Rabu, 31 Agustus 2011

How to Prime a Master Cylinder

How to Prime a Master Cylinder

One of the biggest issues facing any mechanic when installing a new master cylinder is the problem of air getting in the system. Whenever you perform any kind of repair work that involves disconnecting hydraulic lines, air inevitably gets into the system and has to be bled out. In a job such as a master cylinder replacement, a new master cylinder that hasn't been primed introduces a large amount of air that is difficult to remove. To avoid this, it is best to prime your master cylinder before installation.

Instructions

    1

    Place the new master cylinder into a bench vise.

    2

    Use a level to make sure that the master cylinder is horizontal and then tighten it into place with the bench vise. Be careful not to over-tighten the master cylinder because this could cause damage. Tighten it just enough to stay in place.

    3

    Screw the threaded ends of the plastic fittings that came with the bleeder kit into the holes on the master cylinder.

    4

    Fit the hoses from the kit onto the smooth ends of the plastic fittings.

    5

    Place the hoses into two reservoirs full of new brake fluid. Either clamp them so that they cannot move or have someone hold them for you. This is done to keep the hoses from coming out of the reservoirs and spraying out brake fluid or taking in air.

    6

    Use a large Phillips screwdriver to gently push the piston of the master cylinder in about 1 inch and then let it go until it returns back to the normal position. You will notice air coming out of the hoses in the form of large bubbles.

    7

    Repeat Step 6 until the bubbles coming out of the hoses become smaller and smaller and eventually disappear. This could take up to 20 repetitions of Step 6, so be patient. Once this is done, remove the hoses and plastic fittings.

Selasa, 30 Agustus 2011

How to Replace the Rear Disc Brakes on a 2002 Buick LeSabre

The 2002 Buick LeSabre featured the option of rear disc or rear drum brakes, with disc brakes being superior to their drum brake counterparts. They functioned better and needed less adjustments than drum brakes, which would become unadjusted if the parking brake was not used. Drum brakes, once unadjusted, place too much stress on the front brakes. Rear disc brakes eliminated this dilemma and maintained their braking response to help the front brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the Buick LeSabre on a car lift or with a floor jack and support the rear safely onto jack stands.

    2

    Remove the rear wheel nuts using the 1/2-inch-drive impact gun and a socket. Remove the wheels.

    3

    Place a large C-clamp over the caliper housing so the top of the clamp is against the rear of the caliper body and the drive of the clamp is over the outboard brake pad. Tighten the clamp to compress the caliper piston until resistance is felt. Remove the C-clamp.

    4

    Remove the parking brake retaining bolt from the bottom of the control arm using a hand wrench.

    5

    Remove the lower caliper bolt. Pivot the caliper upward and support it with a bent metal coat hanger to hold it in place. Remove the inboard and outboard pads from the caliper bracket. Remove the metal pads clips from the caliper bracket and then clean off the brake dust and corrosion using a small wire brush with denatured alcohol. Clean the surface of the brackets where the metal clips sit. Wipe the clips and the bracket dry with a shop rag.

    6

    Apply a light layer of anti-seize compound to the caliper bracket were the metal clips sit. Place the metal clips back onto the bracket and then apply another light layer of anti-seize on top of the clips. Place the replacement pads onto the caliper bracket. Remove the hanger and pivot the caliper down over the pads and rotor. Lubricate the caliper bolt with anti-seize and replace the bolt into the caliper. Tighten the bolt.

    7

    Remove the two caliper bracket bolts on the back of the knuckle. Use the impact gun with a socket if possible to make it easier, but access room may be an issue, especially if the LeSabre is on jack stands. Otherwise, hand wrenches will work (but the bolts are very tight).

    8

    Support the caliper assembly to the rear chassis reusing the metal coat hanger.

    9

    Remove the rotor. Clean the surface of the hub using an angled die grinder with a reconditioning disc thoroughly. Spray the new rotor with brake clean solution and wipe it dry with a shop rag. Place the new rotor on to the hub. While holding the rotor flush against the hub, replace the caliper assembly over the rotor. Save the metal coat hanger for the other side. Tighten the caliper bracket bolts tightly. Replace the parking brake retaining bolt to the lower control arm. Replace the wheel and wheel nuts and tighten to 100 foot-pounds with a torque stick or torque wrench.

    10

    Replace the wheel and wheel nuts and tighten to 100 foot-pounds with a torque stick or wrench.

    11

    Repeat Steps 2 through 10 for the other side.

    12

    Lower the Buick LeSabre to the ground. Slowly depress the brake pedal and then release it. Wait 15 seconds and depress it again. Continue this until you feel resistance in the brake pedal. This will seat the new pads to the new rotors by way of restoring the compressed caliper pistons. Check the level of the brake fluid in the master cylinder and adjust (if necessary) using new brake fluid. Test drive the LeSabre.

Senin, 29 Agustus 2011

DIY Brake Replacement on a Honda Civic

DIY Brake Replacement on a Honda Civic

While the Honda Civic includes six air bags, an Advanced Compatibility Engineering body structure, active head restraints and an anti-lock braking system, these safety features mean little if the driver is unable to safely stop the vehicle due to worn brake pads. If your Civic isn't coming to a halt as quickly as it once did, or if you hear a grinding sound every time you apply the brakes, the time to replace the brake pads is now. Fortunately, doing so won't break your bank -- providing you do the work yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Park your Honda Civic on a flat, preferably paved, surface.

    2

    Select the set of wheels you'll be working on first -- either the front or back -- and loosen each wheel's lug nuts with a tire iron or a lug nut wrench.

    3

    Place a floor jack under the vehicle, positioning it so it comes into contact with the frame when it's raised.

    4

    Jack up your Civic high enough to slide a jack stand under it. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stand and repeat on the other side.

    5

    Select the wheel you'll be working on first and remove its lug nuts.

    6
    You'll find the caliper, which houses the brake pads, clamped around an upper portion of the rotor.
    You'll find the caliper, which houses the brake pads, clamped around an upper portion of the rotor.

    Grasp the tire with both hands and pull it toward you to remove it from the rotor. Doing so will reveal the caliper, which you'll find seated around an upper portion of the rotor.

    7

    Remove the two bolts holding the caliper in place with a socket wrench.

    8

    Lift off the caliper. Because it will remain attached to your Civic by way of the brake line, you won't be able to set it down -- and letting it hang can damage the brake line. So secure it to the shock absorber or inner wheel well with a rope or bungee cord.

    9

    Remove the old brake pads from inside the caliper. Behind the outer brake bad, you'll find the piston, which will likely be partially extended to compensate for the worn pads.

    10

    Retract the piston by turning it clockwise with a piston tool or a large, flat-head screwdriver.

    11

    Apply a small amount of brake grease to the backs of the new pads. Be careful not to get any grease on the sides of the brake pads that come into contact with the rotor.

    12

    Insert the new brake pads into the caliper and return the caliper to its original position on the rotor.

    13

    Secure the caliper by tightening the caliper bolts with a socket wrench.

    14

    Return the wheel to your Civic and secure it by tightening the lug nuts with a tire iron or lug nut wrench.

    15

    Repeat steps 5 through 14 for the opposite side.

    16

    Lift your Civic off the jack stands using a floor jack, remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground.

    17

    Repeat the entire process for the remaining two wheels, if necessary.

Minggu, 28 Agustus 2011

How to Adjust the Rear Brakes on a 1999 Honda Accord

The brakes on a 1999 Honda Accord are self-adjusting and shouldn't drag. Most brake dragging problems are caused by a poorly tensioned parking brake. Triggering the self-adjusters and manually adjusting the parking brake is a simple procedure that will only take about 10 minutes to complete. If the brakes still drag, the problem is likely a faulty component in the brake system.

Instructions

    1

    Stop the car suddenly several times while traveling in forward and reverse at a low speed. This will cause the auto-adjuster to move the brakes into the correct position.

    2

    Raise one rear wheel of the car off the ground and support the vehicle with a jack stand. Move the jack to the other side and lift the other wheel. The jack points are several inches in front of the wheel on the outside edge of the car. They are reinforced and slightly thicker than the rest of the edge.

    3

    Remove the cover from the parking brake lever. There is a screw on each side and two under a plastic cap in the back.

    4

    Raise the parking brake lever until it clicks once.

    5

    Tighten the nut at the base of the lever until the rear wheels start to drag when you turn them. Release the brake and make sure that the wheels spin freely.

    6

    Pull the parking brake lever to where it feels firm. It should take six to 11 clicks and the wheels will not turn.

    7

    Release the brake and lower the car.

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a Jeep Commander

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a Jeep Commander

Introduced in 2006, the Jeep Commander SUV features both front and rear disc brakes. The front pads compensate for 70 percent braking capacity for the vehicle and will require more frequent servicing. When replacing brake pads on the Commander, be sure to thoroughly inspect the rotors once the pads have been removed. Any visual signs of damage on the plated surface of the rotors will compromise the longevity of the pads.

Instructions

    1

    Apply the parking brake to the Commander on a flat, hard surface. Release the hood latch.

    2

    Open the hood and remove the master cylinder cover. Siphon out 1/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder and discard the old fluid. Replace the cap tightly. This will prevent the master cylinder from overflowing when the caliper pistons are compressed.

    3

    Crack the front lug nuts loose with the lug nut wrench 1/8 of a turn and then lift one side of the Commander with the jack. Secure the front side of the Jeep onto a jack stand and then repeat this procedure for the other side so the front axle is safely suspended.

    4

    Finish removing the lug nuts and then remove the wheels.

    5

    Remove the upper and lower caliper pin bolts with a ratchet and appropriate socket.

    6

    Use a slotted screwdriver to pry the caliper off of the brake pads and rotor. Hang the caliper to the front chassis on a caliper hanger or hook so it will not damage the brake hose.

    7

    Remove one of the pads from the caliper bracket and set it against the caliper piston. Place the C-clamp drive on the pad and the top of the clamp on the caliper housing and tighten the clamp until the piston bottoms out inside the caliper piston bore.

    8

    Remove the remaining pad and then inspect both sides of the rotor.

    9

    Use a small wire brush to clean the surface of the caliper bracket where the pad tabs sit inside and then apply a small amount of silicone lubricant from the tube supplied in the replacement brake pad set box. Be sure to clean and lubricate the lower and upper seats on the caliper bracket.

    10

    Install the shims if applicable. Most quality pad sets will feature staked-on shims, but if they're stick-on shims, peel the protective paper and apply the shims to the backing plate of the pads.

    11

    Insert the pads into the caliper bracket and then remove the caliper from the hook and replace it over the pads and rotor. Apply a light coat of the pad lubricant to the non-threaded section of the caliper pin bolts and align them in through the caliper and onto the knuckle. Tighten the bolts to 45-foot pounds with the torque wrench and a suitable size socket.

    12

    Repeat Steps 5 through 11 for the other side and then replace the wheels and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts as much as you can with the Commander suspended. Lower the SUV and then re-tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern with the torque wrench set at 100-foot pounds and a suitable size socket.

    13

    Pump the foot brake pedal several times to push the caliper pistons back out from the bores and seat the new pads against the rotors. Once the pedal feels firm, recheck the brake fluid in the master cylinder and top it off with new brake fluid if necessary. Test drive the Commander for proper braking operation.

How to Do a Front Brake Job on a Dodge Ram

The front brakes on a Dodge ram use a rotor and caliper assembly to slow the truck down. Hydraulic fluid is forced through steel lines connected to a caliper assembly at each wheel. The caliper assembly contains two brake pads, each clamping down on a disc, called a brake rotor. The rotor is connected to the drive axles of the truck so that when clamping force is applied to the rotors, the entire axle and wheel slow down with the rotor. When the pad material in the caliper gets to be approximately an eighth of an inch thick, you will need to replace the pads and check the rotor for wear.

Instructions

    1

    Break the lug nuts loose using a tire wrench. Turn the lug nuts a quarter turn counterclockwise but do not unseat the wheel from the wheel hub. You only need to loosen the lugs just enough so that you will be able to remove when when the truck is off the ground.

    2

    Place the jack under the Ram's front crossmember and jack up on the truck. Never jack up on any part of the truck that is not a structural member. For example, never jack up on the transmission, engine or any of the body. Only the frame and subframe will support the full weight of the vehicle.

    3

    Place jack stands under the front pinch welds located directly under the driver and passenger side doors.

    4

    Continue to remove the lug nuts and pull the wheel off the wheel hub assembly.

    5

    Remove the Dodge Ram's upper and lower bolts holding the caliper on the caliper mounting bracket.

    6

    Pull the caliper up off the Ram's rotor and secure it to the coil springs above the brake assembly.

    7

    Check the brake rotor for excessive scoring, pitting or warpage. If the brake rotor is damaged in any way, slide the old rotor off the hub assembly (it will slide right off) and slide on a new brake rotor.

    8

    Tap the brake pads out of the caliper assembly using a rubber mallet.

    9

    Placing the face of one of the old brake pads over the piston, force the pad against the piston with a C-clamp. The piston will collapse back into the Dodge's caliper housing. The piston has a boot surrounding it. Be sure not to damage the caliper piston boot in any way during this process. The piston boot should collapse into the caliper in an accordion-style manner.

    10

    Insert the new brake pads into the caliper assembly and reassemble the brake assembly. Make sure that you torque the caliper bolts to the correct torque specifications listed in the vehicle service manual for your specific year of Dodge Ram. Not all years have the same torque specification. If the bolts are not tightened properly, your brake assembly could come apart during normal driving.

    11

    Spray the entire brake assembly with brake parts cleaner. Make sure that you remove all traces of oil (from your fingers), dirt and any other debris from the surface of the brake rotor and pads.

    12

    Re-mount the wheel on the wheel hub and tighten the lug nuts.

    13

    Lower the Dodge Ram to the ground and torque the wheel lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds using a torque wrench. Set the dial on the torque wrench to 100 foot-pounds and turn the lug nuts clockwise until the wrench clicks indicating that the correct torque value has been reached.

Sabtu, 27 Agustus 2011

How to Replace the Brake Master Cylinder on a 1997 Montana

In 1990, Pontiac introduced its first minivan, the Trans Sport. This van was unlike any other around, as it had a very shallow angle that ran from its hood all the way up its windshield, giving it a door-stop-like appearance. In 1997, Pontiac redesigned the Trans Sport, giving it a more contemporary design. The 1997 model year also brought about the first use of the Montana name as a trim level for the Trans Sport. Replacing the brake master cylinder on the Trans Port is relatively simple, but performing the bleeding process afterward is rather complex, thanks to the vans intricate antilock brake and traction control systems.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Press and release the brake pedal four or five times to bleed off any reserve vacuum in the brake booster. Hold a small drain pan under the master cylinder, loosen the brake line-to-master cylinder fittings with a flare wrench and wait for the fluid to stop dripping from them. Remove the brake lines from the master cylinder.

    2

    Siphon out as much of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir, using a clean turkey baster. Press and hold the unlocking button on the fluid level sensors wiring harness on the base of the master cylinder reservoir and unplug the harness.

    3

    Wrap the end of each brake line with a clean, lint-free cloth to prevent contaminants from entering the brake system.

    4

    Remove the two nuts securing the master cylinder to the brake booster using a ratchet and socket. Pull the master cylinder from the brake booster.

Bench Bleeding Master Cylinder

    5

    Set the new brake master cylinder into a bench vice with rubber jaw protectors.

    6

    Thread the bleeder tubes from a master cylinder bleed kit into the brake line ports. Snug the bleeder lines with a flare wrench. Fill the master cylinder reservoir to the Max line with new DOT 3 brake fluid. Bend the bleeder hoses so their ends are submerged in the brake fluid.

    7

    Using the metal dowel rod included with the bleeder kit, press and release the plunger on the rear of the master cylinder. As you press and release the plunger, watch the hose ends in the brake fluid. Pump the plunger until no air bubbles come from submerged ends of the bleeder hoses.

    8

    Remove the bleeder hoses from the master cylinder and wipe up any fluid spills with a clean, lint-free cloth. Tighten the cap onto the master cylinder reservoir. Remove the master cylinder from the vice.

Installation

    9

    Guide the master cylinder onto its mounting studs on the brake booster and hand-thread the nuts. Remove the cloths from the brake lines. Press the brake lines into their respective ports in the master cylinder the lines are hard formed to prevent incorrect connection. Thread the brake line fittings just a few turns by hand.

    10

    Tighten the master cylinder nuts to 20 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. Tighten the brake lines to 15 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and crows foot attachment.

    11

    Bleed the brakes.

Brake Bleeding

    12

    Find the antilock brake modulator to the drivers side of the master cylinder. Press a 1/4-inch-diameter rubber hose onto the bleeder valve the 1/4-inch metal valve on the rear of the ABS modulator. Set the free end of the hose into a clean, clear container and pour new DOT 3 fluid into the clean, clear container until the end of the hose is submerged.

    13

    Loosen the rear bleeder valve on the ABS modulator, using a combination wrench, and instruct an assistant to press the brake pedal slowly to the floor. Watch for air bubbles to come from the submerged end of the hose. Tighten the bleeder valve and instruct the assistant to release the brake pedal. Repeat this step until no air bubbles come from the ABS modulator.

    14

    Repeat steps 1 and 2 on the front bleeder valve on the ABS modulator.

    15

    Remove the 1/4-inch rubber hose. Refill the master cylinder reservoir to the Max line with new DOT 3 brake fluid.

    16

    Locate the traction control system modulator, the hydraulic component on the front drivers side of the engine compartment. Remove the bolt securing the TCS modulator to its bracket, using a ratchet and socket and pull the TCS modulator away from the bracket to see across the bleeder valves.

    17

    Press the 1/4-inch-diameter hose onto the drivers side bleeder valve on the TCS modulator and set the other end of the hose in the clean, clear container, so the end of the hose is submerged in the brake fluid. Loosen the bleeder valve and instruct an assistant to press the brake pedal to the floor slowly. Watch the submerged end of the hose for bubbles. Tighten the bleeder valve and tell the assistant to release the pedal. Repeat this step until no bubbles come from the hose.

    18

    Repeat step 6 on the passengers side bleeder valve.

    19

    Hand-thread the TCS module-to-bracket bolt to hold the module in place. Remove the 1/4-inch rubber hose and refill the master cylinder reservoir.

    20

    Refill the master cylinder to the Max level with DOT 3 fluid.

    21

    Raise the rear of the Montana with a floor jack and slide jack stands under its rear suspension crossmember. Raise the front of the van of the ground with a floor jack and slide jack stands under the Montanas subframe. Lower the front of the van onto the jack stands.

    22

    Crawl under the vehicle, so you are just behind the right rear wheel. Find the bleeder valve near the top of the brake caliper and press the 1/4-inch-diameter hose onto the bleeder valve. Set the free end of the hose into the clean clear container with Dot 3 brake fluid, submerging the end of the hose in the fluid.

    23

    Loosen the bleeder valve and instruct your assistant to press the brake pedal to the floor slowly. Watch the end of the hose in the fluid for air bubbles. Tighten the bleeder valve and tell the assistant to release the pedal. Repeat this step until no air comes from the end of the rubber hose. Wait five seconds between each repetition.

    24

    Refill the master cylinder to the Max level with new DOT 3 brake fluid.

    25

    Repeat steps 11 through 13 on the remaining three wheels in the following order: left front, left rear and right front.

    26

    Raise the front of the van off the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the van to the ground. Repeat this step on the rear of the van.

    27

    Repeat steps 1 through 7 to bleed the ABS and TBS modules. Tighten the TBS module-to-bracket bolt with a ratchet and socket.

    28

    Apply normal braking pressure to the brake pedal. If the brake pedal feels soft or spongy, proceed to the next step. In the pedal feels normal, proceed to step 19.

    29

    Start the engine and allow it to run for at least 10 seconds, do not move the vehicle or press the brake pedal. Shut the engine off. Repeat this step five times to dislodge any trapped air in the brake system, then repeat steps 10 through 17.

    30

    Take all old brake fluid to a used automotive fluid recycler for disposal.

Jumat, 26 Agustus 2011

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 1999 Crown Victoria

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 1999 Crown Victoria

The brake pads are designed to stop the 1999 Crown Victoria by pressing against the sides of the brake rotor. The brake caliper has a cylinder inside of it that pushes the brake pads against the rotor. Due to the friction, the pads will eventually wear down and will need to be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 1999 Crown Victoria in a safe work area and pull the hood release to open the hood.

    2

    Pull the lid off of the brake fluid reservoir and set it to the side.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels with the 1/2-inch breaker bar and the 13/16 socket.

    4

    Jack up the front of the 1999 Crown Victoria with the hydraulic jack. Put the safety jack stands underneath the side rails of the car's front wheels. Lower the hydraulic jack so the Crown Victoria sits securely on the jack stands.

    5

    Finish removing the lug nuts with the 1/2-inch breaker bar and the 13/16 inch drive socket. Pull the front wheels off of the car and place them to the side of the car.

    6

    Locate the brake caliper that sits atop of the brake rotor. Slide the flat end of the small pry bar into the top of the caliper and wiggle the caliper back and forth. This will loosen the caliper's grip on the brake rotor.

    7

    Remove the caliper from the top of the brake rotor. Locate the two slide bolts on the back side of the caliper. Unscrew these bolts with the 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket. Pull the bolts out and slide the caliper off of the rotor. You may have to bump the caliper with the rubber mallet.

    8

    Hang the brake caliper to the side of the front strut or the frame rail with a small piece of rope. Then remove one of the brake pads and slide the 4-inch C-clamp into the inside of the caliper.

    9

    Compress the caliper cylinder with the 4-inch C-clamp. Once the cylinder is fully compressed, remove both the C-clamp and the other brake pad.

    10

    Insert the new brake pads onto the brake caliper. Remove the rope from the caliper, and slide the caliper with the new pads back over the top of the rotor. Insert the two slide bolts and tighten down with the 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket.

    11

    Replace the wheel back onto the wheel hub and screw the lug nuts on. Screw the lug nuts all the way down so the wheel is secure to the wheel hub. Follow these same instructions for replacing the brake pads on the other front wheel.

    12

    Jack the front of the 1999 Crown Victoria back up with the hydraulic jack and slide the stands out from under the side rails. Lower the hydraulic jack until the Crown Victoria is sitting on the ground. Then, slide the jack out from under the car.

    13

    Crank the 1999 Crown Victoria and pump the brake pedal in and out to fit the new pads to the proper distance from the sides of the brake rotor. Five or six pumps should be sufficient. Turn the engine off.

    14

    Check the brake fluid level inside the reservoir. Add brake fluid if it is low. Put the lid back on top of the reservoir and close the hood.

How to Inspect Brake Shoe Linings

You should regularly inspect the brake shoe linings on your car to insure that your brakes continue to function. Issues such as brake pedals that touch the floor, "spongy" brakes or brakes that are too hard to press can be avoided with regular inspections.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the wheel and the brake drum to measure the thickness of the lining. Check for any signs of leaking fluid or grease from the hub or axle shaft seal. Note any cracks or other damage to the drums.

    2

    Inspect brake shoe linings for signs of wear and exposure to oil and grease. If the lining is less than 1/32 of an inch of the rivet heads, replace it.

    3

    Schedule annual inspections to determine whether brake linings wear to the point that you need to change them. The constant contact between the brake shoe lining and the drum is what causes the break lining to wear, and this can cause breaking problems.

Rabu, 24 Agustus 2011

How to Install Rear Brake Pads on a 2005 Chevy Malibu

Rear brakes pads on the 2005 Chevy Malibu normally last roughly twice as long as the front pads. The front pads perform more than half the work to bring the Malibu to a halt; however, the rear pads will require replacement sooner or later. When replacing them, considering machining or replacing the rear rotors to ensure the new pads wear smoothly and evenly. Anyone with basic auto-repair experience can install rear brake pads on a 2005 Chevy Malibu in around two hours.

Instructions

    1

    Place the wheel chocks up against the front tread on the front tires to make sure the Malibu cannot roll forward during the repair. Turn all the rear lug nuts counterclockwise using the lug wrench until theyre loose enough for you to remove them by hand later.

    2

    Jack the rear end of the ground and lower it onto the jack stands. Pull all the rear lug nuts and both rear wheels of the Malibu by hand.

    3

    Put the drop pan under the right-rear brakes and clean all the brake dust off them with the brake cleaner. Unbolt the caliper with the socket set and pull it up and out of the caliper bracket by hand.

    4

    Pull the old brake pads out by hand and then clean the inside of the caliper with the brake cleaner. Lube the caliper slides with the white lithium grease.

    5

    Push the pistons back into the caliper with the caliper tool and then insert the new brake pads by hand. Put the right-rear caliper back into the caliper bracket and bolt it in place with the socket set.

    6

    Move to the left-rear and repeat steps three through five.

    7

    Reinstall both rear wheels and all the rear lug nuts. Lower the Malibu off the jack stands with the jack, move the wheel chocks away from the front tires and tighten the rear lug nuts to 85 ft-lbs. with the torque wrench.

How to Adjust a Slack Adjuster

Slack adjusters are the linkage system located between the rod in the brake chamber and the S-cam or drum brakes in a brake system. The slack adjusters are used to adjust for wear on S-cam air brakes in heavy and medium-size trucks. Although the slack adjusters usually automatically adjust, sometimes they have to be manually adjusted if they are not working properly. This is not a lengthy process, but the adjustment must be done correctly to ensure the brakes work properly on your vehicle.

Instructions

    1

    Secure the vehicle by chocking the wheels to ensure there is no movement during the process.

    2

    Inspect the brake system and make sure it is at full pressure. Press the brake pedal and watch that it returns at full pressure. Enact the emergency brake and push in the air valve, which will release the brakes. The air valve is usually a foot pedal located near the brake.

    3

    Determine the location where the push rod exits the air brake chamber with a piece of chalk. Twist the push rod gently with a wrench to remove it from the brake chamber. Measure the distance between the brake chamber and the chalk line. If the distance is greater than 3/4 inches, then the slack adjuster needs to be adjusted.

    4

    Locate the manual slack adjuster, which is close to the push rod. Turn the slack adjuster with your hand or a wrench if necessary. If air is going into the brake chamber when you press the brakes, you are turning it the wrong way. Reverse the direction you are rotating the slack adjuster if air is going into the brake chamber.

    5

    Turn the slack adjuster with a wrench until it is tight and you feel a little resistance. If the slack adjuster cannot be moved anymore, then the brake linings are fitting tight against the drum. Twist the adjuster one-half turn in the other direction to ensure there is the proper distance between the drum and the brake linings.

How to Remove Brake Drums From a 2007 Sebring

The brake drums on a 2007 Chrysler Sebring are connected to the rear wheels through the lug studs. Brake shoes are located within the drum, and when the brake pedal is pressed, small plungers spread the pads against the brake drum, slowing the vehicle down. If the lining inside the drums wears too thin, the drums will need to be serviced. Brake drums can be replaced or turned. Turning a brake drum means grinding the surface, thus making it smooth again. Take your old drums to an automotive machine shop to see if they can be reused.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a level surface. Place wood blocks in front and behind the front wheels.

    2

    Loosen, but do not unscrew the lug nuts on the two rear wheels, using a lug wrench.

    3

    Raise the rear of the vehicle, using a floor jack. Support the vehicle with jack stands, then remove the jack.

    4

    Unscrew the lug nuts from the two rear wheels, using a lug wrench. Lift the wheels off the hubs and move them out of the way.

    5

    Slide the brake drums off the lug studs, and remove them from the vehicle.

Selasa, 23 Agustus 2011

How to Remove Rotors From a 1979 Blazer 4X4

The front brake rotors on a 1979 Chevrolet Blazer 4x4 are a critical component of the braking system. The rotors spin with the wheel hub, and to stop the SUV, the brake calipers clamp down the brake pads onto the rotors, slowing it down. After thousands of miles of driving, the rotors wear down and must be resurfaced or replaced. Doing so involves taking apart the front end of the Blazer, including disassembling the wheel hubs.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Blazer on a level surface, and set the parking brake. Lift the front wheels off the ground with a jack, and put jack stands beneath the front axle. Remove the front wheels with a tire iron.

    2

    Unbolt the brake calipers from the front axle, and pull them away from the brake rotor. Hang the calipers from the frame using a J-hook.

    3

    Place the tip of a flathead screwdriver in the gap between the dust cap in the center of the wheel hub and the rotor, and tap the back of the screwdriver with a hammer to pop off the cap. Unbolt the retaining ring bolts around the wheel hub with a 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, and pull it off the hub.

    4

    Remove the snap ring on the inside of the hub using snap-ring pliers. Take out the outer clutch retaining ring with the pliers as well, then pull out the cam body.

    5

    Remove the snap ring holding the axle shaft in place using the snap-ring pliers. Take out the hub body assembly and the rotor at the same time from the front axle.

Senin, 22 Agustus 2011

How to Replace Brake Pads on a 2002 Honda Accord

Replacing the brake pads on the 2002 Honda Accord is the same process for the back as it is the front for cars equipped with rear disc brakes. The primary difference is the way the calipers are located on the wheels. When you change the brake pads, do them in sets, such as both back wheels and both front wheels at the same time. The process is not difficult, and each wheel should take about 30 minutes to do.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car on a level surface and place wheel chocks behind the rear wheels if you are working on the front or in front of the front wheels if you are starting with the rear.

    2

    Jack the car up with an automobile jack and place a jack stand under the frame of the car near the jacking point. Position the jack stand as close to the frame as possible.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts from the wheel with the tire iron then remove the wheel.

    4

    Detach the caliper guide pins with the proper-sized socket and ratchet. The pins are threaded onto the backside of the caliper.

    5

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper by releasing them from the retaining clips. Push the caliper piston back into the caliper housing by twisting it clockwise until it is all the way in.

    6

    Place the new pads into the caliper and secure them with the retaining clips.

    7

    Reinstall the caliper onto the mounting bracket and secure it by reinserting then tightening the guide pins with the socket and ratchet.

    8

    Replace the wheel, remove the jack stand and lower the car to the ground.

    9

    Repeat the process for each wheel.

    10

    Depress the brake pedal five to six times to allow the caliper pistons to self-adjust and you can feel the brakes grab. Do not drive the car until you have done so.

How to Change the Front Brakes on a 2002 Nissan Xterra

A new SUV, the Frontier-based Xterra, hit Nissan showrooms in the 2000 model year. The first generation Xterra only hung around for two model years, as the Frontier and the Xterra received mild styling updates for 2002. The 2002 Xterra came standard with a 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine that produced a respectable 143 horsepower. This SUV also had two 3.3-liter V-6s available -- one was a 170-horsepower version and the big boy was the 210-horsepower, supercharged model. Regardless of options, the 2002 Xterra had the same unusual brake setup, which requires you to remove the hub to get access to the rotor.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the front lug nuts with a ratchet and socket and raise the front of the Xterra with a floor jack. Slide jack stands under the Xterras frame rails and lower the SUV onto the jack stands. Remove the front lug nuts and remove the front wheels.

    2

    Remove the two caliper bolts with a ratchet and socket as you hold the caliper pins from turning with a combination wrench. Lift the caliper from its bracket and hang it from a nearby suspension component using a bungee strap.

    3

    Slide the inner and outer brake pads from the caliper bracket. Pull the pad slippers the thin metal shims that go inside the bracket, above and below the brake pads from the caliper bracket. Remove the two bolts securing the caliper bracket and pull the caliper bracket off the front spindle assembly.

    4

    Pry the dust cover from the center of the hub with a flathead screwdriver. Pull the cotter pin from the spindle shaft with needle-nose pliers and pull the castellated nut retainer from the spindle shaft. Remove the spindle nut with a ratchet and socket.

    5

    Pull the hub-and-rotor assembly from the spindle shaft. Use caution to not disturb the inner or outer wheel bearing.

    6

    Position the hub-and-rotor assembly, wheel studs facing up, in a vice with rubber jaw protectors and tighten to secure the hub and rotor. Remove the six bolts securing the rotor to the hub using a ratchet and socket. Remove the hub and rotor from the vice and slide the rotor off the hub.

    7

    Slide a new rotor onto the hub in the same way the old rotor was installed. Align the bolt holes on the rotor with those in the hub. Hand-thread the hub-to-rotor bolts, then secure the hub and rotor in the rubber-jawed vice again. Tighten the six hub-to-rotor bolts to between 36 and 51 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    8

    Remove the hub-and-rotor assembly from the vice and slide it back onto the spindle shaft, use extreme caution not to disrupt the inner or outer wheel bearings inside the hub. Slide the washer onto the spindle shaft and hand-tighten the spindle nut.

    9

    Tighten the spindle nut to between 25 and 29 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. Spin the hub three or four rotations in each direction to reseat the bearings. Tighten the spindle nut to between 25 to 29 foot-pounds again. Loosen the spindle nut about 45 degrees, set the castellated nut retainer over the nut, aligning a valley in the retainers castellated top with the hole through the spindle. Slide a new cotter pin through the hole in the spindle and bend its legs in opposite directions with needle-nose pliers to lock it into place.

    10

    Set the caliper bracket back on the spindle assembly and hand-thread the brackets bolts. Tighten the caliper bracket bolts to between 101 and 131 foot-pounds. Press new pad slippers, which come with the new pads, into their cutouts in the caliper bracket. Slide new brake pads into the caliper bracket.

    11

    Place the old inner brake pad inside the caliper so it contacts the caliper pistons. Position an 8-inch C-clamp over the caliper and tighten it until the clamp bolt touches the inner brake pad and the clamp face touches the rear of the caliper.

    12

    Position a drain pan under the caliper. Open the bleeder valve on the rear of the caliper by turning the valve counterclockwise a half-turn with a combination wrench. Immediately start tightening the C-clamp until the pistons fully retract into the calipers bore. Immediately tighten the bleeder valve. Wipe away the brake fluid that was released from the bleeder valve with a shop rag.

    13

    Remove the C-clamp and pull the old brake pad from the caliper. Set the caliper on its bracket and hand-thread the two caliper bolts. Hold each caliper pin steady with a combination wrench as you torque each caliper bolt to between 16 and 23 foot-pounds.

    14

    Repeat Steps 2 through 13 to replace the brakes on the other side of the Xterra.

    15

    Reinstall the front wheel on the front hubs and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Raise the Xterra off the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the stands. Lower the SUV to the ground and tighten the lug nuts, in a crisscross pattern, to between 87 and 108 foot-pounds.

    16

    Press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm. Check the level of the fluid in the master cylinder reservoir; add DOT 3 brake fluid until it reaches the Max line, if needed.

    17

    Take any old fluid in the drain pan to a local used automotive fluid recycling center. Some auto parts stores take old brake fluid for free.

Minggu, 21 Agustus 2011

My 1999 Chevy S-10 Rear Brakes Won't Bleed

My 1999 Chevy S-10 Rear Brakes Won't Bleed

Bleeding the rear brakes on your 1999 Chevrolet S-10 should be a simple task. There are a few factors that can cause the brakes not to bleed. Diagnosing these factors is a more challenging task than the bleeding project. Repairing the problem could take up to three hours, depending on what your diagnosis reveals. All of the materials needed perform this operation are available at an auto parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the rear of the vehicle. Set jack stands about 1-foot in from the end of the axles, underneath the axle housing. Leave yourself room to access the back of the drum brakes.

    2

    Spray rust penetrant on the brake bleeder screw. Let stand for three minutes.

    3

    Open the brake bleeder screw with an open end wrench. If the bleeder screw resists when you are applying more than 15 pounds of pressure, stop and respray the bleeder. Let it stand for about 10 minutes longer.

    4

    Close the bleeder screw once it is freely turning. Ask your assistant to gently pump up the brake pedal in the truck. If the brake pedal will not pump up, tell your assistant to just let the pedal come up on its own, and remove his/her foot from the pedal.

    5

    Open the bleeder screw and ask your assistant to slowly depress the brake pedal all the way to the floor. Close the bleeder screw when the pedal is all the way down. Repeat this process two times. If no fluid comes out of the bleeder screw, remove the bleeder screw completely.

    6

    Replace the bleeder screw and close it. Attempt to have the brakes pumped up again. Open the screw and instruct your assistant to push the bleeder screw to the floor. If no fluid comes out, you will now need to go farther in your diagnosis. A brake system that fails to bleed can be the fault of a bad wheel cylinder, a vacuum leak, or a bad master cylinder. Start by replacing the wheel cylinder, which is a simple two bolt process once you dismantle the rear brake shoes and hardware.

How to Take Rotors Off a 1997 Hyundai Elantra

The 1997 Hyundai Elantra was part of the second generation of the Korean-manufactured import. Originally introduced in 1991, the second generation started in mid-1995 and lasted through 2000. In 1999, however, the braking system was redesigned. Thankfully, removing the rotors from the 1997 model, although somewhat difficult, is not as complicated as on the later, redesigned model.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the 1997 Hyundai Elantra on a car lift and bring the vehicle up to waist level.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts and wheel using an impact gun and a socket.

    3

    Open a large C-clamp enough to fit over the entire caliper. Place the top of the clamp on the inside caliper housing the the drive of the clamp on the outboard pad. Tighten the clamp enough to allow a sliding movement of the caliper. Compressing the caliper piston fully is recommended if replacing the rotor with a new one.

    4

    Locate and remove the caliper carrier bolts located on the back side of the knuckle using the impact gun and a socket.

    5

    Support the caliper and carrier assembly to the strut coil with a length of mechanic's wire.

    6

    Remove the axle shaft nut using the gun and a socket.

    7

    Attach the base of the gear puller to the hub and secure tightly by threading the lug nuts back onto the lug studs. Position the center shaft bolt of the hub puller onto the axle shaft spindle. Tighten the center shaft bolt with the gun and a socket to pull the rotor and hub from the axle shaft. Be careful not to drop the hub, rotor, and puller.

    8

    Remove the lug nuts from the lug studs and then remove the puller.

    9

    Remove the four hub-to-rotor bolts and then remove the hub and bearing from the rotor. It is recommended to remove the backing plate and clean off any visible rust or corrosion before reassembling.

Sabtu, 20 Agustus 2011

How to Install a Brake Rotor for a C6

How to Install a Brake Rotor for a C6

If you notice your Chevrolet C6 no longer brakes effectively and makes a terrible screeching noise each time you depress the brakes, it may be time to replace the rotor. Replacing a brake rotor is a straightforward procedure that just about any amateur mechanic can do. With the help of a few common tools, you'll be able to remove and install a new brake rotor on your C6 in a matter of a few hours' work.

Instructions

    1

    Park the C6 on a flat surface. Jack the car up at the wheel on which you're going to be replacing the rotor and secure it in position with jack stands. Don a pair of safety glasses before you begin to work on the brakes to prevent any eye irritation or damage.

    2

    Loosen and remove the five lug bolts holding the wheel in place using a lug wrench or tire iron. Firmly grip the wheel with both hands and pull it away from the car to access the braking system.

    3

    Loosen and remove the two caliper mounting bolts. Carefully lift the caliper off the brake rotor, paying extra attention not to kink or damage the brake fluid line. Suspend the caliper out of the way using a bungee cord (don't allow it to hang freely by the brake fluid line).

    4

    Pry off the five clips holding the rotor in position on the mounting rods using a flat screwdriver. Firmly grip the rotor with both hands and pull it away from the axle plate (if the rotor is extremely stubborn, strike the back of it with a rubber mallet to help it along).

    5

    Clean the new rotor with brake parts cleaner spray. Wipe any cleaner residue off the rotor with a clean shop rag. Slide the new rotor onto the wheel mounting until it sits evenly against the axle plate.

    6

    Reassemble the braking system in the reverse order of the removal. Jack the car up, remove the jack stands and lower it to the ground.

How to Replace the Power Steering Pump in a 1998 BMW 750

You can replace the power steering pump on a 1998 BMW 750 without much ado. A power steering pump carefully pressurizes power steering fluid. This helps the front wheels on the car turn with a smaller amount of force needed from the vehicle's driver. No special tools are required to carry out this task.

Instructions

    1

    Take off the splash guard. Turn the four bolts counterclockwise to access the power steering pump. Remove all fluid from the pump by siphoning the fluid out by using the turkey baster.

    2

    Take out the drive belt. Turn the tension pulley counterclockwise. Slide the belt off the power steering pump.

    3

    Unfasten the bolts of the power steering pump. Do this counterclockwise. Take off the lines of the pump. Turn the nuts counterclockwise.

    4

    Take off the pump by pulling it towards you. Switch out the old pump for the newer one. Pour 2 qts.of power steering fluid into the neck/reservoir of the power steering pump. Close the power steering pump cap.

How to Change Toyota 4Runner Drum Brakes

How to Change Toyota 4Runner Drum Brakes

The Toyota 4Runner is equipped with drum brakes and shoes, in addition to disc brakes and calipers; the drum brakes work with the parking brake. If you need to change the drum brakes, you need to remove the brake discs to access them. Changing drum brakes is a complex and potentially dangerous task due to the multiple spring components involved. Use extreme caution and consult with your mechanic beforehand, if at all possible.

Instructions

Accessing the Drum Brakes

    1

    Raise the truck's rear end and support it on jack stands, then remove the rear wheels with the vehicle's tire iron.

    2

    Remove the brake caliper's mounting bolts with a wrench. Lift the caliper off the bracket and suspend it in a secure place with a piece of strong wire, making sure the caliper doesn't hang by the hose.

    3

    Unbolt and remove the caliper mounting bracket from the disc.

    4

    Mark the disc's relation to the hub with paint or chalk, then pull the disc off the studs.

Removing the Brake Shoes

    5

    Remove the two upper return springs and the lower return spring from the drum brake assembly; grasp them with needle-nose pliers to remove them from the anchor and shoes. Pull the adjuster assembly out of the bottom.

    6

    Press on the spring retainer for the front shoe hold-down spring, using the pliers, and turn it 90 degrees to release it from the pin, then remove the front shoe with the spring, retainer and spring seat.

    7

    Remove the strut and spring from the rear shoe, then repeat the previous step to remove the rear shoe.

    8

    Pop off the U-clip from the rear shoe's pivot pin to remove the parking brake lever from the shoe. Make sure you retain the washer underneath the clip without damaging it.

Installation

    9

    Apply a thin coating of high-temperature grease to the spots where the shoes meet the backing plate and the anchor. Apply a very small amount of grease to the new brake shoe's pivot pin.

    10

    Connect the parking brake lever to the replacement rear shoe with the pliers and a new U-clip, placing the washer below the clip.

    11

    Assemble each shoe's hold-down spring and pin onto the backing plate and compress the spring using a slotted tool. Place each shoe into position, lining up each shoe's slot and hole with the pin and the tab in the hold-down spring seat.

    12

    Spread the upper ends of the shoes apart and install the strut and spring between the shoes. Install the adjuster in the lower end of the brake assembly.

    13

    Connect the return springs onto the brake shoes and anchor, using the pliers, starting with the lower return spring and then moving on to the rear and front upper springs.

Post-Installation

    14

    Reconnect the brake disc to the hub and use two lug nuts and washers to temporarily secure it.

    15

    Turn the star wheel adjuster on the brake shoe assembly, using a small screwdriver in the access hole. Once you've adjusted the wheel so that the brake disc won't turn, reverse the wheel adjuster by about eight notches.

    16

    Re-install the caliper mounting bracket and then the caliper, using their mounting bolts and the wrench.

    17

    Install the wheels and lower the truck after changing the brakes on both sides.

Jumat, 19 Agustus 2011

Signs That Car Brakes Are Going Bad

Faulty brakes pose a serious safety hazard when you're on the road. Fortunately, brake issues can often be detected before they become serious, if drivers know some of the warning signs. Things to watch for include unusual sounds or smells, as well as an inability to stop the car as easily or as smoothly.

Brakes Smell Hot

    If you're having a harder time stopping your car or you need to pump the brakes, it may be due to a buildup of heat around the brake assembly, which can ultimately result in brake failure. You'll notice a burning or a "hot" smell after parking the car.

Car "Pulls" When Stopping

    If your car pulls to one side when you attempt to stop, it is usually a sign that the brakes are out of adjustment. Eventually, this will cause uneven brake wear and make your car more difficult to handle while stopping, especially if you have to stop quickly at high speed.

Squeaking Noise

    Usually, the first sign of brake wear is a squeaking noise when you apply the brakes. A squeak occurs when your brake pads are worn down and need replacement. This is a good time to have your brakes serviced before more extensive, not to mention expensive, problems occur.

Grinding Noise

    Once the brake pads are completely worn through, a grinding noise caused by metal-on-metal contact will occur. This a sign of a serious brake problem, and it needs to be corrected immediately to avoid putting you at risk.

Pedal is Hard to Depress

    If you need to apply extra pressure to depress the brake pedal, it may be a sign that the vacuum assist unit, which makes the brake pedal easier to depress, has a leak and needs to be repaired.

Kamis, 18 Agustus 2011

How to Reset the Rear Calipers

How to Reset the Rear Calipers

Resetting a rear caliper piston will require two separate procedures depending on the type of make and model vehicle you're working on. Because caliper pistons sit close to the pads and rotors, providing brake pedal response, when you replace pads and/or rotors (both thicker than the old ones), you need to make room for them. To do this, the caliper piston needs to be reset. Once compressed, the pistons then need to expand again in order to provide an accurate braking response on demand with brake pedal depression.

Instructions

    1

    Refer to the vehicle-specific repair manual before attempting to compress the rear caliper piston. Many vehicles employ a screw-in piston on rear calipers; however, there are some that can be compressed with a C-clamp or channel locks. Using the wrong tool can damage the pistons of the rear caliper.

    2

    Use the rear brake caliper piston tool with a 3/8-inch ratchet and 6-inch extension to screw the rear caliper in a clockwise fashion if applicable. This six-sided tool offers six different piston applications and covers most popular vehicles that use screw-in pistons. With a ratchet and extension, hold the caliper firmly, insert the cubed tool into the grooves in the piston and drive the piston fully into the bore.

    3

    Compress the rear caliper piston with a caliper piston reset tool kit. Although much more expensive than the tool used in Step 2, this kit will cover more vehicle applications and can also act as a C-clamp device for rear calipers that do not require a screw-in piston motion. Match the adapter up, if applicable, to the piston, then attach it to the driving bore of the tool. Insert the anchor inside the outer caliper housing and slowly turn the drive to compress the piston.

    4

    Use the same kit to compress a non-screw-in caliper piston in the same manner. Instead of inserting an adapter, place an old pad or type of brace between the drive of the tool and the piston and slowly tighten the bore drive of the tool.

    5

    Use a 12-inch pair of channel locks or a 6-inch C-clamp if the caliper piston is hollow. Place an old pad against the piston and slowly compress the piston inward using the selected tool.

    6

    Pump the brake pedal once the rear brakes have been reassembled, the wheels replaced and the vehicle is back on the ground. Pumping the pedal will extend the pistons to contact the pads to the rotors and eliminate any sponginess in the brake pedal. Five to six times should suffice, but pump the pedal until it feels firm. On some import vehicles, the repair manual may specify to apply and disengage the parking brake while pumping the brake pedal. This is to help adjust the parking brake and rear piston.

    7

    Check the level of the brake fluid in the master cylinder once your brake pedal is firm. Add only new brake fluid which is specific for your vehicle. The repair manual will indicate (or the cover/cap of your master cylinder brake fluid reservoir) which type of fluid to use. The most common is DOT 3 brake fluid.

How to Bleed the Brakes on a 1997 Honda Accord

How to Bleed the Brakes on a 1997 Honda Accord

The 1997 Accord is a dependable car, and like most Hondas it will last a long time if you keep up with all the routine maintenance like oil and filter changes, fluid levels, tire rotations and proper tire air pressure. The brake fluid needn't be replaced every time you change the brakes, but the fluid becomes contaminated and its water content increases over time. Honda recommends replacing the brake fluid every 25,000 to 30,000 miles. This involves removing all the old fluid from the reservoir, replacing it with new fluid then bleeding the entire brake system.

Instructions

    1

    Jack up the front of the 1997 Accord and remove the front wheels. Locate the bleeder valve on the edge of the inside brake caliper, facing the front of the car.

    2

    Remove the rubber cap from the bleeder valve. Attach a clear hose to the bleeder valve, and put the other end of the hose in a clean bottle on the ground. Top off the brake fluid reservoir with new fluid.

    3

    Have an assistant sit in the driver's seat of the Honda Accord. Say "Down," which is the cue for the assistant to press the brake pedal down to the floor. Open the bleeder valve with a box wrench and wait about three seconds until fluid stops coming out of the bleeder valve. Close the bleeder valve. Say "Up," which is the cue for the assistant to allow the brake pedal to rise all the way up. Say "Down," and repeat the process.

    4

    After about 20 repetitions, add more brake fluid to the reservoir. Repeat the process until the fluid coming out of the hose is noticeably cleaner and more transparent. Tighten the bleeder valve and replace the rubber cap.

    5

    Repeat the process with the brakes on each of the other wheels. Test the brakes on your Honda Accord at low speeds before going out on the highway.

Rabu, 17 Agustus 2011

How to Install an ABS Relay in a Toyota Camry

You have to change the ABS relay in your Toyota Camry when the ABS warning light is lit on the driver control panel display. It is usually impossible to stop a car that has a malfunctioning ABS relay as the relay controls the entire anti-lock brake system.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Camry and engage the parking brake. Open the hood and secure it using the safety bar. Disconnect the black negative battery cable by loosening the nut on the clamp using an adjustable wrench.

    2

    Remove the quarter panel trim under the steering wheel by unscrewing the screws on both sides of the panel with a Phillips screwdriver.

    3

    Notice the black protective box marked ABS. Remove this protective box by unscrewing the four screws using a Phillips screwdriver. You should see the black relay.

    4

    Disconnect the wiring harness on the bottom of the relay by pressing the buttons on the side of the harness. Gently pull down on the harness while you press the buttons. Once this is disconnected, remove the two mounting fasteners using a Phillips screwdriver.

    5

    Place the new ABS relay in the place from which you just removed the malfunctioning relay. Secure it by replacing the mounting fasteners. Tighten them with the screwdriver.

    6

    Plug the wiring harness into the bottom of the relay. Replace the protective box and secure it by replacing the screws. Replace the quarter panel trim and tighten the screws.

    7

    Reconnect the negative battery cable. Tighten the nut on the clamp. Close the hood. Start the car. Look for the ABS warning light. If it remains off, test drive your car by driving slowly and trying to stop. If it comes on, you should take your car to a mechanic to service the system.

Selasa, 16 Agustus 2011

How to Change VW Break Pads

How to Change VW Break Pads

Volkswagen vehicles may come equipped with either disc or drum style brakes. For models that are equipped with disc style brakes, there are components of the braking system known as brake pads. The brake pads are what come in contact with the brake rotors, also known as brake discs, when the brake pedal is pressed. After having been used, the brake pads will eventually wear down and begin to squeal, if they are equipped with a wear indicator. The brake pads must be changed once they have worn down too much.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the vehicle. Apply the parking brake and place the car jack at either the vehicle's specified jack-point, or on a solid part of the frame. Use the car jack to raise the vehicle high enough so that the wheels can be removed. Place wheel chocks underneath the wheels which are still on the ground. Place jack stands underneath the vehicle, on a solid part of the frame, then lower the vehicle so that it is resting on the jack stands.

    2

    Remove the wheel. Use the torque wrench and socket set to remove the lug nuts, which hold the wheel in place.

    3

    Remove the old brake pads. Hold the lower guide pin with the open wrench, and use the torque wrench and the socket set to remove the bolt which connects the lower guide pin to the brake caliper. Pivot the brake caliper up, to gain access to the brake pads. Slide the old brake pads out.

    4

    Install the new brake pads. Put one of the old brake pads against the piston and use the C-clamp to push the piston in, so that there will be room for the new brake pad. Put on the safety glasses and check the brake fluid reservoir underneath the hood to monitor the brake fluid level. If the brake fluid level becomes too high, you will need to use the siphon to remove some brake fluid before the piston can be pushed in.

    5

    Apply brake lubricant to the backs of the new brake pads. Slide the new brake pads in to place. Pivot the brake caliper down, and either install new bolts, or clean off the old bolts and apply a thread-locking compound to them. Refer to the vehicle repair manual, and use the torque wrench and socket set to tighten the bolts to the correct torque specification.

    6

    Put the wheels back on. Put the wheels in place, and use the torque wrench and socket set to tighten the lug nuts to the correct torque specification. Use the car jack to raise the vehicle, then remove the jack stands and wheel chocks. Slowly lower the vehicle completely. Pump the brake pedal until it becomes firm. If you had to remove any brake fluid, fill up the brake reservoir to the correct level, using the correct type of new brake fluid.

Minggu, 14 Agustus 2011

How to Install Rear Brakes on a Ranger

The Ford Ranger uses a rear drum braking system that stops the truck and provides a stationary parking brake. The shoes can wear out and require replacement. The drums should be replaced after every two shoe replacements. The average backyard mechanic can install rear brakes on a Ranger in about an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the truck with the floor jack by placing the jack in front of the wheel with the head on the frame rail, then pumping the jack lever until the wheel is off of the ground.

    2

    Remove the wheel by turning the lug nuts counterclockwise, then pulling the wheel free and setting it away from the truck.

    3

    Remove the drum by turning the keeper bolt (the off center bolt that holds the drum in place) counterclockwise, then sliding the drum off of the brake assembly.

    4

    Remove the shoes by using the screwdriver as a lever on the long spring hooks that loop around the brake shoe spring carriers (the springs can be left in place once disengaged), then turning the primary spring bolts (in the center of the shoes) counterclockwise. Pull the shoes away from the brake assembly.

    5

    Replace the shoes with new units by pushing them back onto the brake assembly, securing their primary spring bolts, and then levering the hooks back onto the shoes' spring carriers. The long springs could be worn out and require replacement, which can cause brake dragging if not attended to.

    6

    Replace or resurface the drum, then slide it over the shoes and back onto the brake assembly. Tighten the keeper bolt until it is snug.

    7

    Replace the wheel by tightening the lug nuts in an alternating pattern.

    8

    Lower the truck from the jack by slowly turning the jack pressure screw counterclockwise.

    9

    Repeat the process on the other rear wheel.

How to Change the Clutch Slave Cylinder in a 1998 Cavalier

How to Change the Clutch Slave Cylinder in a 1998 Cavalier

The clutch slave cylinder allows you to change gears -- without it, you are not going anywhere. Taken in isolation, replacing the clutch slave cylinder is a simple task that any home mechanic can accomplish. However, accessing the slave cylinder itself requires removing the manual transaxle (transmission). This is not a simple task and requires a small arsenal of tools and time. Once the transaxle is removed, however, changing the clutch slave cylinder requires only a handful of simple steps.

Instructions

    1

    Consult a repair manual on removing the transaxle if you have not already accomplished this step. Put simply, you will need to remove the drive axles, unbolt the transaxle from the engine block, and disconnect the shifter rod and all electrical connections. Disconnect the hydraulic clutch line where it enters the transaxle bell housing. Remove the transaxle and clutch assembly from the car using a transmission jack.

    2

    Unbolt and remove the clutch and flywheel assembly.

    3

    Unbolt the slave cylinder from inside the bell housing. There are three bolts, two located on the outside of the bell housing, and one on the inside. The slave cylinder assembly will slide out from the inside of the bell housing.

    4

    Grease the inside of the clutch bearing. Slide the new slave cylinder assembly into place from inside the bell housing and fasten it in place with all three bolts.

    5

    Reinstall the clutch and flywheel assembly. Reinstall the transaxle, drive axles, and shifter linkage. Reattach the hydraulic line.

    6

    Bleed the hydraulic line. Slowly press and hold the clutch pedal, then loosen the bleeder screw on the actuator cylinder. Tighten the screw. Repeat several times, or until all the air is removed from the clutch lines. Check repeatedly to ensure there is hydraulic fluid in the clutch master cylinder.

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Nissan Maxima

Unlike many vehicles, the Nissan Maxima doesn't require any special tools to compress the rear disc brakes, making them easy to replace. Just grab a pair of needle nose pliers and these instructions to quickly, and easily, replace the rear disc brakes in a Maxima.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the rear of the Maxima off the ground using a car jack. Support the vehicle on all sides to prevent it from tipping over.

    2

    Take the rear wheels off the Maxima. Use a torque wrench to loosen the lug nuts. Remove the wheels and set them on the ground, face up.

    3

    Disconnect the parking brake cable bracket bolt. Slide out the pin bolts and remove the caliper body. Carefully remove the pad springs, and then take out the pads and shims.

    4

    Rotate the piston clockwise into the caliper body using a pair of needle nose pliers. Grease the area that the brake pads contact on the mounting support using silicone based grease.

    5

    Replace the pad springs. Attach the shims to the rear disc brake pads and install on the caliper mounting bracket. Lay the caliper body on the mounting support and torque the pin bolts between 16 to 23 ft. lb.

    6

    Install the rear wheels and lower the Maxima to the ground. Verify that the brake fluid is at the proper level and that the brakes function properly.

How To Remove Rust from Brakes

Your brakes will develop rust; there is really nothing you can do about it. Even washing your car will cause rust to build up along the brake rotors or outer brake drums. The good news is that this is cosmetic damage for the most part, and most of it comes off very easily. If there is any rust you need to personally remove, it should only be because you're concerned with the car's appearance.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the car and apply the brakes frequently. This will remove a vast majority of the rust, especially on the brake rotors.

    2

    Remove the wheels to access the brakes if you need to remove any rust personally. Using the stock lug wrench and jack or aftermarket versions, loosen the lug nuts, raise the end of the car with the jack and remove the nuts to remove the wheel.

    3

    Apply brake cleaner to all the brake parts, using a drip pan to catch all residue, and wipe as much rust off the edges of the brakes as you can. Try rubbing the rust off again after the cleaner evaporates.

    4

    Switch to a wire brush--steel or brass--and scrub the brake parts with it. Applying more brake cleaner before scrubbing can help.

    5

    Disconnect the main brake parts if the above methods don't work so you can soak them. For brake rotors, disconnect the caliper and its bracket from the rotor by removing their bolts with a ratchet or hex wrench--it can vary--and pull the rotor off. For brake drums, cut off the pressed washers on the studs with a metal cutter and slip the drum off. (Replace with new washers when you're finished.)

    6

    Soak the disconnected brake parts in a container of liquid cleaning concentrate mixed with about a gallon of water. Make sure the rotor or drum is dry before attaching it back on the car.

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a Sunfire

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a Sunfire

The rear wheel brakes on a Pontiac Sunfire, like those on other cars, will wear much faster than the brakes in the front. When you change the rear brakes, you need to do both wheels at the same time regardless of the wear that is present. Changing the rear brakes is not hard, but you must do it properly or they won't perform as they should. Inspect the drums for damage or excessive wear when you change the brakes, in case the drums need replacing as well.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car on a level surface and place wheel chocks in front of the front wheels.

    2

    Jack the car up with an automobile jack on the side that you will be working on.

    3

    Place the jack stand under the frame of the car near the jacking point and raise it as high as you can to the frame.

    4

    Remove the wheel and the brake drum. If the drum is difficult to take off, hit it several times with a rubber mallet until it breaks free.

    5

    Use pliers to remove the round locking springs. Grip the top of the spring with the pliers, push the spring down, and twist it until it comes free.

    6

    Lift up the actuator and disconnect the actuator link by removing it from the slot in the actuator. Remove the actuator, the pivot and the spring when it is disconnected.

    7

    Spread the brake shoes apart with your hands until they clear the cylinder pistons, and then remove the parking brake strut by removing the spring with spring pliers.

    8

    Spread the brake shoes apart with your hands far enough to clear the wheel hub and disconnect the parking brake cable. Take the shoes off of the wheel.

    9

    Use pliers to remove the C clip from the parking brake lever, and remove it from the shoe.

    10

    Wipe dirt and dust from the backing plate with a damp cloth.

    11

    Examine the wheel cylinders to check for excessive leakage. If excessive leakage is present, they will need to be replaced.

    12

    Lubricate the parking brake lever with the brake grease provided with the brake shoes.

    13

    Reattach the parking brake lever to the shoe with a C clip.

    14

    Attach the adjusting screw and spring to the brake shoes using the spring pliers to clip it into place. Make sure the coils do not touch the star wheel on the adjuster.

    15

    Lubricate the shoe contact surface on the backing plate with brake grease.

    16

    Spread the shoe assembly apart and reconnect the parking brake cable to the lever. Attach the brake shoes to the backing plate and lock into them into place with the locking springs (by pushing them in with pliers and twisting).

    17

    Spread the shoes apart slightly with your hands and use spring pliers to reconnect the parking brake strut and the spring.

    18

    Install the actuator pivot, lever and return spring, and then lift the actuator lever up and hook it to the lever.

    19

    Measure the width of the inside of the drum and then measure the width of the brake shoes. Adjust them as needed by spinning the star screw on the adjuster until they reach the proper width.

    20

    Replace the drum over the brake shoes and reinstall the wheel.

    21

    Remove the jack stand and lower the car to the ground.

    22

    Repeat the process on the other wheel.

Sabtu, 13 Agustus 2011

How to Change the Brake Pads for a 2000 Town & Country

Disc brakes work by squeezing a pair of pads against a rotor to slow the car. Over time, the pads wear down. The brake pads of a 2000 Chrysler Town & Country should be inspected every 15,000 miles or whenever problems are suspected. If any one brake pad is thinner than .313 inches, they should all be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front end's wheels with a lug wrench. Lift the front corner of the van with a jack, and place the jack stands under the frame. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stands, and remove the wheels.

    2

    Unscrew the caliper guide bolts on one side. These two bolts are on the outside of the brake assembly.

    3

    Slide the caliper upward off the rotor, and suspend it with a piece of wire so it's not hanging by the brake line.

    4

    Pry the metal clip off of the outer brake pad with a flathead screwdriver. Remove the pad.

    5

    Pull the inner brake pad out of the cylinder. It will pop out when pulled firmly.

    6

    Compress the caliper piston with a C-clamp. Protect the head of the piston with a scrap piece of wood.

    7

    Pop the inner brake pad into the caliper. Slide the outer pad into place. The metal clip should hold it firmly in place.

    8

    Slide the caliper back into place, and install with the bolts removed earlier. Torque the bolts to 195 pound-inches or 17 pound-feet with a torque wrench.

    9

    Repeats Steps 2 through 8 for the other side of the vehicle.

    10

    Reinstall the wheels, and replace the lug nuts, screwing them on hand-tight. Raise the vehicle off of the jack stands with the jack, and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground, and torque the lug nuts to 95 pound-feet. Pump the brakes until the pedal feels normal. Add brake fluid to the reservoir if necessary.

Jumat, 12 Agustus 2011

How to Install Wagner ThermoQuiet Brake Pads

How to Install Wagner ThermoQuiet Brake Pads

The process of installing Wagner ThermoQuiet brake pads involves lifting your vehicle, removing the tire and swapping out the pads. It's a straightforward process that can be completed without the aid of a mechanic, if you feel comfortable enough to use common hand tools and work under the car. Keeping the brake pads in your vehicle in good working condition is essential to your safety, as it can help to avoid accidents.

Instructions

    1

    Park your vehicle on a flat surface. Maneuver the floor jack so that it's set under your car's undercarriage. Crank the jack so that it begins raising your car. You can stop lifting it once your tires are off the ground high enough to remove them. Place jack stands around the perimeter of your car to set it in place.

    Loosen the lug nuts on the tire and pull them off. Place them aside, so that they won't get lost. Pull the tire out of the well of the vehicle.

    2

    Find the caliper that attaches the brake pads to the brake -- the caliper is a rectangle-shaped piece, and the brake pads are positioned inside of it. Both pads are attached to the brake.

    3

    Remove the bolts from the caliper and slide it away from the brake. Set aside these bolts, so that they don't get lost. Flip the caliper over and you'll notice that the pads are attached to the caliper by a bolt. Loosen and remove this bolt, also setting them aside, and strip the pads off the caliper.

    4

    Press the ThermoQuiet pads in place inside the caliper, in the same manner in which the old pads were installed. Tighten the new pads by screwing the bolts in place. Reattach the caliper to the brake and tighten it, using the same bolts you had previously removed.

    5

    Attach the tire back into the well and screw it in place by tightening the tire bolts. Take away the jack stands and carefully lower the vehicle back to ground level.

Tools Needed for Saturn Ion Brakes

Tools Needed for Saturn Ion Brakes

There are various reasons you may want to work on your Saturn Ion brakes, including indications of low brake fluid, power brake failure and loud noises from the braking system. Squeaking brakes may indicate the need for new brake pads. Replacing brake pads is one of the more common do-it-yourself brake projects as it requires only a few basic tools that many amateur mechanics already have in their garages.

Caliper Compression Tool

    A caliper compression tool makes changing brake pads much easier because it eliminates the need for removal of the calipers. Removing calipers requires first bleeding the brakes which is unnecessary with the compression tool. Because it can be an expensive tool ($300 or more in 2010) consider renting it from a local tool rental center in your area.

Floor Jack

    Use a floor jack to lift one corner of the vehicle off the ground before removing the tire for access to the brakes. Floor jacks are simple to use and safe when you follow the manufacturer's safety recommendations. Floor jacks use hydraulics to lift heavy objects with relative ease. Always secure the jack to a solid part of the vehicle frame and never leave it elevated longer than necessary.

Torque Wrench

    Torque wrenches loosen and tighten bolts with the proper amount of force. Too much pressure and the bolt may become stripped or break. Not enough pressure, and the bolt may become loose, and potentially problematic. You can set the torque wrench to a certain breaking force, allowing the bolt to be tightened to a certain point before an audible "click" is heard, indicating that the desired tension has been reached.

Kamis, 11 Agustus 2011

How to Remove the Brake Drums From 1998 a Pontiac Sunfire

How to Remove the Brake Drums From 1998 a Pontiac Sunfire

The Pontiac Sunfire was introduced in 1995. The 1998 Pontiac Sunfire was equipped with a 2.2-liter, in-line, four-cylinder engine as standard equipment. The 1998 Sunfire GT was fitted with a 2.4-liter, four-cylinder, which produced 35 more horsepower than the 2.2-liter engine. The typical brake setup on the 1998 Sunfire consisted of front disc and rear drum brakes. A four-wheel disc-brake system was an available upgrade. Rear brake drums are usually removed for replacement, or access to the rear brakes and hardware.

Instructions

Removing the Brake Drum

    1

    Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts on the Sunfire, using a tire iron. Raise the rear end of the car, using a jack. Place jack stands beneath the rear axle bar. Remove the lug nuts completely from the rear wheels, and remove the rear wheel and tire assemblies.

    2

    Remove the brake drum retaining clips, which are attached to the lug studs. Use a pair of side-cutters or snips to snip the clips free. If the Sunfire you are working on does not have these retainer clips, disregard this step and proceed to Step 3.

    3

    Attempt removal of the brake drums by pulling the drum with your hands. Gently use a hammer to strike the face of the brake drum (the side facing out from the car), in between the wheel studs. Be careful not to hit any of the wheel studs. Hit the face of the drum five to 10 times, then try removing the drum by hand again. If you cannot remove the drum by hand, proceed to the next step in this project.

    4

    Pull the small rubber stopper off of the brake backing plate, at the bottom of the plate. Insert a small flat head screwdriver into the slot. Turn the star-wheel adjuster by pushing the wheel downward with the screwdriver. Tap the brake drum with a rubber mallet from side to side, on the outside of the drum. If the drum will not release, turn the star wheel adjuster again, then hit the drum from side to side. Repeat this step until the brake shoes are adjusted in far enough for the drum to be released.

    5

    Repeat Steps 2 through 4 of this section to remove the drum from the other side of the Sunfire.

Inspection, Cleaning, and Adjusting of the Rear Brakes

    6

    Inspect the total diameter of the inside of the brake drum. Use a micrometer to measure the total diameter of the drum. The maximum measurement allowed is 7.929 inches. If you do not have a micrometer, you can use a tape measure. Measure the distance across the drum. The standard measurement should be less than 7 7/8-inches. If the drum measurement is not within the specifications given for either the micrometer or tape measure, or if it is very close to the measurement, discard the brake drum and replace it.

    7

    Measure the thickness of the brake shoe. The brake shoe should be at least 3/16 inch thick. If the forward or rear mounted shoes are not within the parameters for thickness, then you need to replace the brake shoes. If the brake shoes are within the specified thickness then a clean and adjust of the rear brakes should be performed.

    8

    Spray the brake drum and drum brake components, using aerosol brake parts cleaner. You should use about half of the can for one side. If the brake drum was loose during the removal process, then the brakes are under adjusted. If the brake drum was very hard to remove then the brakes are over adjusted.

    9

    Turn the star-wheel-adjuster to adjust the rear brakes inward or outward. If the brakes were under adjusted, then you need to turn the wheel so that the brake shoes are pushed apart. If the brakes were over adjusted, turn the star wheel adjust to move the shoes closer together. Only turn the adjuster three turns at a time. Test the adjustment of the brakes by installing and removing the rear drum. You should acquire about 5 to 10 pounds of resistance when sliding the drum on or off. Adjust the brakes until you receive this desired resistance.

    10

    Check your rear brake adjustment by installing the rear tire onto the Sunfire, and tightening the lug nuts until they are snug. Place your hand at the top of the tire, and spin the rear wheel. Let go of the wheel and let it spin freely when your hand is at the bottom of the rotation. The wheel should complete one turn if you have adjusted the brakes correctly. Readjust the brakes then repeat this step as necessary. With the wheel on, you can make the adjustment through the slot in the backing plate. Repeat Steps 1 through 5 to inspect and adjust the second side of the Sunfire.

    11

    Install the rear wheels on the Sunfire and tighten the lug nuts until they are snug. Raise the rear of the car with your jack, and remove the jack stands from beneath the car. Lower the car to the ground.

    12

    Tighten the rear lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds of final torque, using a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket. Double check your torque on both rear wheels as a safety precaution, before driving.

How to Remove a Ford Mustang Front Caliper

Occasionally, you may need to remove a front brake caliper from your Ford Mustang because it's damaged or leaking fluid. A damaged caliper can be dangerous for your vehicle's braking system, preventing the vehicle from stopping properly. You can remove the brake caliper yourself in about a half an hour, saving you time and money.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the Ford Mustang to a level surface, and place the vehicle in "park." Set the emergency brake, and place a wood block behind one of the rear tires.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts of the tire you are removing with a tire tool one full turn. Raise the vehicle up with a floor jack, and place a jack stand under the axle near the tire to be removed.

    3

    Lower the vehicle so it is sitting on the jack stand, and move the floor jack out of the way. Remove the tire from the vehicle, using the tire tool to unfasten the lug nuts until you can take them off by hand.

    4

    Set the tire and lug nuts out of the way, and use a flat head screwdriver to pry the E-clip off the pin holding the caliper to the brake rotor. Unfasten the bolts on the brake caliper with a socket wrench until you can slide the bolts out by hand.

    5

    Unhook the brake line from the caliper with an open-end wrench, and set the brake line upright to prevent any fluid from leaking out. Slide the brake caliper off the Ford Mustang rotor and remove it from the vehicle.

Rabu, 10 Agustus 2011

How to Replace a Dodge Durango Drum Brake

How to Replace a Dodge Durango Drum Brake

The rear brakes on your Dodge Durango use a drum-and-shoe system to provide roughly 30 to 40 percent of the stopping force for the truck. Because they are on the rear of the truck, the transfer of weight when stopping shifts most of the force away from them and to the front disc brakes. The result is a brake shoe and drum that do not wear as fast as the brakes in the front. It is not often that a drum needs replacing but over time they can wear or crack and then they will require replacement.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the rear of your Durango with a lug wrench or a socket and breaker bar. Do not remove them from the wheel studs yet.

    2

    Raise the rear of the truck off the ground with a jack under the rear axle housing. Place a set of jack stands under the axle tube to support the weight of the truck. Remove the lug nuts and wheels from the truck.

    3

    Grasp the brake drum with your hands and remove it from the truck, pulling it straight out. Set the old drum aside, then slide the new drum onto the wheel studs and over the rear brake shoes. If the drum will not slide on you may need to adjust the shoes in a little to allow for the added thickness of the new drum.

    4

    Move to the opposite side of the truck, remove the drum, and replace it using the same process. Install the wheels onto the truck followed by the lug nuts. Tighten them until they are snug.

    5

    Raise the rear of the truck off the jack stands and pull them out from under the truck. Lower the jack, setting the truck back on its tires. Tighten all the lug nuts with a lug wrench or socket and breaker bar.

How to Change Rear Brake Pads on a Dodge Caravan

How to Change Rear Brake Pads on a Dodge Caravan

The Dodge Caravan (front-wheel drive models) rarely come equipped with rear disc brake pads, but use drum brakes and brake shoes. However, all-wheel drive models (mostly in the Grand Caravan series) often come with rear disc brakes. Earlier versions of the rear disc brakes used a different parking brake mechanism. The newer version required a different procedure to compress the rear caliper piston in order to make room for the replacement of the new, thicker pads without causing damage to the pistons. In either case, the same special tool set can be used for either application.

Instructions

    1

    Place a wheel block in front of one (or both, if two are available) of the front tire treads. Kick the block inward against the tread.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts of the rear tires with the lug wrench, but only crack them loose from the hubs.

    3

    Lift one rear corner of the Caravan with the vehicle jack and then support that corner onto a jack stand placed in a safe and secure location. Repeat for the other rear corner to elevate the entire rear axle.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts and wheels.

    5

    Locate the guide pins on the inside of the caliper housing. The rear calipers sit up on top of the rear knuckle and rotor on the Caravan. Use the ratchet and 7 mm socket bit to remove the two guide pins holding the caliper to the bracket and knuckle assembly.

    6

    Pry off the front of the caliper gently using the angled pry tool or screwdriver and then pry off the rear of the caliper. Hang the caliper to the rear suspension using a small bungee cord to prevent damage to the brake hose (attached to the caliper).

    7

    Pry the outer pad wing clips off of the caliper housing using the pry tool or screwdriver to remove the outer pad. Pull the inner pad and retaining clip out of the caliper piston (older version) or remove the inner brake pad from the caliper bracket still seated behind the rotor (newer version).

    8

    Compress the hollow piston caliper using the caliper piston retracting tool kit like a C-clamp. Use an old brake pad to sit against the hollow piston and set the retracting tool into the caliper housing and tighten the tool (by turning the knob) until the piston is fully seated. For newer style caliper pistons, the piston will not be hollow but will have crossed slots on its face. Find a suitable sized adapter in the tool kit to fit into the notches of the slots and again set the tool up with the adapter on the end. Tighten the tool to turn the piston clockwise and screw the piston inward until it is fully seated.

    9

    Clean the bracket, knuckle and caliper mating surfaces with a wire brush to remove rust and brake dust. Apply a level coating of silicone brake grease to the mating areas.

    10

    Insert the inner pad first (on the bracket for newer version or push the retaining clips into the hollow caliper piston for older version). Clip the wing clips of the outer pad onto the outer caliper housing.

    11

    Place the caliper over the rotor and align the caliper so the guide pins can be hand threaded in at first. Tighten the guide pins with the ratchet and socket bit once threaded properly.

    12

    Replace the wheels after both sides of the brake pads of have been replaced. Replace the lug nuts and tighten them secure to the hubs.

    13

    Lower the rear corners of the Caravan (one side at a time) slowly after removing the jack stands. Tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern with the torque ratchet (set at 100 foot-pounds) and a socket (19 mm or 3/4-inch).

    14

    Pump the brake pedal several times to reset the caliper pistons. The brake pedal will feel firm (normal height) when the pistons have reset and the pads are properly seated. Remove the wheel block and test drive the Caravan.

Selasa, 09 Agustus 2011

How to Change Brake Pads in a 2004 Ford Mustang

How to Change Brake Pads in a 2004 Ford Mustang

The 2004 Ford Mustang features both front and rear disc brakes, which employ brake pads as friction material. The front disc brake system may feature single- or dual-piston calipers. The rear disc brake system features a single-piston caliper, but the piston has to be turned into the caliper bore with a special tool. It can not be compressed inward like the front calipers (dual- or single-piston). Other than these minor differences, replacing the pads is a fairly standardized procedure.

Instructions

Front Brake Pads

    1

    Remove half the brake fluid from the brake fluid reservoir/master cylinder, using a brake fluid suction baster. Discard the old fluid and then replace the cover to the reservoir.

    2

    Place a tire wedge behind one of the the rear tires and apply the parking brake.

    3

    Use the wheel nut wrench to crack the wheel nuts loose on the front tires.

    4

    Lift the front end of the Mustang--one side at a time--and then place jack stands under each front frame rail to safely support the vehicle. Remove the wheel nuts and wheel assemblies.

    5

    Remove the upper and lower caliper locking pins with a ratchet and socket. Pry the caliper from the rotor and caliper anchor assembly with a pry tool. Support the caliper on a caliper hanger and hang it from the chassis to protect the hydraulic brake hose.

    6

    Compress the caliper piston(s) into the caliper with the caliper piston reset clamp. Use one of the old brake pads to place on top of the piston before compressing it in order to protect against damage from the reset clamp.

    7

    Remove the remaining brake pad and then remove the rattle clips. Use a wire brush to clean off any rust or dirt from the caliper anchor and then clean the rattle clip with the brush. Apply a light coat of brake pad/caliper lubricant to the seat section of the clips (where the brake pad tabs sit) and then replace the clips to the anchor.

    8

    Install the new brake pads. Remove the caliper from the hanger and place it over the pads. Align the caliper locking pins and tighten them.

    9

    Repeat steps 5 through 8 on the other front wheel and then replace the wheels and wheel nuts. Tighten the wheel nuts snug and then use the jack to slightly raise the Mustang just high enough to remove the jack stands--one side at a time. Lower the car to the ground.

    10

    Tighten the wheel nuts in a star pattern with an adjustable torque tool set at 100 ft-lbs. and a socket.

    11

    Apply the brake pedal several times in order to reseat the caliper pistons and brake pads to the rotors. Once the pedal feels firm, recheck the brake fluid level in the reservoir and add DOT3 brake fluid to top it off, if necessary.

    12

    Remove the tire wedge, release the parking brake and then test-drive the Mustang.

Rear Brake Pads

    13

    Follow the first three steps as delineated in Section 1 to the rear axle and tires, however, do not apply the parking brake and place the tire wedge in front of one of the front tires.

    14

    Remove the retaining screw from the brake hose bracket to the shock absorber bracket and then remove the upper and lower caliper locating pins with the ratchet and a socket.

    15

    Pry the caliper off the pads and rotor and hang it from the chassis, using a caliper hanger. Use the rear caliper piston reset tool kit to screw the caliper piston clockwise until it bottoms out in the bore. Align the two slots in the rear brake piston face so it will engage the nibs on the back of the new inner brake pad.

    16

    Remove the old brake pads from the anchor plate and clean the surfaces with a wire brush. Apply a coat of lubricant to the clips. Replace the clips and install the new pads.

    17

    Replace the caliper and locating pins and tighten. Replace the brake hose bracket retaining screw to the shock absorber bracket. Repeat for both sides and then lower the Mustang to the ground and torque the wheel nuts. Pump the brake pedal until the pistons seat the brake pads and then test-drive.