Sabtu, 26 Februari 2011

How to Replace the Front-to-Rear Steel Brake Line on a 2003 Tahoe

The brake lines on a 2003 Tahoe are made from steel and designed to resist corrosion. These lines run from the brake master cylinder to an ABS box just underneath the cab, then to each individual wheel in the front, with one line running to the back where it connects to the rear axle via a fitting.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the Tahoe with the jack and put it on jack stands, with two stands underneath the axle and another two underneath the rear section of the frame. Crawl underneath the driver's side of the Tahoe and locate the ABS control box on the inside of the frame on the driver's side.

    2

    Locate the steel brake line that runs from the ABS box at the front of the Tahoe to the T-fitting on the back of the Tahoe by the axle. Remove the fitting on the brake line at the ABS box and the axle fitting with a line wrench.

    3

    Unbolt the clips holding the brake line in place with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Pull the brake line off from the inside of the frame and away from the Tahoe. Lift the replacement brake line up into the frame and bolt it in place with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Install the brake lines to the ABS box and the rear T-fitting with a line wrench.

    4

    Take off the rear wheels on the axle with the tire iron. Locate the brake bleeder valve on the passenger side brake caliper. Slide the clear hose over the bleeder valve and slide the other end of the hose into the drain pan.

    5

    Position the assistant in the driver's seat and have them start the Tahoe. Loosen the bleeder valve on the caliper with a line wrench, then have your assistant pump the brake pedal. Watch the brake fluid coming through the clear tubing, and when you don't see anymore air bubbles in the tubing, have the assistant hold down the brake pedal, then tighten the bleeder valve.

    6

    Repeat steps 4 and 5 for the driver's side rear brake caliper. Reinstall the rear tires with the tire iron and lower the Tahoe off the jack stands with the jack.

Jumat, 25 Februari 2011

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 1991 Isuzu Trooper

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 1991 Isuzu Trooper

The brake pads on a 1991 Isuzu Trooper are located on the front axle between the brake calipers and the brake discs. These pads wear over time and are designed with a thin metal strip that will contact the brake disc when the pads need replacing. If you hear a grinding coming from the front of your Trooper it is likely the pads are worn beyond safety tolerances. If you suspect the pads are worn you should check them immediately, as this metal strip can gouge the brake discs if the pads are not replaced.

Instructions

Removing the Front Wheels

    1

    Remove one-half of the fluid from the brake master-cylinder reservoir using an old turkey baster. You can never use the turkey baster for food preparation again.

    2

    Place wood blocks before and behind both of the rear wheels.

    3

    Loosen all of the lug nuts on both front wheels one full turn, using a lug wrench.

    4

    Position a floor jack underneath the front axle differential and raise the front of the vehicle. Then support with axle stands placed underneath the axle.

    5

    Unscrew the lug nuts on both the front wheels, using a lug wrench.

    6

    Lift the front wheels off the hubs and set them out of the way.

Removing the Brake Pads

    7

    Unscrew the two bolts that secure the brake caliper to the caliper bracket, using a socket. These bolts will be located on the inboard side of the brake disc.

    8

    Lift the brake caliper off the disc with your hand, but do not allow the caliper to hang from the rubber brake hose. Doing so could damage the hose. Instead, secure the caliper to the vehicle's frame using a plastic wire tie.

    9

    Pull the brake pads from the caliper using your hand. Be sure the shims come out with the pads.

    10

    Pull the spring clip from the top of the caliper.

Replacing the Brake Pads

    11

    Position a brake-pad spreader inside the brake caliper, then screw the handle of the spreader clockwise to drive the piston into the caliper.

    12

    Reinsert the spring clip into the top of the brake caliper.

    13

    Position the shims behind the new brake pads and insert the pads into the caliper.

    14

    Lower the caliper onto the brake disc.

    15

    Screw in the bolts that secure the brake caliper to the caliper bracket.

Reinstalling the Wheels

    16

    Lift the front wheels onto the hubs. Screw the lug nuts onto the wheel studs and tighten using a lug wrench.

    17

    Lower the front of the vehicle.

    18

    Retighten the lug nuts on the front wheels using a lug wrench.

    19

    Add fresh, clean brake fluid to the master-cylinder reservoir until the fluid level is between the MAX and MIN lines.

How to Replace a Caliper in an Acura Integra

With the Acura Integra no longer in production, replacement parts may be hard to come by. If you need to replace a major part like a brake caliper, consult a professional expert and make sure you have the appropriate part for your model Integra.

Instructions

Removing the Old Caliper

    1

    Raise the car properly on the jack. Remove the wheel and tire assembly.

    2

    Disconnect the brake line from the caliper by removing the banjo bolt. You need to replace the sealing washers when reconnecting this.

    3

    Loosen and remove the caliper mounting bolts. Turn the caliper upward on its pin away from the rotor and slide it off the pin.

    4

    Remove the brake pads and shims and the pad spring from the caliper body, if it's equipped. Remove the caliper bracket by disconnecting the mounting bolts.

Installing the New Caliper

    5

    Connect the caliper bracket and torque the bolts to 80 foot pounds. Install the pad spring, brake pads and shims.

    6

    Slide the new caliper onto the pin boot in an upward position and then pivot it downward towards the rotor. Attach the slide mounting bolts. Torque the bolts to 24 foot pounds for an Integra.

    7

    Reconnect the brake line with the banjo bolt, using new washers. Torque the bolt to 25 foot pounds.

    8

    Bleed the brake system by opening the bleeder valves and removing air with the brake pedal. Afterward, torque the bleed screws to 84 inch pounds.

    9

    Place the wheel back on the car, and torque the lug nuts to 80 foot pounds. Lower the car off the jack.

    10

    Test the brakes with the new caliper. Pump the pedal several times until the brakes are firm. Then test the brakes on the road.

Kamis, 24 Februari 2011

How to Install XJ Cherokee Brake Boosters

How to Install XJ Cherokee Brake Boosters

The addition of a brake booster to the braking system in your Jeep Cherokee XJ makes it easier to stop the SUV. When this booster goes out, that additional power goes away, leaving you with a hard to depress brake pedal and a vehicle that's difficult to stop. To fix that problem, the defective brake booster must be removed and a replacement installed. This should take about an hour to do.

Instructions

    1

    Pop the hood on your Cherokee. Loosen the bolts holding the master cylinder to the brake booster with an open-end wrench but do not remove them from the booster.

    2

    Open the driver's door and remove the trim panel underneath the steering column with a 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Take off the retaining clip at the top of the brake pedal that holds the booster linkage to the pedal by hand. Take off the bolts holding the booster to the chassis with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket.

    3

    Take off the vacuum hose clip on the brake booster manually. Remove the bolts holding the master cylinder to the booster. Slide the master cylinder off of the booster and the booster out of the firewall. Insert the replacement booster onto the firewall and loosely install the master cylinder to the booster with the stock hardware.

    4

    Bolt the booster to the chassis from the inside of the cab and reconnect the booster push rod to the brake pedal with the original retaining clip. Reattach the vacuum hose clip to the booster and tighten the nuts holding the master cylinder to the booster with the open-end wrench.

Rabu, 23 Februari 2011

How to Make Play Football Helmets for Kids

Small children are naturally drawn to the excitement of football by adult fan influences. Foster that interest by outfitting them with make believe gear. Starting from the top, make play football helmets for kids out of construction paper.

Instructions

    1

    Measure the childs head. Place the end of a fabric measuring tape between your childs eyebrows and roll it over the head down to the nape of the neck and add one inch to the measurement. Spread the tape straight across the back of your childs head and get a sight measurement of the heads width from the tops of the ears. These two measurements make up the length and width of the helmet top.

    2

    Cut out the helmet top. Find a piece of construction paper to fit the measurements in Step 1. Use the color you want for the base color of the helmet.

    3

    Draw one of the sides. Curve the helmet top into shape and hold it perpendicular against a folded piece of construction paper. Have your child assist you by holding the paper in place while you draw the top arc of the helmet side. Fill in the bottom of the helmet side with a freehand sketch.

    4

    Cut out the sides. Cut out both helmet sides out at the same time with the paper folded.

    5

    Decorate the headgear. Use different colors of construction paper to mimic your favorite college or pro design, or invent your own team logo. Cut out the designs and glue them on the helmet sides. Add striping to the top in the same fashion if desired.

    6

    Assemble the shell. Lay one side of the helmet on a table with the logo down. Curl the helmet top over it and tape it in place. Press all of the sticky sides of the tape firmly against paper to keep hair from getting stuck. Tape the other side on with the logo out.

    7

    Add a facemask. Cut two strips of desired color construction paper 1/4 inch wide and 14 inches long. Cut another 1/4 inch strip about 8 inches long. Tape the ends of a long strip to both sides of the lower front of the helmet, so it bulges out in front of the face. Tape the ends of the other long strip in the same spot, but make the arc of the bulge stand two inches higher than the first strip. Cut strips from the remaining piece 2 1/4 long. Tape them in place connecting across the two arcs.

How to Change the Rear Brake Drum on a Mercury Mystique

How to Change the Rear Brake Drum on a Mercury Mystique

The rear brakes on the 1994 through 2000 Mercury Mystic are drum-and-shoe brakes. The drums are removable to allow access to the shoes or to replace the drums. In some cases, resurfacing the drums is enough, but if the damage or wear is bad, replacement is the only choice. Replacement drums are available from most auto-parts stores or through the Ford or Mercury dealership.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the rear lug nuts on your Mercury using a lug wrench or breaker bar and socket. Do not remove the lug nuts from the studs until after the weight is off the tires.

    2

    Raise the rear of the car with a jack until the tires are off the ground. Position jack stands under the rear suspension to stabilize the vehicle, then lower the jack, allowing the car to sit completely on the stands.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts from the wheel studs and remove the tires from the car. Set the lug nuts and tires aside for now.

    4

    Grasp the sides of the brake drum and pull it straight out toward you. Set the old drum aside and slide a new drum on over the rear brake pads and wheel studs.

    5

    Install the tire on the wheel studs and thread the lug nuts onto the wheel studs. Move to the opposite side of the car and repeat the steps to replace the second brake drum.

    6

    Raise the rear of the car off the jack stands, remove the jack stands from under the car, then lower the jack, setting the tires on the ground. Tighten the lug nuts with a lug wrench or breaker bar and socket.

How to Install a GMC Brake Booster

The brake booster on a GMC uses vacuum power that the engine generates to give a power assist to the braking system. Unfortunately, the brake booster is not a serviceable unit. If the booster fails, then the old booster has to be removed from the truck so that it can be replaced. Once you have the old booster removed, then you have to install the new booster. Installing a new booster should take about 30 minutes to do.

Instructions

    1

    Pop the hood. Slide the brake booster into the firewall so the vacuum port is located on the top passenger side corner of the booster. Plug the vacuum line and check valve into the vacuum port on the booster with your hands.

    2

    Look under the dash. Secure the booster to the GMC with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Put the brake booster linkage onto the brake booster with your hands. Install the brake switch onto the end of the pedal, then install the factory clip onto the brake pedal to lock it in place.

    3

    Slide the master cylinder onto the brake booster. Bolt it down with an open-end wrench. Start the GMC and test the brake pedal to make sure it works correctly.

How to Change Rear Brake Pads on a Pontiac G6

How to Change Rear Brake Pads on a Pontiac G6

Not much has changed on Pontiac vehicles that employ rear disc brakes. The Pontiac G6 is no exception. Introduced in the fall of the 2004 as a 2005 model, the G6 replaced the popular Grand Am. Much like the Grand Am, the G6 may feature rear disc brakes or rear drum brakes. The only major difference between the two is the rear caliper piston and how to compress it. The tool to perform this is available at most all auto parts stores and doesn't cost very much.

Instructions

    1

    Remove 1/2 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using a brake suction tool and then discard it appropriately.

    2

    Make sure the parking brake is not set or you will not be able to remove the rear calipers. Place a wheel block in front of one of the front tires on a flat, hard surface.

    3

    Crack the rear lug nuts loose on the G6 with the tire iron. Only turn them about 1/4 turn to loosen them.

    4

    Lift one rear quarter of the G6 with the jack and support it onto a jack stand. Repeat this for the other side to suspend the rear axle. Finish removing the lug nuts and then remove the tires and set them out of the way.

    5

    Remove the two caliper-mounting bolts using a box-end wrench and then pry the caliper off of the anchor, pads and rotor using a screwdriver.

    6

    Support the caliper to the rear coil spring with a caliper hook. You can use a metal coat hanger to make a makeshift caliper hook.

    7

    Insert the caliper piston tool onto the caliper piston. The tool features six different-sized piston options, so be sure to match up the correct-sized side of the tool to the caliper piston. Place the 3/8-inch ratchet into the square drive of the tool and turn the piston inward clockwise until it begins to resist. The pistons on the G6 caliper will stick out slightly once fully seated in the bore.

    8

    Pull the caliper pins out of the caliper anchor, one at a time. Wipe off the old grease and re-lubricate it with new brake lubricant and then reinsert it into it respective anchor hole. One of the pins has a rubber bushing on the end, so make sure the pins get placed in the same location.

    9

    Remove the rear pads and hardware from the caliper anchor. Use the screwdriver to pry the hardware off of the anchor if necessary.

    10

    Place the new hardware from the replacement pad set onto the anchor and then lubricate the top sections of the hardware that the pad tabs contact. Be careful not to get lubricant on the rear rotors.

    11

    Place the new pads (and shims supplied in the replacement pad set) into the anchor.

    12

    Remove the caliper hook and replace the caliper over the pads. Align the caliper bolt-mounting holes to the caliper pins and then replace the bolts. Tighten the bolts to 45 to 55 foot lbs. with a torque wrench and socket. Repeat the brake pad replacement for the opposite side.

    13

    Replace tires and lug nuts and tighten the lug nuts snug. Lower the G6 to the ground and then re-tighten the lug nuts to 100 foot lbs. with the torque wrench and socket.

    14

    Ensure the master cylinder cap is on tightly. Pump the foot brake pedal several times slowly until the pedal feels firm. Apply and disengage the hand brake several times.

    15

    Add brake fluid to the master cylinder to the full mark if necessary. Replace the cap. Remove the wheel block and then test drive the G6 for proper braking operation.

Selasa, 22 Februari 2011

How to Bleed a Brake on a Front Wheel

Anytime a hydraulic brake component on the front braking system of your car is replaced, a bleeding procedure is required. Hydraulics rely on constant pressure from the fluid, and when compromised, these systems allow internal air pockets that will reduce the effectiveness of the system. Brake hoses, calipers or steel brake lines comprise the hydraulic system in front brakes. When one or more of these components require replacement, you will need to bleed the braking system to restore the hydraulic pressure.

Instructions

    1

    Top off the brake fluid in the master cylinder and replace the cap or cover.

    2

    Place a catch pan beneath the caliper in the wheel you're going to bleed. This will prevent brake fluid from draining onto the surface area where the vehicle is parked.

    3

    Remove the rubber protective cap from the bleeder screw on the caliper if applicable.

    4

    Crack open the bleeder screw using a ratchet and an appropriate sized six-sided socket. Bleeder screws are often exposed to the environment and can easily seize in their position. If necessary, apply heat to the area of the caliper surrounding the screw using a portable propane torch to expand the metal housing of the caliper around the screw. Using a six-sided socket on the bleeder screw will help prevent rounding out the screw.

    5

    Allow the bleeder to gravity bleed once opened. This may take several minutes until a steady trickle of fluid seeps from the open bleeder screw. Hand tighten the screw using a line wrench or a box-end wrench and allow the screw and caliper to cool down if a torch was used.

    6

    Have an assistant manually pump the foot brake pedal four to five times and then hold the pedal in the down position. This action purges air through the system. While they're holding down the pedal, install an appropriate sized transparent tube to the bleeder screw and place the other end into an empty jug or bottle.

    7

    Open the bleeder screw again using a line wrench or box-end wrench. The brake pedal in the vehicle will drop further to the floor until the hydraulics are restored. Close the bleeder screw and have the assistant pump the pedal again until the brake pedal feels firm. The brake fluid purging from the bleeder screw should be absent of air bubbles. If necessary, recheck the master cylinder often and add brake fluid to prevent the cylinder from draining completely.

    8

    Top off the master cylinder to restore the brake fluid lost during the bleeding procedure. Make sure the assistant is not applying pressure to the brake pedal before removing the master cylinder cap or cover before removing it.

How to Repair Auto Hydraulic Brake Lines

The brake system in a car is the heart and soul of its safety features. Without properly functioning brakes, disaster is inevitable. Brakes use hydraulic pressure to force brake fluid into a wheel cylinder. The cylinder applies pressure to the brake rotor and pads, forcing the vehicle to stop. Repairing flexible brake lines can be done fairly easily, but in most cases for hard lines, it is easier to simply replace the entire brake line.

Instructions

    1

    Drain the brake fluid from the vehicle. There are two ways to do this. You can open the reservoir in the engine bay and siphon out the fluid. Or, you can remove the fitting on the brake caliper with an open-ended wrench and allow the fluid to drain. Let the fluid drain into a bucket and reinstall the caliper fitting if it was removed.

    2

    Use an open-ended wrench to remove the compression fitting at each end of the damaged brake line. Flexible brake lines are shorter and connect from a bracket to the brake calipers themselves. Hard lines are used along the length of the frame of the vehicle and connect the brake booster to the flex lines.

    3

    Remove the damaged brake line. This is the most difficult part of the procedure because of the location of some brake lines. Depending on the vehicle, manufacturers will place the brake lines inside the frame rails, between the frame and the body of the vehicle or in a tight crevice. Sometimes it is easier to leave the old line on the vehicle after you've disconnected it.

    4

    Travel to the auto store with a small piece of the old brake line. You will need a piece long enough to use as a reference for buying the new line and testing new compression fittings. The store employees should be able to help you identify the necessary pieces for your vehicle.

    5

    Attach the compression fittings to the new brake line. Use the brake line flaring tool to create the necessary lip on the end of the line and slide the fitting over top of the lip. This will create a vacuum tight seal for the brake line once it is installed. Repeat this step on both ends of the tubing.

    6

    Place the new piece of brake line into position. Use the open-ended wrench to attach the fittings at the front of the vehicle first. Position the brake line along the body and use zip ties to attach them to existing lines along the body. Attach the back end of the brake line in the same manner as the front.

    7

    Fill the brake reservoir with fluid. Remove the caliper fitting and have a friend pump the brake pedal to force all the air out of the lines. It will take several minutes of pumping to return full pressure to the line. Once a steady stream of fluid is coming out of the caliper, reinsert the fitting and tighten it down with an open-ended wrench. Repeat this step on any other brake line that was removed.

Senin, 21 Februari 2011

How to Change the Brake Pads on a VW Passat

After sales on the rear-engine VW Beetle began to decline in 1973 and the acquisition of Audi, VW Motors designed the front water-cooled engine VW Passat. Available in 1974, the Passat has endured six generational redesigns and is still available on the market today. The Passat has always used front disc brakes and now is also available in rear disc brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Refer to the repair manual for your VW Passat. Since the vehicle has endured 35 years and six generations, there are different procedures to remove and replace front or rear brake pads. While the concept remains somewhat standardized, there may be important alternative procedures for successfully installing the pads on your year Passat.

    2

    Open the hood and siphon one-third of the brake fluid from the master cylinder and then discard the fluid. Resecure the master cylinder cap.

    3

    Remove the hubcaps if applicable. Loosen the lug studs using the breaker bar with a 17 mm socket. Lift the Passat with a floor jack and position the jack stands under the frame rails to support it. Remove the lug studs and then remove the wheels.

    4

    Remove the bottom caliper bolt with a wrench. Most Passats will require you to hold the guide pin in place with an open-end wrench while removing the carrier bolt.

    5

    Pivot the caliper upward and use mechanic's wire to support it to the suspension coil spring.

    6

    Remove the old pads from the caliper bracket by pulling them straight out. Place an old pad onto the caliper piston and retract the caliper piston into the bore using a large C-clamp and slowly tightening. Some older Passats may require a screw-in caliper tool set to compress the piston. Refer to the repair manual for the specific caliper type you have before attempting to squeeze in the piston.

    7

    Inspect the surface of the rotors to determine if they should be replaced. The presence of scoring, grooves or rust on the plate surface of the rotor should suggest the replacement of them.

    8

    Clean the surface of the rattle plates with a small wire-bristled brush and then apply a light coat of anti-seize compound in the pad seats of the clips. Install the new pads.

    9

    Remove the mechanic's wire and then reposition the caliper over the pads and rotor. Apply a light coat of thread lock-tight compound on the threads of the lower caliper bolt, align the bolt into the guide pin and then tighten the bolt while holding the guide-pin in place with a wrench.

Minggu, 20 Februari 2011

How to Change Brakes on a 1998 Ford Taurus

How to Change Brakes on a 1998 Ford Taurus

The 1998 Ford Taurus uses brake calipers and pads on the front and rear wheels. The procedure for replacing the front brakes differs slightly from replacing the rear ones. It is possible that you may need to replace the front and rear brakes at the same time, but it's more likely that you'll need to replace the front brakes. This should be done every 60,000 to 80,000 miles. Either way, you must change the pads for the left and right wheels together.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Siphon out approximately two-thirds of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir using a turkey baster or other small suction tool. Dispose of this fluid in an environmentally appropriate manner.

    2

    Jack up the front or rear end of the Taurus. Support the vehicle on jack stands. Remove the wheels on both sides of the car.

    3

    Clean off the brake assembly using an aerosol brake cleaner and a drip pan. Dispose of the residue in an appropriate manner.

    4

    Compress the parking brake lever and spring (rear caliper only) using slip-joint pliers. Disconnect the brake cable from the lever with locking pliers. Pry off the retaining clip on the cable with a screwdriver and pull the cable off the caliper.

    5

    Push the caliper piston on the front caliper -- accessed through the arch in the caliper -- back into its bore using a C-clamp.

    6

    Remove the front caliper's lower mounting bolt and swing the caliper upward and off the bracket, tying it to the suspension with a strong wire. If you are working on a rear caliper, remove the upper bolt and pivot it down.

    7

    Remove the brake pads from the bracket.

    8

    Rotate the rear caliper piston clockwise using needle-nose pliers or a special caliper-adjusting tool to seat the piston in the bore. Make sure one of the piston notches is in the same position as before.

Installation

    9

    Clean off all grime and residue from the inside of the caliper using a wire brush. Then, clean and lubricate the slide pins with high-temperature grease.

    10

    Remove the anti-squeal shims from the old front brake pads. Apply anti-squeal compound to the shims and connect them to the new pads.

    11

    Insert the replacement pads into the mounting bracket.

    12

    Swing the caliper back onto the bracket, making sure the anti-rattle clip is in place. Then install the bolt, tightening it with a torque wrench to 23 to 25 foot pounds.

    13

    Reconnect the parking brake cable to the rear calipers using the pliers. Reinstall the wheels and lower the car once you've changed the brakes on both wheels.

    14

    Refill the master cylinder reservoir with fresh brake fluid.

How to Replace a 2003 Camry's Brake Light Switch

How to Replace a 2003 Camry's Brake Light Switch

The brake-light switch is an easy repair that can be done at home in less than an hour. Your Camry's brake lights help keep you from getting in an accident, and some care must be taken to get their adjustment correct. The measurements in this article come from the Chilton Manual for the 2003 model Camry.

Instructions

    1

    Locate the brake-light switch on a bracket above the brake pedal.

    2

    Disconnect the wiring harness from the top of the switch.

    3

    Loosen the lock-nut and remove the old switch.

    4

    Install the new switch into the bracket, re-tighten the lock-nut and reconnect the wiring harness.

    5

    Adjust the brake-light switch to 1/32 to 3/32 of an inch between the bracket and the brake-pedal stop. If you do not have the ability to measure the distance, adjust the switch until it is just barely touching the pedal stop. Tighten the lock-nut.

    6

    Have an assistant stand behind the car and check the lights; readjust, if needed.

Sabtu, 19 Februari 2011

How do I Install a Brake Booster on a 1993 Mazda MX-3?

The brake booster on a 1993 Mazda MX-3 converts the vacuum created by the engine into energy for the braking system. When the brake booster develops a leak, the booster won't function correctly, and it will become very difficult to stop the car. To fix the problem, you have to remove the booster and install a new one on the firewall. The job should take you around two hours to do correctly.

Instructions

    1

    Pop the hood. Remove the cap on the master cylinder, which is on the driver's side of the firewall. Siphon out the brake fluid from the master cylinder with the siphon. Unplug the wiring on the master cylinder, then remove the brake lines from the master cylinder with a line wrench. Unbolt the master cylinder from the booster with an open-end wrench and move the master cylinder away from the car.

    2

    Pull off the check valve and vacuum line from the booster with your hands. Move to the underside of the dash. Take out the cotter pin on the clevis pin connecting the booster linkage to the brake pedal with your hands. Pull the clevis pin out as well. Unbolt the brake booster from the firewall with the 3/8-inch ratchet, extension and sockets and the 3/8-inch universal joint. Pull the booster off of the firewall.

    3

    Install the replacement booster onto the firewall with the 3/8-inch ratchet, extension, sockets and universal joint. Insert the clevis to connect the linkage to the brake pedal, then insert the cotter pin to lock the clevis in place. Install the master cylinder onto the booster with an open-end wrench.

    4

    Install the master cylinder bleeding kit onto the brake line fittings on the master cylinder. Run the tubes from the kit up from the fittings into the master cylinder bowl. Fill the master cylinder with brake fluid. Have your assistant pump the brakes until no bubbles appear from the master cylinder.

    5

    Remove the master cylinder bleeding kit and install the brake lines with a line wrench. Plug in the wiring to the master cylinder. Push the vacuum line and check valve onto the replacement booster.

When to Replace the Original Brakes on a Camry

"Toyota's midsize Camry has been the best-selling car in America for nine of the past 10 years," according to the online version of Kelley Blue Book in 2009. This decade of explosive sales means that many Camry owners are likely beginning to wonder when they should replace their brakes.

Brake Life Expectancy Factors

    Ask any mechanic how long your brakes will last and you'll get questions such as these: "How do you drive?" "Where do you drive?" "Do you use the engine to help slow the car, or are you a person who waits until the last second to stop for a light or stop sign?" All of these factors, and others, determine brake life. No two drivers will get the same mileage on a set of brakes; there are just too many variables, and that makes predicting brake replacement by mileage alone impossible.

How to Predict the Need for New Brakes

    The most reliable way to know when it is time to replace the original brakes on a Camry, or any car, is to develop a relationship with a mechanic at your favorite repair garage and ask him to check the brakes when your car is in for an oil change or other service. Of course, if your brakes are making grinding noises when you step on the pedal, take the car to your mechanic right away and have him check it over. He can visually check the thickness of the brake friction material and advise you as to when the brakes should be checked again, or replaced.

Jumat, 18 Februari 2011

How to Replace a Caliper in a Nissan Pathfinder

A Nissan Pathfinder, like most SUVs, is dependent on its brakes. Replacing a worn or cracked brake caliper is not an easy task and is best done by an expert. Talk with one to make sure you know exactly what to do before you take on such maintenance yourself.

Instructions

Removing the Old Caliper

    1

    Remove the correct tire and wheel assembly once the vehicle is safely raised and supported on the jack stand.

    2

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper by removing the attaching bolt. Plug the brake hose with a small piece of rubber to prevent brake fluid loss and contamination.

    3

    Remove the support mounting bolts from the caliper. Lift the caliper away from the knuckle to remove it.

Installing the New Caliper

    4

    Position the new caliper assembly onto the knuckle. Make sure the rotor fits between the brake pads. Install the bolts and tighten them to the appropriate torque.

    5

    Connect the brake hose to the caliper. Use new washer with the attaching bolt and torque the bolt to 12 foot pounds to 14 foot pounds.

    6

    Bleed the brake system of air. Open the bleeder valve and have someone else hold down on the pedal to remove the air. Disconnect the negative battery cable before doing this.

    7

    Use the brake pedal again to test the whole system. Make sure the pads are set and the pedal is firm, and make sure there are no leaks.

    8

    Reattach the wheel and lower the vehicle. Test the brakes on the road.

How to Service a Stuck Brake Caliper Piston & Pad on a 1995 Accord

How to Service a Stuck Brake Caliper Piston & Pad on a 1995 Accord

If one of your brake caliper pistons is stuck it can cause a number of issues. The stopping distance will increase because of the decreased braking power, and the car may also pull to one side or the other when you put on the brakes. If the brakes are stuck on, the pads may make it difficult to move the car; when you do, you may find the pad smells of burning and squeaks or grinds loudly. In either case you should repair it as soon as possible.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts with the lug wrench but do not remove them. Raise the car on the jack and place it on the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and remove the wheel.

    2

    Examine the caliper and pads around the rotor, focusing on the way the pads are mounted and on the caliper. Check the caliper piston for corrosion. You may have to peel back the rubber cover. Use the flat-head screwdriver to pry it back. If there is corrosion on the caliper you'll need to replace the caliper.

    3

    Examine the brake pads to check they have not become stuck and they're not binding. If they seem to be stuck against the rotor, remove the caliper bolts, swing the caliper away from the rotor and reset them in the caliper. They are not attached to the caliper with a bolt. If they are worn you should replace them.

    4

    Open the hood and check the brake fluid level. While this does not cause the caliper to stick it may cause the caliper to not close correctly and, therefore, cause the caliper to not close around the wheel. If the brake fluid is low, bleed the brakes. Place the plastic tube around the nipple on the brake line and unscrew the nipple a little. Fill the plastic bottle with brake fluid and put the other end of the plastic tube in the brake fluid in the bottle. Press the brake and you should see bubbles come out of the end of the tube. Keep pressing the brake until the bubbles stop, tighten the nipple and remove the tubing and bottle. Make sure you keep the brake fluid topped up, otherwise more air will get into the system.

    5

    Replace the wheel and hand tighten the lug nuts. Lower the car from the jack stands and tighten the lug bolts.

Kamis, 17 Februari 2011

DIY Toyota Corolla Brake Repair

DIY Toyota Corolla Brake Repair

The most basic form of brake repair on your Toyota Corolla is replacing the brake pads, which needs to be done every 60,000 miles at the most. Other parts of the brake may need repair at times, though. If the caliper is cracked or damaged, or if the disc is worn down, they must be replaced.

Preparation

    It' a good idea to siphon out at least 2/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir, as the repair work can force fluid into the cylinder and make it overflow. Use a syringe bottle or turkey baster that has never been used for anything else and don't use it for anything else afterward. Raise the car's front end and support it on jack stands, then remove both wheels; it helps to loosen the lug nuts before raising the car. Before you remove the caliper, compress its piston into the bore with a C-lamp--this is where the risk of fluid overflow comes.
    Wash off the entire brake assembly with brake cleaner, using a drip pan to catch the residue. Brake dust contains asbestos, so never use compressed air.

Brake Pads

    You must always change brake pads on both wheels together. The pads are stored within the calipers. The caliper is mounted onto the brake disc with two bolts. Remove them with a socket wrench and lift off the caliper to find the brake pads in the caliper mounting bracket. If you're not removing the caliper, hang it from the strut spring with a strong wire; never hang it by the brake hose.
    Remove the shims for each brake pad followed by the pad itself; start with the outer brake pad. If one is equipped, remove the wear indicator from the inner brake pad using a screwdriver and place it on the new inner pad. Install the new pads and shims, starting with the inner one, and make sure the pads' ears properly engage with the pad support plates.

    Remove and clean the upper and lower slide pins, then apply a high-temperature brake grease to the pins before reinstalling them. Place the caliper back on the bracket and tighten the bolts to 25 foot pounds. Re-connect the wheels and lower the car once you've changed the brakes on both sides. Set the brakes by pumping the brake pedal until it feels firm.

Brake Calipers

    If you must replace a brake caliper, disconnect the brake hose by removing its banjo bolt, then plug the hose with a small piece of rubber hose to keep the fluid from escaping. Disconnect the caliper from the disc as described in the previous section. Installation is the reverse of removal. Like brake pads, you should always replace calipers in pairs.

    Disconnecting the caliper from the hose lets air into the brake system; you must bleed the system from each caliper. Make sure the master cylinder reservoir is filled, then connect a clear tube to the caliper's bleeder valve, submerging the tube's other end in a container of fluid. Have another person press on the pedal as you open the valve, and look for air bubbles in the container. Keep pressing the pedal as you open and close the valve until all is purged, then close off the valve and top off the reservoir.

Brake Discs

    The disc must be repaired by a professional machine shop if there are any deep scratches or score marks. If, however, the disc's thickness is less than the minimum requirement (the minimum is marked on the disc), it must be replaced.
    To remove a disc for repair or replacement, remove the wheels and calipers as described above; you don't need to disconnect the caliper from it hose. Remove the caliper mounting bracket by removing its bolts, then remove the lug nuts holding the disc in place and slide it off the hub. Installation is the reverse of removal.

How to Install Disc Brakes in a '93 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera

How to Install Disc Brakes in a '93 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera

There are three ways to tell when it's time to change your brakes. The first is if you hear a squealing sound as you brake or drive. The second is if the brakes "grab" or stop jerkily when you use them. The third way is if there is a grinding sound when you drive or stop. If any of these are occurring, it is time to take a look at your brakes. Disc brake replacement for the 1993 Oldsmobile Ciera takes less than two hours for the at-home mechanic.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen all the lug nuts for the wheels that you will be removing, using a tire iron to turn them turn.

    2

    Set a floor jack underneath the axle of the Cutlass, and jack up the car so there is at least 2 inches of clearance between the tires and the ground. Set jack stands under the axles for stability, and remove the tires.

    3

    Remove the brake caliper mounting bracket, using a socket wrench. The bracket is held on by two bolts. Tie the bracket to the wheel well with rope to remove any stress on the brake line. The brake line is the long black tube protruding from the rear of the bracket.

    4

    Remove the brake pads from the bracket. These will simply slip out of the bracket.

    5

    Compress the brake caliper cylinder with a C-clamp. Align the C-clamp on the cylinder, which is in the center of the bracket, and clamp it until it is flush with the base of the bracket.

    6

    Install the new brake pads. Make sure the the black brake material is facing the rotor. Use one set of brake pads for each wheel. The brake pads themselves can go on either side of the bracket.

    7

    Bolt the bracket back onto the rotor with the socket wrench. Set the tire back onto the rotor, and tighten the lug nuts. Lower the Ciera and tighten the lugs once more with the tire iron.

How to Replace the Brakes on a Ford Taurus

How to Replace the Brakes on a Ford Taurus

Changing the brakes should be a regular part of your overall maintenance plan for your Ford Taurus. You should inspect them periodically before they wear down to the point that they cause damage to the brake drums or rotors. If you drive the car a lot in stop and go traffic, then you should be checking them at least every three months. Once the pads wear to the point that they are grinding into the rotors or drums, then a relatively inexpensive brake job could end up costing you much more.

Instructions

Front Brakes

    1

    Park the car on a level surface and place wheel chocks behind the rear wheels.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel you are working on with a lug wrench but do not remove them.

    3

    Raise the car with a jack and place a jack stand under the car's frame near a jacking point. Raise it as close to the frame as possible.

    4

    Remove the wheel from the car.

    5

    Remove the brake caliper guide pins with the proper-sized socket and ratchet.

    6

    Use a wire tie to secure the caliper to the strut so it is not dangling.

    7

    Remove the inner and outer brake pads by sliding them out.

    8

    Push the caliper piston back into the housing with a C-clamp.

    9

    Place the new brake pads into the caliper by sliding them in. Make sure that the clips seat properly and are sitting flat.

    10

    Reinstall the caliper guide pins and tighten them with the wrench.

    11

    Remount the wheel and remove the jack stand.

    12

    Lower the car to the ground and repeat the process for the other front wheel.

Rear Brakes

    13

    Place wheel chocks in front of the front tires

    14

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel you will be working on but do not remove them.

    15

    Raise the car with the jack and place the jack stand under the frame near the jacking point. Raise the jack stand as close as possible to the frame.

    16

    Remove the wheel from the car then pull the brake drum off. If the brake drum doesn't release easily, hit it with a rubber mallet until it breaks free.

    17

    Remove the old brake shoes using a pair of pliers to disconnect the springs by twisting them off. Remove all other springs from the brake shoes with the pliers.

    18

    Install the new brake shoes and lock them into place with the locking springs. Position the other spring back onto the pads with the pliers.

    19

    Measure the inside diameter of the brake drum with a tape measure.

    20

    Adjust the brake with the brake adjuster until the diameter is the same as the inner diameter of the drum.

    21

    Place the brake drum back onto the axle.

    22

    Remove the jack stand.

    23

    Remount the wheel onto the car and lower it back to the ground with the jack.

    24

    Repeat the same process for the other rear wheel then pump the brake pedal until you feel pressure, indicating that the brake pads have seated.

Selasa, 15 Februari 2011

Brake Line Repair Tools

Brake Line Repair Tools

To say that brake lines are important is a vast understatement. According to master mechanic Jeremy Cramos, "the brake lines are the most important part of the car. I don't care how fast the booger goes, I want it to stop." Brake lines ensure that brake fluid is supplied to the brakes. When brake lines fail to perform correctly due to a clog, damage or breakdown in material, it doesn't take the insight of a pro like Jeremy Cramos to know it's time to repair the brake line before something bad happens. Brake line repair tools will be essential to complete these repairs.

Wrenches

    Tightening and loosening brake lines requires the use of two wrenches.
    Tightening and loosening brake lines requires the use of two wrenches.

    It's important to have a good set of wrenches when repairing a brake line. Wrenches are used to remove the hexagonal fittings attached to each end of the brake line. The hexagonal fittings will need to be tightened and loosened at the same time, which will require the use of two wrenches.

Tube Cutters

    Tube cutters are used to cut metal brake lines to the correct size needed, evenly. A tube cutter keeps the ends of the metal brake lines from fraying; a traditional hacksaw would fray the ends.

Brake Line Flaring Kit

    Most brake lines already come flared, but if you purchase metal brake line material that you have to cut to size, you will need to flare the ends. Flaring the ends ensures your brake lines will not leak at the connections. Flares are measured in degrees and will depend on the car which size will be needed. It's important for your safety that the correct size is obtained.

Tube Bending Tool

    Brake lines need to be bent around other car parts. Due to the fact that brake lines need to stay flexible, running them in a straight fashion is not always the safest choice, even if the distance is shorter. Brake lines need to be tucked away safely with enough flexibility to move with the car to avoid breaking at the connections.

Socket Set

    A socket is needed to remove brake line brackets.
    A socket is needed to remove brake line brackets.

    Brake lines are held in place with brackets. These brackets will need to be removed with the appropriate sized socket. Socket sizes differ based on the make and model of vehicle.

Support Stands & Floor Jack

    Support stands are used to keep the vehicle off the ground while you're replacing brake lines. A floor jack is used to lift the car up so you can put the support stands in place underneath the vehicle.

Senin, 14 Februari 2011

Honda Pilot Brake Rotor Removal Instructions

Honda Pilot Brake Rotor Removal Instructions

The Honda Pilot was manufactured starting in the summer of 2002 as a 2003 model. It features front and rear disc brakes. There may be many reasons why you must remove or replace the brake rotors on the SUV. The procedures to remove the front or rear rotors are similar, but there is one significant difference between the two.

Front Brake Rotors

    Before lifting the Pilot, siphon about half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder in the engine compartment. Any time you remove the calipers, you must compress the hydraulic pistons in with a C-clamp or caliper tool. This will purge the fluid back through the system and into the master cylinder. If the cylinder is full, the fluid will overflow.

    Apply the parking brake before lifting and removing the front brake assembly on the Pilot. Be sure to support the SUV onto jack stands and not just the jack.

    After you've removed the wheels, locate and remove the caliper bolts from both the upper main pin and the lower sub pin. Extract the pins from the caliper. Note that the upper pin has a rubber bushing on the end, so be sure when you replace the pins that you put them in the proper location. Gently pry the caliper off the pads and rotor. Be careful of the pad springs, as you'll need to reuse them.

    Compress the caliper pistons (Pilots feature dual piston calipers), using a suitable caliper piston tool or a large C-clamp, then hang the caliper to the coil spring with a hook or a wire. This will prevent damage to the rubber brake hose attached to the caliper. On the back of the knuckle are the caliper anchor bolts. Remove these in order to remove the anchor so you can remove the rotor.

    Note on the hub face of the rotor that there is a Phillips-head retaining screw. Remove this using an impact screwdriver and a hammer to break it free from the hub. Then pull the rotor straight off the hub. It's not uncommon for rotors to become stuck to the hub because of corrosion or rust. If this is the case, spray penetrating lubricant onto the hub and rotor mating surface, and allow it to soak in. To remove the rotor, you'll have a couple of different options. You can shock it off the hub using a dead-blow hammer. If you're replacing the rotor, this is a viable option. However, if you intend to reuse the rotor, you do not want to damage it by striking it with a hammer. On the hub facing where the rotor retaining screw was located, you'll notice two smaller screw holes opposite each other. Insert the appropriate threaded bolts into these holes, and tighten them alternately a couple of turns each until the rotor separates from the hub so that you can remove it by hand.

Rear Brake Rotors

    The rear rotors will follow a similar procedure to remove. One significant difference is that the rear rotors employ internal brake shoes integrated with the parking brake system. Do not apply the parking brake when removing the rear rotors, or they will be stuck to the brake shoes. In addition, use caution when it comes time to remove the rotor in the event the internal hub is stuck to the parking brake shoes, or you could damage the shoes.

After Removal

    If you're replacing new rotors, clean them with a brake clean spray. Rotors feature a rust preventive coating so they will not rust from condensation in the air while stored on the parts shelves. If you don't clean it off, this coating can damage the surface of pads and cause a great deal of smoke when you apply the brakes.

    If you're replacing the same rotors you removed, mark a wheel stud and the rotor so that you replace it in the same position on the hub flange you removed it from. This will prevent run-out problems.

    Torque all the caliper anchor bolts, caliper bolts and lug nuts to the proper torque specifications. Pump the brake pedal several times when the Pilot is back onto the ground and before you attempt to drive the vehicle. Compressed caliper pistons will not respond if not seated properly, and you will have no brake pedal right away. Once the brake pedal feels normal, recheck and refill the master cylinder using only new brake fluid.

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads for a 2002 Hyundai Elantra

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads for a 2002 Hyundai Elantra

The rear disc brakes in the 2002 Hyundai Elantra should be inspected every 15,000 miles or whenever you notice unusual braking noise. If the pads are worn, you can purchase replacement pads from most auto parts stores. Installation will take about 15 minutes per wheel. Caliper replacement in the 2002 Elantra is more difficult--you&039;ll need to remove the parking brake cable adjusting nut, under the console, to fully remove them.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the rear lug nuts on both sides. Raise the rear of the vehicle with a floor jack--there is a jack pad just ahead of the center of the bumper. Lower the vehicle onto a pair of jack stands, placed ahead of the rear wheels. Remove the lug nuts and wheels.

    2

    Unbolt the caliper assembly and slide it off the rotor. It is located toward the rear of the rotor and holds the pads in place. Suspend it with a length of wire so you don&039;t stretch the brake lines. You may need to unbolt the bracket that holds the brake cable in place to make more slack.

    3

    Pry the brake pads out of the springs that retain them. Install replacement pads and bolt the caliper into place. Torque the bolts to 48 to 63 foot pounds. Attach the wheel and hand tighten the lug nuts. Repeat on the other side.

    4

    Lower the car and tighten the lug nuts. Pump the brakes a few times to align the pads.

Minggu, 13 Februari 2011

How Do Car Brakes Cause Vibrations?

    Modern automobiles use disc brakes, which consist of a caliper and a rotor assembly. A caliper acts very much like a hand in the way that it grips the rotor, which causes the braking action. The caliper is attached to a bracket that holds it securely on top of the rotor. The rotor is a flat circular disc mounted over the wheel studs. This disc spins with the wheel, while the caliper is held immobile with the rotor passing through it. The caliper has two brake pads mounted on it that come in contact with the rotor. When the brakes are applied, the caliper acts like a hand and squeezes the rotor, using the resulting friction to slow the rotation of the rotor and the car.

Vibration Causes

    The rotors are the major culprit for causing vibrations felt in the car and in the brake pedal. Rotors are very precise in that they cannot be out of round even two-thousandths of an inch or they will cause a vibration. When they are out of round, they tend to wobble as they are rotated. As they pass through the caliper, this wobble tends to move the pad in and out.

    The cause for this phenomena is a caliper not sliding freely enough or not releasing all the pressure the way it should or an overly rapid cooling of the rotor after extensive use of the brakes or a hard stop. Rotors tend to heat up considerably when used extensively, and running through a puddle of water, which quickly cools the rotors, tends to warp the rotor and take out some of the temper. There is no way for a person to avoid this; it is just one of those service items that are uncontrollable.

    To eliminate the vibrations, have the rotors turned on a brake lathe. This cuts just a little metal off the rotor to make it true again. Every rotor has a minimum thickness embossed on the front or rear of the rotor. As the rotor is used, it tends to wear down and get thinner. The thinner rotors get, the more susceptible to warping they become. This is the reason for the minimum thickness on the rotors. Turning a rotor that is already thin is not a good idea because it will warp much more easily. Once it gets too thin, it is better to replace the rotor.

Sabtu, 12 Februari 2011

Problems With Brakes on the Ford Focus

Problems With Brakes on the Ford Focus

The Focus led the charge in Ford Motor Companys vehicle line overhaul that began in the late 1990s and well into 2010. Drawing many design and engineering cues from similar vehicles in the European automotive market, most specifically BMW and Mercedes Benz, the German influence in the Focus design is easy to discern. Unfortunately, due to the far lower price point, the Focus does not come with the standard features and warranty benefits that owners of the higher end vehicles enjoy.

Design

    The Ford Focus brake system is modeled after the brake system found on the BMW 3 series. While BMW service technicians are required to inspect and replace (if needed) brake pads and rotors at the 15,000 mile service checkup, Ford Motor Company only warranties brake pads and rotors due to wear for the first 12,000 miles. In a nutshell, the brake pads on a Focus are not designed to last as long as similar parts on a larger Ford car, such as the Taurus, or any of their SUVs or trucks.

Consumer Awareness

    Most car salesman are taught to build value in the mind of the consumer in order to achieve a sale. Enlightening a potential customer to the fact they may need to replace their brake pads and rotors, out of their own pocket, at some point between the 12,000 and 20,000 mile marks is often seen as counterproductive by salesmen.

    By simply informing the consumer that this cost will come up at some time within the life of the vehicles factory bumper to bumper warranty, the illusion that Focus brakes have something wrong with them could easily be avoided.

Warranty

    Pages eight and nine of the 2002 Ford Focus warranty manual clearly state that Focus brake linings and pads are not covered under warranty, but rather are considered to be wear items that fall under the owners maintenance responsibilities. When the pad condition is ignored long enough, damage to the rotors will occur and this will also not fall under the new vehicle warranty.

Solution

    A Focus owners best strategy for this is to have the brakes inspected by a qualified service technician at or about 10,000 miles, and every 5,000 miles thereafter. If the owner is servicing the vehicle under severe duty conditions, requiring 3,000 mile oil change intervals, the brake inspection should be requested every other oil change, coinciding with tire rotations.

How to Remove Stuck Brake Drums

Brake drums on the rear wheels of a car can be difficult to remove at times. There can be a number of reasons for the drums to get stuck, mainly due to the expansion of the shoes within the drum. Sometimes it can be fixed just by retracting the shoes, and sometimes some force is needed. Use caution when trying any of these methods, and let an expert handle it if none of these work.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure the parking brake is fully released; the brake drum cannot be removed without this. Push the parking brake lever down as far as it will go. Block the vehicle's front wheels before releasing the brake and especially before raising the vehicle's rear end to keep it from rolling.

    2

    Remove the inspection cover hole plug from the backing plate, located at the back of the drum. Removing this plug gives you access to the adjuster star wheel and its lever.

    3

    Insert a screwdriver into the hole to release the lever on the adjuster star wheel. While holding back the lever, use another screwdriver to turn the star wheel counter-clockwise until it completely stops. This retracts the brake shoes so the drum should be free to remove.

    4

    Be sure to remove the retaining screws if the drum will turn but won't come off the wheel studs; these screws usually require a flathead screwdriver. If the drum still won't come off, use a flat end punch to catch the flange on the drum's edge, pointing the punch away from the car's center, and strike the drum with a 2-lb. hammer.

    5

    Use a brake drum puller, which basically grabs the drum flange with three claws with a screw that presses on the center. Use the puller's manual screw to tighten it around the drum (don't over-tighten it), and strike the drum with the hammer while rotating the drum with the puller.

Jumat, 11 Februari 2011

How do I Separate Toyota Discs From Hubs?

How do I Separate Toyota Discs From Hubs?

Toyota uses "knock-off" rotors on all their front-wheel drive cars, and began using them on their four-wheel drive trucks and SUVs in 1995. This allows the rotors to be removed from the hubs once the brake calipers and support plates are removed from the integral knuckle. By contrast, special tools and a strong background in mechanical knowledge are necessary to remove rotors on the older style Toyota trucks and SUVs.

Instructions

    1

    Place the tire wedging block against the outside tread of a tire on the opposite axle from which you're removing the brake disc/rotor from the hub, then apply the parking brake (for front discs/rotors removal only).

    2

    Use the breaker bar and a 21-mm socket to crack the lug nuts loose on the tire(s) you're removing the disc(s)/rotor(s) from.

    3

    Hoist the Toyota up with the jack and support it onto the jack stand(s). You can do one side at a time or raise the entire axle if desired.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts and tire.

    5

    Compress the caliper piston(s) with the C-clamp or quad caliper piston tool until you have about a 1/2-inch of free-play in the caliper/pad assembly. Remove the clamp or tool.

    6

    Loosen the two caliper bridge bolts with the breaker bar and an 18-mm socket. Once the bolts are loose switch the breaker bar over to the ratchet to remove the bolts. Do not mix the caliper bridge bolts from the caliper bolts. Removing the bridge bolts will allow you to remove the caliper and the bridge assembled to save time. If you're replacing pads, remove the caliper from the bridge first.

    7

    Hang the caliper/bridge assembly to a suspension or chassis component from the caliper hook to protect the rubber brake hose attached to the caliper. Make sure there is no tension on the hose.

    8

    Try to remove the disc/rotor by hand first. In some instances, the disc/rotor will come off the hub. Commonly, rust and other corrosion cause the disc/rotor to stick to the hub. If the disc/rotor does not come off, spray penetrating oil in the two small screw holes on the hub face plate of the disc/rotor. Spray more penetrating oil around the circumference of the hub-to-disc/rotor mating surface. Allow 5 minutes for the penetrating oil to soak in.

    9

    Screw the two 2-inch by 8-mm by 1.25-mm pitch bolts into the disc/rotor hub face until they bottom out against the hub. Tighten one screw two times, then alternate to the other screw using the ratchet and a suitable socket. Continue tightening in this manner until the disc/rotor breaks free from the hub. Repeat for the disc/rotor on the other side if necessary.

Kamis, 10 Februari 2011

How to Replace Brake Shoes on the 2003 Corolla

How to Replace Brake Shoes on the 2003 Corolla

You need to take special care if you try to replace your Toyota Corolla's brake shoes. The shoes are part of a drum assembly that uses multiple springs with levers and an adjuster system to control the shoes. You need to replace the shoes on both rear wheels together to make sure the rear wheels and brakes maintain their balance. This is a process similar to changing brake shoes on many other vehicles.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Block the car at the front end using blocks or chocks on the front wheels, then release the parking brake, raise the rear end onto jack stands and remove the rear wheels.

    2

    Mark the brake drum's relationship to the hub using paint, chalk or a marker and then slide the drum off the hub.

    3

    Spray-clean the entire brake assembly using brake cleaner. Have a pan ready to catch all residue and carefully dispose of it as per your local ordinances.

    4

    Unhook the first adjuster spring at the top of the assembly from the adjuster lever, gripping the long, hooked end with pliers, and disconnect it. Remove the lever from the rear shoe using the same pliers.

    5

    Disconnect and remove the lower spring from both shoes using the pliers.

    6

    Press down on the shoe retainer springs, turn each one 90 degrees and release it using the pliers to disconnect each spring from its shoe.

    7

    Pull the front shoe out of its slot in the adjuster mechanism up top and twist the spring end free of the shoe. Remove the second upper spring -- the outer spring -- from the shoe.

    8

    Remove the rear shoe and the backing plate. Disconnect the parking brake lever from the shoe by prying off the clip with your pliers.

Installation

    9

    Connect the parking brake lever to the stud on the new rear brake shoe and clip it in place, clamping a new C-washer with your pliers.

    10

    Lubricate the six oval-shaped contact points on the backing plate with small dabs of high-temperature grease.

    11

    Position the rear shoe on the plate, guide its hold-down spring into the hole on the shoe and connect the hold-down cup over the spring with the pliers.

    12

    Lubricate the adjuster screw's moving parts lightly with the grease and connect the adjuster to the rear shoe on its slot. Hook the long end of the inner return spring to the top of the shoe.

    13

    Guide the spring's other end into the front shoe with the pliers and then line up the front shoe's top end with the piston slot in the adjuster cylinder. Connect the front shoe's hold-down spring.

    14

    Connect the adjuster lever and connect the outer return spring to the front shoe and adjuster lever with the pliers.

    15

    Connect the lower spring to both shoes.

    16

    Slide the brake drum back onto the hub, lining up the marks you made earlier.

How to Install Auto Zone Brake Calipers

How to Install Auto Zone Brake Calipers

AutoZone is a nationwide auto parts store that sells direct-fit calipers for almost all passenger vehicles and light trucks. There are commonly two types and brands of calipers the company sells. Fenco remanufactured calipers come as half calipers; meaning just the top half of the caliper without the caliper bridge. On some models, loaded calipers are available at AutoZone as well. The calipers are manufactured by Morse and come assembled with the caliper anchor, pads and hardware. AutoZone charges a core fee for all of its calipers. This core fee is refunded once your old caliper is removed and returned to the store (as long as it is not damaged and can be remanufactured).

Instructions

    1

    Remove half to two-thirds of the fluid from the master cylinder using a brake fluid suction baster; discard the old fluid. Replace the master cylinder cap or cover.

    2

    Place a wheel block behind or in front of one tire on the opposite axle from where you're lifting the vehicle to prevent it from rolling. If you're replacing the front caliper, apply the parking brake. If you're replacing a rear caliper, do not apply the parking brake or you'll be unable to remove the rear caliper.

    3

    Use a lug nut wrench to loosen the lug nuts on the wheel or wheels on which you're replacing a caliper, then lift the vehicle (you only have to lift one wheel if you're only replacing one caliper) with the jack and support it onto jack stand(s). Finish removing the lug nuts and then remove the wheel.

    4

    Place a drain pan beneath the brake hose connection to the caliper and then place a brake hose crimp tool on the brake hose close to the banjo bolt connection.

    5

    Remove the banjo bolt with a ratchet and socket or a box-end wrench. Remove the copper washers from each side of the banjo bolt and discard them. New washers are provided with AutoZone calipers.

    6

    Remove the rear parking brake cable from the caliper (rear calipers only), if applicable.

    7

    Remove the two caliper mounting bolts using the appropriate tools. Most calipers employ hex-head mounting bolts that can be removed with a ratchet and suitable socket. Other types of calipers may require a Torx head or hex-head bit inserted into the caliper mounting bolt. Refer to the vehicle-specific repair manual to determine what tools will be needed to remove these bolts.

    8

    Pry the caliper off the caliper anchor using a pry bar or large flathead screwdriver. Remove the pads from the caliper, if applicable. Some vehicles have pads clipped to the calipers while other models employ pads retained in the caliper anchor. Place the caliper into the drain pan so the brake hose hole is face down to allow brake fluid to drain from it.

    9

    Remove the pads from the caliper anchor if replacing a loaded Morse caliper only, and then remove the caliper anchor bolts using a breaker bar and suitable socket. If you're only replacing a Fenco caliper housing, leave the caliper anchor intact but apply fresh brake silicone lubricant to the pad contact points on the caliper anchor. Be careful not to get any on the brake rotors.

    10

    Disassemble the loaded Morse caliper, if applicable. The loaded Morse calipers come from AutoZone without lubricant on the hardware for the pads to slide properly on. You'll need to disassemble the unit and replace it in parts (anchor first, then pads and caliper) while adding lubricant to the hardware clips that the pads come into contact with. If you're replacing a Fenco caliper, skip this step.

    11

    Reassemble the caliper by reversing the disassembling procedure. Remove the red rubber plug from the brake hose hole in the new caliper and set it aside. Be sure to refer to the vehicle-specific repair manual for the proper torque specification of the caliper anchor bolts and the caliper mounting bolts. If applicable, apply a coat of brake silicone lubricant to the smooth section of the caliper mounting bolts and/or slides. Be sure to remove the brake hose crimp tool from the brake hose once reattached.

    12

    Top off the master cylinder brake fluid reservoir with the vehicle-specific brake fluid. While most vehicles use DOT 3 brake fluid, your vehicle will dictate what it uses on the master cylinder cap or cover or it will be listed in the vehicle repair manual. Leave the cover of the master cylinder off.

    13

    Place the drain pan beneath the bleeder screw of the caliper. Remove the black rubber cover on the bleeder screw and then loosen it with a box-end wrench or ratchet and socket. Wait for brake fluid to begin trickling out of the bleeder screw. This is called "gravity bleeding" and will assist in purging air from the brake line system. Close the bleeder screw snugly with a box-end wrench and then add more brake fluid to the master cylinder to top it off. Replace the cap or cover to the master cylinder.

    14

    Place an assistant carefully into the hoisted vehicle and have him pump the foot brake pedal four to five times and then hold pressure down onto the pedal. Reopen the bleeder screw while the assistant is still applying pressure to the brake pedal until air and fluid purges from the bleeder screw. Have him release the brake pedal and repeat this step until the brake fluid lacks air bubbles and the brake pedal feels firm. Be sure to check the master cylinder brake fluid level during this step to ensure it does not run dry and then replace the black rubber cover to the bleeder screw when done.

    15

    Replace the wheel(s) and lug nuts, lower the vehicle and then torque the lug nuts to the proper torque specifications specified in the vehicle repair manual with the torque wrench and suitable socket. Test drive the vehicle for proper braking operation.

    16

    Place the red rubber plug from the new caliper brake line hose hole to plug the brake line hose hole on the old caliper. Place the caliper into the box the new caliper came in. Return the caliper in the box to AutoZone to receive a refund on your core charge for the Fenco or Morse caliper.

How To Repair Brakes on a 1990 Ford Ranger

How To Repair Brakes on a 1990 Ford Ranger

The 1990 Ford Ranger's brake system is made of three key components; the brake pads, the caliper, and the rotor. The brake caliper holds the brake pads in place and houses the piston. The brake pads make contact with the rotor to stop the Ranger during braking. To repair the brakes you must correctly identify and replace the component(s). Replace warped or badly scored rotors, worn brake pads and cracked calipers to ensure that the Ford's brakes perform as designed.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Ford Ranger on a flat surface. Apply the parking brake and put the transmission in "park."

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts with the tire iron.

    3

    Place the lifting jack beneath the frame of the truck. Lift the vehicle and place jack stands under the frame. Lower the Ranger onto the stands.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts and wheels from the wheel bolts.

    5

    Remove the two caliper bolts on the inside wall of the caliper with a 13 mm wrench. Pull the caliper from the rotor.

    6

    Remove the two bolts on the back side of the caliper bracket with a 16 mm wrench. The bracket is behind the rotor.

    7

    Pull the rotor from the wheel bolts.

    8

    Disconnect the brake line from the caliper using a 10 mm wrench. Place a drip pan beneath the disconnected line to catch any fluid from the hose.

    9

    Place the brake pads into the new caliper. Slide the metal clips of the brake pads over the sides of the caliper.

    10

    Connect the brake line to the new caliper. Screw on the line by hand and tighten with a 10 mm wrench.

    11

    Spray the new rotor with brake cleaner. Wipe the excess cleaner off with a clean towel. Place the new rotor onto the wheel bolts, with the raised "top hat" section facing outward.

    12

    Replace the caliper bracket and screw in the 16 mm bolts. Replace the caliper and screw in the 13 mm caliper bolts.

    13

    Place the wheel onto the wheel bolts and screw on the lug nuts by hand.

    14

    Lift the Ranger to remove the jack stands. Lower the truck to the ground and tighten the lug nuts with the tire iron.

    15

    Press the brake pedal to inject brake fluid into the new caliper. Press and hold the pedal three times.

    16

    Lift the hood of the Ford. Remove the master cylinder cap (located on the driver's side, near the windshield) and add brake fluid as needed.

Rabu, 09 Februari 2011

How to Replace Nissan Xterra Front Brake Pads

How to Replace Nissan Xterra Front Brake Pads

The Nissan Xterra uses larger brake calipers and pads than many other vehicles; the calipers themselves each use two pistons. You will likely need to change the brake pads at 60,000 miles; if you hear the brakes grinding, replace them immediately. You must replace both sets of front brake pads at the same time. The replacement process can vary depending on the year of the truck, particularly with mounting bolt torque specifications, so it's a good idea to talk with your mechanic first.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Open the brake fluid reservoir in the engine compartment and siphon out two-thirds of the fluid using a suction tool you have never used before like a syringe bottle or turkey baster.

    2

    Raise the car's front end and support it on jack stands. Remove both front wheels while preparing to work on one brake assembly at a time.

    3

    Wash away the brake dust and other dirt and debris with an aerosol brake cleaner, using a drip pan under the assembly to catch any residue.

    4

    Compress both pistons in a single caliper using a C-clamp. Make sure the brake fluid doesn't overflow as it is forced back into the master cylinder and reservoir.

    5

    Unscrew and remove the caliper's lower mounting bolt with a flare nut wrench--the bolt is accessible from the rear of the caliper--and pivot the caliper upward.

    6

    Remove the inner and outer brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket.

    7

    Pull the lower slide pin and the upper and lower pad retainers out of the mounting bracket.

Installation

    8

    Apply anti-squeal compound to the backs of the replacement pads in straight horizontal lines across the middle. Remove the shims from the old pads and place them on the new pads; the compound will be sandwiched in between.

    9

    Install the pad retainers in the caliper mounting bracket and then install the inner and outer brake pads.

    10

    Clean the slide pin, lubricate it with high-temperature brake grease and re-install it in the bracket.

    11

    Pivot the caliper back down over the bracket and install the bolt.

    12

    Reconnect the wheels and lower the car after changing both sets of brake pads.

    13

    Fill the master cylinder reservoir with fresh brake fluid.

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 2000 Pontiac Grand Am GT

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 2000 Pontiac Grand Am GT

The 2000 Grand Am GT has disc brakes on all four wheels. The procedure to replace any one brake is the same on all the different wheels, though when replacing brakes, both sides of the vehicle should be replaced at the same time. Replacing only one side will cause odd wear patterns on the tires and can cause handling problems when stopping the vehicle. For those mechanically inclined, the whole process should take less than three hours to complete.

Instructions

Positioning the Vehicle

    1

    Park the car on a level, solid surface, like a cement garage floor.

    2

    Loosen the wheel's lug nuts using the tire iron.

    3

    Jack up the front or rear of the vehicle, depending on the set of brakes you want to change first. The front should be raised using the frame cross-member and the back using the rear frame.

    4

    Position a jack stand below the frame on both sides of the vehicle next to the wheel wells. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stands.

    5

    Remove the lug nuts and tires on the raised half of the vehicle.

Changing the Brakes

    6

    Remove the bolts holding the brakes in place using the wrench and socket set.

    7

    Pry off the brake assembly from the rotor using the screwdriver.

    8

    Remove the brake pads from the assembly.

    9

    Clean off any corrosion on the assembly using the steel wool.

    10

    Smear a little bit of lubricant on the brake pad tracks, and use the paper towel to smear it around in the tracks to form a very thin film of lubricant. Excess lubricant must be removed promptly.

    11

    Slide the new brake pads into the tracks on the brake assembly, and then place the assembly over the rotor.

    12

    Insert and tighten the bolts holding the brakes in place.

Finishing Up

    13

    Replace the tire and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts hand-tight.

    14

    Repeat the process of changing of the brake pads for the other side of the car.

    15

    Lift the vehicle off the jack stands using the floor jack and lower the car to the ground after both tires have been replaced.

    16

    Tighten the lug nuts on both tires with the tire iron.

How to Replace Brake Pads on 1986 Nissan Pickups

Replacing the front brake pads on your Nissan D-series truck at home will save you a costly repair bill for a job that can be completed with basic hand tools in the driveway. The pads on the front of the D-series trucks are available from most auto-parts stores and come in different grades to match your driving style. The rear shoes are available as well, but the process for changing the shoes is a bit more complicated and may require a few specialty tools to complete.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front of your pickup with a lug wrench about two turns; do not remove them from the truck. Place a jack under the front end of the truck and raise it until the front tires are off the ground.

    2

    Position a set of jack stands under front suspension to support the truck ,then remove the lug nuts and pull the front wheels off the truck. Locate the brake caliper on the steering knuckle, then remove the lower pin bolt from the caliper with a wrench.

    3

    Loosen the top pin bolt but do not remove it, pivot the caliper up and locate the pad retaining clips on the upper and lower end of the pads. Remove the pad retainers with a flat screwdriver, then pull the pads straight back and out. Discard the old pads.

    4

    Slide the new brake pads into the bracket and clip the new retaining clips that came with your pads into place. Set them on the caliper and push to snap them in. Pivot the caliper body down and install the lower pin bolt.

    5

    Tighten the lower pin bolt with a wrench until it is secure. Do not over-tighten the bolt or you will never get it out again. Move to the opposite side of the truck and repeat the process.

    6

    Install the tires and lug nuts on the front hubs. Tighten the lug nuts with a lug wrench, then lift the front of the truck off the jack stands with a jack. Remove the stands from under the truck and lower the truck to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts completely after the weight of the truck is back on the wheels.

Selasa, 08 Februari 2011

How to Install Brakes for a Pontiac G6

New brake pads need to be installed in your Pontiac G6 every 60,000 miles or even earlier if you frequently drive under stressful conditions, such as city driving. The brake pads, which press against the brake rotor when the breaks are applied, are seated within the brake caliper and its mount on the rotor. You need to install new brake pads on both sides of the car, not just one side at a time.

Instructions

    1

    Check the fluid level in the brake master cylinder. It needs to be midway between the minimum and maximum levels. If it is higher, siphon out as much fluid as needed with a clean siphon or turkey baster.

    2

    Raise the G6's front end securely on jack stands. Loosen and remove the lug nuts on the wheels with a tire iron, and remove the wheels. Place lug nuts onto two of the wheel studs to keep the rotor in place.

    3

    Loosen and remove the lower guide pin bolt on the brake caliper with a wrench. Push the caliper's piston back into its bore with a piston installation tool or C-clamp. Pivot the caliper up off its mount and hold it in place with a strong wire.

    4

    Install the new brake pads into their shims and retaining clips within the caliper mount. If the old pads are still in there, remove them, then remove the shims and retainers, clean off all dirt and corrosion, rub an anti-squeal compound on the shims' backing plates and place them back in the mount before installing the pads.

    5

    Lower the caliper back into place and tighten the guide pin bolt. Replace the wheel onto the G6; you'll need to remove the lug nuts supporting the rotor first.

    6

    Seat the brakes once you have installed them on both sides. Push the brake pedal about two-thirds of the way down, release the pedal and repeat every 20 seconds until the pedal feels firm.

Types of Car Brakes

Types of Car Brakes

Automotive brakes are grouped into three basic categories: disc brakes, drum brakes and parking brakes.

Disc brakes use a pair of pads that clamp against the flat rotor or disc, while drum brakes use brake shoes that expand against the inside of a cylindrical drum. These brake types are both hydraulic systems designed to convert the forward momentum of a moving vehicle into heat and slow the vehicle.

Parking brakes function mechanically and use static friction to hold a parked vehicle in place.

Disc Brake Function

    Floating disc brake

    There are two types of disc brake system in use today. They can be identified by their caliper piston position.

    The floating caliper disc brake system can be identified by caliper piston(s) located in only one side of the caliper assembly. When the brakes are applied by the driver, the inside pad is forced against the rotor. As the force increases, the inside pad pushes against the rotor and forces the caliper to slide on its slide pins and pull the outside pad against the rotor. This is the most common caliper design used today.

    The fixed caliper disc brake system is identified by its multiple pistons, with equal number of pistons on each side of the caliper. In this system, as the brakes are applied, the force is applied equally on both sides of the rotor surface. This clamping force is what stops the vehicle.

Drum Brake Function

    Non-servo drum brake

    With drum brakes there are also two types. The type of drum brake system is identified by the position of the self adjuster or star wheel.

    When this adjuster is located on the lower portion of the shoe and becomes the connecting point between the shoes, this is a servo drum brake system. On this system, the lower portion of the shoes are connected by an adjuster and spring, and the upper portion is separated by an anchor pin bolted to the backing plate. When the brakes are applied, the wheel cylinder spreads the shoes against the rotating drum. When contact is made, the shoe's natural tendency is to rotate with the drum. As the primary shoe tries to rotate, the force of that rotation is transmitted into the secondary shoe through the adjuster between them. The secondary shoe tries to follow the rotation of the drum as well, but is stopped by the anchor pin at the top of the backing plate. Since it can't rotate, it becomes jammed against the drum surface. This is why the secondary shoe is always bigger then the primary, because the secondary shoe is applying all the force and wears faster.

    In a non-servo system, the anchor is located at the bottom of the backing plate. Instead of being a round pin, it's a flat, wedge-shaped plate. At the top of the backing plate, we find the adjuster located just below the wheel cylinder. As the brakes are applied, again the shoes try to follow the rotation of the drum. But on this system, the leading shoe hits the wedge shaped anchor plate and is forced down the wedge into the drum. The trailing shoe is stopped by the wheel cylinder, applying its force into and through the wheel cylinder continuing into the top of the leading shoe. The shoes in this system are the same size, and uneven wear is common on the leading shoe, because it applies all of the braking force going forward.

Parking Brake Function

    Parking brake lever

    Parking brake systems are mechanical brakes used to hold a vehicle when it's parked. They have three basic designs.

    The conventional drum brake design, works within the basic drum brake and is cable actuated. When the parking brake lever or pedal is set, the cable pulls a lever attached to a brake shoe. A flat steel bar connecting the lever and the secondary shoe forces both shoes against the drum providing the pressure to hold the vehicle.

    The actuator caliper, disc brake system is also cable actuated. When the parking brake is applied, the cable pulls a lever attached to the actuator in the caliper. This rotates a worm screw in the caliper and caliper piston, and it actually "unscrews," forcing the piston and pad into the rotor. This provides the needed force to hold the vehicle.

    The final system is called drum-in-hat and is used on some disc brake systems. The inside of the rotor, called the hat, is machined in the same way a brake drum is. A small set of auxiliary shoes is attached to the backing plate, and the rotor is slipped into place over them. When the parking brake is applied, the cable pulls a lever attached to the actuator. This spreads the shoes and provides the needed friction to hold the vehicle.

Conclusion

    There are several types of brake systems used today. Your vehicle will use any or a combination of these to perform its functions.

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Minggu, 06 Februari 2011

How to Replace Brakes on a 2001 Ford Focus

How to Replace Brakes on a 2001 Ford Focus

Replacing the brakes on a 2001 Ford Focus is much like replacing the brakes on any Focus model from 2000 to 2005. The front brakes use brake pads that are the main components used with the brake pedal, while the rear wheels use brake shoes that work mainly with the parking brake. Whether you're changing front or rear brakes, you must change them on both sides of the car at the same time.

Instructions

Front Brake Pads

    1

    Apply the car's parking brake and loosen the lug nuts on both front wheels. Raise the front end, support it on axle stands, and remove the wheels.

    2

    Pry the brake caliper's retaining clip out with a screwdriver, disconnect the brake hose from its strut bracket, and disconnect the caliper by removing its guide pins with an Allen wrench. Support the caliper someplace where it won't stretch its brake hose. You can hang it with wire or string, for instance.

    3

    Pull the inner brake pad and its built-in retaining spring out of the caliper piston. Slide the outer brake pad and its securing clip out of the caliper.

    4

    Compress the piston with a C-clamp. This will push fluid back into the brake master cylinder. Make sure the reservoir doesn't overflow.

    5

    Install the new pads into the caliper. The inner pad connects to the piston via its spring, and the outer one attaches with its securing clip.

    6

    Connect the caliper back on the disc and tighten the guide pin bolts to 21 foot-pounds.

    7

    Repeat the process on the other front wheel. Reinstall the wheels and lower the car.

Rear Brake Shoes

    8

    Block the car's front wheels, release the parking brake, and make sure the car is in Park. Raise the rear end, support it on axle stands, and remove both rear wheels.

    9

    Unscrew the four bolts at the rear of the drum and hub assembly to remove the drum.

    10

    Remove the hold-down springs and pins for the shoes with pliers. Disconnect the top ends of the shoes from the cylinder, then pull the bottom ends off of the bottom anchor. Disconnect the parking brake cable from the rear shoe.

    11

    Disconnect the return springs and the adjuster from the shoes by moving the bottom ends together and pulling the front shoe away from the strut. Pull the adjustment strut away from the rear shoe and remove the strut support spring.

    12

    Apply high-temperature grease to the spots on the cylinder that contact the brake shoes as well on as the sliding components on the brake shoe adjuster.

    13

    Connect the adjustment strut and its support spring to the replacement rear shoe, connect the front shoe to the adjustment strut and the brake shoe adjuster, then connect the return springs to the shoes and the parking brake cable to the rear shoe.

    14

    Install the bottom end of the shoes to the cylinder's bottom anchor and connect the top ends on the cylinder. Connect the eccentric cam to the rear shoe with it set at its lowest position. Connect the hold-down pins and springs to the shoes.

    15

    Reconnect the brake drum to the cylinder and tighten the bolts to 49 foot-pounds.

    16

    Repeat the process on the opposite rear wheel. Connect the wheels and lower the rear end.

Removing the Brake Rotors From a 1998 V-6 Camry

Removing the Brake Rotors From a 1998 V-6 Camry

The 1998 Toyota Camry was equipped with a 2.2-liter in-line four-cylinder engine in the base model, with front disc brakes and rear drum brakes. A 3.0-liter V-6 engine was optional in the 1998 Camry, as well as four-wheel disc brakes. Replacing the brake rotors is essential to maintaining the integrity of the entire brake system, whether the vehicle has two-wheel or four-wheel disc brakes. The rear rotor replacement instructions only apply if you are working on a vehicle with four-wheel disc brakes.

Instructions

Front Rotor Replacement Instructions

    1

    Loosen the front wheel lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the front of the Camry with a jack. Place jack stands beneath the front frame rails, on both sides of the engine. Lower the car onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts from the front wheels completely, then remove the front wheels from the Camry.

    2

    Spray the bleeder screws on the caliper with rust-penetrating spray, and let the spray set for at least 10 minutes. Remove the caliper bolts from the rear of the caliper with a ratchet and socket. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using a small pry bar, if needed. Hang the caliper from the front strut coil spring, using a metal clothes hanger. Do not let the caliper hang from the rubber hose on the rear of the caliper.

    3

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper bracket by hand. Remove the caliper bracket mounting bolts with a ratchet and socket. Remove the caliper bracket from the brake assembly by hand. Remove the brake rotor from the wheel hub by hand.

    4

    Install the new brake rotor onto the hub, and install a single lug nut onto a stud against the face of the rotor by hand. Install the caliper bracket onto the steering knuckle, and tighten the mounting bolts to 73 foot-pounds with a 1/2-inch-drive torque wrench and socket. Spray the entire brake rotor and the caliper bracket with brake cleaner to remove the factory rust-preventing oil. Failure to remove all of the oil from the rotor will ruin your brake pads and possibly the new rotor. You should use about half of the aerosol brake spray per rotor.

    5

    Hold one of the old brake pads against the caliper piston, on the inside of the front caliper. Attach a set of large, locking pliers against the brake pad and the rear of the caliper. Open the bleeder screw on the caliper with an open-end wrench. Compress the caliper piston completely into the caliper housing by tightening the locking pliers slowly. Hold the locking pliers on the brake assembly with one hand while tightening the bleeder screw with your free hand.

    6

    Place a thin film of caliper grease on the contact points of the caliper bracket. Install the new brake pads onto the caliper bracket. Place a thin film of caliper grease onto the backing plates on the inboard and outboard brake pads. Install the compressed caliper onto the brake assembly, and tighten the mounting bolts to 34 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. Remove the single lug nut from the wheel stud.

    7

    Repeat steps 2 through 6 to complete the rotor and brake pad replacement on the other side of the Camry. Reinstall the front wheels on the car, and tighten the lug nuts snugly with a tire iron. Raise the front of the Camry off the jack stands, remove the stands from beneath the car, lower the Camry to the ground and tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern. Set the lug nuts to 76 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and wheel-nut socket.

    8

    Sit in the driver's seat of the Camry. Depress the brake approximately two-thirds of the way to the floor. Release the brake pedal and let it return to its resting position. Repeat this step three to five times, or until the brake pedal becomes stiff and hard to depress. If the pedal does not stiffen after the second pump, stop pumping the brake pedal and bleed the front brake calipers.

Rear Rotor Replacement

    9

    Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the rear of the Camry, and place jack stands beneath both ends of the rear axle crossmember. Set the jack stands about four to six inches inward from the rear wheels to access the rear of the brake assembly. Lower the Camry onto the jack stands. Remove the rear wheel lug nuts and remove the rear wheels from the car.

    10

    Spray the rear caliper bleeder screw with rust-penetrating spray and let the spray set for at least 10 minutes. Remove the caliper bolts with a ratchet and socket. Remove the rear caliper, using a small pry bar, if needed. Hang the caliper from the rear coil spring with a metal clothes hanger. Do not let the caliper hang by the rubber hose on the rear of the caliper.

    11

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper bracket by hand. Remove the caliper bracket bolts from the steering knuckle with a ratchet and socket. Remove the caliper bracket and then the rear brake rotor by hand. If the rotor is stuck, use a flat-head screwdriver to remove the small rubber grommet from the brake backing plate. Adjust the parking brake adjuster wheel upward to loosen the brake from the inside of the rotor. Tap the rotor forward and rearward from the sides with a rubber mallet. Remove the rotor.

    12

    Spray the parking brake parts with aerosol brake cleaner to remove excess brake dust from the brake shoe. Inspect the brake shoe for thickness. If the parking brake shoe is less than 1/16 inches thick, the parking brake shoe needs to be replaced.

    13

    Install the new brake rotor onto the rear hub assembly and spin a single lug nut against the face of the rotor. Install the rear caliper bracket and tighten the bolts to 73 foot-pounds with a 1/2-inch-drive torque wrench and socket. Spray the entire brake assembly with brake cleaner to remove the factory installed rust-prevention oil. Place a thin film of caliper grease onto the brake pad contact points of the bracket once the brake cleaner evaporates.

    14

    Place an old brake pad against the caliper piston on the inside of the caliper housing. Install large, locking pliers around the old brake pad and the rear of the caliper. Open the brake bleeder screw with an open-end wrench. Compress the caliper piston completely by tightening the locking pliers slowly. Hold the locking pliers tight with one hand and tighten the bleeder screw with your free hand.

    15

    Install new brake pads onto the caliper bracket and place a thin film of caliper grease on the backing plates of the inboard and outboard pad. Install the brake caliper onto the brake assembly. Tighten the caliper bolts to 34 foot-pounds of torque with a torque wrench and socket. Remove the single lug nut from the face of the rotor.

    16

    Repeat steps 2 through 8 to complete the rotor and brake pad replacement on the second side of the Camry. Install the rear wheels back onto the car and tighten the lug nuts snug with a tire iron. Raise the rear of the Camry off the jack stands, then remove the stands from beneath the car. Lower the Camry to the ground and tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern. Set the lug nuts to 76 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and wheel nut socket.

    17

    Sit in the driver's seat of the Camry. Depress the brake approximately two-thirds of the way to the floor. Release the brake pedal and let it return to its resting position. Repeat this step three to five times or until the brake pedal becomes stiff and hard to depress. If the pedal does not stiffen after the second pump, stop pumping the brake pedal and bleed the rear brake calipers.