Kamis, 30 Juni 2011

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 1994 Ford Probe GT

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 1994 Ford Probe GT

The 1994 Ford Probe GT integrates the Mazda 626, MX-6 and Millenia disc braking systems. While the Probe features front disc brakes with brake pads, rear brakes vary. Your Probe may come equipped with rear disc brakes and pads or rear drum brakes and brake shoes. While replacing the brake pads, a careful inspection of the rotors and calipers should be performed to assess whether these components should be replaced as well.

Instructions

Front Brake Pads

    1

    Apply the parking brake and then remove half of the brake fluid from the brake fluid reservoir using a brake fluid baster. Discard the fluid and replace the cover of the reservoir.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels with the lug wrench. Hoist the front of the Probe up with a jack to support each side on jack stands respectively.

    3

    Remove the lower caliper bolt with a metric box-end wrench and then pry the caliper off of the rotor and pads with a medium pry bar. Hold the caliper upward to remove the inner and outer brake pads from the caliper. If necessary, pry the pads out of the caliper support plate with the pry bar.

    4

    Insert the caliper piston boring tool into the caliper housing and tighten the tool to compress the caliper piston fully. Inspect the rubber piston boot surrounding the caliper piston and pinch the boot upward and out to relieve any air bubbles distorting the boot.

    5

    Apply a coating of high-temp caliper grease to the steel backing plates and the tabs of the replacement brake pads. Install the brake pads into the caliper support plates.

    6

    Pivot the caliper downward over the pads and rotors and then rethread the lower caliper bolt into the caliper housing and steering knuckle. Tighten the bolt and replace the wheel and lug nuts. Snug the lug nuts with the lug wrench using a star formation until the rim is firm to the hub. Repeat the pad replacement procedure for the other front wheel.

    7

    Lower the Probe to the ground slowly and then re-tighten the lug nuts with the torque wrench and socket to 90-foot pounds.

    8

    Top off the brake fluid reservoir with brake fluid, replace the cap and then pump the brake pedal until it feels firm. Recheck and adjust the brake fluid once more in the reservoir and then replace the cap.

    9

    Release the parking brake. Test drive the Probe.

Rear Brake Pads

    10

    Perform Steps 1 and 2 in Section 1 but do not apply the parking brake. Instead, place a wheel-blocking wedge into the outside front tread of a front tire.

    11

    Loosen parking brake adjustment from the rear of the interior parking brake handle using the ratchet, extension and a socket.

    12

    Disconnect the parking brake cable locknut from the cable bracket using the ratchet and a socket. Remove the upper caliper mounting bolt with a metric box-end wrench. Pivot the caliper downward, replace the brake pads and compress the caliper piston as illustrated in Section 1, but don't remove the brake pad springs prior to removal.

    13

    Reassemble the rear brakes by reversing the steps.

    14

    Start the engine and then pump the brake pedal five to six times. Apply the parking brake and tighten the adjustment screw as necessary. Recheck the parking brake cable adjustment in between until there's a very light drag on the brakes when rotating the wheels by hand. Install the wheels and lug nuts and then torque to 90-foot pounds.

How to Replace the Rear Rotors on a 2007 Silverado 2500

How to Replace the Rear Rotors on a 2007 Silverado 2500

Rear rotor damage occurs over time on your Silverado 2500 but can happen more often if you use the truck to repeatedly tow or carry heavy loads. Even though the truck is designed with this capability in mind, it doesn't change the fact that the heavier the load, the harder the brake system has to work to stop it. A typical sign of rear rotor damage is the truck lunging forward instead of stopping evenly when you apply the brakes. With a few tools, you can replace the rear rotors on your 2007 Silverado 2500 right at home. The repair should take 60 to 90 minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the hood on your Silverado and locate the brake fluid reservoir. Take the cap off the reservoir and use a baster to remove half of the brake fluid. Set the baster to the side of your work area in an upright position so that the fluid doesn't leak all over the ground. Do not discard the fluid, because you will need it at the end of the repair job.

    2

    Place a wheel block in front of each of the front tires. Make sure that they're firmly jammed into position.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts on the rear passenger tire with your lug wrench a half-turn, but don't completely remove them. Raise the rear end of the truck with a hydraulic jack and place a jack stand near the tire, beneath the frame rail, to help support the truck.

    4

    Remove all of the lug nuts and slide the tire off the wheel studs. Roll the tire out of the work area and place the lug nuts in your pocket for safekeeping.

    5

    Place an 8-inch C-clamp around the outer body of the brake caliper and wind the screw down until it touches the surface of the outer brake pad. If you look at the back of the inner brake pad, you should see the caliper's piston pushing against its surface. The rounded section on the brake caliper is the bore hole that houses the piston. Begin turning the C-clamp clockwise, slowly, until you see that the piston has completely retracted into the bore hole, then remove the C-clamp.

    6

    Remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bracket bolts with a socket wrench. Place a 5-gallon bucket right next to the bracket assembly. Pull the assembly off the rotor, using both hands, then set it down on top of the bucket. Make sure that the brake line isn't twisted or pulled too tightly. If so, scoot the bucket closer.

    7

    Remove the rotor by pulling it straight off the wheel studs in an outward motion. Install the new rotor by reversing this step.

    8

    Slide the mounting bracket back down over the new rotor and start each of its bolts by hand. Set your 3/8-inch drive torque wrench to 221 ft-lbs. and then completely tighten both bolts in place.

    9

    Remount the tire on the wheel studs and return each of the lug nuts by hand as well. Tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern until snug. using your lug wrench.

    10

    Remove the jack stand and lower the truck until the tire contacts the ground--enough to give it traction. Reset the torque wrench to 140 ft-lbs. and continue the star-pattern tightening until the lug nuts are totally secure. Lower the truck completely and remove the hydraulic jack.

    11

    Pump the brake pedal until it stiffens beneath your foot, then check the brake fluid level. If the fluid appears low, add some of the brake fluid from the baster to bring it to the correct level and then put the cap back on the reservoir. Use this procedure to change your other rear rotor as well.

How to Test a Vacuum Brake Booster on a Tahoe

The Chevrolet Tahoe is a full-sized SUV that was introduced during the 1995 model year. As with all modern vehicles, the Tahoe is equipped with power-assisted brakes, and the vacuum booster is a vital component of the power braking system. Any problems with the vacuum booster can mean that a tremendous effort will be required on the part of the driver in order to slow or stop the vehicle. Fortunately, testing the vacuum booster operation is a simple task that drivers can preform for themselves.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle, turn off the engine and pump the brake pedal a few times to use up any residual vacuum in the vacuum booster. Depress the brake pedal and hold it down. Start the engine. The brake pedal should drop about 1/4 inch. If this happens, it indicates that the vacuum booster is functioning properly.

    2

    Run the engine for a minute or so. Stop the engine and slowly pump the brake pedal four or five times, waiting a couple of seconds in between each pump. The brake pedal should depress to a slightly higher position with each pump, indicating that the booster is air-tight, and the booster check valve is working properly. If there is a leak in the booster or the check valve, then the brake pedal will stop at the same high position with each pump.

    3

    Start the engine and allow it to run for a minute or so. Depress the brake pedal and hold it down. While holding the brake pedal down, stop the engine. Keep holding the pedal down with steady pressure for about 30 seconds. If the pedal does not slowly rise during this time, it indicates that the booster is not leaking, and the check valve is working properly.

Rabu, 29 Juni 2011

Tools for ABS Brakes

Tools for ABS Brakes

ABS (anti-lock) brakes are a technologically advanced system used to protect you by offering stopping power for your vehicle. Repairing these brakes requires a variety of tools. From basic tools like wrenches and socket sets to high-tech scanning tools, fixing your brake system calls for a host of tools to get the job done right.

Scan Tool

    The ABS scan tool is used to diagnose the brake switch, wheel speed sensor and brake control module. It also checks the pump motor and anti-lock control solenoids. When the vehicle's brake warning light is displayed, an OBD II scanner detects problems through the electronic control unit.

Floor Jack and Jack Stands

    The floor jack is used to lift the car to place it on jack stands. The jack is removed once the vehicle is lowered onto the jack stands. Once the vehicle is raised, you can remove the tires and get to the brake assembly

Lug Wrench and Socket Set

    A lug wrench and socket set are necessary to remove the wheels and to remove the calipers from the brake assembly. Once you loosen the calipers, you can remove the old brake pads. The wrenches and sockets are also used to secure the calipers and wheels to complete the job.

Pliers

    The pliers will be used to collapse the piston after removing the caliper bolts. The rotors will be accessible to inspect for replacement or resurfacing. The pliers come in tongue-and-groove and slip-joint styles.

Sandpaper and Wire Brush

    The sandpaper and wire brush are used to remove rust from the brake caliper. After the wheel is removed, you can sand off the rust, using the brush to get into the tough spots.

Selasa, 28 Juni 2011

How to Remove Brake Rotors on a 4WD Ford

How to Remove Brake Rotors on a 4WD Ford

Most four wheel drive Ford products use a disk braking system, which includes a rotor, caliper and pads. These parts are considered routine maintenance items, and can be removed and replaced when worn. The rotor is a spinning friction surface that can be resurfaced until it is too thin to be considered safe. The average backyard mechanic can remove the brake rotors from a 4x4 Ford in about thirty minutes per rotor.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the Ford with a floor jack and place the front frame rail on one or more jack stands; the brakes can be removed one at a time, or both at the same time with the front end lifted securely.

    2

    Remove the wheel and tire by turning the lug nuts counterclockwise with a lug wrench. Pull the wheel from the lug bolts and set it aside. Inspect the brakes for obvious damage to the friction surfaces. Unplug the ABS sensor from the wiring harness at the caliper socket.

    3

    Remove the caliper by turning the rear twin mount bolts in a counterclockwise direction. Some models may have Torx bolts, or a bolt that requires a special socket adapter. Once free from the mount, the caliper and pads will slide off of the rotor. Remove the pads and set the caliper onto a control arm, or tie it up so that the brake lines do not support the full weight of the caliper.

    4

    Remove the rotor by turning the spindle nut counterclockwise with the adjustable wrench. Then pull the rotor from the hub assembly. Some models could have cotter pins, or secondary nuts in the center of the rotor. With the spindle nut removed, the rotor comes free easily.

How to Change the Brake Rotor on a 2002 Blazer

The process for changing the brake rotors on the 2002 Chevy Blazer and 2002 Chevy Blazer S10 is the same. The S10 Blazer has two doors and the Blazer has four, but both have one brake rotor behind each wheel. The brake rotor is a metal plate that the brake pad squeeze to stop the Chevy Blazer while in motion. This is a good job for a beginner with little knowledge of the Blazer models.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nut from the front left tire with the tire iron. Raise the front left side of the Chevy Blazer off of the ground with the jack. Rest the weight of the front left side of the Blazer on a jack stand. Completely remove the lug nuts and pull the tire off of the frame.

    2

    Locate the small securing nut on the side of the brake caliper and loosen that nut using the wrench. Pull the brake caliper off of the front left rotor and rest it on the axle. Locate all of the securing nuts that are securing the rotor to the axle in the center of the rotor. Remove all of the securing nuts with the ratchet set. Pull the front left rotor off of the axle.

    3

    Slide the new brake rotor onto the front left axle. Replace the securing nuts to the center of the rotor and tighten the nuts to secure the new rotor to the axle. Replace the brake caliper to the new rotor and tighten the securing nut with the wrench.

    4

    Replace the tire to the front left side of the Chevy Blazer. Replace the lug nuts to the tire. Life the Blazer's left side using the jack and remove the jack stand from under the frame. Completely tighten the lug nut with the tire iron.

Senin, 27 Juni 2011

How to Change Brake Pads on an ABS Car

How to Change Brake Pads on an ABS Car

Concerns about changing the pads on an ABS-equipped vehicle include damage to the modulator valve assembly due to debris in the system, air trapped in the system due to improper bleeding and air being inadvertently introduced into the system when the pump motor pressurizes the accumulator after pad replacement. These problems can be avoided by following proper procedures. The service manual specific to the vehicle should always be consulted before beginning work to identify bleeding sequences and procedures.

Instructions

    1

    Safely raise the vehicle, with a floor jack, and place a jack stand under the frame. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stand so that the floor jack is not supporting the weight of the vehicle. Remove the wheel and store the lug nuts, along with the wheel, in a secure place to prevent loss of lug nuts and tripping hazards.

    2

    Remove the caliper bolts from the caliper, and lift the caliper off the mounting bracket. Remove the pads from the bracket, and save any clips or shims that are on the old pad set for use on the new pad set. These clips and shims are critical for quiet brake operation; do not discard them unless replacements are available.

    3

    Open the bleeder screw, and compress the caliper piston back into the piston bore in the caliper housing. Allow any fluid that is displaced to run into the drain pan, and close the bleeder screw when the piston is fully compressed. Doing this will prevent any debris trapped in the caliper bore from being sent through the ABS system's modulator valve assembly.

    4

    Install the clips and shims from the old pads onto the new set, and install the new pads onto the bracket. Install the caliper over the pads, and bolt it securely to the caliper bracket.

    5

    Top off the master cylinder with new fluid, and turn the key to the run position without starting the vehicle. This will allow vehicles that are equipped with pump motors to pressurize the system without draining the master cylinder completely. Pump the brake pedal several times to expand the caliper pistons in their bore.

    6

    Reinstall the wheel and lower the vehicle to the ground. Start the engine and test drive to verify the repair. If the system needs to be bled, consult the service manual for the proper sequence and any special procedures.

How to Replace a 2007 VW Jetta 2.5 Rear Brake Pad

In 2005, Volkswagen gave the Jetta a significant makeover, eliminating the Jetta's simple styling, which had been its mainstay since its release in 1980, and introducing a modern and sporty design. The 2007 model year was a down year for the Jetta, as Volkswagen had to eliminate the 1.9-liter turbo-diesel engine from its lineup -- a popular option for fuel economy-conscience buyers -- due to emission regulations. Replacing the rear brake pads on the 2007 Jetta 2.5 is not much different than for most other cars, with exception to the types of bolts used.

Instructions

    1

    Open the Jetta's hood, and unscrew the cap from the master cylinder reservoir. Siphon out about half of the fluid from the master cylinder reservoir, using a clean turkey baster. Transfer this fluid to a small container.

    2

    Loosen the wheel bolts on the rear wheels, using a ratchet and socket. Raise the rear of the Jetta of the ground, using a floor jack, and position jack stands under the rear suspension. Lower the Jetta onto the jack stands. Remove the wheel bolts, and pull the rear wheels off the vehicle.

    3

    Remove the two caliper bolts, using a ratchet and socket, while holding the caliper pin -- the sleeve that the caliper bolt screws into -- from turning with a combination wrench. Pull the caliper off the caliper bracket, and hang it from a nearby suspension component, using a bungee strap.

    4

    Pull the brake pads from the caliper bracket, and pull the anti-rattle clips -- the thin metal shims above and below the brake pads -- from the caliper bracket.

    5

    Remove the two caliper bracket bolts, using a ratchet and Torx-bit socket, and pull the caliper bracket off the rear hub. Remove the two screws securing the rotor to the hub, using a ratchet and hex-bit socket. Pull the brake rotor off the hub.

    6

    Inspect the rotor for visual defects, including cracks, hot spots, ground areas and deep grooves. If defects exist, replace the rotor with a new one.

    7

    Line the bolt holes in the rotor up with the bolt holes in the hub, and press the rotor onto the hub's center ring until it contacts the hub. Hand-tighten the rotor-retaining screws, then tighten them with a ratchet and hex-bit socket.

    8

    Set the caliper bracket back onto the Volkswagen's hub, and hand-tighten the bracket's retaining bolts. Tighten the bracket-retaining bolts to 66 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and Torx socket.

    9

    Install new anti-rattle clips -- included with the brake pads -- onto the upper and lower parts of the caliper bracket. These clips can only fit in one direction to prevent incorrect installation. Slide new brake pads into the caliper bracket.

    10

    Twist the caliper piston clockwise as you press it inward, using a caliper piston tool. This process varies greatly, depending on the type of tool uses, so refer to the tool's instructions for specifics.

    11

    Set the caliper on the caliper bracket, and hand-tighten the caliper bolts into place. Tighten the caliper bolts to 26 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and socket to turn the bolt, while holding the caliper pin still with a combination wrench.

    12

    Repeat Steps 3 through 11 to replace the brake pads and rotor, if needed, on the other side of the Jetta.

    13

    Reinstall the rear wheels onto the Jetta's hub, and hand-tighten the wheel bolts. Raise the rear of the Jetta off the jack stands, using a floor jack, and remove the jack stands. Lower the rear of the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts 80 foot-pounds, in a crisscrossing pattern, using a torque wrench and socket.

    14

    Press and release the brake pedal repeatedly until it feels firm. Check the level of the fluid in the master cylinder reservoir, and add DOT 4 brake fluid until the level reaches the "Max" line.

    15

    Take the old brake fluid in the small container to a used-auto-fluid recycling center for disposal. Some auto parts stores take this old fluid free of charge.

Sabtu, 25 Juni 2011

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Ford Taurus

You can make parking brake adjustments to your Ford Taurus easily once you have a special tool called a cable tension gauge. Save yourself time and money making the adjustment at home, instead of taking your Ford Taurus to the mechanic. You should adjust the parking brake when your car starts to slip down the hill when it is parked on a slope. The technique below applies to the Ford Taurus from years 1996 to 1998.

Instructions

    1

    Release the parking brake pedal to make sure it is disengaged. Put your Ford Taurus in "N" for neutral.

    2

    Raise your Ford Taurus rear wheels in the air using your jack and support the rear wheels with the jack stands.

    3

    Get underneath the vehicle and locate the parking brake cables. There is a cable coming from each rear wheel and meet in the middle with an adjuster nut.

    4

    Use the cable tension gauge 021-00018 or another tension gauge to measure the parking brake adjuster nut against the rear parking brake cable adjuster. Follow your tension gauge instructions to measure 18 to 26 pounds of tension for your 1996 year Ford Taurus and 34 to 46 pounds of tension for your years 1997 to 1998 Ford Taurus.

    5

    Press in on the parking brake foot pedal to the ground and then release the parking brake pedal.

    6

    Verify the rear wheels spin freely when the parking brake pedal is fully released.

    7

    Lower your Ford Taurus using the jack and remove the jack stands from the rear wheels.

How do I Test a Power Brake Booster For a 1971 Chevelle?

Chevrolet first introduced the Chevelle in 1964. Auto enthusiasts quickly found the Chevelle to be a tinker's dream, and Chevrolet was quick to introduce a number of sportier versions to take advantage of the muscle car image. The 1971 Chevelle was part of the second generation design, and power front disc brakes were offered as part of the optional SS package. The power brakes were state-of-the-art in 1971, however the design was fairly rudimentary by today's standards. The heart of the system was a power booster that used a vacuum generated in the engine intake manifold to assist the driver in braking. Testing this type of booster is a simple task that drivers can easily do themselves.

Instructions

    1

    Park your Chevelle and allow the engine run quietly at idle for a minute or so. Depress the brake pedal, and hold it down with steady force. Now turn the engine off. Continue to hold the brake pedal down for about 30 seconds while paying close attention to the pedal position. The pedal should remain in a steady position. If the pedal slowly rises it means that there is a leak in the system that is causing the power booster to lose vacuum.

    2

    Keep the engine off and pump the brake pedal a few times to use up any vacuum left in the booster with the engine still off. Depress the brake pedal and hold it down with steady force. Start the engine, paying close attention to changes in the pedal position as you do so. The brake pedal should drop slightly when the engine starts. If it does not, then the booster is not receiving vacuum from the engine intake manifold.

    3

    Allow the engine to run at idle for a minute or so. Shut the engine off and immediately pump the brake pedal a few times, waiting a few seconds between each pump. Pay close attention to the position that the brake pedal stops at with each successive pump. The pedal should stop at a slightly higher position with each pump, for at least the first three or four pumps. If the pedal stops at a low position with the first pump and then stops at the same high position on all successive pumps it means the booster is leaking and loosing vacuum.

How to Adjust a Mustang's Rear Brakes

Mustangs equipped with rear drum brakes can benefit from having the rear brakes adjusted periodically. This adjustment will restore brake-pedal height and, in most cases, parking-brake function. Mustangs equipped with rear disc brakes are automatically adjusted when the brake pedal is pushed and no provision is made by the manufacturer to adjust them. No special tools are required and the average Mustang enthusiast can complete the adjustment in an hour using basic hand tools.

Instructions

    1

    Place the wheel chocks behind and in front of the front wheels. Raise the rear of the Mustang, using the floor jack placed under the rear differential, until the rear wheels are off the ground. Position the jack stands under the rear axle tubes and lower the Mustang onto the stands.

    2

    Release the parking brake and place the transmission into neutral. It is critical that the Mustang be lifted and supported as described in Step 1 to prevent injury if the vehicle were to slip off the floor jack.

    3

    Remove the adjustment plug located near the bottom of the backing plate behind the rear wheels. Slide the adjusting tool or screwdriver into the back of the backing plate through the adjustment hole and rotate the self adjuster up while spinning the rear wheel. The rear brake is properly adjusted when there is a slight drag on the brake system when turning the wheel. Reinstall the plug into the backing plate and repeat the process on the remaining rear wheel.

    4

    Place the transmission in park or first gear. Lower the vehicle to the ground by raising it off the jacks stands, removing the jack stands from under the car, and releasing the floor jack slowly. Apply and release the parking brake a few times and test-drive the car to verify the repair.

Kamis, 23 Juni 2011

ABS Brakes Pros & Cons

ABS brakes are an anti-lock braking system that prevents the wheels on your vehicle from locking up while you are braking. ABS brakes have a rotating road wheel, allowing you to have steering control while heavy braking at the same time. This prevents your vehicle from skidding on the surface, because the wheels are continuing to interact with the surface and help you avoid any dangerous situations.

Pros

    ABS brakes are designed to help you stop better, which they do by preventing your wheels from locking up. ABS brakes work best on slippery surfaces, because they provide your vehicle with the shortest stopping distance. Because your wheels aren't locking, you still have control over the steering mechanism in the car and can avoid hitting any objects in your way.

Cons

    Although ABS brakes are able to help prevent your wheels from locking up, it doesn't mean that they prevent all accidents. ABS brakes have been known to provide drivers with a false sense of security and make them believe that they have more control then they actually do. ABS brakes give you more control over your car, but you still don't have control over other drivers or objects.

Function

    You should never pump the brakes in a vehicle with an ABS system. Pumping your brakes is used only in non-ABS systems to prevent your vehicle from locking up and making sure that your vehicle stays on the road. The wheels with an ABS system will never lock up, so when you are making an emergency stop, you need to hold the brake pedal down firmly. It's normal to feel the pedal begin to pulse, but do not take your foot off the break.

Parts

    There are four different components that make up an ABS brake system, which makes them so effective, and they are the speed sensors, valves, pump and controller. The speed sensors are located on each wheel and alert the anti-lock braking system that the wheel is about to lock. The valve has three positions that help it work; position one is when the valve is open and the master cylinder passes the pressure onto the brake. The second position is when the valve blocks the brake line and prevents pressure building up, so the brake can continued to be pushed. The third position is when the valve release pressure from the brake. The pump in the ABS braking system puts the pressure back in the system after the valve releases it. The controller is a computer in the vehicle and controls the valves.

Warning

    According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, vehicles that are equipped with ABS brakes were not any less likely than non-ABS systems to be involved in fatal vehicle accidents. There are many theories on why this is the case. Many experts think that people aren't using the ABS brakes correctly, because they pumping them instead of continuously pressing down. Another reason why ABS brakes are not showing their effectiveness is because drivers are steering off the road and crashing into roadside objects.

How to Install an Emergency Brake Cable on a Ford Ranger

How to Install an Emergency Brake Cable on a Ford Ranger

Replacing an emergency brake cable on a Ford Ranger is not difficult. The cable system has three parts: a front section that hooks to the emergency brake pedal, and two rear sections that hook to the secondary brake shoes on the rear brakes. When you push the emergency brake pedal, this pulls on the cables that run to a lever that pushes the secondary brake shoes out against the brake drums to hold the truck in place.

Instructions

Removing the Emergency Brake Cable

    1

    Jack up the front and rear of the truck and place on jack stands. Place the front jack stands under the frame. Place the rear jack stands under the rear axle housing.

    2

    Remove the cable from inside the Ranger. Disconnect the cable from the brake pedal assembly and feed it through the hole in the firewall.

    3

    Remove the cable from the mounting bracket on the frame. Take off the adjusting nut and washer from the equalizer. Remove the cable.

Replacing the Front Emergency Brake Cable

    4

    Place your new cable in the hole in the equalizer. Replace the nut and washer. Run the nut halfway up onto the adjuster screw.

    5

    Replace the cable in the mounting bracket on the frame. Run the cable up to the hole in the firewall and feed the cable through the hole. Reattach the cable to the brake pedal. Adjust the tension on the cable until the cable has about one inch of play between the body of the truck and the cable.

    6

    Replace the cable in the mounting bracket on the frame. Run the cable up to the hole in the firewall and feed the cable through the hole. Reattach the cable to the brake pedal. Adjust the tension on the cable until the cable has about one inch play between the body of the truck and the cable.

Removing and Replacing the Rear Cable

    7

    Release cable tension by pressing the emergency pedal down and releasing it. Pull the cable back to the rear of truck. Both rear cables are removed and replaced the same way. Find out which one is bad and remove the rear wheel and the brake drum.

    8

    Release the front cable from the rear cable by removing the end of the rear cable from the equalizer and take the cable out of the bracket. The end of the cable is hooked to a lever on the secondary brake shoe. Remove the cable end from the lever on the secondary brake shoe.

    9

    Remove the cable end from the lever on the secondary brake shoe. Release the cable retainer from the wheel side of the backing plate. Press the spring steel retainer until it passes through the hole in the backing plate. Replace the new cable in the hole in the backing plate from the back side of the backing plate. Push the cable through the hole until the retainer snaps in place. Hook the cable end to the slot in the lever.

    10

    Place the emergency cable in the retaining bracket and reattach the cable end in the equalizer bar. Adjust the emergency brake, leaving about one inch between the truck body and the cable. Do not overtighten. Both right and left rear cables replace the same way. Jack up the truck and remove the jack stands from the the rear axle. Lower the rear to the ground. Jack up the truck in the front and remove the jack stands from the frame. Lower the front to the ground.

Rabu, 22 Juni 2011

How to Remove Brake Calipers on a Car

Calipers are an important part of your brake system. They hold the brake pads that offer the support and cushion your brakes need to operate properly. The calipers are just one component of the brake system, so there are other parts along the way to remove in order to access the calipers.

Instructions

    1

    Locate and remove the cover from the brake fluid reservoir. Siphon off two-thirds of the fluid. Do not siphon with your mouth; instead, use a pump or baster.

    2

    Loosen the wheel lug nuts and raise the front of the car on jackstands. Make sure the car is securely on the jackstands before starting any work. Push the piston back into the brake caliper core. This can be done with either a C-clamp or screwdriver, depending on the make and year of vehicle.

    3

    Remove the brake hose bolt in order to remove the brake hose. Have a rag handy to catch the fluid spilled. Wrap the open end of the brake hose in plastic wrap to avoid more spilling and contamination. Don't disconnect the brake hose from the caliper if you are only removing the caliper.

    4

    Unscrew the two caliper mounting bolts, or slide pins, depending on the make and year of your vehicle. Remove the caliper carefully by taking out the bolts completely and rolling the caliper up and backwards off the mounting stud.

How to Test an 88 GMC Brake Booster

The brake power booster uses vacuum generated in the engine intake manifold to amplify the force the driver exerts on the brake pedal, making the driver's job easier when slowing or stopping the vehicle. This is especially important on large vehicles like those made by GMC. Problems with the power booster can create a dangerous situation because the driver may unexpectedly need much greater effort when braking. If the braking seems to be more difficult than normal it is time to test your brake booster. Testing the booster is an easy task that every driver can do to assure herself that it is functioning properly.

Instructions

    1

    Park your 88 GMC and turn the engine off. Pump the brake pedal slowly five or six times to relieve any residual vacuum in the booster. Push the brake pedal down and hold it down with light but steady force. The brake pedal should feel harder and higher than normal. Start the engine. The brake pedal should immediately drop 1/4-inch or so and it should suddenly feel normal. If your booster is not functioning properly the pedal will stay in a high position and will feel hard.

    2

    Let the engine idle for a couple of minutes. Turn the engine off and slowly pump the brake pedal, waiting a couple of seconds between each pump. The pedal should go down to a normal position on the first pump, and then stop a little bit higher with each following pump.

    3

    Start the engine again and let it idle for a couple of minutes. Push the brake pedal down and hold it down with light but steady force. Turn the engine off and continue to hold the brake pedal down for about a minute or so. The pedal should not rise during this time.

Selasa, 21 Juni 2011

DIY: Honda Accord Front Brakes

DIY: Honda Accord Front Brakes

Honda Accord front brakes are disc and caliper brakes that operate by compressing brake pads against a metal rotor disc to create friction and stop your vehicle. Over time both the brake pads and the rotor will wear and require replacement. Typically the brake pads are the first to go and will need to be replaced more frequently than the disc rotor.

Parts Needed

    The simplest type of brake job involves replacing your brake pads. For more worn brake systems you may need to replace or repair your brake rotor disc. Regardless of the condition of your brake system the process is similar.

    You will need wrenches, a lug wrench, a C clamp, a jack and jack stands to do a front brake job on your Honda Accord. You'll also need replacement brake pads and brake pad lubricant.

Inspect the Brakes

    Park your Honda Accord on a hard level surface, engage the parking brake and place a block under the rear wheel to ensure your car doesn't roll while you are working on it. Elevate the front end of your car and place jack stands under the front axle. Lower the car onto the jack stands and check to ensure the car is stable and resting on the jack stands solidly and squarely. Use the lug wrench to remove the front wheels and set them aside. Turn the steering wheel all the way to one side to make it easier to access the brake caliper.

    Inspect the brake system. Look for wear on the brake rotor disc and for any leakage from your brake lines or caliper. If the brake rotor is smooth and there is no leakage, then a simple brake pad replacement will usually be all you need. If your rotor is worn, it may need to be replaced or machined smooth. If your calipers are leaking they need to be replaced.

Remove the Pads

    Start by removing the two caliper bolts. Place your C clamp around the caliper and tighten slowly to release tension on the brake pads against the rotor disc. This will allow the caliper to pull away from the rotor disc allowing access to the brake pads. Remove the old brake pads paying attention to the location of the shims.

    Place the new brake pads into position in the calipers with the shims. Place brake pad lubricant on the brake pads. Carefully slide the caliper back onto the rotor disc and replace the mounting bolts. Remove the C clamp and the brake pads will seat against the rotor disc. Repeat the process on the other side of your Accord. Once both sides are complete, mount your tires and lower your car off of the jack stands. Finally, pump your brake pedal a few times and check the brake fluid reservoir.

Sabtu, 18 Juni 2011

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Acura Integra

Replacing the rear disc brakes on an Acura Integra is a pretty basic process. It does, however, require the use of a specific brake grease, Molykote M77, for the proper operation of the brakes. Read further to learn how to replace the rear disc brakes on your Integra in about an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Siphon half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir. This will prevent overflow when compressing the piston into the bore. Use a syringe or suction gun to siphon the fluid and empty it into an approved, sealed container.

    2

    Raise the rear of the Integra off the ground with a car jack. Preventing it from tipping by using jack stands to support it on all sides. Keep children and animals away from the car while servicing it.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts with a torque wrench and remove the rear wheels from the Integra. Place the wheels on the ground face up to prevent damage to them.

    4

    Disconnect the brake hose bracket located on the rear-trailing arm, and then take off the caliper shield. Remove the caliper from the bracket by unscrewing the caliper mounting bolts. Take out the pad shims and brake pads.

    5

    Rotate the caliper back into the piston using a lock-nut wrench. Once retreated, turn it back slightly to line the cutout in the piston with the tab on the inboard brake pad.

    6

    Clean the mounting bracket, caliper assembly and brake disc. Check for damage and replace if necessary. Grease the brake pads and shims with Molykote M77 brake grease.

    7

    Install the brake pads and shims to the caliper bracket. Lay the caliper over the brake pads and tighten the mounting bolts then cover it with the caliper shield. Replace the wheels and lower the Integra.

How to Install Rear Brake Rotors on a Toyota Land Cruiser

In this day and age, saving money just makes sense to a lot of people. Keeping your Toyota Land Cruiser on the road is expensive enough, and now you need rear brake rotors. The estimate given to you from the local repair station or dealership was pretty pricey. There is a particular challenge involved replacing the rear brake rotors, but it's certainly doable for anyone with some tools and technical know-how. Give yourself a little time and try replacing them yourself

Instructions

    1

    Park the Land Cruiser on a flat, level paved or concrete surface. Release the hood latch.

    2

    Place a wheel chock in front of one of the front tires. Open the hood and suck out half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir using the turkey baster. Discard the fluid appropriately. Replace the cap securely to the master cylinder.

    3

    Break the lug nuts loose on the rear tires. Do not loosen them too much and do not remove them.

    4

    Lift one side of the rear end of the Land Cruiser by the lower control arm using the floor jack. Place a jack stand under the rear axle on that side. Repeat for the other side to elevate the rear axle.

    5

    Remove the lug nuts and wheel of the left rear tire.

    6

    Remove the caliper bolts using a ratchet and a socket. Pry the caliper off using the flathead screwdriver and squeeze the piston of the caliper in with the C-clamp. Hang the caliper to the rear frame using a bungee cord to support it.

    7

    Gently pry the rear brake pads from the caliper anchor using the flathead screwdriver. Remember how the pads were installed so you can replace them in the same manner.

    8

    Remove the caliper anchor bolts using the ratchet and a socket.

    9

    Remove the rotor. The most challenging part of this job is to separate the rotor from the rear parking brake shoes underneath without damaging them. If the rotor is rusted stubbornly to the hub, strike it with the hammer on the fins until loosened. If it is moving on the hub, but still clings to the hub, chances are the parking brake shoes are hung up on the inside of the rotor. Equal parts of tenacity and ingenuity using the pry bar, flathead screwdriver and the hammer will pay dividends, but it may take time. Worse case scenario is breaking some of the rear parking brake shoe hardware and having to take another run to the parts store.

    10

    Spray both sides of the new rotor using brake cleaner. Wipe it dry with a shop rag.

    11

    Install the new rotor. It should fit tightly over the parking brake shoes, but you should not have to force it on and incur damage to the shoes. If you have to, there's an adjuster arm for the shoes that could be taken in using the screwdriver on the star-wheel. Turn it inward a few clicks at a time and try the rotor again until it fits on snugly.

    12

    Replace the caliper anchor and bolts. Replace the pads. Replace the caliper and caliper bolts. Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts as tight as you can with the ratchet and a socket with the wheel elevated.

    13

    Repeat the procedure for the right side.

    14

    Remove the jack stands and lower the Land Cruiser to the ground and torque the lug nuts in an alternate fashion to 100 foot-pounds using the adjustable torque wrench.

    15

    Pump the foot brake pedal several times until it feels normal. This will restore hydraulic pressure back to the compressed caliper pistons.

    16

    Check and adjust the brake fluid level in the master cylinder. Add only new DOT-approved brake fluid for your Toyota Land Cruiser.

    17

    Remove the wheel chock and test drive.

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a VW Passat

Adjust your parking brake when your car starts to slip down the hill. Use this technique on your VW Passat years 1997 to 2004.

Instructions

    1

    Press the brake pedal down with your foot and release it. Put the parking brake lever in the lowest position. Locate the parking brake lever between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat.

    2

    Take off the rear ashtray with your screwdriver. Locate this between the center console between the driver seat and the front passenger seat.

    3

    Pull off any plastic pieces that you see installed around the compensator or parking brake component. These do not need replacing.

    4

    Hold onto the compensator with your screwdriver. This prevents it from turning while you work on the adjuster nut. Take off the locking nut.

    5

    Turn the adjusting nut by hand until the grooves on the cable are completely covered. Push the sleeves of the cables together while turning the adjuster nut.

    6

    Unscrew the adjuster nut by hand until the grooves are visible, then replace the locking element. Pull the cables sleeves until you tighten the cables.

    7

    Remove your screwdriver from the compensator. Pull up on the parking brake three times to set the brakes.

Jumat, 17 Juni 2011

How to Replace the Rear Brake Shoes on a 2001 Rav4

How to Replace the Rear Brake Shoes on a 2001 Rav4

The Toyota RAV4 was redesigned in 2001 to have a huskier, more contemporary sport utility vehicle appearance, according to ConsumerGuideAuto.com. The RAV4 has a four-cylinder engine that qualifies as a low-emissions vehicle in California. The 2001 RAV incorporated a roomier interior design to allow passengers increased leg room. The RAV4 is renowned for its maneuverability as well its visibility. It comes with all around disc brakes, which makes brake repairs fairly simple.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen each lug nut 1-1/2 rotations counter-clockwise. Place the blocks in front of the front tires.

    2

    Place the floor jack beneath a support strut. There is a support strut located along the edge of the underside near each tire. Raise the vehicle enough to allow the tires to come off easily. Place the jack stands underneath the same support strut as the jack.

    3

    Finish removing the lug nuts and take the tire completely off.

    4

    Loosen the lower bolt on the caliper using the socket wrench. Tie the mount up to the undercarriage with the rope to hold it out of the way.

    5

    Denote the orientation of the brake pads and the clips that hold them in. Remove the clips by pulling them out and remove the brake pads.

    6

    Compress the caliper by pressing it inwards, using the thin handled hammer or the C-clamp if the hammer doesn't work.

    7

    Place the new pads in where the old ones were and put the clips in where they were.

    8

    Untie the bracket and bolt it back onto the rotor. Put the tire back on and lower the vehicle. Tighten the lug nuts.

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Mazda6

Make parking brake adjustments on your Mazda 6 using the dash light as a guide for the adjustment measure. You need to adjust your parking brake when your car starts to slip when parked on a hill, and this is a repair you can make yourself. Use this technique to make parking brake adjustments for your Mazda 6 from the year 2004 or newer.

Instructions

    1

    Start your Mazda6 engine. Press on the brake pedal and release it three or four times. Turn your car's engine off.

    2

    Remove the center console cover from between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat by taking off the hooks and lifting the cover.

    3

    Use your wrench or pliers to adjust the adjusting nut. Turning the adjusting nut around the cable to adjust the parking brake lever.

    4

    Pull the brake lever up one notch. Turn on the engine and verify the parking brake warning light turns on. Release the parking brake lever.

    5

    Raise up your Mazda6 with a jack and support the rear wheels with jack stands. Verify the rear wheels turn freely when the parking brake lever releases.

    6

    Lower your Mazda6 using the jack and remove the jack stands from the rear wheels. Replace the center console cover and put the hooks back into place by hand.

Kamis, 16 Juni 2011

Replacing Rear Brakes on a 1995 Mercury Grand Marquis

Replacing Rear Brakes on a 1995 Mercury Grand Marquis

The rear brakes on the Mercury Grand Marquis use brake shoes that also operate the parking brake. The brake drum assembly uses a number of levers and springs that adjust the position of the shoes as needed. You must always change the brake shoes for both rear wheels together, but work on one assembly at a time so you will always have a complete assembly as a visual reference.

Instructions

Preparation

    1

    Block the car's front wheels with wheel chocks; then release the parking brake.

    2

    Raise the car's rear end and support it on jack stands. Remove the rear wheels.

    3

    Pull off the brake drum for the first brake assembly; if it sticks, remove the plug in the backing plate and turn the star wheel with a screwdriver to back off the shoes. Inspect the drum and replace it if it's scored or worn. It is recommended that you replace the drums or have them turned when replacing the shoes.

    4

    Spray the entire brake assembly with an aerosol brake cleaner, using a drip pan to catch all residue that drips off the brakes. This will reduce the amount of asbestos dust entering the air.

Removal

    5

    Remove the two return springs at the top of the assembly with pliers or a spring removal tool. Unhook and remove the adjusting cable eye and the shoe guide from the pin that the springs were connected to.

    6

    Push in each retaining springs on the brake shoes with the pliers, rotate it 90 degrees and pull it off the pin.

    7

    Separate the two shoes and remove the star wheel and adjuster spring that connect them on the bottom.

    8

    Remove the primary (front) brake shoe from the assembly. Remove the adjusting lever from the bottom of the secondary shoe, remove that shoe and pull the parking brake cable off actuating lever with pliers.

    9

    Pry off the E-clip connecting the lever to its brake shoe and remove the lever.

    10

    Disassemble the three parts of the adjuster screw assembly, clean the moving parts, lubricate them with high-temperature grease and reassemble the screw. Screw the star wheel all the way in.

    11

    Removing the anchor pin guide plate and the parking brake strut from the assembly and clean them with the brake cleaner and a rag before reassembling them.

Installation

    12

    Connect the parking brake lever to its replacement brake shoe using a new E-clip. Remember that the primary shoe is the shorter of the two, and it goes toward the front end of the vehicle.

    13

    Lightly lubricate all spots on the brake assembly's backing plate that contact other parts using high-temperature grease. Do not get grease on the shoe itself.

    14

    Connect the brake shoes on the backing plate and slide the parking brake link into position underneath the wheel cylinder at the top of the assembly -- make sure the cylinder and link engage with the shoes.

    15

    Install the adjusting screw at the bottom of the shoes, making sure the screw's long end points toward the front of the car. Screw the adjuster all the way in to ensure the drum fits back on the assembly.

    16

    Connect the adjusting lever to the to the secondary shoe and install the shoe guide and adjuster cable to the top pin.

    17

    Connect the bottom return spring to the adjusting lever and the top return springs to the guide pin.

    18

    Re-install the drum. Repeat the entire process for the other side.

    19

    Re-install both wheels. Pump the brake pedal to center the shoes. Insert your screwdriver into the star wheel's hole, and turn the star wheel until the drum drags against the shoes as you turn the wheel by hand, then back the adjuster off until the wheel stops dragging. Repeat for the other side. Lower the car off the jack stands.

How to Replace the Front Disc Brakes on a Ford E-250

How to Replace the Front Disc Brakes on a Ford E-250

Regardless of whether you have cheap brake pads on your Ford E-250 or the so-called lifetime brakes, there will be some point in time where you will have to change the front disc brakes. Brakes have a built-in piece of metal that is there to warn you when the brakes are nearing the end of their useful life by emitting a squealing sound. However, you should not depend on that to tell you when they need to be changed. Your brakes should be inspected on a regular basis, such as every two to three months.

Instructions

    1

    Park the van on a level surface and place wheel chocks behind the rear wheels.

    2

    Raise the front of the van on the side that you will start on first with a jack.

    3

    Remove the wheel then place a jack stand under the frame near the jacking point. Position the jack stand as close to the frame as possible.

    4

    Detach the caliper with the proper-sized socket and ratchet. The guide pins are located on the backside of the caliper.

    5

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper by sliding them out of the front of the caliper.

    6

    Push the caliper piston back into the caliper housing using one of the old brake pads as a surface and twist the screw into the C-clamp until the piston seats itself.

    7

    Install the new brake pads by sliding them into the front of the caliper, locking them into place with the clips attached to the pad.

    8

    Place the caliper back into the caliper support and lock it into place by tightening the caliper guide pins with the proper-sized socket and ratchet.

    9

    Remount the wheel and remove the jack stand.

    10

    Lower the van to the ground and repeat the process on the other wheel.

    11

    Depress the brake pedal five to six times before you drive the van to be sure the piston seats itself properly against the brake pads.

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Ford Focus

Adjust the parking brake when your car starts to slip when you park it on a slope. Use these directions for your 2004 to 2008 Ford Focus.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the center console cover around the parking brake lever. Locate this between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat. Put the parking brake lever to the lowest position towards the floor.

    2

    Loosen the parking brake cable adjuster nut with your wrench or pliers. Locate the adjuster nut on the parking brake cable rod stick behind the parking brake lever. Press and release the brake pedal, not the parking brake lever, to ensure the rear brakes adjust correctly.

    3

    Get underneath the Ford Focus and follow the parking brake cables from the rear wheels to the center of the vehicle. Make sure there are no cuts or problems and that the cables are in their proper position.

    4

    Raise your Ford Focus rear wheels in the air using the jack and support the rear wheels using the jack stands. Pull up on the parking brake lever to four notches. Tighten the adjuster nut on the inside of the vehicle to increase resistance when pulling up on the parking brake lever. Release the parking brake lever to the floor.

    5

    Pull up on the parking brake lever and release it three or four times to adjust the parking brake lever system. Release the parking brake lever to the floor.

    6

    Check the movement of the caliper parking brake lever by getting underneath the vehicle and looking at the right and left rear inside wheel well. Make sure that for drum brakes the calipers do not move more than 1mm to 8mm. Make sure that for rear disc brakes that the calipers do not move more than 0.5mm to 2mm.

    7

    Rotate the rear wheels to make sure they rotate freely. Put the parking adjustment nut retaining clip on to hold the adjuster nut in place. Put the center console cover back on, lower your Ford Focus using the jack and remove the jack stands.

How To Repair Parking Brake Shoes

How To Repair Parking Brake Shoes

When a car is not stopping as fast as it used to or when the parking brake seems to be losing its power, it could be time to replace your brake shoes. The parking brake, or emergency brake, is usually attached to the rear wheels of a car. Activating the parking brake is similar to applying the brakes on conventional drums. Most brake shoes are constructed to continue working well for 20,000 to 40,000 miles. Refer to your owner's manual for any vehicle part clarification. A general knowledge of auto mechanics is recommended for this project.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the brake fluid from the master cylinder by using a siphon. Use your owner's manual to identify and locate the vehicle parts you will be working with. A turkey baster can be substituted for the siphon.

    2

    Jack up the car. Place jack stands securely in place. Remove the tires, using a 13mm socket, swivel adapter and extension for the bolts. Pull the drum off the rear brakes. The rear brakes should now be visible. Clean the entire assembly using the brake cleaner spray.

    3

    Remove the retaining clips by pushing down on them with a screwdriver. Jiggle the rear brake assembly until it comes off the backing plate.

    4

    Remove the parking brake cable from the brake assembly. Remove the brake pads from the springs and put on the new brake pads per manufacturer instructions.

    5

    Clean the backing plate with brake cleaner spray. Apply silicone lubrication to the backing plate and any rub points. Wipe excess spray from the brake pad surface.

    6

    Put the entire assembly back in place. Press the wheel cylinder pistons in toward each other, making the brake assembly fit around it. Install the pins through the backing plate. Fit the retaining clips in by holding the pin from the back of the drum as far up as possible. Push in the retaining clip using needle-nose pliers. Let the pin drop into the clip and release.

    7

    Check to see that the shoes are centered and even with each other. Separate the cam on the adjuster and move the shoes as close together as possible.

    8

    Reinstall the tires, retaining bolts and lug nuts. Lower the vehicle. Repeat the previous steps for each brake assembly on the car.

How to Replace the Disc Brakes on a Ford 500

The Ford Motor Company manufactured the Ford 500 from 2005 through 2007. It replaced the Taurus, then was renamed the Taurus in 2008. As did the later-model Taurus, the 500 featured front and rear disc brakes. The front brakes supported 75 percent braking capacity for the car and the rear supplied the rest. Since the rear calipers and pads are smaller, there were a lot of problems with premature brake wear.

The Front Disc Brakes

    There are some key differences in performing a front disc brake repair on the Ford 500. Lift the vehicle, but shift into neutral before lifting. This will allow the front wheels to rotate as well as move back and forth for better access to the caliper guide and anchor bolts.

    After removing the wheels, remove the two caliper guide bolts from the caliper and then pry the caliper off the rotor. Remove the inboard pad from the caliper piston and remove the outboard pad. Removing the caliper anchor bolts will require a suitable tool such as a breaker bar. Ford recommends discarding and replacing the anchor bolts for reinstallation. The anchor only needs to come off if the rotor is being replaced, but when pads are being replaced, it's always a good idea to replace the rotors as well.

    Once the anchor is out of the way, remove the rotor retaining screw and then remove the rotor.

    Compress the caliper piston inward using a large C-clamp until the piston bottoms out into the bore.

    To install the pads, it's best to purchase a set that come with new rattle clips and hardware. Remove the old clips and hardware and then replace the new ones onto the anchor. Lubricate the mating surface of the clips using an anti-seize compound or high-temp silicone brake lubricant.

    Replace the rotor, anchor -- new anchor bolts should be torqued to 81-foot pounds -- pads, and then the caliper. Replace the guide bolts, but apply lubricant to the non-threaded section before reinserting. Tighten the guide bolts to 40-foot pounds.

    Replace the wheels and nuts. Torque the nuts to 100-foot pounds.

    To seat the pads on the 500, start the engine and then apply 20- to 30-foot pounds of pressure to the brake pedal for one full minute. Shut the engine off and pump the pedal to check for firmness. Always check and adjust the brake fluid level before replacing brakes.

The Rear Disc Brakes

    The procedure is similar to replacing the front brakes. A key difference is removing the integrated parking brake cable from the caliper. Another major difference is the caliper pistons. The pistons employ a threaded design and a special tool must be used to work on them. This tool is available for purchase or rental at most parts stores. The left side caliper -- driver's side -- needs to be turned clockwise while pressure to the piston bore is being administered. This can be tricky and may require repeated attempts. The right caliper -- passenger side -- must be turned counterclockwise in the same fashion to compress the piston.

    Again, it is recommended to discard and replace the caliper anchor bolts. The torque specifications are the same for the front and rear.

Rabu, 15 Juni 2011

How to Replace the Rotor in a Acura Integra

Rotors rarely need to be replaced, but if your Acura Integra is shuddering and pulsing when you hit the brakes then your rotors are probably warped or worn down and it's time to buy new ones. If you are comfortable working on your own vehicle, replacing the rotors yourself is a cost effective alternative to sending it to the shop.

Instructions

    1

    Buy a new pair of rotors for your Acura Integra at your local auto parts store or online. Plan on swapping out all four rotors at once, or at least the front or rear pair. Never replace just one rotor, as this leads to uneven and very unsafe braking.

    2

    Drain half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using a siphon. This relieves the pressure in the brake line. Then get your Integra off the ground by jacking up the vehicle and then using jack stands to support it. Make sure the Acura is parked on level ground before you start working.

    3

    Remove the tire and wheel assembly by using a socket wrench to undo the lug nuts. Undo the caliper mounting bolts with a socket wrench and move the caliper away from the rotor. Use mechanic's wire to suspend the caliper to prevent any damage to the brake line. Next, remove the rotor retaining screws.

    4

    Pull off the old rotor and clean the area with a damp cloth to remove any rust or debris. Dust or corrosion can contain asbestos, so exercise caution while cleaning the area.

    5

    Install the new rotor by lining it up on the wheel hub. Make sure that the mounting screws and any threaded area is dry before installing it. Secure the mounting screws into place.

    6

    Replace the caliper and mounting bolts with a torque wrench. Be sure to remove the mechanic's wire before replacing the tire and wheel assembly.

    7

    Put the wheel assembly and tire back on. Once all four tires and rotors have been replaced, add new brake fluid. Bleed the brakes if necessary. Lower the car and then tighten the lug nuts on each wheel properly using a torque wrench or an air ratchet with an appropriate adapter.

Selasa, 14 Juni 2011

How Do I Install Rear Brakes on a '94 GMC Pickup?

The rear brakes on your '94 GMC pickup truck are servo-style drum brakes. As the brake shoes are expanded against the brake drum, they grab and try to follow the rotation of the drum. The rotation of the primary shoe wedges the secondary shoe against the anchor pin and drum, causing friction and deceleration of the truck. Replacing the shoes when they wear out is a common do-it-yourself auto repair project that requires basic brake repair tools.

Instructions

    1

    Park the truck on level ground and block both front wheels with wheel chocks. Raise the rear wheels using a floor jack positioned under the center of the rear differential and place jack stands under both rear axles. Lower the truck onto the stands for extra safety and support. Remove the wheels using a lug wrench.

    2

    Slide the brake drum off the rear axle and the brake shoes. Clean the brake shoes off using soapy water. If the drums are rusted to the axles, a few sharp blows from a hammer around the outer edge of the drum will loosen the rust and allow you to remove the drum.

    3

    Remove the return springs that attach the brake shoes to the anchor pin located at the top of the brake backing plate, using a brake return spring tool from the set. Place the tool over the anchor pin and rotate it until it slips the spring off the pin. Slide the parking brake bar, located below the wheel cylinder, out from between the brake shoes and lay it aside. Slip the adjuster cable off the anchor pin and lay it aside.

    4

    Remove the hold-down springs that attach the brake shoes to the backing plate, using a hold-down-spring tool from the brake tools set. Push the spring in with the tool and rotate it until it pops free from the pin that passes through it.

    5

    Twist the primary shoe and secondary shoe in opposite directions and allow the adjuster and lower anchor spring to drop free from the shoes. Remove the U-clip that attaches the parking brake lever to the secondary shoe using a pair of pliers. Remove the shoes from the backing plate and lay them aside.

    6

    Install the parking brake lever on the new secondary shoe using a new U-clip. Attach both new shoes to the backing plate, using the hold-downs springs and the hold-down-spring tool. Position the parking brake bar between the two shoes and slip the adjuster cable over the anchor pin.

    7

    Install the cable guide and return springs using the return-spring tool to pry the springs onto the anchor pin. Rout the adjuster cable around the cable guide and hook the end of it onto the adjuster lever. Attach the lower spring to the secondary shoe and the adjuster lever. Pull the two shoes away from each other at the bottom edge and slip the adjuster into position on the brake shoes.

    8

    Rotate the adjuster to expand it and the shoes until the drum will slide just over the shoes. Install the drum and reinstall the wheel. Repeat the process on the other rear wheel.

    9

    Adjust the brakes. Remove the rubber plug on the bottom edge of the back of the backing plate and insert the brake adjusting tool from the set into the slot. Rotate the adjuster downward until the drum rubs on the brake shoes slightly when the wheel is turned. Repeat for both sides.

    10

    Raise the truck off the jack stands and remove the stands before lowering the jack and the truck to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts securely with a lug wrench. Test drive the truck to verify that the brakes function properly.

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a Saab 900

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a Saab 900

Saab Automobile manufactured the Saab 900 from 1978 to 1998. It was a two-door, compact car that had excellent gas mileage and handling. The disc brakes on it were simple to change and usually took around 30 minutes per wheel for the at home mechanic. The brakes were good for 50,000 to 100,000 miles and usually lasted three to five years. The lightness of the car added to the life of the brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen all of the lug nuts on the tires one rotation counterclockwise with the tire iron. Make sure that the car is in park, but do not set the parking brake.

    2

    Situate the floor jack under the axle of the vehicle and raise it until the tire is 2 inches off of the ground. Set the jack stand under the same axle to stabilize the car. Remove the lug nuts completely and remove the tire.

    3

    Remove the bolts that hold the brake caliper mounting bracket (the half moon shaped metal bracket on the rotor) to the rotor with the socket wrench. Tie the bracket to the wheel well with the rope so that there is no strain on the brake line (the black tube protruding from the back of the bracket).

    4

    Pull the brake pads out of the bracket with your hands. They easily slip out of the bracket.

    5

    Clamp the c-clamp onto the bracket. Set the stationary end of the c-clamp against the back of the bracket and the movable end against the brake caliper cylinder. The cylinder is in the center of the bracket. Compress the c-clamp until the caliper cylinder is flush with the bracket.

    6

    Insert the new brake pads into the slots where the old ones were removed from. They will simply slip in to the bracket.

    7

    Reattach the mounting bracket to the rotor. Set the wheel back on and tighten down the lug nuts by hand and lower the vehicle. Tighten all of the lug nuts with the tire iron once the car is lowered.

Senin, 13 Juni 2011

1997 Toyota T100 Front Brake Rotor Removal

1997 Toyota T100 Front Brake Rotor Removal

The 1997 Toyota T-100 was equipped with a 2.7-liter four-cylinder engine and two-wheel drive in the base model. A 3.4-liter V-6 was available as an upgrade, as was four-wheel drive. When you replace the rotors on the T-100, you should replace the brake pads as well. Old brake pads will ruin the new rotors much faster. The 1997 T-100 has two styles of brake calipers: PD60 and PD66 types. The replacement procedures for the pads is different for the two types of caliper.

Instructions

Rotor Replacement

    1

    Loosen the front wheel lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the front of the truck with a jack, and place jack stands beneath the front frame. Lower the truck onto the stands. Remove the wheel lug nuts completely, then remove both front wheels from the truck.

    2

    Remove the caliper bolts with a ratchet and socket. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using a pry bar if necessary. Insert the pry bar between the inboard and outboard brake pad, and pry the inboard brake pad toward the rear of the caliper. Continue prying until the caliper piston is completely compressed into the caliper. Hang the caliper assembly from the front coil spring, with a metal clothes hanger or rod.

    3

    Remove the caliper mounting bracket bolts with a 1/2-inch-drive ratchet and socket. Remove the bracket from the brake assembly. Slide the rotor off of the wheel hub by hand.

    4

    Install the new brake rotor onto the wheel hub. Spin a lug nut onto one of the lug stems, against the face of the rotor, to hold it in place. Install the caliper bracket over the rotor and onto the steering knuckle. Install and tighten the caliper bracket bolts to 80 foot-pounds, with a 1/2-inch-drive torque wrench and socket. Thoroughly spray the front and back sides of the new rotor with aerosol brake cleaner. Remove all of the factory installed anti-rust oil from the rotor with the spray.

    5

    Repeat Steps 2 through 4 to replace the rotor on the second side of the truck. Proceed to one of the following sections, based upon which caliper (PD60 or PD66) your T100 is equipped with. The instructions for pad removal and replacement are different.

Caliper Type PD 60

    6

    Remove the brake pads and shims from the caliper, if they did not release during caliper removal. Install new brake pads onto the caliper bracket.

    7

    Lubricate the metal backing plates of each pad with a thin layer of caliper grease.

    8

    Install the compressed caliper over the pads and new rotor. Install and tighten the caliper bolts to 24 foot-pounds, with a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket.

    9

    Repeat Steps 1 through 3 of this section to replace the pads and install the caliper, on the second side of the T100. Remove the single lug nut from the faces of each rotor. Install the front wheels and tighten them snug with a tire iron. Raise the truck off of the jack stands, and remove the stands from beneath the truck. Lower the truck to the ground and tighten the lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds, with your torque wrench and socket.

    10

    Sit in the driver's seat of the truck and pump the brake pedal slowly, 10 to 15 times. If the brake pedal does not stiffen after five or six pumps, stop pumping the brakes and bleed the front brake system.

Caliper Type PD66

    11

    Remove the two-"V"-shaped anti rattle clips from the PD66 caliper with a pair of pliers. Pull the brake pads and anti-squeal shims out of the caliper.

    12

    Install new brake pads and new brake shims into the caliper. The large shim goes on the outboard pad, while the circular shaped shim goes between the inboard pad and caliper piston. Install the "V" shaped anti-rattle clips onto the caliper. Tap the clips in place with a small hammer if necessary. Lubricate the exposed outside shim plate with a light coating of caliper grease.

    13

    Install the separate brake wear indicators -- the small "L" brackets -- onto the caliper bracket. One indicator goes on the outboard side of the bracket, and the other goes on the inboard side. See the attached diagram in the Reference section. Install the caliper onto the brake assembly, and tighten the caliper bolts to 80 foot-pounds of torque. Remove the single lug nut from the face of the rotor.

    14

    Repeat Steps 1 through 3 to complete the pad replacement on the second side of the T-100. Install the front wheels and tighten them snug with a tire iron. Raise the truck off of the jack stands, and remove the stands from beneath the truck. Tighten the lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds with a 1/2-inch-drive torque wrench and socket.

    15

    Sit in the driver's seat of the truck and pump the brake pedal slowly, 10 to 15 times. If the brake pedal does not stiffen after five to six pumps, stop pumping the brakes and bleed the front brake system.

How to Assemble 1992 Chevrolet Pickup Rear Brakes

The 1992 Chevy Pickup was equipped from the factory with a duo-servo style rear drum brake system. This system used the rotation of the brake drum to force the secondary brake shoe (closest to the rear of the truck) against the brake drum to slow the vehicle. In this system the primary and secondary shoes are different sizes and must be installed in the proper orientation to work correctly. The home auto mechanic will complete the brake shoe replacement in a couple of hours.

Instructions

    1

    Park the truck on level ground and block the front wheels by placing wheel chocks securely against the tires. Roll the floor jack under the center of the rear differential and lift the truck until the rear wheels are off the ground. Place a jack stand under each axle tube located on either side of the differential and lower the truck onto the stands to support the differential. Remove the rear wheels using a lug wrench.

    2

    Remove the drum from the rear brake assembly by sliding it off the hub and brake shoes. A few sharp blows to the edge of the drum with a hammer will loosen a stuck drum. Rinse the excess brake dust from the brake shoes using a water hose and scrub brush to prevent the system from breathing the brake dust.

    3

    Position the brake shoe return spring tool onto the anchor pin located above the wheel cylinder. Hook the return spring with the tool and rotate the tool to roll the spring from the anchor pin. Remove both return springs in this manner and lay them, along with the brake adjuster rod, adjuster lever and parking brake strut that are now loose, aside.

    4

    Turn the brake adjuster's star wheel, located between the lower edges of the brake shoes, with your fingers until the adjuster is as short as possible. Pull the lower edges of the brakes shoes away from each other until the adjuster drops out from between the two shoes. Unhook the adjuster spring.

    5

    Rotate the brake shoe hold-down spring clips 1/4-turn, using the hold-down spring tool, and lay the springs aside. Remove the e-clip that attaches the parking brake lever to the brake shoe and lay both shoes aside.

    6

    Clean the backing plate with water and a scrub brush. Apply a small dab of silicon brake lube to the raised shoe contact areas on the backing plate. Install parking brake lever onto secondary shoe and secure it with the e-clip.

    7

    Slip the brake adjuster lever and rod onto the primary brake shoe and install the brake shoes on the backing plate. Use the hold down springs to secure the shoes to the backing plate. Remember the bigger shoe is the secondary shoe and goes toward the rear of the truck.

    8

    Install the parking brake strut between the shoes just below the wheel cylinder. Reinstall the brake shoe return springs using the return spring tool to pry the springs onto the anchor pin.

    9

    Clip the adjuster spring to the lower edges of the brake shoes. Pull the shoes apart and slip the adjuster into its slot between the shoes. Rotate the adjuster to expand the shoes. Expand the shoes until the brake drum just fits over the shoes and onto the hub.

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a 1997 Buick Century

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a 1997 Buick Century

The 1997 Buick Century came equipped with disc brake pads all the way around the vehicle. The Century is stopped by applying the brake pads to the brake rotors. The brake pads are applied to the brake rotors by the brake caliper cylinder. When the brake pedal is pushed inward, the brake caliper cylinder pushes the outer brake pads to the sides of the brake rotors. As the outer brake pad compresses to the brake rotor, it closes the complete brake caliper around the brake rotor to stop the Century.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 1997 Buick Century on a hard, level surface.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on both rear wheels by turning the lug nuts counterclockwise with the tire tool.

    3

    Jack the rear of the 1997 Buick Century up and place the car stands under the proper jacking points on both sides of the Buick Century. Lower the jack so that the Century is sitting securely on the stands.

    4

    Remove both rear wheels and place the wheels face down on the side of the car.

    5

    Locate the brake caliper on the rear driver-side brake rotor. Pry the outer brake pad towards the caliper cylinder until the caliper becomes loose.

    6

    Remove the two caliper bracket bolts from the rear of the caliper with the 3/8-inch drive ratchet and a socket.

    7

    Pull the brake caliper off the brake rotor and hang it to the lower control arm, that is, behind the wheel hub assembly, with a small piece of rope.

    8

    Pry the inner brake pad out of the brake caliper with the flat-head screwdriver. Position the C-clamp into the brake caliper. Turn the C-clamp clockwise so that it compresses the outer brake pad towards the brake caliper cylinder. Continue to compress the cylinder until it has fully retracted inside the caliper.

    9

    Unscrew the C-clamp and remove it from the caliper. Pry the outer brake pad out of the caliper. Remove any brake pad accessories from the brake caliper.

    10

    Install the new brake pads into the brake caliper. Make sure that the clips that hold the brake pads inside of the brake caliper are locked in place. Put the caliper back over the brake rotor and secure it in place with the two bracket bolts. Tighten the caliper bolts with the ratchet and socket. Put the wheel back on and tighten the lug nuts with the tire tool.

    11

    Move to the rear passenger-side wheel and follow the same exact steps as outlined above for replacing the brake pads. Once finished with the brake pad installation, crank the 1997 Buick Century and push the brake pedal in and out seven or eight times to remove any air from the brake system. Then, turn the engine off.

    12

    Jack the 1997 Buick Century back up and remove the car stands. Lower the Buick Century back to the surface and slide the jack out.

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a 2002 Volvo S40

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a 2002 Volvo S40

The rear brakes on your 2002 Volvo S40 usually last longer than the front brakes, because front brakes do most of the work in bringing the vehicle to a stop. The rear pads will eventually wear out and require replacement. Symptoms of worn rear brakes include metallic grinding or squealing noises from the rear wheels. If the rear brakes are not replaced in time, the worn pads can damage the rotor and other brake hardware. Replacing the rear brakes takes 30 minutes to complete in ideal conditions.

Instructions

    1

    Park the S40 on a level surface. Loosen the wheel lugs on the rear wheels with the lug wrench.

    2

    Use the floor jack to lift the rear of the vehicle from the ground. Stabilize the vehicle with jack stands placed underneath the S40's rear jack points.

    3

    Remove the loosened wheel lugs from the wheel. Remove the wheel from the hub to reveal the brake hardware.

    4

    Use a ratchet and socket to remove the two retaining bolts at the back of the brake caliper. Lift the caliper off of the rotor and detach the brake pads from the caliper. Suspend the caliper from the the car with mechanic's wire.

    5

    Use brake cleaner to remove any dirt and grime from the caliper. Twist the piston inside of the brake caliper housing with the brake piston retraction tool.

    6

    Attach the wear indicator to the bottom of the inner brake pad. Insert the brake pads inside the caliper and lower the caliper over the rotor. Reinsert the retaining bolts into the caliper and tighten them with the ratchet and socket. Repeat the procedure for the other side.

    7

    Mount the wheel onto the hub and reattach the wheel lugs. Hand-tighten the lugs before lowering the vehicle to the ground.

    8

    Remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle with the floor jack. Tighten the wheel lugs using the lug wrench.

How to Replace a Master Cylinder for a 94 Beretta

The master cylinder stores the brake fluid for the car's brake system. You need to replace a cylinder that is leaking fluid or otherwise improperly sending fluid to the brakes. The brake system on a 1994 Chevrolet Beretta is more electronically controlled than most other models, so there are more components that you must deal with on this model. This process will send air into the brake system, so you must bleed the entire system of air.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Disconnect the car's negative battery cable.

    2

    Unplug the electrical connectors on the master cylinder's two solenoids, the electrical connector on the fluid level sensor and the two motor pack electrical connectors.

    3

    Detach the four brake lines from the master cylinder, using the wrench on their fittings, then cap the lines with rubber plugs or caps.

    4

    Unscrew and remove the retainers connecting the master cylinder to the brake booster using a ratchet or socket wrench. Lift the cylinder and hydraulic modulator out of the engine.

Installation

    5

    Position the master cylinder and modulator within the engine, making sure the cylinder engages the brake booster, and tighten the cylinder's fasteners to 20 foot-pounds.

    6

    Connect the brake lines to the cylinder and tighten their nuts to 15 foot-pounds.

    7

    Connect all the electrical connectors to the cylinder, then reconnect the battery cable.

    8

    Fill the master cylinder at the reservoir with DOT 3 brake fluid.

Bleeding

    9

    Raise the car and support it on jack stands, then remove all four wheels.

    10

    Connect a tube to the bleeder valve on the right rear brake caliper and submerge the tube in a small bottle partially full of brake fluid.

    11

    Loosen the caliper's bleeder screw with a wrench while a second person pushes on the brake pedal -- this pushes air and fluid out of the tube and into the bottle. Close the screw, have a second person release the pedal and repeat until there are no more air bubbles.

    12

    Repeat the previous two steps for the left rear, right front and left front wheels in that order. Keep an eye on the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir and fill it with more fresh fluid as needed.

    13

    Reconnect the wheels, lower the car and refill the master cylinder reservoir as needed.

Minggu, 12 Juni 2011

How to Adjust a Hand Brake in a Ford Escape

The Ford Escape is equipped with either a traditional front disc/rear drum or a four-wheel disc with drum in hat parking brake function. Either system applies the parking brake by expanding a set of brake shoes against the friction surface of a drum. Adjusting the hand brake on your Ford Escape properly requires two steps. First, a brake shoe adjustment is necessary to ensure proper clearance between the brake shoes and drum, followed by a hand brake lever adjustment to adjust lever travel.

Instructions

    1

    Secure the front wheels by placing wheel chocks in front of and behind both front tires. Lift the rear of the Escape with a floor jack positioned under the center pivot of the rear suspension. Place jack stands under the rear control arms for safety. Remove the rear wheels with a lug wrench and set them aside.

    2

    Slide the rear drums off the brake shoes. If your Escape is equipped with rear disc brakes, remove the two 14 mm caliper bracket bolts that attach the caliper to the spindle with a 14 mm socket and ratchet. Lift the caliper assembly off the rotor and slide the rotor off the parking brake shoes.

    3

    Adjust the rear brake shoes on the drum brakes by prying out the adjustment cam on the equalizer located under the wheel cylinder. Pry out on the cam with a small screwdriver until the drum just slides onto the shoes with slight resistance. On disc brakes, adjust the parking brake shoes by turning the adjuster located between the parking brake shoes. Rotate the adjuster with a pair of pliers until the rotor creates a slight drag on the shoes when installed.

    4

    Remount the wheels and test the parking brake. A properly functioning parking brake will fully apply the brake when the lever is raised four to six clicks by the ratcheting mechanism. If the hand brake requires more travel than this, adjust the lever freeplay.

    5

    Adjust the hand brake lever freeplay by gently prying the dust cover away from the lever until you can see the adjusting nut located at the bottom of the lever. Turn the adjusting nut with a 10 mm socket on an extension and ratchet until the parking brake can be fully applied.

How to Check for a Brake Fluid Leak in Your Vehicle

If you've ever applied your car brakes only to find them spongy and low, chances are your vehicle is leaking brake fluid. To avoid a disaster, you need to check for a possible leak. Follow these steps to check for a brake fluid leak in your vehicle.

Instructions

    1

    Locate your vehicle's brake master cylinder. Generally, it is mounted in the vicinity of the firewall at the back of your engine compartment.

    2

    Open the cylinder and check the level of brake fluid inside. The cylinder should be full. Some vehicles have a mark inside the cylinder that indicates a fill line.

    3

    Loosen the nuts that attach the master cylinder to the brake booster and look at the seal surrounding the push rod. It will be obvious if brake fluid is leaking.

    4

    Check your vehicle's caliper piston for leaks. If the piston seal leaks, it will leak brake fluid.

    5

    Examine brake hoses or lines connected to the piston for cracks. Moisture or water on your caliper may indicate a brake fluid leak.

    6

    Confirm that the cap to your vehicle's brake master cylinder is tight and that there are no leaks or signs of previous leaks.

    7

    Drive your vehicle onto a blanket, sheet or large piece of cardboard and tap your brakes hard several times. Look for signs of a brake fluid leak on the surface.

    8

    Watch for your red brake warning dash light to appear. This can indicate low brake fluid.

Sabtu, 11 Juni 2011

How to Do the Front Brakes on a 1997 Ford F-150

How to Do the Front Brakes on a 1997 Ford F-150

Truck brakes are designed to stop the truck with little applied pressure and to do so quickly in case of emergency. Once the brakes on a Ford F-150 start to go out, they need to be diagnosed immediately. The easiest way to tell if your brakes need to be changed is through one of three tell-tale signs: there is a squealing sound when you drive or when you apply the brakes, the brakes "grab" or stop harshly with little pressure, or when the brakes are unresponsive. If any of these conditions occur it is time to change your brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the tires. The lug nuts need to be loosened before the F-150 is raised into the air. Do not remove the lugs, merely rotate them one complete turn counterclockwise. Place wood blocks securely behind the rear tires.

    2

    Jack up the F-150. Slide the floor jack beneath a support strut underneath the front section of the truck. Raise the truck high enough that one jack stand may be placed alongside the jack, under the support strut. Repeat this for the opposite side of the truck.

    3

    Remove the tires. Once the F-150's tires are off of the ground, continue to remove the lug nuts completely. Remove the tire when all of the lugs are removed.

    4

    Use a ratchet wrench set to remove the brake caliper mount. Completely remove the caliper mount from the rotor (the caliper mount is the half-moon shaped metal bracket attached to the wheel rotor). Once the mount is removed, use the rope to suspend the mount from the under side of the truck to prevent any strain on the brake line hose (the small black hose protruding from the mount).

    5

    Remove the brake pads. The brake pads will easily slip out of the caliper mount.

    6

    Compress the brake caliper mount. In the center of the brake caliper mount you will see a 3- to 5-inch wide cylinder; this is the caliper. To compress the caliper, place the C-clamp around the mount so that one end is pushed against that back of the mount and the other is pressing against the caliper. Continue to tighten the C-clamp until the caliper is flush with the mount.

    7

    Insert the new brake pads. The new brake pads should easily slip into the slots where the old brake pads were removed from.

    8

    Bolt the caliper mount back onto the rotor. Untie the mount and reattach it to the rotor. Once the rotor is attached, you can place the tire on the wheel and screw on the lug nuts. Make sure to tighten them evenly and only to finger-tightness. Once the vehicle is lowered, then use a tire iron to completely tighten the lugs.

How to Change Front Disc Brakes on a Hyundai Accent

How to Change Front Disc Brakes on a Hyundai Accent

The front disc brakes on a Hyundai Accent provide the majority of the vehicle's stopping power. Brakes need to be replaced regularly, and most modern braking systems come with a built-in warning to alert the driver that the brakes are wearing out. When the brakes let out a high-pitched squeal, the brake pads are worn down enough that they should be replaced soon.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Hyundai Accent on a flat surface and set the parking brake. Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels with a lug wrench. Place a jack under the frame of the Accent and lift the front end. Put jack stands under the front axles and lower the Hyundai until its weight is fully supported by the jack stands. Finish removing the lug nuts on the wheel that will be worked on first. Remove the wheel.

    2

    Remove the calipers from the pad brackets by squeezing the spring clips and pulling the caliper away. Place the caliper on the steering knuckle carefully and position it so it will not fall.

    3

    Push in on the center of the brake pads to return the piston to its original position. Pull back on the retaining clips holding the brake pads. Remove the brake pads. If the brake pads are stuck, pry on them gently with a screwdriver.

    4

    Apply silicone grease to the back of the new brake pads. Position them in place. Make sure the retaining clips are secure.

    5

    Replace the caliper in its original position. Reinstall the wheel and tighten the lug nuts by hand.

    6

    Repeat the steps with the other side of the vehicle. When both sides are finished, lower the car with the jack and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

Jumat, 10 Juni 2011

How to Change the Rotors on a Colorado

How to Change the Rotors on a Colorado

Changing the brake rotors on the Chevy Colorado is not a difficult procedure. You would typically change the pads at the same time that you would the rotors. You can expect the rotors to take you about 30 minutes to replace on each wheel and you can do the project in your driveway. When you change pads and rotors on your truck, always replace them on both wheels on the axle. If you replace them on only one side, braking will not be balanced between the wheels. Note that these instructions are specific to the two-wheel-drive Colorado.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Colorado on a level surface and turn the key off. Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Jack the truck up with the floor jack. Place a jack stand under each side of the truck near the jacking point and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts using the lug wrench and pull the wheels off the truck. Work on one side at a time, so you will always have a completed assembly as a visual reference.

    2

    Unplug the speed sensor from the wheel hub. Remove the caliper pins with a socket and ratchet. Pull the caliper from the wheel assembly. Secure it to the strut or frame with a wire tie or stiff wire, such as a coat hanger. Do not allow the caliper to hang from the brake line.

    3

    Pull the rotor from the wheel assembly. Clean the wheel assembly thoroughly with the wire brush. Put the new rotor on the wheel assembly. Note that you must clean the new brake rotors with brake cleaner or denatured alcohol before you put them on the truck. Remove and replace the pads in the caliper. Place the brake caliper on the mounting bracket. Tighten the locking pins with the socket and ratchet.

    4

    Place the wheel on the Colorado and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the truck. Lower the vehicle to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

    5

    Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the pads against the rotors before driving the truck.

How to Choose the Correct Braided Brake Line Size

How to Choose the Correct Braided Brake Line Size

When cars come from the factory, they are properly equipped to handle most road conditions. If, however, you wish to drive your car in a manner that is more sporting and exceeds the standards for which it was originally designed, you may want to upgrade the systems to suit the driving style. One such system is the brakes, specifically the brake lines. Most cars come from the factory with high-pressure flexible rubber lines that connect the rigid steel lines to the brake calipers. A popular upgrade to these lines are flexible steel braided lines. These do not expand under pressure, and transferring that pressure to the caliper as brake pressure. This conversion is very easy, but you need to know what size brake line you need.

Instructions

    1

    Locate and remove the brake lines you wish to replace. Alternatively, you can leave them in place, though this will make measuring more difficult.

    2

    Measure from where the brake line enters the caliper to where it connects to the solid steel line. If the line is already removed, pull the line as straight as possible and measure from one end to the other.

    3

    Repeat measurements on all four brakes. Record the measurements. Brake lines are sold in pre-made sizes. If the supplier does not have the exact size, it is best to round up to the next longest size, as the added line can be routed in such a way that doesn't interfere with the vehicle's operation. The added line can also help smooth over any measurement errors.