Selasa, 31 Mei 2011

The Average Cost of Brake Repair

The Average Cost of Brake Repair

Properly maintaining your brakes is one of the most important aspects of vehicle care. After all, without brakes, your car will be unable to stop, resulting in a dangerous crash. Surprisingly, the cost of brake repair and maintenance is lower that what you might expect. By paying attention to the behavior of your vehicle, you can solve brake problems before they get costly, and more importantly, deadly.

Early Detection

    While driving your vehicle, occasionally turn off your radio and listen to your car. If you detect a grinding sound coming from any corner of your vehicle while braking, or a rough feel coming from your brake pedal, it's likely that you need a brake pad replacement, at the very least. It's important to take care of this problem early. Putting off a repair will lead to additional problems, such as broken rotors or loss of pressure in your brake fluid lines, compromising your safety.

Brakepad Replacement

    If you do detect a light grinding noise or feel while braking, a brake pad replacement is probably in order. If you're handy with basic repairs, you can do this replacement yourself. Head to your local auto parts store and ask for brake pads for your vehicle. Basic pads will cost around $15 per wheel. It's important to purchase pads as a pair. You want your brake pads to wear evenly, so even if your front left pad is worn, replace the front right pad as well.

Rotor Replacement

    If you've neglected to replace your brake pads quickly enough, or if you've gone through several pad replacements, your brake rotors might need to be replaced as well. Rotors will cost between $30 and $60 per wheel. This repair can be done at home as well, though a bit more work is required than in a simple pad replacement. If your brake rotors haven't been rotated or replaced in a while, they might be fused to the internals of your wheel.

Brake Repair at a Service Center

    If you bring your vehicle to a service center, expect to pay anywhere from $150-$1,000 for a brake job. This will depend on the condition of pads, rotors, and brake lines, as well as the labor costs of the service staff. If you're afraid to attempt the repair yourself, this will be your only option. Be sure to act like you have experience with brake repairs when talking to the service rep. This will help in avoiding being overcharged.

Warnings

    Functional brakes are extremely important to your safety. If you aren't confident that you can repair your brake system yourself, be sure to have the repair job done at an authorized service shop. Saving a hundred dollars is simply not worth risking your life or the lives of others on the road.

How Do I Replace the Back Brake Shoes on a 2003 Honda Civic?

How Do I Replace the Back Brake Shoes on a 2003 Honda Civic?

The 2003 Honda Civic uses a drum brake system on the rear wheels to stop the vehicle. The part of the system that presses against the drum and experiences the most wear is the brake shoe. You need to replace the brake shoes any time your Civic experiences braking problems which are a safety hazard. Always replace all four back brake shoes on your 2003 Civic when one of them is worn down.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the rear lug nuts with a lug wrench then raise the Civic's rear end with a jack. Support the car on jack stands and block the front wheels. Release the parking brake and remove the lug nuts completely. Pull off the rear wheels.

    2

    Pull the brake drum off of the axle and shoe assembly; if it does not slide off easily, ensure that you have fully released the parking brake. Clean the drum and brake shoe assembly with brake cleaner before continuing.

    3

    Press the retainer spring down with a screwdriver. Rotate the tension pin so that its blade is aligned with the slot in the retainer spring. Pull the brake shoe assembly off of the backing plate then disconnect the return spring.

    4

    Pull the parking brake cable spring back and grip the cable with a pair of pliers. Keep the spring compressed and disconnect the end of the cable from the parking brake lever. Swing the lever out so that it is away from the trailing shoe. Press the adjuster bolt clevis out of its groove and separate the two brake shoes.

    5

    Remove the adjustment lever and spring from the leading shoe. Separate the lever and shoe after prying open the retaining clip for the parking brake lever. Place a new trailing shoe onto the lever then place the washer over the pin. Install the retaining clip, making sure you crimp the ends of the clip with the pliers.

    6

    Clean the adjuster bolt with brake cleaner and lubricate the bolt and clevis with high-temperature grease. Reconnect the adjustment lever spring to the leading shoe and place the lever pin into the hole on the shoe from which it was removed. Place the clevis of the adjuster bolt into the appropriate slot on the leading brake shoe. Ensure it connects to the adjustment lever.

    7

    Reconnect the upper return spring between both brake shoes. Pry the bottom ends of the shoes apart and replace the clevis at the other end of the adjustment bolt into the proper slot in the brake shoe. Coat the brake shoe contact areas of the backing plate with high-temperature grease.

    8

    Compress the spring for the parking brake cable and hold it in this position while you reconnect the cable to the lever. Put the brake shoe assembly against the backing plate and be sure to engage the shoes with the proper slots in the pistons of the wheel cylinder. Reconnect the return spring at the lower end of the shoes.

    9

    Insert the tension pins through the holes in the backing plate and the brake shoes. Reinstall the retainer springs in their original position, and ensure that the lower return spring and parking brake cable are behind the anchor plate.

    10

    Place the drum assembly back onto the hub. Remount the wheel and reinstall the lug nuts. Repeat the process for the other rear wheel.

    11

    Use a jack to remove the car from the jack stands to complete the repair.

How to Fix Scout's Rear Brakes

How to Fix Scout's Rear Brakes

The International Harvester Scout (in all variants) was manufactured with rear drum brakes, which have components that can fail and require replacement or repair. The Scout's brakes improved with the introduction of the Scout II in 1971, but retained the rear drums until its demise in 1980. The average backyard mechanic can repair the rear brakes on a Scout in about an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the rear wheel of the Scout by placing the floor jack under a frame rail (in front of the wheel), then pumping the jack's lever. Place a jack stand on the same frame rail for support.

    2

    Remove the wheel using the lug wrench to turn the lug nuts counterclockwise. Place the wheel away from the work area, and store the nuts in a safe location.

    3

    Remove the drum by sliding it from the brake assembly, directly away from the backing plate. Inspect the drum interior surface for pitting or debris, and check the wheel cylinder for leaks. The shoes are clearly visible on either side of the brake assembly.

    4

    Remove the shoes by levering off the four long retainer springs with the brake tool or a screwdriver. Turn the primary spring bolt in the center of the shoe counterclockwise, then slide the shoe off. Some brake kits will come with replacement springs, and this should be done while the shoes are off. Simply pull them from the retainer hooks and out of the brake assembly. Replace them by looping the spring over the hook. The "shoe side" of the spring will dangle until the shoes are replaced in the next step.

    5

    Replace the shoes by sliding them onto the brake assembly, then turning the primary spring bolt clockwise. Replace the retainer springs by levering them onto the shoe hooks with the brake tool. Set the bottom adjustment bolt between the shoes by hand, turning it clockwise until there is just a little play.

    6

    Replace the wheel cylinder if it is leaking by turning its rear mount bolts counterclockwise and pulling the cylinder piston from the mount. The gaskets on either side can be replaced, as well as the center piston gasket. Turn the mount bolts clockwise to secure the cylinder.

    7

    Resurface or replace the drum and slide it over the shoes, all the way back to the backing plate. Replace the wheel and turn the lug nuts clockwise. Remove the jack stand and lower the Scout down from the floor jack.

Minggu, 29 Mei 2011

1999 Isuzu Rodeo Rotor Removal

1999 Isuzu Rodeo Rotor Removal

The brake rotors on the 1999 Isuzu Rodeo sit on the wheel studs at the wheel hub. Removing the brake rotor will require removing the brake caliper and caliper bracket. If the rotor is being replaced, it will be necessary to compress the caliper piston into the caliper bore to make room for the thicker rotor.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Break loose the lug nuts with the lug wrench; do not remove them at this time. Lift the front of the vehicle with the floor jack, and place the jack stands under the front frame rails of the vehicle. Lower the vehicle until it rests securely on the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench and pull the wheel away from the vehicle.

    2

    Remove the two caliper mounting bolts with the 13 mm socket and ratchet. Pry the caliper away from the caliper bracket and rotor gently with the small pry bar, supporting it with one hand so it does not fall.

    3

    Hang the caliper from the upper control arm with the mechanics wire so that it hangs freely with no pressure on the rubber brake line.

    4

    Remove the two caliper bracket mounting bolts with the 15 mm socket and ratchet and remove the caliper bracket.

    5

    Slide the rotor over the wheel studs, making sure not to drag it across the wheel studs. If the rotor does not slide freely or seems to be stuck to the wheel hub, tap the back of it with a rubber mallet to free it from corrosion.

Installation

    6

    Slide the rotor over the wheel studs; be careful not to drag it across the wheel studs.

    7

    Hold the caliper bracket in place and hand-tighten the caliper bracket bolts. Tighten both caliper bracket mounting bolts to 126 foot-pounds with the torque wrench.

    8

    Support the caliper by hand and remove the mechanics wire. Slide the caliper into the caliper mounting bracket and over the rotor. Line up the caliper mounting holes with the mounting holes on the caliper bracket and hand-tighten the caliper bolts. Tighten the caliper bolts to 54 foot-pounds with the torque wrench.

    9

    Place the wheel and tire onto the vehicle and hand tighten the lug nuts. Raise the vehicle off the jack stands with the floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground.

    10

    Tighten the lug nuts to 70 foot-pounds of torque. Start the vehicle and pump the brakes several times to adjust the brakes before driving.

How to Replace Brake Rotors on a Suburban

The Suburban has been in the GM family for many years as a large SUV. Although the vehicle has been through many generations and redesigns, replacing the brakes has remained relatively unchanged. There are slight differences between the weight ratings of the vehicle (1/2 ton, 3/4 ton, and dual rear wheel models) but the concept is similar. Replacing the rotors usually indicates a problem with the rotor. Scoring or excessive runout (warping of the rotor which results in vibrations during braking) are common reasons for replacing rotors.

Instructions

How to Replace Brake Rotors on a Suburban

    1

    Place the Suburban safely and securely onto a car lift. Before lifting, release the hood latch and remove the master cylinder cover. Remove 2/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder by sucking it out with a brake fluid siphon. Replace the cover.

    2

    Lift the Suburban to a comfortable height to work on the brakes (waist level). Remove the hub caps and then remove the lug nuts using the impact gun and a socket. Remove the wheels.

    3

    Remove the front wheel hub extension if applicable (dual rear wheel models). Insert the screwdriver or pry bar through the caliper port and into one of the brake rotor vents to prevent it from moving. Make a mark with a tire crayon on one of the lug studs and also on the wheel hub extension to establish the relationship between the the extension and its position on the hub. When it comes time to replace the hub extension, it is strongly suggested to put it on the hub in the same position in which it was removed. Marking the hub and the stud will ensure you are replacing it in that fashion. Remove the extension bolts with the gun and a socket and then remove the extension. Tap it with a rubber mallet if necessary to break it free from the hub. If a wheel hub extension is not present, skip this step and proceed to step 4.

    4

    Insert the large screwdriver or pry bar into the front open port of the caliper and pry the edge of the rotor against the caliper piston. This will compress the piston of the caliper enough to remove it from the knuckle. Pry the rotor inward slowly and as far as it will allow you to. The replacement rotor will be thicker than the existing one so more room will be necessary when you're ready to reinstall the caliper onto the new rotor.

    5

    Remove the caliper assembly by removing the two caliper assembly bolts with the impact gun and socket. A swivel may be required to properly seat the socket onto the caliper assembly bolts. Remove the caliper assembly and secure it with mechanic's wire to a front-end component so it does not hang by the hydraulic caliper hose.

    6

    Remove the rotor. If necessary, spray penetrating oil into the two threaded holes in the front hub face of the rotor. Insert the two 10x1.5 millimeter bolts into the holes and then tighten them alternately with the ratchet and a socket to draw the rotor from the hub. Remove the bolts to reuse on the other rotor if desired.

    7

    Clean the surface of the hub using an angled die grinder and reconditioning disc. Be sure to wear safety glasses before attempting this. Clean the face of the hub and the edges (that the replacement rotors will contact) of the hub so that they're free of burrs, rust, and corrosion build-up with the die grinder.

    8

    Clean off the oily residue on the replacement rotors by spraying on brake clean solvent. Install the new rotor onto the hub. If applicable, replace the wheel hub extension and bolts.

    9

    Replace the caliper assembly and bolts.

    10

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Be sure to torque the lug nuts per proper torque specifications of the particular Suburban year and model you're working on. Replace the hub cap.

    11

    Repeat steps 3 through 10 for the other rotor.

    12

    Lower the Suburban to the ground and pump the foot brake pedal to seat the pads against the new rotors. Check and add brake fluid to the master cylinder.

How to Change Brake Pads on a 1995 Toyota Corolla

How to Change Brake Pads on a 1995 Toyota Corolla

The 1995 Toyota Corolla featured front disc brakes and offered rear disc brakes (though rear drum brakes were more common). There was a difference in procedure to replace front and rear brake pads on the imported compact vehicle. Because the front brakes accounted for up to 75 percent of the vehicle's braking power, the front pads were usually replaced more often than the rear brakes. This tutorial explains how to change brakes on Corollas equipped with rear disc brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Use the brake fluid siphon to extract half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder located on the driver's side firewall of the engine compartment. Replace the cover after discarding the old fluid.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels behind which you're replacing brake pads, using a lug nut wrench.

    3

    Lift the axle of the Corolla one side at a time with the vehicle jack and place a jack stand under the front lateral frame rail. Lower the car onto the jack stand, then repeat the process on the other side of the car so the front or rear end is supported on jack stands.

    4

    Finish removing the lug nuts and remove the wheels.

    5

    Remove both the upper and lower caliper mounting pins with a metric hand wrench.

    6

    Remove the caliper from the caliper bracket and pad assembly and suspend the caliper to the chassis with a hanger or thin wire to keep the brake line from getting damaged

    7

    Use the C-clamp to compress the front caliper piston until it is fully seated. For the rear caliper piston compression, use the caliper reset tool and turn the caliper piston clockwise until it is fully seated.

    8

    Disconnect the wire pad clips with a pair of pliers (front pads only) and remove the pads from the caliper bracket.

    9

    Apply the dual shims (if applicable) to the backing plates of the brake pads. Place a small amount of the brake lubricant supplied inside the brake replacement pads set box to the tabs of the brake pads and place them in the bracket.

    10

    Reassemble the wire clips to the pads, replace the caliper and align the caliper mounting bolts. Tighten the bolts to 25 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    11

    Repeat the process on the other side. Lower the Corolla once the brake pads, tires and lug nuts have been reinstalled on both sides. Tighten the lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds in a crisscross pattern with the torque wrench and socket.

    12

    Pump the foot brake pedal (after making sure the master cylinder cover is secure) until the brake pedal feels firm and seats the replacement pads against the rotors.

    13

    Check (and adjust if necessary) the brake fluid level in the master cylinder, adding only new brake fluid before test-driving the Corolla.

How to Remove the Master Cylinder in a Jeep

The brake master cylinder on a Jeep (as well as other vehicles) contains most of the brake fluid and sends it to the brakes when the brake pedal is applied. It is mounted to the Jeep's brake booster within the engine and includes a large plastic reservoir that holds the majority of fluid. If you need to remove the master cylinder from the Jeep, use caution in dealing with the fluid inside. Brake fluid is a very corrosive liquid that will damage car paint, among other things, so protect all surfaces on the Jeep and do your best to avoid spilling the brake fluid as you remove the master cylinder.

Instructions

    1

    Siphon out as much brake fluid as you can from the master cylinder reservoir. You can use any of several tools, including a siphon, poultry baster, large syringe or suction gun. Never use any of these for any other task, however, once you have used it to remove the fluid.

    2

    Disconnect the negative cable from the Jeep's battery. Place rags on the floor underneath the brake line fittings and cover any painted surfaces near the area.

    3

    Loosen the nuts connecting the brake lines to the master cylinder using a flare-nut wrench. Pull away the lines and plug them with rubber plugs to keep the system from getting contaminated.

    4

    Unplug the electrical connector to the fluid level switch, which is the connector with the wires located to the side near the reservoir. Remove the nuts mounting the master cylinder to the brake booster and remove the cylinder, making sure you don't kink the hydraulic lines as you remove it.

    5

    Unscrew the cap to the master cylinder reservoir and properly dispose of all remaining brake fluid in the reservoir.

Sabtu, 28 Mei 2011

How to Replace the Rotors on a 1996 Chevrolet 1500 Two-Wheel Drive

The stock rotors on a 1996 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 two-wheel drive spin with the wheels and wear down with every stop you make. Over time, the rotors will wear down with the brake pads. When it comes time to change the pads, you should remove the rotors at the same time and either get them turned or replace them entirely. Should you decide to replace them, you can do so at home with a little bit of work.

Instructions

    1

    Lift up the front of the Chevrolet truck using the jack and set it onto jack stands to support its weight. Remove the wheels with the tire iron and move them out of the way. Use the hammer to tap off the center dust cap on the rotor. Unbolt the brake caliper from the spindle with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, then suspend it by a bungee cord on the frame or front suspension.

    2

    Remove the cotter pin in the center of the rotor using the needle-nose pliers. Unbolt the center nut on the rotor with the 1/2-inch ratchet and socket, then pull off the washer and slide the rotor off the spindle. Discard or recycle the rotor and bearings.

    3

    Pack the replacement bearings with the bearing grease, then install the rear bearing into the rear of the rotor by hand and tap the seal onto the rotor with the hammer. Slide the rotor onto the spindle.

    4

    Slide the replacement front bearing over the spindle and into the rotor. Reinstall the washer, then reinstall the center nut. Tighten it down using the 1/2-inch ratchet and socket until it is tight, then back it off one-quarter rotation. Install the replacement cotter pin with the needle-nose pliers and reinstall the dust cap.

    5

    Reinstall the rotor using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, then reinstall the wheels using the tire iron. Lower the truck off the stands with the jack.

How to Measure Brake Shoes

As brake shoes wear down from use, the hydraulic wheel cylinder has to push its pistons out farther in order for the shoes to contact the inner diameter of the drum. When the brake lining of the shoe wears away, metal-to-metal contact will occur and can damage the brake drum. There are a couple of shoe styles--one riveted, the other bonded--and they require slighly different ways of measuring. You can also measure the width of an installed shoe to compare it to interior drum diameter in the installation of drum brakes.

Instructions

Measuring Shoe Lining Thickness

    1

    Clean all the rivets on riveted brake shoes prior to measurement. Much of the friction material that wears away can become trapped and pressed inside the rivets. Use a small straightedge screwdriver to cleans the rivets out thoroughly.

    2

    Use a tire tread depth gauge. Insert it into each rivet. There can be more than eight rivets on a brake shoe. Measure each by placing the flat base of the tire tread depth gauge onto the brake lining and then pushing down on the sliding ruler. Compare the measurements of each rivet in 1/32 inches to determine even or uneven brake shoe wear.

    3

    For bonded shoe measurements, use a brake lining gauge. Bonded shoes do not employ rivets; they are glued to the shoe plates. This style of shoe has to be measured from the edges of the brake shoe lining. Take several measurements along the edge of the shoe to compare even or uneven wear. Since there are a few different brake lining gauges, each may employ slightly different procedures. Some use a scissor motion to pinch the actual lining in the end of the tool and compare the measurement on the opposite, wider end. Other gauges simply have a preset thickness and offer different sizes on the same tool.

Brake Shoe Adjustment Measurement

    4

    Use a Vernier caliper tool to measure the inside diameter of the brake drum being placed onto the rear brake shoes. The caliper tool employs two sides: one for the interior diameter measurement, the other for the exterior diameter measurement. Use the internal measuring side to measure the inside diameter of the drum, then record the measurement.

    5

    Manually adjust the opposite exterior diameter side of the caliper and reduce the measurement by 0.024 inches.

    6

    Place the exterior ends onto the brake shoe width and manipulate the self-adjuster mechanism on the brakes until the shoes hit each side of the caliper evenly. Be sure to place the caliper ends on the parts of the curved shoes that protrude outward the most. This will allow easy drum installation on the shoes.

Jumat, 27 Mei 2011

How to Replace a Caliper in a Ford Focus

Replacing brake calipers is not a simple procedure, even on a small car like the Ford Focus. It's always best to have a trained professional handle such maintenance. If you do try to replace a caliper on your Ford, make sure you have all the parts and knowledge for such a task.

Instructions

Removing the Old Caliper

    1

    Lift the car off the ground on a jack stand. Remove the tire and wheel.

    2

    Disconnect the brake hose from the support bracket and clamp or plug it. Remove the outer brake pad retaining clip.

    3

    Remove the caliper from the steering knuckle. Disconnect the bolts, pivot the caliper upward from the rotor and slide it off the pin. Remove the brake pads.

    4

    Detach the brake hose from the caliper at the mounting bolt. Toss away the washers on the bolt.

Installing the New Caliper

    5

    Attach the brake hose to the new caliper. Tighten the fitting to 11 foot pounds. Attach the brake pads.

    6

    Install the caliper to the steering knuckle, using the reverse method of removal. Tighten the pin bolts to 21 foot pounds for a front caliper and 26 foot pounds for the rear.

    7

    Connect the brake pad retaining clip and the brake hose to the support bracket. Install the wheel back on the vehicle.

    8

    Bleed the brake system to remove any air. Lower the vehicle. Test the brakes, first while stopped and then on the road.

Brake Adjustment Procedures

Brake Adjustment Procedures

Knowing how to inspect, troubleshoot, and adjust automobile brakes can help you be safer on the road and save you money at the repair shop. Familiarity with brake adjusting procedure can keep your car running better and longer.

Inspection

    Inspecting the brake system before attempting an adjustment is the safe bet.
    Inspecting the brake system before attempting an adjustment is the safe bet.

    The absolute first thing any brake adjustment procedure must include is an inspection of the brake system. No adjustment will make up for a needed repair or worn part. Learn to check for wear or glazing on brake pads or shoes, check brake fluid level and quality, and know how to troubleshoot parts like calipers and springs. If your problem is mechanical in nature, you'll want to repair or replace your failing braking components before attempting any adjustments.

Bleeding

    Bleeding the brakes releases air bubbles from the system.
    Bleeding the brakes releases air bubbles from the system.

    In the majority of brakes that need adjustment, bleeding is the answer. Bleeding the brake line system is simple and quick, and can resolve most brake pedal feel issues. Air bubbles are released during brake line bleeds, making for a more steady, stable, and firm braking when pressure to the pedal is applied. A repair manual for your car's make and model will guide you on where your brake lines and fluid reservoir are located.

Adjusting Mechanical Components

    Checking for trueness in a rotor is an important part of knowing what your brake system needs.
    Checking for trueness in a rotor is an important part of knowing what your brake system needs.

    The final step in adjusting brakes is making sure the mechanical components of the wheel system are working properly. The majority of modern cars use self-adjusting brakes, but many are triggered by parking brake use. If you never use your parking brake, then your brakes may not be properly adjusted. See your repair manual to find out what procedures to follow to activate the self-adjusting properties of your brake pads or shoes. Also check to make sure that the caliper is sitting evenly on each side of the brake, and that the rotor is "true" and not warped.

Kamis, 26 Mei 2011

How to Change the Front Brakes for a 2001 Dodge Ram

How to Change the Front Brakes for a 2001 Dodge Ram

In 2001 Dodge redesigned its full-size pickup, the Ram. This new Dodge Ram was bigger, stronger, and had a larger interior than the prior model. It had optional four-wheel anti-lock brakes and disc front brakes. The disc brakes are far easier to change than the rear drum brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen all of the lug nuts on the front wheels. Put the Ram in park on a level surface, but do not apply the parking brake, and set the wheel chocks behind the rear tires.

    2

    Raise one side of the front of the Ram, using the jack, until the tire is more than 2 inches off the ground. Slide the jack stand underneath the front axle or frame rail and lower the Ram onto the stand. Then go to the other side of the front of the Ram and repeat the process. When the front of the Ram is securely resting on the jack stands. remove the loosened lug nuts and remove the wheels from the front of the Ram.

    3

    Unbolt the brake caliper mounting bracket from one of the rotors using the socket wrench. The bracket is the half-moon piece of metal that is revealed when the wheel has been removed. Once the braket is off, hang the caliper in the wheel well with the rope, string, wire or bungee to prevent any stress damage to the brake line.

    4

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket. The brakes are just sitting in there and easily slip out.

    5

    Compress the brake caliper piston with the C-clamp. The C-clamp will fit over the bracket and can be placed against the cylinder. Compress the cylinder until it is flush with the bracket.

    6

    Install the new brake pads into the bracket in the same orientation the old ones were in. Make sure the black brake material is facing toward the rotor.

    7

    Bolt the mounting bracket back onto the rotor with the wrench. Put the tire back onto the Ram axle hub and tighten the lug nuts with your fingers.

    8

    Repeat Steps 3 through 7 on the other side of the Ram. Lower the Ram and tighten all of the lugs with the tire iron.

How to Choose Aftermarket Brake Disc Pads

How to Choose Aftermarket Brake Disc Pads

Brake pads are available in a variety of price ranges, type and brands. It is easy to be confused by levels that seem to be good, better and best. This is not always the case. The brake pads you choose should depend on your driving habits, location and the kind of vehicle you drive. There are four types of commercial brake pads available: semi-metallic, non-asbestos organic, low metallic and ceramic. Each has properties desirable for different applications.

Instructions

    1

    Look for a certified label. Brake pads can be voluntarily certified by manufacturers to prove that they meet the original manufacturer's minimum specifications. There are two types of certification, BEEP (brake effectiveness evaluation procedure) and D3EA (differential effectiveness analysis). Because these tests are both voluntary and expensive, manufacturers often test only the standard line of pads they offer. Any pads offered above this line meet the certification standards and more. AC Delco and NAPA are brands that are D3EA certified.

    2

    Decide if you need a high-performance pad. Evaluate your daily driving. If you drive in mountainous areas, down a steep grade often or tow and haul with your vehicle, a premium pad may be right for you. Some premium pads contain more metal. This increases stopping power but also increases noise and dust. Ceramic pads offer excellent braking and produce little dust. The most expensive option, ceramic pads may be worth the extra cost if you need a premium pad and have custom wheels that may be damaged by dust.

    3

    Shop for brand and pricing. Evaluate carefully the brands you are considering. Before your purchase, ask if the standard brake line is certified. Evaluate braking needs versus cost. You will not necessarily be safer with more expensive pads. The trade-off in reduced noise and dust may not be worth the additional cost of high-performance brake pads for normal driving conditions.

Rabu, 25 Mei 2011

How to Remove the Rear Caliper Pad from a 1996 Honda Odyssey

Four-cylinder models of the 1996 Honda Odyssey have disc brakes in both the front and the rear. These brakes have pads that wear down when you apply the brake pedal. Although the rear brakes don't wear out very often, you must eventually replace them. To do so, you must first remove the rear brake caliper pads -- a job that should take about half an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Put wheel chocks around the Odyssey's front wheels. Lift the rear end of the minivan with a jack, and put jack stands underneath the rear end of the minivan to support it.

    2

    Take off the rear wheels by loosening the lug nuts with a tire iron, and move them away from the Odyssey. Unbolt the bottom bolt on the brake caliper using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket.

    3

    Tilt the bottom of the caliper up with your hands. Pull the brake pad shims and brake pads out of the rear brake system with your hands, then discard them if they're worn.

How to Change Ducati Brake Pads

The Ducati line of motorcycles are essentially racing motorcycles. These sport bikes are made by Ducati Motor Holding S.p.A., an Italian motorcycle manufacturer. The brakes on the Ducati bikes are all of a caliper and rotor design using a small brake lining to stop the bike. Over time, this brake lining, called a brake pad, eventually wears down due to friction with the rotor surface. When the pads become 1/8 inch thick, you will need to replace the pads.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the caliper mounting bolts on the front (or rear) wheel. Turn the mounting bolts counterclockwise with a socket wrench.

    2

    Slide the caliper off the brake rotor.

    3

    Pry the retaining clip off the top of the brake pads, and remove the retaining clip and pin.

    4

    Pull the pads out of the caliper. Since there is nothing holding them in place, they should come right out.

    5

    Spray the inside and outside of the caliper with brake parts cleaner to remove any residual brake dust.

    6

    Install the new pads. Installation is the reverse of removal.

    7

    Place the retaining clip back over the top of the pads. Some of the Ducati bikes have a small arrow stamped into the retaining clip.

    8

    Slide the pin back through the center of the brake caliper (through the hole in the center of the brake caliper). This pin helps to hold the pads in place along with the retaining clip.

    9

    Wedge a screwdriver between the pads and pry them apart. This will force the caliper piston back into the caliper. The piston is what pushes against the brake pads, which in turn are forced against the brake rotor. Be careful not to damage the surface of the brake pad while doing this.

    10

    Slide the caliper assembly over the rotor and tighten the caliper mounting bolts to the torque specs listed in your specific bike's service manual with a torque wrench.

Selasa, 24 Mei 2011

How to Change Drum Brakes on a Chevy Tahoe

The drum brakes on the Chevy Tahoe are connected to the parking brake. If the brakes become weak, you must change out the brake shoes on the drum. Disconnecting the shoes from the drum brakes is a complex process, as there are adjusters and springs you must disconnect to reach them. You must always change brakes in pairs, never replacing the brakes on one wheel at a time.

Instructions

    1

    Losen the lug nuts on the Tahoe's rear wheels without removing them yet. Then raise the Tahoe's rear end on jack stands. Block the front wheels and remove both of the rear wheels. Release the parking brake.

    2

    Remove the brake drum, cutting off the pressed metal washers with a strong cutting tool.
    If the drum won't come off because the drum shoes have worn into the drum, retract the shoes by removing the access plug from the backing plate. Push the lever off the adjuster star wheel with a small screwdriver and turn the star wheel with another screwdriver.

    3

    Clean off the entire assembly with brake system cleaner, using a drain pan to catch the residue. Never blow away brake dust with compressed air.

    4

    Detach the spring from the adjuster level from within the drum by gripping it with pliers. Then pull out the retractor spring from the hole in each drum shoe.

    5

    Remove the trailing shoe and adjuster lever. Remove the adjuster screw assembly. Pull away the retractor spring and remove the leading shoe. Disconnect the trailing shoe from the parking brake lever.

    6

    Clean off the backing plate and lightly lubricate its shoe contact areas with high-temperature grease. Clean the adjuster screw assembly and lubricate the threads and socket end.

    7

    Inspect the condition of the drum itself. If there are any cracks, score marks, deep scratches or discolored areas that can't be removed with an Emory cloth, have the drum resurfaced at an automotive machine shop.

    8

    Attach the new trailing shoe to the parking brake lever, position it on the backing plate and install the retractor spring's end into its hole. Re-install the adjuster screw assembly, making sure it engages with the leading shoe. Lubricate and install the adjuster level on the trailing shoe.

    9

    Place the trailing shoe on the backing plate, making sure it properly engages with the adjuster screw assembly, and insert the retractor spring into its hole within the trailing shoe. Place the actuator spring within its hole in the leading shoe, stretch the spring and connect it to the adjuster level.

    10

    Install the drum back on the Tahoe. Turn the adjuster screw's star wheel until the drum slips over the shoes without rubbing them. Reconnect the wheels once the brakes are changed on both sides and lower the vehicle.

How to Replace Rotors Step-by-Step

A rotor is a major component in a vehicle's disc braking system. Prior to the 1970s, most American vehicles had drum brakes, in which an internally expanding brake shoe makes contact with the inside of the drum to slow and stop the vehicle. Disc brakes became standard on the front wheels of most vehicles in the mid-1970s. Unlike drum brakes, disc brakes are not affected as much by heat or water. Although disc brake rotors are made from heat-treated metal and will last a fairly long time, you may need to replace them eventually.

Instructions

    1

    Place a hydraulic floor jack under the frame rails on the end of the vehicle where you wish to replace the rotors. Chock the wheels on the opposite end of the vehicle. Raise the jack until the wheels are off the ground. Place jack stands under each side of the vehicle under the frame rails or under the lower suspension control arms. Loosen and remove the lug nuts with a lug wrench. Remove the wheels.

    2

    Locate the two brake caliper retaining bolts. Remove the bolts with a socket and ratchet and place them aside. Obtain replacement bolts if the old ones are corroded or the threads are damaged.

    3

    Lift the brake caliper straight up from the brake rotor. Be careful not to damage the flexible brake line still attached to the caliper. Tie the caliper to the upper wheel house liner out of the way of the rotor with a piece of wire.

    4

    Remove the two brake caliper mounting bracket retaining bolts with a socket and ratchet. Lift the bracket straight up and remove it from the rotor.

    5

    Check the face of the brake rotor near the wheel lugs for retaining screws. Remove the screws with a hex key wrench or Phillips screwdriver, depending on what type of fastener is used. Skip this step if the rotors do not have retaining screws.

    6

    Pull the brake rotor straight off of the wheel hub. Tap the rotor with a rubber mallet to loosen it from the hub, if necessary.

    7

    Push a new brake rotor onto the hub until it is fully seated. Replace the retaining screws, if applicable. Replace the caliper mounting bracket and tighten the retaining bolts with a socket and ratchet.

    8

    Unhook the caliper from the wheel well liner and push it back down over the rotor, lining up the mounting holes with the holes in the bracket. Replace the caliper retaining bolts and tighten them.

    9

    Replace the wheel and tighten the lug nuts. Raise the vehicle and remove the jack stands. Lower the floor jack.

    10

    Repeat the procedure for all rotors you wish to replace.

How to Install a Third Brake Light on a Chevy

How to Install a Third Brake Light on a Chevy

A burnt-out brake light not only negatively impacts your automobile's overall look, but is also extremely unsafe. A non-working third brake light may make it difficult for other drivers to see that you are stopping, increasing the risk of a rear-end collision. Changing your brake light is a very simple task that should only take about five minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Unscrew the two screws on the back of the third brake light.

    2

    Pull out the lens housing.

    3

    Unscrew the light bulb.

    4

    Screw in the new bulb.

    5

    Place the lens back into place and screw in the two screws you had removed previously.

Senin, 23 Mei 2011

Snap-On Brake Line Flaring Tools

Snap-On Brake Line Flaring Tools

Snap-On Tools is a well respected tool company in automotive circles. Manufacturing high quality tools, the company offers lifetime warranties on many of its products. Many mechanics often have to make their own brake lines, and for them Snap-On offers a complete series of brake line flaring tools.

TF5A Double Flaring Tool Set

    The TF5A Double Flaring Tool is a complete set of the various tools needed to make flares in soft steel, copper and a variety of other metals. The capacity is from 3/16 to 1/2 inch outside diameter of the tubes. The flare angle is 45 degrees. This tool has the capacity to make double or single flares. A single flare is just the end of the tube spread out, so it looks like a small funnel. A double flare is first a single flare, then the end is folded over and pushed into the funnel. The result is a double sided flare. A carrying case is included, and the suggested retail price is $51.50 as of November 2010.

TF528D Double Flaring Tool Set

    The TF528D Double Flaring Tool Set is similar to the TF5A tool set, except it includes a tubing cutter and adapter for various size tubes. It can handle tubing sizes from 3/16 to 1/2 inch. This set is a heavy-duty version of the TF5A. It is designed for professional use, for a mechanic who has to make single and double flares throughout the workday. A carrying case is standard, and this set has a suggested price of $144.

TFM428 Metric Bubble Flaring Tool Set

    The TFM428 Metric Bubble Flaring Tool Set is specifically designed for metric brake systems, such as found on imported cars. It makes a "bubble" flare. Instead of the funnel having straight sides, it has curved sides, so it looks like a bubble. This tool can handle tubing sizes from 4.75 to 10 millimeters. The set has a suggested price of $131.

Minggu, 22 Mei 2011

How to Repair the Toyota's Warped Rotors

The brake rotors on your Toyota are made of thick metal plating. When the rotors warp, you will feel the brake pedal pulsating when you press on it. You can replace the rotors with new ones or you can have the warped rotors "turned true" at a machine shop. A mechanic places the rotor on a lathe and flattens the face of the rotor. This eliminates the warping in the rotor.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on your front wheels. Place a jack stand under the frame behind the driver's side front wheel, jack up the Toyota, place a jack stand under the frame and lower the Toyota onto the jack stand.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheel off the vehicle.

    3

    Loosen the two bolts that secure the brake caliper onto the rotor using a socket and ratchet. The caliper is a metal housing that rests on top of the rotor. There is a slot on the top of it used to pass cooling air to the rotor. Pull the caliper off the rotor. Place a wire tie through the slot on the top of the caliper and tie it to one of the coils on the coil over shock. This prevents the caliper from hanging on the rubber brake line it connects to.

    4

    Pry the cap off the center hub using a screwdriver.

    5

    Remove the jam nut that secures the rotor to the hub using a socket and ratchet.

    6

    Pull the rotor off the wheel hub.

    7

    Repeat Steps 1 through 6 on the passenger side of the vehicle.

    8

    Take the rotors to a qualified machine shop and ask a specialist to remove the warp.

    9

    Place the rotor back onto the wheel hub of the driver's side and secure it using the jam nut, socket and ratchet.

    10

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper and place the new brake pads into the caliper.

    11

    Hold the brake pads inside the caliper while you slide the caliper back over the rotor.

    12

    Secure the caliper to the vehicle using the two bolts, socket and ratchet.

    13

    Place the wheel back onto the Toyota and secure it using the lug nuts and tire iron.

    14

    Jack up the Toyota, remove the jack stand and lower it to the ground. Double-check the lug nuts for tightness using the tire iron.

    15

    Repeat Steps 9 through 14 on the passenger side.

How to Replace a Brake Caliper on a 1983 GMC 3500

How to Replace a Brake Caliper on a 1983 GMC 3500

The brake calipers on the 1983 GMC 3500 are the main components that press the brake pads to the brake rotors. The brake fluid travels through the brake line and into the brake caliper. When the brake pedal is compressed from inside of the truck, the cylinder inside of the brake caliper compresses against the brake pads. The brake pads then compress against the brake rotor. When the caliper cylinder has fully pressed the brake pads to the rotor, the truck will come to a stop.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 1983 GMC 3500 and engage the parking brake. Open the hood and remove the square plastic lid from the brake-fluid container.

    2

    Loosen all of the lug nuts on both of the front wheels. Then, jack up the 1983 GMC 3500 from the front axle. Place a jack stand under each side of the front axle near the front tires. Lower the GMC onto the jack stands.

    3

    Unscrew all of the lug nuts from both front wheels. Slide the wheels off of the hubs and place the wheels to the side. Start the brake-caliper replacement process on the front driver's side of the truck.

    4

    Look on the back of the brake caliper on the locate the two upper and lower Allen-head bolts that hold the caliper onto the caliper bracket. Insert the appropriate Allen wrench into the recessed bolts. Turn the bolts counterclockwise to loosen and remove them from the brake caliper.

    5

    Insert the flat-head screwdriver into the top part of the brake caliper. Pry the back brake pad back and forth towards the engine to loosen up the caliper.

    6

    Remove the brake-fluid line from the back side of the brake caliper with an open-end wrench. Turn the brake-line nut counterclockwise to loosen it from the rear of the brake caliper. Finish unscrewing the brake-line nut with your fingers.

    7

    Slide the brake caliper off the rotor. Hang the brake caliper to the side of the wheel well or to the frame rail with a small rope. Remove the brake pads from the caliper.

    8

    Slide the brake pads into the new brake caliper. Remove the small rope from the brake caliper and slide the new brake caliper onto the rotor. Insert the two Allen-head bolts into the rear of the brake caliper and tighten both down tight with the Allen wrench.

    9

    Screw the brake-line nut back onto the back side of the brake caliper with the open-end wrench. Make sure that the brake line is tight.

    10

    Put the wheel back onto the wheel hub and screw the lug nuts back onto the lugs. Tighten the lug nuts down tight with the lug wrench. Follow the same steps above for replacing the brake caliper on the front passenger side of the truck. Jack the truck back up and slide the jack stands out from under the front axle.

    11

    Lower the truck to the ground. Crank the engine and pump the brakes six or seven times to fill the new brake caliper up with brake fluid. Then, turn off the truck.

    12

    Check the brake-fluid level inside the brake-fluid container. If the fluid level is low, add the DOT-3 brake fluid to the container until full. Put the plastic lid back onto the brake-fluid container and close the hood.

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a Chrysler Sebring

Brake pads are an important part of your Chrysler Sebring's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a 1/4 inch, or risk damaging your Sebring's brake discs.

Instructions

Remove the Rear Brake Pads

    1

    Park your car on a level surface. Set the parking brake. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

    2

    Open the hood of your car. Locate the master cylinder and remove about two thirds of the brake fluid. A turkey baster is a good tool for this.

    3

    Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

    4

    Remove the caliper guide and lock pins. Slide the caliper off of the disc brake and suspend it near the disc brake with a small bungee cord or coat hanger. Suspend the caliper housing so that you do not damage the brake hose.

    5

    Take the brake pads, spring clip and shims out of the caliper.

    6

    Hand tighten the wheel lug nuts to the wheel studs to keep the rotor from moving while you work on the caliper.

Install Rear Brake Pads

    7

    Place a large C-clamp over the body of the brake caliper. Place the clamp ends against the rear of the caliper body and the outboard pad or a wood block placed against the caliper piston. Tighten the clamp until the piston is completely compressed into the caliper bore. Remove the clamp and the old pad or wood block.

    8

    Replace the caliper on the rotor. If you pivoted the caliper instead of removing it, pivot the caliper down to its original position.

    9

    Use high temperature silicone lubricant to lubricate the caliper guide and lock pins. Replace them in the caliper. Tighten the guide and locking pins to 32 foot pounds (43 Nm).

    10

    Replace the wheel assembly (tire). Lower the car to the ground. Press the brake pedal two thirds of its travel distance and release. Wait 15 seconds and depress the pedal the same distance. This seats the brake pads. Do this several times before trying to move your car.

    11

    Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder container. Add fluid to the container as needed. Reconnect the negative battery cable.

Sabtu, 21 Mei 2011

How to Change Rear Brakes on a 2002 Chrysler 300M

The Chrysler 300M has deeper roots than just its 1999 introduction. The 300 lineup actually dates back to the 1955 model year when the 300 no letter after the number debuted. Originally, Chrysler designed the 300 to be a muscle car, and its 300-horsepower Hemi engine was the most powerful of the era. As time went on, the 300 series got larger and less muscular, and Chrysler eliminated it in 1972. The 2002 300M, three years after its reintroduction, came standard with rear disc brakes. Thanks to the parking brake system using a separate set of brake shoes, changing the rear brakes on the 2002 300M requires no special tools.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels, using a ratchet and socket. Lift the rear of the 300M with a floor jack and slide jack stands under its rear cross member. Lower the Chrysler onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheels from the rear hubs.

    2

    Remove the two caliper guide pins with a ratchet and socket. Pivot the top of the caliper from the caliper bracket, then lift the caliper from the lower abutment on the bracket. Hang the caliper from a nearby suspension component, using a bungee strap.

    3

    Pry one side of the outer brake pads retaining clip upward with a flat-head screwdriver and pull that side of the pad out of the caliper until the retaining clip is free from its groove in the caliper. Repeat this step on the other side of the retaining clip, then remove the pad.

    4

    Position a drain pan under the caliper and position an 8-inch C-clamp over the caliper, so its fixed side contacts the rear of the caliper and its screw portion contacts the inner brake pad. Loosen the bleeder valve the 1/4-inch metal valve on the rear of the caliper with a combination wrench. Immediately begin tightening the C-clamp until the pad stops moving. Tighten the bleeder valve.

    5

    Pull the inner brake pad from the caliper. Notice it has small metal fingers that secure it in the caliper piston.

    6

    Remove the circular rotor-retaining clips from the lug studs, if applicable, using needle-nose pliers. Discard these clips, as they are only required for initial assembly of the vehicle. Pull the rotor from the rear hub, using caution so as not to disturb the parking brake shoes.

    7

    Inspect the rotor for any visual defects, including grind marks, deep grooves, hot spotting, cracks or a mirror-like shine. If any defects exist, replace the rotor with a new one.

    8

    Slide the rotor onto the rear hub.

    9

    Align the metal fingers on the rear of the inner brake pad with the cavity in the caliper piston. Press the pad toward the caliper piston until it contacts the caliper. Set the outer brake pad so its metal retaining clip aligns with the outer body of the caliper. Press the pad downward until the metal retaining clip seats in its grooves on the caliper.

    10

    Set the lower part of the caliper onto its bracket first the pads have a groove in which the lower part of the caliper bracket seats. Pivot the top of the caliper toward the bracket until it seats into place. Hand-thread the caliper guide pins, then torque them to 16 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    11

    Repeat steps 2 through 10 to replace the brakes on the other side of the 300M.

    12

    Reinstall the rear wheels onto the rear hubs and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Raise the Chrysler off the jack stands with the floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground and tighten the lug nuts, in a crisscross pattern, to 100 foot-pounds.

    13

    Press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm, then check the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir. If the level is below the Max line, unscrew the cap from the master cylinder reservoir and add new DOT 3 brake fluid to the reservoir until the level reaches the Max line. Tighten the cap onto the master cylinder reservoir.

    14

    Take all of the old brake fluid in the drain pan to a nearby automotive fluid recycler. Many auto parts stores provide this recycling service free of charge.

Removing Ford Focus Brake Pads

The Ford Focus has been in production since 2000, and is Ford's best-selling compact car. The Focus is a very low-maintenance vehicle, and most repairs can be done cheaply in your garage or driveway. You should change the brake pads on your Focus every 40,000 to 60,000 miles. If the pads show more wear, or most of your driving is done in town, you should change the pads more often.

Instructions

    1

    Park your Focus on a flat, hard surface, such as a concrete garage floor or driveway. If you have jack stands, raise the entire front end of your Focus off the pavement to allow for easier access. If you have a standard jack, you can do one side at a time.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts from the wheel. You can do this by using a tire tool, a standard wrench set or an air wrench.

    3

    Remove the wheel from the car and put it aside. You can put the lug nuts on the wheel so they will be easy to locate later.

    4

    Unbolt the caliper from the caliper mount and pull the caliper off the vehicle. Be careful when lifting the assembly off the rotor, so you don't damage the rotor.

    5

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper. The brake pads are usually attached by two screws, and are easy to slide out of the brake assembly.

Jumat, 20 Mei 2011

How to Change the Drum Brakes on a 1999 Chevy Tahoe

How to Change the Drum Brakes on a 1999 Chevy Tahoe

The Chevrolet Tahoe is a full-size SUV manufactured by GM. It has four wheel disc brakes for general stopping and rear wheel drum brakes for the parking brake. The disc brakes need to be changed regularly while the drum brakes may not need to be changed over the life of the vehicle, unless it becomes damaged, such as by driving with the parking brake frequently engaged.

Instructions

Accessing the Brakes

    1

    Park the Tahoe on a solid, level surface.

    2

    Use a tire iron to loosen the lug nuts on both rear wheels.

    3

    Place a floor jack under the rear differential, lift the back of the Tahoe, then slide jack stands below the frame, just in front of the rear wheel wells.

    4

    Lower the back end of the Tahoe onto the jack stands.

    5

    Remove the lug nuts and the rear tires.

Changing the Drum Brakes

    6

    Use a wrench and socket set to loosen the outer set of bolts on the back of the disc brake assembly.

    7

    Remove the bolts on the inner set of bolts on the back of the disc brake assembly and remove the whole assembly.

    8

    Take off the caliper pins (outer set of bolts) from the brake assembly and separate the brake caliper from the assembly housing.

    9

    Place a wooden block over the caliper piston and hook a C-clamp over the block and the caliper housing. Tighten the clamp until the piston is protruding about 1/8 inch from the housing.

    10

    Hook the drum puller arms evenly around the edge of the brake rotor then screw the center bolt until it is against the axle hub.

    11

    Place the wrench on the end of the center bolt and tight the bolt 1/4 of a turn. If the drum starts to slide off of the axle, continue turning then remove the drum. Otherwise, gently tap around the outside of the drum with the hammer and turn the wrench another 1/4 turn. Repeat the tapping/turning process until the drum comes off easily.

    12

    Unhook the springs from the brake shoes using needle-nose pliers.

    13

    Unhook the brake shoes from the caliper and remove the shoes from the assembly by hand.

    14

    Hook the new brake shoes onto the caliper then connect the springs to the brake shoes. You may need to use the pliers to connect the springs to the brake shoes.

    15

    Slide the new brake drum over the brake assembly and fit it squarely onto the axle hub.

    16

    Place the disc brake housing over the brake rotor and insert the bolts. There should be a brake pad on either side of the rotor, and the pad portion should be pressed up against the rotor.

    17

    Loosen the C-clamp on the disc brake housing and remove the clamp and wooden block.

    18

    Place the brake caliper over the disc brake housing and insert the caliper pins to hold it in place.

    19

    Tighten the brake assembly bolts and the caliper pins using the wrench and socket set.

Finishing Up

    20

    Repeat the drum brake changing procedure for the other side of the Tahoe.

    21

    Place the tires over the axle hubs and screw on the lug nuts.

    22

    Lift up the rear of the Tahoe by the differential using the floor jack.

    23

    Remove the jack stands then lower the back end of the Tahoe to the ground.

    24

    Tighten all of the rear lug nuts using the tire iron.

Rabu, 18 Mei 2011

How to Change the Brake Pads on the 2007 Grand Caravan

How to Change the Brake Pads on the 2007 Grand Caravan

The Dodge Caravan was introduced in 1983. The 2007 Dodge Caravan came equipped with a 2.4-liter in-line four-cylinder engine in the base model. Two versions of the Chrysler 3.3-liter V-6 (Flex-Fuel, and OHV) were available as upgraded engines. The brake pads on the 2007 Caravan are part of a standard front disc brake system. The pads are enclosed in the brake caliper, which squeezes the pads onto the rotor. The squeezing causes friction between the pads and rotors, which is what stops the vehicle.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the front wheel lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the front of the Caravan with a jack. Place jack stands beneath both front frame rails, just inward from the lower control arms. Do not rest the jack stands beneath the lower control arms. Lower the Caravan onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts, then remove the front wheels from the minivan.

    2

    Insert a pry bar into the access hole in the center of the caliper housing. Gently pry the inboard (rear) brake pad toward the center of the vehicle, with a pry bar. Remove the caliper bolts with a ratchet and a socket. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using the pry bar if needed.

    3

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper-mounting bracket. Insert the inboard brake pad against the caliper piston on the inside of the caliper housing. Compress the caliper piston into the caliper, using a C-clamp wrapped around the brake pad and the rear of the caliper. Turn the C-clamp slowly so as not to disrupt the caliper piston seals, and introduce air into the brake system.

    4

    Insert new brake pads onto the caliper bracket, while holding the caliper in your free hand. Install the caliper over the pads, onto the brake assembly. Apply a thin layer of caliper grease onto the outboard brake pad shim plate.

    5

    Apply grease to the caliper bolts, then install them into the caliper. Tighten the bolts to 35 foot-pounds of torque, with a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket.

    6

    Repeat steps 1 through 5 to complete the brake pad replacement on the second side of the Caravan. Install the front wheels onto the van after you have double-checked the torque on all of the caliper bolts. Tighten the front wheel lug nuts onto the wheel with a tire iron. Raise the Caravan off of the jack stands and remove the stands from beneath the van.

    7

    Tighten the front lug nuts to 105 foot-pounds with the 1/2-inch torque wrench and a socket. Immediately proceed to the driver's seat of the van. Pump the brake pedal 10 to 15 times to set the new brake pads.

Selasa, 17 Mei 2011

How to Repair an Emergency Brake on a Disc Brake

The parking brake is an important component of the vehicle even though many people don't utilize them. The parking brake, or hand brake, can prevent the car from rolling while in "Park," and can be used as an emergency brake in case the regular brake malfunctions. In vehicles that have four-wheel disc brakes, the brake pads sit pressed up against the rotor near the caliper pistons. If the emergency brake fails in a vehicle with disc brakes, the vehicle owner may need to repair it themselves. Professional repair costs can be as much as $350, so home repair may be needed.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the boot from the floor covering the bottom of the emergency brake handle with a slotted screwdriver. Remove the boot by pulling up and off the handle. Unzip the leather boot, pulling the boot off the leather. Pull out the two cables that run along with the emergency brake handle carefully (they are connected to the underneath portion of the vehicle; each cable is connected to one of the rear tires and the slack cable is the cable that requires replacement).

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the tire that's attached to the broken cable with a lug wrench. Raise the car using a jack and transfer the weight of the car on the jack to a jack stand. Place wheel blocks around the opposite wheel. Remove the lug nuts, and remove the tire to gain access to the wheel drum.

    3

    Remove the wheel drum. Pound the wheel drum in a clockwise motion with a hammer if the wheel drum is seized, and if that doesn't work, use a slide hammer with a wheel drum attachment to pull the wheel drum starting on the left side, moving to the rise on and so on until the wheel drum is removed. Pull the emergency brake cable connected to the drum from behind the wheel to check to see if anything is loose.

    4

    Remove the broken cable line carefully. Loosen the tension nut that holds the cable to the emergency brake handle using a wrench. Pull the cable out from the nut. Loosen the anchor nut on the equalizer bar, and remove the other end of the cable from this position. Install the anchor ends at the equalizer.

    5

    Replace the broken cable with the new one. Pass the cable through the tension nut, holding it with a pair of vise grips, and tighten the nut into place. The tension should be firm to the touch. Check to make sure that the cable cannot slide back and forth when removing the handle.

    6

    Loosen the nut behind the drum brake where the emergency brake handle enters, which will allow enough slack. Remove the hook wire from the emergency brake from the front, and then pull the entire cable out the back. Slide in the new cable through the spring and the nut in the back, pulling it through the front and hooking it onto the emergency brake pad. Tighten down the tension nut until tension is gained, keeping the wire in place.

    7

    Move to the middle of the vehicle and find an open-threaded nut where the cables thread in. Remove the old cable, and thread in the new cable. Put the brake drum back on.

    8

    Pull the emergency brake handle inside the vehicle. Follow the path of the cable all the way to the back of the rear where everything was just replaced, and check for tension. If the emergency brake pad does not have enough tension to hold the drum on, tighten the nut in the middle of the vehicle (on the underside) with the emergency brake handle in the down position and test again. Repeat processes until the brake drum does not slide off easily. Reinstall the wheel and lug nut.

Senin, 16 Mei 2011

How to Change the Drum Brakes on a Bronco

How to Change the Drum Brakes on a Bronco

The Ford Bronco was manufactured with a combination of four wheel or rear-only drum brakes, which have routine maintenance parts that must be regularly inspected and repaired, if necessary. The drum style of braking system was standardized; the parts on one brake are identical to the others.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the truck at the rear wheel by placing the jack head underneath a frame rail, then pumping the lever until the wheel is in the air. Support the jack with the jack stand in the same relative location.

    2

    Remove the wheel by turning all the lug nuts counterclockwise, then pulling the wheel free of the hub. Set the wheel aside, away from the work area.

    3

    Remove the drum from the brake assembly by pulling it directly out. (Some models have keeper bolts holding the drum in place; these bolts are on the face of the drum and removed by turning counterclockwise.)

    4

    Remove the brake shoes by levering the long springs from the shoe hooks with a screwdriver or brake tool. Turn the primary spring bolt counterclockwise, and pull the shoe directly away from the backing plate. (Some models have adjustment bolts that come out as well.) Take this opportunity to inspect the wheel cylinder for leaks.

    5

    Replace the shoes with new units by sliding them into position, and turning the primary spring bolt clockwise. Place the adjustment bolt between the shoes, if applicable. Lever the long springs back onto the shoe hooks.

    6

    Resurface or replace the drum and slide it back over the brake assembly, securing any keeper bolts if necessary. Replace the wheel by turning the lug nuts clockwise, in an alternating pattern. Remove the jack stand and lower the truck.

    7

    Repeat the entire process on the opposite brake.

How to Bleed Disc Brakes

Bleeding the disc brakes is one of the first steps that should be taken if the pedal in your vehicle begins to feel soft or spongy. Bleeding simply means releasing the air caught in the brake lines that is preventing the fluid from doing its job. Although this job can be done with simple hand tools, it is recommended to have another person ready to help. Expect to spend 30 to 60 minutes for both front wheels, depending on your experience.

Instructions

    1

    Jack the front of the vehicle up, chocking the tires if necessary. Use the jack stands for added safety.

    2

    Remove the wheel and loosen the bleeder screw.

    3

    Have a partner slowly push the brake pedal to the floor while you catch the fluid from the bleeder valve in the container. Refill the brake fluid reservoir after every third pump or as necessary.

    4

    Tighten the bleeder screw once the brake pedal is at the floor and your partner holds it there. Once the bleeder screw is tight, your partner can let the pedal back up.

    5

    Repeat this process until only a smooth stream of fluid exits the bleeder valve. Then tighten the bleeder screw, install the wheel and lower the vehicle.

How to Release the Brakes on a Trailer

Over time, excessive use of trailer brakes can cause the brakes to wear down. Once the trailer brakes wear down too far, they will damage the brake drums. Damaged or grooved brake drums can cause the brakes to form uneven wear. The uneven wear can cause the brakes to get stuck inside of the grooves of the brake drums. As the damage to the brake drums and the brakes get worse, it will cause the brakes to get stuck inside of the drums more often. Check the brake wear on a consistent basis to prevent damage to the drums.

Instructions

    1

    Park the trailer on a level surface and apply the trailer brakes.

    2

    Place the wheel chocks in front of and behind each rear trailer wheel.

    3

    Release the air to the trailer brakes. Slide under the back of the trailer and locate the trailer brake slack adjusters that are mounted to the rear trailer axle. There are two slack adjusters -- one on the driver side of the rear axle, the other on the passenger side of the rear axle.

    4

    Locate the adjustment bolt on the back side of the driver side slack adjuster. Position a ratchet and a socket onto the adjustment bolt. Push the head of the ratchet inward against the adjustment bolt to release the spring loaded plate around the adjustment bolt. Turn the ratchet counterclockwise one to two full turns to release the brakes from the brake drums.

    5

    Shine the flashlight through the backside of the wheel hub until you can see the trailer brakes inside of the brake drum. Make sure that the brakes are completely free of the brake drums. If the brakes are still applied to the drum, continue to turn the adjustment bolt counterclockwise until the brakes are free of the drums. Move to the passenger side slack adjuster and repeat the same process to release the trailer brakes.

Sabtu, 14 Mei 2011

How to Replace the Brake Master Cylinder on a 1995 Nissan Altima

The brake master cylinder stores the brake fluid. It is mounted within the engine compartment on the brake booster, which sends the fluid through the brake lines. Replacing the master cylinder in the 1995 Nissan Altima is very much the same as with any other vehicle, as auto braking systems have not changed much. Your main concern will be locating a shop that can get the exact type of cylinder used by this car. You need to replace this component if it is leaking fluid or is otherwise damaged.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Disconnect the car's negative battery cable.

    2

    Disconnect the electrical harness for the brake fluid level sensor from the master cylinder reservoir.

    3

    Disconnect the two brake fluid lines from the cylinder, loosening their connecting nuts with a flare-nut wrench. These lines are at the front end of the cylinder, one on the top and one at the bottom. Cap these lines with small caps or tape.

    4

    Remove the mounting nuts for the master cylinder using your wrench and remove the cylinder off of the brake booster.

Installation

    5

    Apply 19 inches of Mercury to the brake pushrod with a vacuum pump and measure the rod's length from its end to the brake booster's front face (if the rod is adjustable). It needs to be between .4045 and .4144 inches.

    6

    Install the replacement master cylinder on the brake booster and tighten its mounting nuts to between 9 and 11 foot pounds with a torque wrench if possible.

    7

    Connect the brake lines to the cylinder and tighten their fasteners to between 11 and 13 foot pounds.

    8

    Fill the master cylinder and reservoir with fresh brake fluid using an unused turkey baster or similar siphon tool, filling it to within a quarter inch of the reservoir's top edge, and then bleed the brakes as described below.

    9

    Reconnect the battery cable and the electrical harness for the brake fluid level sensor.

Bleeding

    10

    Raise the car and support it on jack stands, then remove all four wheels.

    11

    Connect a small length of rubber tubing to the right rear wheel's brake bleed screw, which is on the brake drum backing plate. Dip the tube's other end in a small container with brake fluid.

    12

    Loosen the bleed screw with a line wrench and have another person press down on the brake pedal to send air out the tube into the container. Close the screw and have the assistant release the pedal.

    13

    Repeat Step 3 until you see no air bubbles at all when your assistant presses the pedal, then close the screw for good and remove the tube.

    14

    Repeat all of these bleeding steps for the left rear wheel, the right front and the left front one in that order. On the front wheels, the bleed screw is at the top of the brake caliper.

    15

    Reconnect all the wheels and lower the car after bleeding the brakes at every wheel.

Jumat, 13 Mei 2011

How to Change Front Brakes on a 2004 Pontiac Vibe

How to Change Front Brakes on a 2004 Pontiac Vibe

The larger size of the Pontiac Vibe can sometimes take a toll on its brakes. A grinding sound when applying the brakes indicates the brakes need to be changed immediately before they damage the rest of the brake system. Replacing the front brake pads on the Vibe is similar to changing the front brakes on most other vehicles, as they are contained within calipers mounted on the brake discs.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Park the vehicle on a level surface and turn off its ignition. Open and secure its hood. Open the cap on the brake fluid reservoir located in the engine compartment to allow air flow. This helps air escape the reservoir, not let air in. Loosen the front wheels' lug nuts with the tire iron, turning counterclockwise.

    2

    Raise the Vibe's front end--a commercial floor jack will work better than the stock jack--and support it on jack stands. Unscrew and remove the lug nuts. Remove both front wheels, even though you will work on one brake assembly at a time.

    3

    Compress the piston in the brake caliper using a C-clamp; the piston is located within the arch on the caliper. This will push brake fluid into the reservoir; make sure it does not overflow.

    4

    Apply an aerosol brake cleaner to the entire brake assembly to clean it off, using a pan to catch any dripping residue.

    5

    Unscrew the two bolts at the ends of the caliper with a wrench--do not touch the center bolt with the brake hose--and remove the caliper from the disc. Hang the caliper from the shock coil using a strong wire.

    6

    Pull the shims out of the caliper mounting bracket, then remove the brake pad. Each pad contains an outer and inner shim; remove both shims for one pad and then the pad.

Installation

    7

    Install the replacement inner brake pad with its two shims, making sure the pad's retaining ears engage with the upper and lower pad support plates. Repeat the step for the outer pad.

    8

    Remove the slide pins from the bracket and clean them with brake cleaner and a rag. Apply high-temperature grease to the pins and reinstall them in the bracket.

    9

    Reconnect the caliper to the mounting bracket using its bolts. You might need to compress the caliper piston with the clamp if you cannot fit the caliper.

    10

    Reconnect the wheels and lug nuts, turning clockwise. Lower the car off the jack stands with the jack after completing the above steps for both brakes.

    11

    Inspect the level of brake fluid within the reservoir and add more fluid, if needed.

How to Remove the Rear Brake Calipers on a Lincoln LS

How to Remove the Rear Brake Calipers on a Lincoln LS

Removing the rear calipers on a Lincoln LS is required if you're replacing the caliper, replacing the pads and or replacing the rotors. Having to replace the rear calipers is not a very common repair, but it does occur sometimes. Replacing the pads and rotors is more common, but to gain access to them, you'll need to disengage the caliper from the rear knuckle. The only time you need to remove the hydraulic brake line from the caliper is when you're replacing the caliper, however.

Instructions

    1

    Do not apply the parking brake prior to lifting the Lincoln LS and attempting to remove the rear brake caliper(s). The parking brake is integrated with the rear caliper and applying it will prohibit you from removing the caliper.

    2

    Break the rear lug nuts loose on the rear wheel(s) with a wheel nut wrench.

    3

    Lift the rear axle of the LS with a jack and place it securely onto jack stands.

    4

    Remove the wheel nuts and wheel.

    5

    Place a brake line crimp on the rear brake hose to help prevent losing too much brake fluid.

    6

    Place a drain pan beneath the caliper where the brake hose connects to the caliper.

    7

    Remove the banjo bolt from the brake caliper retaining the rear brake hose with a ratchet and suitable socket. Disconnect the rear brake hose from the caliper. It will drip brake fluid slightly, so be sure to align the drain pan properly.

    8

    Disengage the parking brake cable from the cam of the brake caliper using a pair of pliers.

    9

    Remove the two caliper guide bolts from the caliper and then pry if off the rear pads and rotor. Be careful, as brake fluid will still purge from the brake hose connection.

    10

    If desired, remove the pads from the caliper anchor and then remove the two caliper anchor bolts from the rear of the backing plate and knuckle.

How to Determine What ABS System a Chevy Truck Has

How to Determine What ABS System a Chevy Truck Has

Chevrolet trucks were first produced in 1918. The first Chevrolet truck to receive the antilock brake system, or ABS, was the 1993 K series and C series. The S-10 line of trucks received antilock brakes as well. Finding out which antilock brake system your Chevrolet truck has, regardless of the year or model, is a nearly identical process. The only thing that will differ among the years or models is the location of certain ABS parts.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood on your Chevrolet truck. Visually inspect the engine compartment and locate the antilock brake pressure modulator box, which has a multitude of brake lines protruding from it. The master cylinder on the Chevrolet truck will have only two lines protruding from it, whereas the antilock brake control valve or brake pressure modulator will have anywhere from four to six lines protruding from it. Most brake pressure modulators are located underneath the master cylinder, in the rear of the engine compartment. Some 1990s versions of the Chevy truck have the modulator under the truck, directly beneath the driver's cockpit, along the inside of the chassis rail.

    2

    Physically count the amount of brake lines protruding from the brake pressure modulator. If you have four lines on the modulator, you only have two-wheel ABS. If there are six lines on the modulator, you have four-wheel ABS.

    3

    Visually inspect the rear of each brake assembly to find out whether you have front wheel or rear-wheel ABS. The ABS control module has wiring harnesses that go into the back of the wheels with vehicle speed sensors on them. The wheels with electric wires going into the back of the brake assemblies are wheels that have ABS equipped on them.

How to Seat Brake Pads

When you replace your brake pads, which is the simplest part of repairing the brakes on your car, you release the pressure on the calipers that hold the brake pads against the brake rotors or disks. The friction of the pads against the rotors or discs is what stops the vehicle. Here is how to seat the new brake pads properly.

Instructions

    1

    Reattach the brake caliper to the wheel. Make sure you have compressed the caliper enough to fit it over the disc with the new pads. Because the new pads are thicker than the older ones, you may have to remove the new pads and spread the calipers a bit more to fit it around the wheel. Snug down the bolts to the caliper until it is in place, and then give the bolts one last good, tight turn on the wrench.

    2

    Check the master cylinder reservoir under the hood to make sure you have enough fluid. If you don't, refill the reservoir to the fill line. If the level of brake fluid falls too low, air may get into the brake lines. Braking when air is in the lines makes the pedal feel soft due to the compressibility of the air.

    3

    Get behind the driver's wheel and press the brake pedal. This act forces hydraulic brake fluid into the brake system and applies pressure to the calipers on the wheels. As pressure is applied, the gap between the brake pads and the brake disc will close until the brake pads are seated on the surface of the disc. Pump the brake a few more times and make sure the pedal feels solid, with no softness. Hold your foot on the pedal and make sure itl doesn't start strong and then soften after a minute or so.

How to Fix Brakes on a 2001 Lincoln LS

How to Fix Brakes on a 2001 Lincoln LS

If your car pulses or squeals when you apply the brakes, this is a sign of impending brake failure, and you need to address the problem. Repairing your front disc brakes can be relatively inexpensive if you know what to do.

Instructions

    1

    Put on your safety goggles. Apply the emergency brake and chock the rear wheels. Lift the front right wheel with the floor jack. Remove the lug nuts and front wheel. Carefully place the jack stand under the frame rail and gently lower the car so that it is safely supported by the stand.

    2

    Clean the brake caliper and rotor with the brake cleaner. Inspect the caliper. Locate and remove the two bolts holding it in place with the ratchet and a socket. Slide the caliper off the rotor and remove the old brake pads. Discard them. Using a short length of the nylon string, gently hang the caliper from the strut springs to avoid damaging the rubber brake hose.

    3

    Inspect the caliper mounting bracket and locate the two bolts that secure the bracket to the spindle. Using the breaker bar and a socket, loosen and then remove the bracket bolts. Set the bracket to one side. Remove the rotor and discard.

    4

    Install the new rotor and replace the caliper bracket. Tighten the bracket bolts securely. Open the master cylinder lid. Using the large C clamp, compress the caliper piston to allow room for the new pads. Install the pads and slide the caliper into place on the new rotor. Tighten the two caliper bolts securely. Recheck the bracket bolts to ensure everything is tight. Replace the front wheel and lower the vehicle.

    5

    Repeat steps 1 through 4 on the other front wheel.

    6

    Start the engine and depress the brake pedal before driving the vehicle. Pump the brake pedal repeatedly until the caliper pistons have expanded and the brake pedal level remains consistent. Examine the brake fluid level in the master cylinder and replenish if needed.

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a Mitsubishi Lancer

The Mitsubishi Lancer is manufactured with a hydraulically operated caliper braking system that requires routine pad maintenance. Replacing worn or damaged pads ensures safe braking and can prevent damage to other brake components. The average backyard mechanic can replace the brake pads on a Lancer in about half an hour per wheel.

Instructions

Replacing the Brake Pads on a Mitsubishi Lancer

    1

    Raise the car near the wheel, and place it onto the jack stands with the floor jack. The jack stands should be positioned on the frame, not the suspension parts.

    2

    Remove the wheel at the brake that is to be repaired by turning the lug nuts counterclockwise. Place the wheel away from the car.

    3

    Turn the twin rear mount bolts on the caliper in a counterclockwise direction, then slide the caliper off the rotor.

    4

    Replace the two pads on the caliper by pulling them free of the caliper pistons, then positioning two new pads in their place. The new pads will rest in place but will not be secured to the pistons.

    5

    Slide the caliper back onto the rotor, then turn the rear mount bolts clockwise until they are snug.

    6

    Replace the wheel by turning the lug nuts in a clockwise direction, in an alternating pattern.

    7

    Repeat steps 1 through 6 on the remaining brake pads.

    8

    Lower the Lancer from the jack stands.

How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a Ford Mustang

How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a Ford Mustang

Ford Mustangs with four-wheel disc brakes have self-adjusting rear brake calipers. The benefit of self-adjusting calipers is longer lasting brake pads. Every time you hit the brakes, you wear the pads slightly as a by-product of stopping the Mustang. While this leads to an eventual brake job, the rear brake pads last longer than brake shoes installed on older Mustangs. Anyone with a few hours of free time and basic auto repair experience can replace rear brake pads on a Ford Mustang.

Instructions

    1

    Turn each of the rear lug nuts counterclockwise, using a lug wrench, until they are finger tight. Slap the wheel chocks against the front and rear tread of the left-front tire.

    2

    Pick up the back end of the Mustang with the floor jack. Lower it onto the jack stands, placed near the spring shackles on the axle.

    3

    Remove each of the rear lug nuts and both back tires by hand.

    4

    Set the drop pan below the Mustang's left-rear brake assembly. Rinse away all of the brake dust on the rotor can caliper with brake cleaner.

    5

    Take the left-rear caliper bolts out with a socket set. Lift the left-rear caliper out of the caliper bracket by hand. Remove and discard the old brake pads manually.

    6

    Wash the inside of the caliper thoroughly, especially the pistons and slides, using brake cleaner. Wipe a thick layer of white lithium grease onto the caliper slides.

    7

    Push the caliper pistons back into the left-rear caliper with your caliper tool. Set the new brake pads into the caliper by hand.

    8

    Set the caliper back into the caliper bracket manually. Bolt it in with the socket set.

    9

    Slide over to the Mustang's right-rear, and repeat Steps 4-8. Put the Mustang's back tires and lug nuts on by hand.

    10

    Lower the Mustang off the jack stands. Torque the rear lug nuts to 100 ft-lb, using the torque wrench.

Rabu, 11 Mei 2011

How Do I Remove the Master Cylinder on Jeep Bendix 9 Anti-Lock Brakes?

The task of removing the master cylinder from your Jeep Bendix 9 anti-locking brake system is relatively straightforward because there are few bolts that secure the master cylinder to the vehicle. The master cylinder holds the excess brake fluid not in the brake lines or the brake calipers. When you push on the brakes, the hydraulic pressure of the brake fluid located in the master cylinder pushes on the fluid into the caliper and forces it to close. Subsequently, the brake pads located inside the caliper grab onto the brake rotor to stop the Jeep.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the cover off the master cylinder by pulling the metal snap rings off to the side.

    2

    Loosen the lock nuts that secure all four of the brake lines to the master cylinder. When you pull the first brake line away from the master cylinder have a bowl ready to catch the brake fluid as it drains from the hole left by removing the brake line. Once the fluid drains, remove the other three brake lines from the master cylinder.

    3

    Loosen the large nut that secures the master cylinder to the brake assister. The brake assister looks like a large bowl attached to the firewall on the driver's side of the engine bay. Turn the large nut away from the brake assister and closer to the master cylinder.

    4

    Turn the master cylinder counterclockwise to thread it off the brake assister. Some brake fluid will spill from the joint between the master cylinder and the brake assister; wipe it up with a towel.

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Pontiac Grand Prix

Get underneath your 1974 to 1983 or years 1988 to 2005 Pontiac Grand Prix to adjust the parking brake. Make this simple adjustment to help with the safety of your car when you notice the parking brake does not hold the car on a slope. Save yourself time and money, avoiding the mechanics shop and doing the adjustment at home. Tackle this simple project and feel a great sense of accomplishment.

Instructions

Years 1974 to 1983

    1

    Pull up on the parking brake lever by hand until it clicks two times. Raise your Pontiac Grand Prix rear wheels in the air using your jack. Support the back wheels using your two jack stands.

    2

    Get underneath the vehicle and locate the wire cables that come from each rear wheel. Locate the equalizer plate that brings the cables together.

    3

    Use your pliers to hold on to the cable that feeds through the equalizer. Then rotate the adjuster nut with your wrench or other pliers. This adjusts the parking brake tension.

    4

    Turn the adjuster nut with your pliers until there is tension when spinning the left rear wheel backwards. The back rear wheel should not spin forward at this time.

    5

    Lower your Pontiac Grand Prix using the jack and remove the jack stands from each rear wheel. Pull up on the parking brake lever until the desired ten to twelve clicks happens.

Rear drum brakes Years 1988 to 2005

    6

    Apply the parking brake to 10 clicks and then release. Repeat five times. Turn your car on and verify the parking brake light is off.

    7

    Raise your car using the jack and jack stands. Turn the equalizer on the parking brake cables underneath your car. Use your pliers to turn this until the wheels brake starts dragging.

    8

    Back off the equalizer one full turn. Apply the parking brake and verify the wheels do not turn. Release the parking brake and verify the wheels turn freely.

    9

    Lower your car using the jack and remove the jack stands.

Selasa, 10 Mei 2011

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 1995 Saturn

The disc brakes in your 1995 Saturn S-series work by squeezing a pair of pads against a brake rotor attached to the lug nuts. The friction slows the wheel. Worn brake pads will cause noise, vibration, weak braking and eventual damage. The pads should be inspected every 15,000 miles or when wear is suspected. You can pick up replacement pads at most auto-parts stores. Expect to spend about 15 minutes per wheel.

Instructions

Front Brakes

    1

    Loosen the front lug nuts. Raise the vehicle with a jack and lower it onto a jack stand. Remove the wheel. The lift point is directly behind the front wheel, where the body panel attaches to the undercarriage.

    2

    Remove the lower bolt from the brake caliper. Rotate the caliper upwards around the upper bolt. Pop the brake pads out of the retaining clips on the caliper.

    3

    Snap the replacement pads into the clips. Pivot the caliper into place and install the bolt. Torque it to 27 ft-lbs. Install the wheel and lower the vehicle. Finish tightening the lug nuts once the wheel is on the ground. Repeat on the other side.

Rear Brakes

    4

    Loosen the rear lug nuts. Raise and support the vehicle, then remove the wheel. The lift points are immediately ahead of the rear wheels. If you have two jack stands, there is a lift pad directly between the rear wheels, underneath the leaf spring. Lift the vehicle with a floor jack and place a jack stand under each side lift point.

    5

    Remove both bolts from the caliper and slide it off the rotor. Hang it from a convenient point with a length of wire to prevent the brake line from getting stretched. Pull the brake pads out of their retaining clips.

    6

    Snap the replacement pads into place and install the caliper. Torque both bolts to 27 ft-lbs. Install the wheel and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Lower the vehicle and finish tightening. Repeat on the other side.

How to Remove 1993 Honda Accord Rotors

The brakes on your 1993 Honda Accord are based on friction. The calipers hold the brake pads, which clamp down on the rotors to stop the car. When the brake pads wear out, most people just replace them with new pads. You should also replace or turn the rotors to ensure that the pads have a smooth, flat surface to clamp to. Fortunately, removing the rotors should take about 15 minutes to do per corner.

Instructions

    1

    Place the jack underneath the front crossmember on the Accord. Lift the vehicle up using the jack and set it on jack stands on either side of the front of the car. Unbolt the front tires from the car using the tire iron.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper from the steering knuckle with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, then pull it off of the rotor. Hold the rotor in one hand, and loop the wire through the center of the caliper with the other. Then loop the wire through the suspension and twist the two ends of the wire together with the pliers to support the calipers with the wire.

    3

    Unscrew the two Phillips-head screws in the middle of the rotor using the phillips-head screwdriver. If the screws are rusted in place, spray penetrating oil into the screws and allow them to sit for 10 minutes or so to break up the rust. Then slide the rotor off of the hub using both hands.