull the caliper slide pins out of the back of the caliper by hand. Dip them directly into your tub of caliper grease. Install the pins back into the caliper. Install the caliper bolts, and tighten them between 16 and 24 foot-pounds of torque, with a 1/2-inch-drive torque wrench and socket.

    8

    Repeat Steps 2 through 8 to complete the pad replacement and rotor measurement on the second side of the Sonata. Install the front wheels on the car, and snug the lug nuts with a tire iron.

    9

    Raise the car off of the jack stands. Remove the stands from beneath the car, then lower the Sonata to the ground. Tighten the wheel lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds of torque.

    10

    Sit in the drivers seat of the Sonata. Pump the brake pedal slowly, about 10 times. This will allow the new brake pads to seat to the brake rotors. If the pedal goes to the floor or will not stiffen up, stop pumping the brakes. Step out of the vehicle and make sure there is no brake fluid leaking from one of the lines. If no leak is present and the pedal remains soft, bleed the front brakes.

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Chevy Silverado

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Chevy Silverado

Replacing the rear brake pads on the Chevy Silverado is a common repair. When the truck first integrated rear disc brakes, the position of the caliper allowed road dirt and debris to contaminate the mounting bracket where the pads are seated. While the design has been rectified by employing a mud flap to prevent the debris from entering the caliper, servicing the caliper and mounting bracket frequently is a good idea. Otherwise, the pads get stuck in the anchor, constantly drag against the rotor and prematurely wear down.

Instructions

    1

    Remove half the brake fluid from the master cylinder using a brake fluid suction baster. Discard the old fluid and replace the cap on the master cylinder.

    2

    Loosen the rear lug nuts slightly with a lug nut socket and a breaker bar.

    3

    Lift the Silverado with a jack and support it onto jack stands placed under the rear axle.

    4

    Finish removing the lug nuts and then remove the wheels.

    5

    Place the medium pry bar into the front window of the caliper as a lever. Pry the backing plate of the outboard pad inward to compress the caliper piston until it bottoms out in the bore.

    6

    Remove the two caliper-mounting bolts using a box-end wrench and then remove the caliper. Rest it on top of the rear knuckle or use a hook to hang it so it does not hang from the hydraulic brake hose.

    7

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper-mounting bracket. Pry them out of the bracket with the pry bar if necessary.

    8

    Pry the old pad clips off of the caliper mounting bracket and discard.

    9

    Install the new clips onto the mounting bracket and use an acid brush to apply a liberal coat of anti-seize compound. Try not to get any on the rotor. Use a shop rag to wipe any compound off the rotor is necessary.

    10

    Place the new pads onto the clips inside the bracket. Be sure the dual-wear sensor pad is on the outside and the single sensor pad is on the inside.

    11

    Replace the caliper and caliper mounting bolts. Tighten the bolts to 80-foot lbs. with a torque wrench and socket.

    12

    Repeat the pad replacement for the other rear wheel.

    13

    Replace the wheels and lug nuts and torque the lug nuts between 120- to 145-foot lbs. (depending on the weight class of the Silverado) with a torque wrench and lug nut socket.

    14

    Pump the foot brake pedal to seat the new pads against the rotor and then refill the master cylinder with new brake fluid.

How to Determine Which Rotor Is Warped

How to Determine Which Rotor Is Warped

Keeping your vehicle's brakes in good shape helps ensure that you will be able to stop when you need to. In some vehicles, the rotors may become warped due to heat or improper installation of tires or brake pads. When the rotors become warped, they can make braking dangerous, especially in emergency situations. Therefore, you should monitor your rotors for any potential warping and fix the issue as soon as possible.

Instructions

    1

    Stay alert when braking. If the steering wheel shudders or vibrates, you rotors may be warped.

    2

    Jack up your vehicle so you can take a closer look at the rotors. With some vehicles, you may be able to see the rotors without removing the wheels. It can be difficult to see if the rotors are warped, however, from this perspective.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts from the wheel with a socket wrench so you can access the rotor and get a better view. Pull the wheel off and set it aside.

    4

    Look at the rotor from the side so you can see the space between the rotor and the brake pad. Slowly spin the wheel while watching the space to check for noticeable differences. If there are slight differences, you may not be able to see them.

    5

    Clean off the rotor with brake cleaning fluid in case the vibration problem is due to residue build-up.

    6

    Check each rotor on your vehicle until you find the one that is warped or eliminate each one. If none of the rotors are warped, see a mechanic to further diagnose the issue.

Sabtu, 12 November 2011

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 1994 Ford Taurus

The 1994 Ford Taurus comes with front disc brakes and may also come equipped with rear disc or rear drum brakes. Replacing the front brakes in the Taurus is a relatively unchanged process no matter what year it is; the rear disc brakes employ a different procedure to retract the caliper piston than do the front. A special tool is required to screw the rear caliper piston into the caliper bore. Otherwise, the procedure is quite similar to the front brake pad replacement.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the cover to the master cylinder and then siphon out 1/3 of the brake fluid from inside it. Discard the old fluid appropriately. Replace the cover to the master cylinder.

    2

    Loosen the wheel nuts with wheel nut wrench before lifting the Taurus.

    3

    Lift the Taurus, one side at a time, with the jack and then support each frame rail gently onto a jack stand. Finish removing the wheel nuts and wheels.

    4

    Remove the brake pin retainers using a ratchet and a socket set. Remove the caliper and support it to the strut spring using a caliper S-hook. This will prevent damage from occurring to the hydraulic brake hose. Be sure not to twist the caliper and brake hose when replacing.

    5

    Remove the outboard pad and inboard pad from the caliper housing. A screwdriver may help removing the retaining clips of the pads. Place one of the old pads against the caliper piston and use the 4-inch C-clamp to compress the caliper piston inward until it bottoms out. Tighten the C-clamp slowly so the caliper piston does not incur damage.

    6

    Inspect the rotor for any visible damage to the surface. If you're not replacing it, use a medium-grit sandpaper to hand-sand the glazing from the surface.

    7

    Install the inboard and outboard pads to the caliper. Make sure the rattle clips are properly seated and holding the pads in correct position to the caliper housing. Apply a light coat of lubricant to the integral caliper seat of the knuckle where the caliper anchors to. Install the caliper and then replace the brake pin retainers and tighten. Repeat the same procedure for the other side.

    8

    Replace the wheels and wheel nuts and then tighten them to 100-foot pounds using the torque wrench and 19mm socket after lowering the car to the ground. Pump the foot brake pedal several times to position the pads against the rotors. Check the master cylinder again and top off the brake fluid, if necessary, with new brake fluid. Test drive the Taurus.

Jumat, 11 November 2011

How to Put Rear Brakes on a 1995 Nissan Maxima

The 1995 Nissan Maxima is a reliable 4-door sedan. However, if your brakes are squealing, grabbing, or jerking, then its reliability wanes. Changing the brakes is well worth the time and energy, considering it usually takes less than 90 minutes and requires very little physical exertion. Also, the money you save by doing it at home is significant, usually a few hundred dollars.

Instructions

    1

    Use the tire iron to loosen (do not remove) each lug on each of the rear tires. You can loosen them each one to two full rotations.

    2

    Place the floor jack beneath a sturdy section of the underside of the rear of the car. Jack it up enough to be able to place a jack stand underneath it. Repeat for both sides. Make sure to place wood blocks in front of each of the front tires.

    3

    Remove the lugs from each tire and remove the tires themselves.

    4

    Use the socket wrench to remove the bolts holding the brake pad housing to the rotor. Using the bungee cord or rope, tie the housing to the underside of the car, so that no strain is on the brake line (the small black hose protruding from the brake pad housing).

    5

    Remove the brake pads. The brake pads should simply slip out.

    6

    Compress the brake caliper. The brake caliper is the cylindrical piston in the brake pad housing. This can be done in one of three ways. You can simply use your hands to compress the caliper. You can use a c-clamp to compress the caliper. Also, if the caliper will not simply compress (if it has a horizontal groove on it) you will need to use the brake caliper compression tool (which can be bought or borrowed at your local auto parts store).

    7

    Slip the new brake pads into the slots from where the old ones were removed. Brake pads are universal so it doesn't matter which side you put them on, as long as one whole boxed set is used for each side. You want the rough "brake material" facing inward.

    8

    Replace the bolt holding the housing on after it is back in place. Then reattach your wheels. Carefully lower your car with the floor jack.

Kamis, 10 November 2011

How Power Brakes Work

Rest mode

    The common vacuum operated power brake booster is made up of a vacuum valve, atmospheric valve, a rubber covered steel diaphragm and a stamped steel housing.

    The rest mode is the mode the booster is operating in any time the engine is running and the brakes are not applied. During this time the vacuum is equal on either side of the steel diaphragm inside the booster housing, centering the diaphragm in the housing. This is also the normal mode of operation while driving, when no brake input is given by the driver.

Applied mode

    When the brake pedal is applied, the vacuum is shut off from the rear chamber, and the chamber is vented to allow atmospheric pressure to enter the rear chamber. This happens when the vacuum valve in the booster is closed and the air valve opens. The difference in pressure between the two halves causes the diaphragm to deflect. Increasing the amount of pressure the driver applies to the pedal increases the volume of atmospheric pressure allowed into the diaphragm, causing additional pressure to be applied to the master cylinder.

Hold mode

    During the hold mode, when the driver's brake input stabilizes, the diaphragm continues to deflect until both valves (atmospheric and vacuum) close. This prevents further deflection of the diaphragm, and holds steady pressure on the brake system .

Release mode

    When the brake pedal is released by the driver, the atmospheric valve closes and the vacuum valve opens allowing the pressure to equalize on both sides of the diaphragm. A combination of spring pressure and hydraulic pressure returns the diaphragm to center. When the diaphragm centers and vacuum equalizes, we return to rest mode.

How to Change the Brakes on a 1996 Miata

The brake pads on a 1996 Mazda Miata should be inspected every 15,000 miles and replaced at least every 30,000 miles. The brake pads are simple to replace, but unlike with many cars, a special tool to is required to compress the front brake caliper pistons. The pads and tool can be purchased or ordered from most auto-parts shops.

Instructions

Front Brakes

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on both front wheels. Lift the front of the vehicle with a floor jack. The lift point is directly between the front wheels. Remove the wheels.

    2

    Remove the lower bolt from the back of the caliper. Pivot the caliper around the upper bolt to remove it from the disc. Suspend it with a piece of wire.

    3

    Remove the spring that retains the pads. Remove the pads.

    4

    Separate the shims and upper and lower guide plates from the pads and attach them to the replacement pads.

    5

    Push the piston into the caliper with the piston pushing tool. Install the new pads and attach the spring. Rotate the caliper into place and tighten the bolt to 33 to 39 ft-lbs. of torque. Repeat on the other side of the car.

    6

    Attach the wheels and lower the car. Tighten the lug nuts.

Rear Brakes

    7

    Loosen the rear lug nuts and raise the rear of the car. Remove the wheels. The lift point is on the differential housing.

    8

    Remove the plug that angles upwards behind the brake assembly.

    9

    Pull the cap off the lower bolt on the back side of the caliper and remove the bolt. Rotate the caliper upwards off the disc and suspend it with a piece of wire.

    10

    Turn the adjustment gear counterclockwise with an Allen wrench to loosen the caliper.

    11

    Remove the spring that retains the brake pads. Remove the pads and separate the shims.

    12

    Replace the pads. Installation is the reverse of removal. Tighten the adjustment with an Allen wrench until the wheels start to drag. Loosen the gear one-third of a turn. Replace the wheels and lower the car to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts.

How to Replace Brake Shoes on a Chrysler Town & Country

How to Replace Brake Shoes on a Chrysler Town & Country

Like most vehicles, the brake shoes on a Chrysler Town & Country work primarily with the parking brake, so they may not need changing as often as brake pads. If the shoes do need to be replaced, you need to change the shoes on both rear wheels. This can be a difficult process, as the brake drum assembly uses multiple springs and clips with the brake shoes.

Instructions

Accessing the Brake Shoes

    1

    Raise the rear end of the van and support it on jack stands, then remove the wheels. Loosening the wheel lug nuts before raising the van will help.

    2

    Slip the brake drum off. If it is stuck, turn the gear on the adjuster port in the brake's backing plate with a screwdriver to retract the brake shoes.

    3

    Clean off the whole brake assembly with brake cleaner spray, placing a pan or other appropriate container below to catch the dripping fluid.

Removing the Shoes

    4

    Detach the front brake shoe hold-down spring by pressing the retainer and turning it 90 degrees. This works better with a special auto parts store tool designed for this task.

    5

    Disconnect the upper return spring and the adjustment lever spring from the brake shoe using needle-nose pliers, then remove the upper spring, along with the tension clip and automatic adjuster, and the adjustment lever and spring.

    6

    Disconnect the two return springs located at the bottom of the shoes and remove the front brake shoe.

    7

    Remove the actuating strut from the lower half of the brake assembly, remove the rear shoe hold-down spring and pin with the same tool as the front, and remove the rear shoe with the parking brake actuating lever.

    8

    Clean and lubricate the threads on the automatic adjuster screw. Use a high temperature grease.

    9

    Detach the parking brake actuator plate from the old front brake shoe and install it on the replacement, making sure you properly seat the retaining clips.

Installation

    10

    Lubricate the contact surfaces of the brake assembly's backing plate with the high-temperature grease.

    11

    Connect the parking brake actuating lever to the brake cable and install the rear shoe to the backing plate, applying the hold-down pin and spring.

    12

    Reconnect the parking brake actuating strut, automatic adjuster, tension clip and upper return spring.

    13

    Install the new front brake shoe and mount it in place with its hold-down pin and spring. Attach the upper return spring, automatic adjustment lever, actuating spring and lower return springs with the pliers.

    14

    Connect the brake drum back onto the hub flange.

    15

    Adjust the brake shoes by inserting a screwdriver into the adjuster port--remove the rubber plug--and turning the adjuster gear. Adjust it until the shoes drag against a turning brake drum and then turn it the other way so the shoes just avoid dragging.

    16

    Reconnect the wheels and lower the car after changing the brakes on both sides.

How to Replace a Caliper in a Ford Taurus

The Ford Taurus is a simple vehicle. However, the brakes are no less important. A trained professional should mainly handle parts as important as the calipers. Only if you have a full working knowledge of your Taurus should you try to replace a caliper on your own.

Instructions

Remove the Old Caliper

    1

    Drain brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir until it's no more than half full. Disconnect the cable from the negative battery terminal.

    2

    Raise the car up on a jack stand. Remove the wheel in front of the caliper you must get to.

    3

    Disconnect the brake hose by removing the hollow bolt connecting it to the caliper. Plug the brake hose with a piece of plastic. Discard the two copper sealing washers on the bolt.

    4

    Take off the retaining clip from the parking brake on the rear caliper. Disengage the parking brake cable end at the lever arm.

    5

    Remove the caliper locating pins. Lift the caliper off the rotor (front) or support bracket (rear) by using a rotating motion.

Prepare the New Caliper

    6

    Make sure the new caliper's piston is fully in the piston bore. If not, retract it into the bore with an old brake pad or block of wood and a C-clamp.

    7

    Attach the disc brake pads to the new caliper. See that the brake pad insulators are properly attached to the brake pad plate.

    8

    Rotate the rear disc brake piston (for a rear caliper) and adjuster clockwise until it is fully seated. Use the rear caliper piston adjuster tool T87P-2588-A.

    9

    Apply a silicone dielectric compound to the inside of the slider pins and pin boots.

Install the New Caliper

    10

    Position the front caliper assembly above the rotor and install it with a rotating motion. Position the rear caliper assembly on the support bracket through the slider pins and boots. Make sure all pads and the outer anti-rattle spring are properly positioned.

    11

    Lubricate the locating pins and the insulators (for a front caliper) on the inside with silicone grease. Remove the residue from the rear caliper's pin retainer threads and apply a drop of threadlock and sealer.

    12

    Install the locating pins to the front caliper and torque them to 26 foot pounds. Install the pin retainers to the rear caliper and torque to 24 foot pounds.

    13

    Unplug and install the brake hose to the caliper, using two new copper washers. Torque the hollow bolt to 35 foot pounds on the front calipers, 41 foot pounds on the rear.

    14

    Fill the master cylinder as needed and bleed the brake system. Install the wheel and tire assembly, and then torque the nuts to 85 to 104 foot pounds. Lower the car off the jack and reconnect the battery cable.

    15

    Pump the brake pedal repeatedly to position the brake pads. Road test the vehicle, making sure the brakes work properly.

Rabu, 09 November 2011

How to Adjust the Rear Drum Brakes on a 1997 Ford Contour

The 1997 Ford Contour, equipped with rear drum brakes, has a ratcheting self-adjuster that expands when the parking brake is applied. If you are like many people and don't use the parking brake regularly, the brake system may become maladjusted beyond what the ratcheting system can compensate for. If this occurs, a manual adjustment of the drum brakes will restore proper brake shoe clearance and stopping efficiency.

Instructions

    1

    Raise and support the rear of the car with wheel chocks, a floor jack and jack stands. Remove the rear wheels with a lug wrench and set the wheels aside.

    2

    Slide the brake drums off the shoes. Clean the accumulated brake dust from the shoes with water.

    3

    Adjust the ratchet cam by prying it outwards with a pocket screwdriver to expand the shoes. Adjust the cam until the drum can be slipped onto the shoes with a slight drag between the shoes and drum.

    4

    Reinstall the rear wheels and torque the lug nuts to 80 ft.-lbs. with a torque wrench. Lower the car to the ground and test the function of the brakes. Readjust them if necessary.

How Fix the Brakes on a 98 Malibu

How Fix the Brakes on a 98 Malibu

Grinding or high-pitched squeaking noises when you come to a stop in your 1998 Chevy Malibu probably means it's time to change the brakes. Replacing your brakes at the first sign of wear is the best bet, as it prevents damage and ensures the safety of you and your family. Among do it yourself auto repair projects, replacing your brakes is fairly easy, economical and doesn't take too much time to complete.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of your 1998 Chevy Malibu and locate the brake fluid reservoir. On a 1998 Malibu, it's located on the driver's side closest to the front windshield. Open the reservoir tank and place the cap in a safe place where it won't get lost.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts slightly on the left front tire of your 1998 Malibu.

    3

    Jack up the vehicle up and put the jack stands into place.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts completely, then remove the tire.

    5

    Use a socket wrench to remove the two bolts holding the brake caliper in place. The bolts are located on the rear of the brake caliper.

    6

    Slide the brake caliper up and away from the rotor. Attach a wire coat hanger or a bungee cord to the brake caliper and attach it to the frame. This will prevent you from damaging the brake line that is attached to the caliper.

    7

    Slide the old brake shoes of your 1998 Malibu out of the brake caliper. It may be necessary to use a C-clamp to seat the piston back into its bore.

    8

    Slide the new brake shoes into the caliper.

    9

    Untie the caliper and slip it back into place. Use the socket set to replace the two brake caliper bolts.

    10

    Replace tire and then repeat the same steps for the front passenger side brakes of your 1998 Malibu.

    11

    Replace the cap back on the brake fluid reservoir. Start your 1998 Malibu and pump the brakes.

Selasa, 08 November 2011

How to Change a Brake Master Cylinder Without Bleeding the Entire Brake System

How to Change a Brake Master Cylinder Without Bleeding the Entire Brake System

The brake master cylinder provides hydraulic pressure for the entire braking system. When the brake pedal is depressed, a push rod activates the master cylinder and pushes brake fluid to all four brakes at each corner of the vehicle. When the master cylinder requires replacement, it must be removed from the vehicle, which means the brake lines must be disconnected from it. By bench bleeding the replacement master cylinder, you may be able to prevent having to bleed the air from the entire braking system and prevent air bubbles from entering the system.

Instructions

    1

    Open the jaws of a bench vise wide enough to accommodate the replacement master cylinder. Place the metal body of the master cylinder in an upright position between the jaws. Tighten the jaws just enough to keep the master cylinder firmly in place, but without damaging it.

    2

    Remove the master cylinder reservoir cap. Fill the reservoir with fresh brake fluid to the full mark on the reservoir.

    3

    Connect a short length of tubing from a master cylinder bench-bleeding kit to one of the brake line fittings at the base of the master cylinder. Tighten the fitting with a tubing wrench to keep from damaging the fitting. Repeat this step for all remaining fittings on the master cylinder.

    4

    Insert the opposite ends of the tubing installed previously into the master cylinder reservoir, making sure the ends of the tubes are submerged in brake fluid. If necessary, hold the tubes in place by using the plastic tab that came with the bleeding kit.

    5

    Depress the master cylinder plunger, which is found on the end of the master cylinder where it attaches to the engine firewall, using a wooden dowel or any other blunt object. Continue to compress and release the plunger until the air bubbles coming from the tubes you installed earlier have subsided. Continue to push the plunger in short, slow strokes, as it will become increasingly difficult to depress the plunger while the air bubbles are being purged. Continue to push in on the plunger until there are no more air bubbles coming from the tubes.

    6

    Top off the brake fluid in the reservoir until it reaches the full mark and replace the cap. Remove the tubes from the base of the master cylinder with a tubing wrench. Leave the master cylinder in a level, upright position until you are ready to install it back into the vehicle.

Why Would My Breaks on My Car Squeak?

Why Would My Breaks on My Car Squeak?

Squeaking brakes can occur for a variety of reaons, including hardening of brake pad surfaces, the composition of the brake pad material, or loose or missing brake parts. An expert mechanic should be consulted to diagnose the problem properly.

Brake Pad Hardening

    A brake pad may develop a hard surface, called "glazing," or the entire brake pad may become hard, known as "crystallization." Either condition can cause a squeaking noise. Glazing and crystallization result from frequent or sudden braking while applying large amounts of force (abusively), or when braking in conditions that are especially sandy or humid.

Semi-Metallic Brakes

    In 1989, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) placed a ban on original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and aftermarket brake pads containing asbestos. Although the ban was reversed, most car manufacturers had already gone through the process of replacing asbestos brake pads with semi-metallic brake pads. Semi-metallic brake pads contain layers of metal slivers, have better stopping power and generally last longer. However, when the metal slivers on the semi-metallic brake pads press against each side of the metal brake rotor, a jaw-clenching high-pitched sound is common (and expected).

Loose or Missing Brake Parts

    Squeaky brakes are associated commonly with overlooked or overdue maintenance issues. Possible causes of squeaky brakes include loose brake pads, missing anti-rattle clips or springs, insufficient silicone on the back of the brake pad or resurfaced rotors that are not smooth.

Senin, 07 November 2011

How to Remove Stuck Rear Rotors on an Expedition

There are a couple different reasons why the rear rotors on your Ford Expedition are stuck to the hub. Depending on your geographic region, rust could certainly be the biggest factor. However, interior parking brake shoes can be another reason. There are ways to get every job done, and some require a little more tenderness than others. If you're replacing the rear rotor, you do not have to apply as much delicateness when removing it. If you're removing it to have it machined on a brake lathe and want to reuse it, then you must apply a great degree of delicateness for the removal of it. If the rotor is completely rusted to the hub, consider replacing the rotor altogether.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Expedition on a level paved or concrete surface. Release the hood latch. Do not apply the parking brake.

    2

    Place a wheel chock in front of one front tire and open the hood. Remove half the amount of brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir with the turkey baster and discard. Replace the master cylinder cap.

    3

    Break the lug nuts loose on the rear tires with the breaking bar and a socket.

    4

    Raise the rear of the Expedition with the floor jack and place the jack stands under the rear axle on the left and right side.

    5

    Remove the lug nuts and wheels.

    6

    Remove the caliper bolts with the ratchet and a socket. Pry the caliper off the rotor and pads using a flathead screwdriver, and support the caliper to the frame with the bungee cord. Do not let the caliper hang from its brake hose. Compress the piston of the caliper inward using a C-clamp.

    7

    Remove the pads from the anchor and remove the caliper anchor bolts using the ratchet and a socket. Remove the anchor.

    8

    Remove any rotor retaining rings located on the lug studs. These rings can be discarded, and you do not have to replace them, so you can pry them off without regard. If there are no retaining rings, skip this step.

    9

    Determine to the best of your knowledge how the rotor is stuck to the hub. If there is movement in the rotor somewhat, then it is most likely stuck on the interior parking brake shoes. If there is absolutely no movement in the rotor, then it's most likely seized/rusted to the hub. Spray the center of the rotor around the hub and lug nuts with lubricant. If you're replacing the rotor, strike it on the fins with a heavy metal hammer (wear safety glasses). If you want to save the rotor, use a rubber mallet, but you will have less successful results. A slide hammer with an adapter may also break the rotor free from the hub without incurring much damage to the rotor. Adding heat to the hub and around the lug nuts with a hand torch is another helpful hint for breaking the rotor free from rust, but only when replacing the rotor.

    10

    Remove the rubber plug from the porthole located on the back of the backing plate once the rotor is separated from the hub but is still stuck on the parking brake shoes. Inside the porthole is a star adjuster wheel that can be turned in to contract the parking brake shoes closer together using a brake shoe adjuster spoon or a screwdriver. Turn the wheel in until the rotor releases from the parking brake shoes.

    11

    To replace, reverse the procedure. Clean the hub with sandpaper and apply a thin coat of anti-seize high-temp lubricant around the edge of the hub and where the center of the rotor sits against it to help out in future rotor removal procedures.

    12

    Torque the lug nuts to the tires when the Expedition is back on the ground using the adjustable torque wrench. Also pump the foot brake pedal to restore hydraulic pressure to the compressed caliper pistons. Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder and add new DOT-approved brake fluid only after you've pumped the brake pedal.

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 95 Dodge Ram

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 95 Dodge Ram

The 1995 Dodge Ram was available in three different sizes--1/2-ton, 3/4-ton and 1-ton. It also came in both two-wheel drive and four-wheel drive varieties. Starting in 1994, the Dodge trucks (including even the smaller Dakota) began using Delco sliding calipers. These calipers differed in size, appropriate to the size of the Ram they were on, but universalized the replacement of the front brake pads. The Rams back then employed rear drum brakes with brake shoes as friction material.

Instructions

    1

    Apply the parking brake and then loosen the front wheel lug nuts with a tire nut wrench.

    2

    Raise the front of the Ram with a service jack and place it safely onto a jack stand rated for the weight of the vehicle.

    3

    Remove the wheel lug nuts and then remove the front tires.

    4

    Use a large C-clamp placed over the caliper to compress the caliper piston inward. Position the top of the clamp on the inner caliper housing and the driving bore of the clamp on the outboard pad. Tighten the clamp until the piston is fully seated inside the caliper bore.

    5

    Remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts with a 3/8-inch hex-head socket bit and a ratchet.

    6

    Remove the caliper and support it to the chassis with a bungee cord so it does not compromise the flexible brake hose.

    7

    Remove the outer pad first. Use a small pry tool to unseat one side of the retaining spring from the outer caliper housing and then pivot the pad away from the caliper. Remove the inner pad last by simply pulling its retaining clip up away from the inside of the caliper piston.

    8

    Clean the mating surfaces of the steering knuckle and caliper with a stiff wire brush and then apply a coating of high-temperature, multi-purpose grease to the cleaned areas.

    9

    Install the replacement brake pads into the caliper housing. Remove the caliper from the bungee cord and replace it over the knuckle and rotor assembly.

    10

    Lubricate the smooth portion of the caliper mounting bolts with the high-temperature grease. Insert the bolts into the inner caliper housing and tighten the bolts to specifications of the size Dodge Ram you're working on, using a torque wrench and the 3/8-inch hex-head socket bit.

    11

    Replace the brakes on the other side of the front axle. Replace the wheels and lug nuts. Tighten the nuts snugly to the rim and then lower the truck to the ground. Torque the nuts to the specifications appropriate to your Ram in a star or crisscross pattern (depending on how many lug nuts on the weight series Ram you're working on).

    12

    Apply the brake several several times until it feels firm and normal. Release the parking brake and then test-drive the Ram for braking operation.