Minggu, 30 Januari 2011

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Nissan Altima

The Nissan Altima has one of two braking systems in the rear of the vehicle; disc or drum brakes. If your Altima has rear disc brakes and you need to replace them, follow these instructions. You won't need any special tools other than what you will find in a standard tool box.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the rear of the Altima off the ground using a car jack. Use a torque wrench to loosen the lug nuts of the rear wheels. Take them off and set them on the ground face up.

    2

    Disconnect the parking brake by removing its cable bracket bolt. Take out the pin bolts and lift off the caliper body. Pull out the rear disc brake pad springs.

    3

    Rotate the brake piston clockwise into the caliper body. Be careful not to cause damage to the caliper boot.

    4

    Apply silicone based grease to the mounting support. Pay particular attention to the area that maintains contact with the brake pad.

    5

    Insert the new brake springs. Attach the new shims to the brake pads. Position the brake pads onto the mounting support.

    6

    Place the caliper body on the mounting support. Use the torque wrench to tighten the pin bolts between 16 to 23 ft. lb. Reassemble the wheels and lower the Altima to the ground.

    7

    Verify that the rear disc brakes operate properly when you replace them, and then replace the necessary amount of brake fluid to bring it up to the proper level to complete the job.

Sabtu, 29 Januari 2011

How to Adjust Rear Brakes in 1991 Chevys

How to Adjust Rear Brakes in 1991 Chevys

The drum brakes on the rear of a 1991 Chevrolet are designed for stability more than stopping power. These keep the front of the vehicle from diving towards the ground when you brake. Over time, the brake shoes wear out and need adjusting. 1991 Chevys have a semi-automatic adjuster on the brake shoes, so you will need some mechanical work to adjust them properly. The process is fairly easy, and proper adjustment will help your front brakes last longer.

Instructions

    1

    Place wheel chocks in front of the front wheels and raise the rear of the vehicle, using the floor jack. Place the jack stands beneath a secure part of the vehicle and lower the jack until the vehicle is sitting on the jack stands.

    2

    Place the vehicle in neutral, if it has rear-wheel drive, and spin the rear wheels. If they spin without resistance, you need to adjust them.

    3

    Crawl beneath the rear of the vehicle and remove the rubber plug on the drum brake backing plate, the metal plate behind the rear brakes. The rear drum brakes are located directly behind the rear wheels.

    4

    Insert a flat-head screwdriver in the hole that you removed the rubber plug from, until it reaches the star-shaped adjustment wheel.

    5

    Spin the rear wheel as you pry the adjustment wheel downward. Notice a clicking sound with each turn of the wheel. Continue spinning the rear wheel and turning the adjuster wheel until light resistance is felt on the rear wheel. Pry the adjuster wheel 12 clicks in the opposite direction. Place the rubber plug back into the drum backing plate.

    6

    Repeat steps 3 through 5 for the wheel on the other side of the Chevy.

    7

    Raise the vehicle from the jack stands, using the floor jack. Remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground. Remove the wheel chocks from the front wheels.

    8

    Complete the rear adjustment by putting the vehicle in reverse. Allow the vehicle to start moving backward and then stop the vehicle. Repeat this step three or four times to allow the semi-automatic adjusters to adjust the brakes the rest of the way.

How to Install the Rear Disc Brakes on a 1985 GMC Sierra

Replacing the rear disc brakes on a 1985 GMC Sierra is an important repair for safety. If you need to replace them, you'll find that you don't need any special tools to get the job done.

Instructions

Rear brake removal

    1

    Remove about two thirds of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir with a suction gun or syringe. The master cylinder reservoir is on the passenger's side of the engine compartment of the GMC Sierra.

    2

    Raise the rear of the car with a jack and prop on jack stands. Loosen the lug nuts of the rear tires using a torque wrench and then remove the wheels.

    3

    Remove the caliper and the caliper mounting bracket bolts so you can take out the brake pads.

Rear brake installation

    4

    Fasten a wear indicator to the inner pads and two to the outer pads.

    5

    Place the brake pads on the caliper mounting bracket and then bolt the mounting bracket to the steering knuckle.

    6

    Place the caliper over the brake pads and connect with bolts.

    7

    Replace the tires, tighten the lug nuts and lower the car.

    8

    Refill the master cylinder reservoir with brake fluid to the level indicated.

How to Remove the Brakes on a 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

The brakes on a 2004 Dodge Ram can take a lot of abuse because of the weight of the vehicle and what it can carry. As a result, the brakes may wear down faster than on normal vehicles, making it necessary to replace them more often. At some point, it may be necessary to remove all of the brake components from the vehicle to have them all either rebuilt or replaced, which can take a few hours to do.

Instructions

Front brakes

    1

    Lift up the Dodge Ram using the jack. Set a pair of stands underneath the frame, then lower the jack so the truck is supported on the four jack stands. Take off the wheels with the tire iron.

    2

    Set the brake line clamp onto the rubber brake line running into the brake caliper. Remove the brake line connection using a line wrench. Unbolt the caliper from the knuckle using the 3/8-inch ratchet and hex-head socket.

    3

    Tilt the caliper off of the knuckle and set it to the side. Slide the rotor off of the knuckle using both hands to support the weight.

Rear brakes

    4

    Set the brake line clamp onto the rubber brake line running into the brake caliper. Remove the brake line connection using a line wrench. Disconnect the emergency brake cable connection using a flathead screwdriver.

    5

    Unbolt the caliper from the rear axle using the 3/8-inch ratchet and hex-head socket. Lift the caliper off of the axle and set it to the side.

    6

    Slide the rotor off of the axle using both hands to support the weight.

Jumat, 28 Januari 2011

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 2000 Honda Accord

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 2000 Honda Accord

The brake pads in the 2000 Honda Accord are used to prevent wear and tear on the brake components. The pads are clipped in the caliper and push against the rotor when the brake pedal is pressed. The pads get worn down after time and need replacement to prevent any damage to the caliper or the braking system.

Instructions

Removing the Brake Pads

    1

    Place a jack under the front crossmember to raise the vehicle up. Place a set of jack stands under the "pinch" points, which are located under the front doors.

    2

    Take the front wheels off with the tire tool. Place the wheel to the side.

    3

    Locate the caliper that is bolted above the rotor. There will be two bolts at the back of the caliper, which will need to be removed so the caliper can be pulled off the rotor.

    4

    Pull the caliper off the rotor by hand. Pull the brake pads out of the caliper. The pads will be attached to the caliper by small clips attached to the back.

    5

    Insert one of the old pads back in to the caliper with the front of the pad pressed against the piston. Squeeze the piston back in to the caliper with a c-clamp. Place one end of the c-clamp on to the back of the brake pad. Place the other end on the back of the caliper. Turn the t-handle on the top of the c-clamp until the piston is back inside the caliper. Discard the old brake pad.

Installing the Brake Pads

    6

    Insert the new brake pads. They will be labeled to make installation easier. Ensure the clips secure the pad to the caliper.

    7

    Position the caliper back on to the rotor. Insert the two bolts and tighten them with a socket wrench.

    8

    Tighten the wheel back on with the tire tool. Tighten all the lug nuts.

    9

    Repeat to replace the brakes on the passenger side. Ensure both sets of lug nuts are tightened on the wheels before lowering the car.

    10

    Raise the car with a jack. Remove the jack stands. Lower the car to the ground.

    11

    Start the car and allow it to idle. Pump the brake pedal to reset the brake pads.

Kamis, 27 Januari 2011

How to Remove the Rear Brakes on a 2000 Camry

How to Remove the Rear Brakes on a 2000 Camry

The Toyota Camry was originally developed in 1983 and made its US-built debut in 1988. It finally became the best-selling family car in America in 1997 and continues to hold that honor. The 2000 model has an upgraded interior and a revised styling, which are ideas that Toyota hopes will help it keep its number 1 title. The 2000 Camry sports a 2.2 L engine with a 4-speed automatic transmission. The brakes are disk on front and rear and should be changed twice a year or as needed.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts. Using the tire iron, loosen each lug nut two full rotations. Put a wood block in front of each of the front tires.

    2

    Raise the car. Place the floor jack underneath a support strut and raise the vehicle enough to allow the tire to come off. Place a jack stand underneath the same support strut.

    3

    Remove the tire. Finish removing the lug nuts and take the tire completely off. Set the tire and the lugs aside.

    4

    Remove the brake mounting bracket. The brake mounting bracket is held on with two bolts that can be removed using the socket wrench set. Tie the bracket up to the undercarriage of the car to prevent strain on the brake line. The brake line is the black tube that protrudes from the rear of the bracket.

    5

    Remove the brakes. The brake pads will slip out of the mounting bracket.

    6

    Compress the brake cylinder. The brake cylinder can be compressed using the C-clamp. Place one of the old brake pads over the piston to allow better grip with the clamp.

    7

    Install the new brake pads. The new brake pads will slip into the same slot where the old ones were removed from.

    8

    Reattach the mounting bracket. The bolts can be retightened with the socket wrench. Reattach the wheel and lower the car. Repeat steps 1 through 8 for the other wheel.

Special Brake Tools

Special Brake Tools

Brakes require more attention than most people care to imagine, and replacing worn or damaged brakes can get expensive. You save money by repairing the brakes yourself. The task intimidates most people, but with the right tools, working on brakes becomes easy. Several manufacturers design and build different types of specialty brake tools, but all help to remove and repair brake systems.

Compression Tools

    A C-clamp and an old brake pad accomplish most of the compression you need to push the caliper piston back into the brake caliper. Without a clamp, you can use a disc brake spreader, which operates by turning a knob that pushes a flattened screw into the caliper, forcing it back into position. With rear disc brakes, the caliper screws in, so you need a caliper reset tool. Additionally, with dual-piston front brakes, you have the option to use a dual-piston brake caliper compressor, which looks like a caulking gun attached to a clamp.

Repair Tools

    A rotor becomes grooved and worn with time. Using a micrometer tells you the width of the rotor, which must remain above a certain level, depending on your vehicle. The micrometer simply measures the width; the brake honing tool accomplishes the repair. A brake honing tool has three heads with honing stones on them. The tool attaches to a spinning tool like a drill press that allows the honing tool to push down on the brake rotor (a steady hand and a drill accomplishes this) until the metal of the rotor is smoothed out.

Springs and Clips

    Drum brakes house a half-dozen or more springs that attach to various clips. The most common specialty tool, called brake-spring pliers, allows you to remove the springs with a turn of the wrist and remove clips. Additionally, manufacturers offer a brake-clip removal tool and a parking-brake cable remover. The clip remover pushes onto a retaining clip on disc brakes, and with a turn of the wrist, removes the clip. The parking-brake cable removal tool compresses the parking brake line, allowing you to disconnect the ends with one hand.

Senin, 24 Januari 2011

How do I Replace Brakepads on a 2005 Scion XB?

How do I Replace Brakepads on a 2005 Scion XB?

Toyota introduced the Scion xB in 2004. The following year, the Scion xB was equipped with a 1.5-liter, in-line four-cylinder engine, capable of producing up to 108 horsepower and 105 foot-pounds of torque. The 2005 xB was produced as a five-door wagon. It was offered with the option of two-wheel or four-wheel disc brakes. Over time, the pads on the brakes wear thin due to daily braking habits. When the brake pads wear thin, they need to be replaced. The Scion xB with four-wheel disc brakes has an enclosed emergency brake system inside the rear rotor, appropriately called the rotor/drum.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the torque from the front wheel lug nuts. Turn the nuts counterclockwise with a tire iron to remove the torque, but do not remove the lug nuts yet. Raise the front end of the xB using a 2-ton (or greater capacity) jack. Place jack stands beneath the two front frame rails, just inside the lower control arms underneath the wagon. Remove the lug nuts completely from both front wheels and then remove both front wheels from the Scion.

    2

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts from the back of one of the calipers. This project is to be completed one side at a time. This will allow you to use the second side of the vehicle as a visual reference if you get stuck on how to reassemble something. The caliper is the large metal piece that wraps around the rotor. Turn the caliper bolts off of one caliper with a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket. Remove the bolts from the caliper completely. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using a small pry bar to remove the caliper if necessary.

    3

    Place the brake caliper directly behind the brake rotor assembly, on the lower control arm of the xB. The lower control arm is the triangular arm extending from the bottom of the brake assembly to the frame of the wagon. Do not let the caliper hang freely or you will damage the rubber brake hose attached to the caliper. Remove the brake pads from the caliper-mounting bracket, if they have not already fallen out. There is one pad on the front of the bracket and one on the rear, behind the brake rotor. Pull both off by hand.

    4

    Lubricate the backing plates or shim plates on the new pads, using a tube of caliper grease. Lightly coat the metal backing plates to reduce brake squealing during the initial wearing in of the pads. Install the new brake pads onto the caliper-mounting bracket so the greased sides are facing away from the brake rotor.

    5

    Install a 9-inch or larger C-clamp around the back and inner portion of the brake caliper. Place an old brake pad against the piston, which protrudes from the center of the caliper. Close the C-clamp onto the rear of the caliper and the old brake pad. Continue to turn the C-clamp tighter until the caliper piston has been completely retracted and the brake pad is flush with the inside of the caliper housing.

    6

    Install the caliper over the rotor and new brake pads. Install the caliper mounting bolts and tighten the bolts to 25 foot-pounds of torque with a 3/8-inch drive torque wrench. Spray the entire brake assembly down on the completed side, using a can of aerosol brake cleaner spray.

    7

    Repeat Steps 2 through 6 to complete the second front wheel. Reinstall both wheels onto the car only after you have confirmed that you've properly tightened the caliper bolts. Set the wheel lug nuts on both sides of the car and snug the wheel nuts to mount the wheels flush. Raise the front of the Scion xB with a jack and remove the jack stands from beneath the front of the car. Lower the vehicle to the ground. Immediately torque the wheel lug nuts to 90 foot-pounds of torque using a torque wrench and socket.

    8

    Sit in the driver's seat and slowly pump the brake pedal. It should take you at least three seconds to push the pedal all the way down if you are performing this step correctly. Repeatedly pump the brake pedal at least 10 times, or until the brake pedal stiffens and the brake tension has been reset to normal operating tension. Many shop accidents following a brake job are due to the technician not pumping the brake pedal properly before attempting to test drive the vehicle.

    9

    Repeat Steps 1 through 8 to complete the replacement of the rear brake pads, if the Scion xB is equipped with four-wheel disc brakes. The process for the rear pad replacement is identical to the one you just performed on the front brake pads. Make sure you follow all torque specifications directly and heed safety warnings.

Minggu, 23 Januari 2011

How to Compress the Piston in Rear Disc Brakes

How to Compress the Piston in Rear Disc Brakes

Rear disc brakes feature calipers as hydraulic components to expand and squeeze the brake pads against the surface of the rotors. They are smaller than their front disc brake counterparts. When replacing pads, rotors or both, you must compress the caliper pistons to make room for the new, thicker brake parts. While some vehicles feature calipers that can be compressed with simple tools, others are not so easy. Always refer to a repair manual for your specific vehicle to determine which kind you have or you can damage the calipers.

Instructions

    1

    Hang the caliper with a caliper hook or makeshift hook with a wire coat hanger to the rear suspension once removed. Do not let it hang from the brake hose or you can damage the hose.

    2

    Visually inspect the piston on the caliper. If it is a solid piston with grooves, it cannot be compressed with a C-clamp or channel locks. If it is a hollow piston, it can be.

    3

    Insert the C-clamp onto the caliper so the top of the clamp is contacting the inside housing and the driving bore of the clamp is inside the hollow piston. If desired, you can use the backing plate of one of the pads to sit on top of the piston. Tighten the C-clamp slowly to compress the piston.

    4

    Use a set of large channel locks to accomplish the same task as Step 3 if you don't have a 6-inch C-clamp. Rear calipers are smaller than front calipers and the pistons can usually be compressed much easier than the front.

    5

    Use a caliper reset tool to compress the pistons that are solid. (These pistons will have visible notches on the solid piston positioned opposite of one another.) To do so, match up an adapter from the reset tool kit to the notches, then place in the reset tool.

    6

    Place the brace bracket of the reset tool on the inside of the outer caliper housing with the adapter and arbor attached to the piston.

    7

    Turn the arbor clockwise to compress the piston until it's fully seated inside the bore. Be aware that some vehicles may feature both right and left hand-threaded calipers. This means one side (usually driver's) will feature a clockwise motion to compress the piston, while the other side may feature a counterclockwise motion to compress the piston. While this scenario is rare, it does exist--trying to compress the piston the wrong way can damage it.

How to Use a Brake Reset Tool

Retracting the brake piston back into the cylinder is an important task in disc brake servicing. On many rear disc brake designs, this task is accomplished in the same manner as on the front brakes; the piston is simply pushed back into the cylinder. On other designs, however, the piston must be simultaneously pushed and rotated back into the cylinder. A brake reset tool is a special brake tool that is used to perform this task. Each auto manufacturer has a different brake design, and each produces a specific reset tool suitable for its own design. Aftermarket brake reset tool kits are also available that have a set of adapters that allow them to work on most different designs.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a firm and level surface. Do not set the parking brake. Securely block the front wheels to prevent accidental vehicle movement. Partially loosen the lug nuts of the rear wheel to be serviced, and jack the car up. Support the car securely on a jack stand. Completely remove the lug nuts, and pull the wheel off.

    2

    Remove the two caliper bolts. Lift the caliper up and off the disc. Hang the caliper out of the way using a bungee cord, taking care not to damage the flexible brake hose.

    3

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper by sliding them in toward the middle of the caliper until they release. If retaining clips are present, pry them off the caliper bracket with a screwdriver or pull them off with pliers. Do not damage the clips during removal so that they can be reused during reassembly.

    4

    Retract the piston using the brake reset tool. The tool consists of a threaded spindle that passes through a metal plate. The spindle has a handle on one end and a keyed face on the other end. Place the keyed face against the piston face, and match the protrusions of the tool face to the indentations in the piston face. Depending on the design, the tool may have pins or ridges that insert into holes or grooves on the piston face. Place the metal plate of the tool against the inner surface of the outer caliper frame. Rotate the tool handle to advance the spindle while simultaneously rotating the piston. Continue until the piston is fully retracted into the cylinder. Take care not to damage the rubber piston boot. When using an aftermarket tool, you must first fit the adapter that corresponds to your specific piston face before using the tool.

How Do ABS Brakes Work?

Before ABS application

    Pressing your car's brake pedal triggers a series of actions to provide safe stopping ability for your car. ABS (anti-lock braking system) works in conjunction with your regular braking system to provide computerized stopping assistance when your car loses control. Understanding how a car's brake system works will help you envision how ABS improves braking ability in difficult driving conditions.

    When you apply the brakes, this sends a message to the master cylinder which forces fluid into the brake lines of your car. When the master cylinder compresses to force fluid into the lines, this creates friction that heats up the lines and brake pads. The heated pads press against the brake discs or drums, slowing the car and eventually stopping forward motion.

Detection

    ABS systems contain a controller that functions as a computer. Controllers measure speed and control the valves and pump of the ABS system. If the controller senses a difference in wheel speed in the speed sensors, the ABS overrides your pressure on the brake pedal. This complicated process begins with detection at your computer and speed sensors. The computer evaluates the speed of the slipping wheel and controls the valves to provide a measured response. The controller evaluates wheel speed and rotation as well as continuity between the wheels.

    Based on this evaluation, the controller decides whether the car can regain control without ABS, if the system requires complete takeover to return control to the car, or if the valve should release pressure to return the brake system to normal. The controller performs this assessment within seconds.

Triggering ABS application

    Valves control the amount of fluid available to the lines and brake system. Once the controller tells the valves of the ABS that the system needs to control the skid, this engages a pump on the ABS. The pump releases and applies variable pressure to the braking system to stop the car or regain traction. The pumping system also varies the application of the brakes at a rate to control the skid.

    If multiple wheels lose control, the controller sends different messages to each wheel based on its assessment of stopping requirements. ABS varies the rate of brake application based on information collected from the wheel sensors. ABS automatically applies the brakes based on each individual wheel evaluation to reestablish control.

    ABS pumps your brakes at a much greater speed that humanly possible. This feels like a pulsing in the brake pedal when ABS is engaged. Some ABS systems can apply brakes up to 30 to 40 times per second, much faster than humanly possible.

Returning to normal

    Activating your ABS system temporarily prevents the initiation of regular braking. As soon as the ABS system gains traction, the controller notifies the valves to release pressure from the brake lines. This restores the normal braking system to the vehicle. The pump restores normal pressure to the brake lines after application of the ABS.

Sabtu, 22 Januari 2011

DIY for a Drum Brake on a Chevy Van

DIY for a Drum Brake on a Chevy Van

The rear drum brakes on your Chevy van enclose the brake shoes, related mechanism and mounting hardware. Drum brakes adjust themselves and require little maintenance service. However, the brake lining--the friction material that rubs against the inside of the drum wall--eventually wears out, may become contaminated with oil or damaged and need to be replaced. Brake shoes are not as easy to replace as the pads on disc brakes but a set of special brake tools will make your job much easier.

Removing the Brake Drums

    When installing new brake shoes on the rear wheel assemblies, remove both rear wheel/tire assemblies and drums. Then work on one brake assembly at a time and use the other assembly as a visual reference to make sure you install all the brake components in their correct place.

    Before raising the rear of your Chevy van, insert a pin on the hole of the parking brake lever to disable the parking brake. Then, before removing the wheel/tire assembly, make match marks on the wheel and wheel hub so that you install them in the same position. Make matchmarks on the brake drum and hub.

    On some Chevy vans, the drum can be remove by hand after removing the wheel/tire assembly, on other models, you will need to remove the drum retainers from the studs. If the drum seems stuck, tap lightly on the outer edge of the drum with a rubber mallet.

Removing the Brake Shoes

    Start removing the retaining and hold-down springs from the brake assembly and keep all the brake mounting hardware in order so that you can reinstall them in their correct place. Once you have removed the brake shoes, spray the brake assembly backing plate with brake parts cleaner and wipe the brake dust from the assembly.

    Before installing the new brake shoes, apply a thin coat of high temperature silicone brake lubricant to the backing plate where it contact the brake shoes. Also, lubricate the threads of the brake shoe adjuster screw with the same silicone. Use the other rear brake assembly as reference to install the new shoes, if necessary, so that you do not mix up the retaining springs.

    After installing the brake drum and wheel/tire assembly, adjust the brake shoes through the adjusting hole in the back of the backing plat. Use a screwdriver to push the lever resting against the star wheel on the star wheel of the adjusting screw and rotate the star wheel using a brake adjusting tool. The brake shoes will be properly adjusted when they slightly drag against the drum as you rotate the wheel by hand.

    After installing both brake shoe assemblies and lowering your van, depress the brake pedal gradually a couple of times, with the engine off, to allow the brake shoes to seat properly against the drum.

How to Replace the Rear Drum Brakes on a 2005 Toyota Matrix

The 2005 Toyota Matrix was available in front-wheel-drive and all-wheel-drive versions, and was equipped with a 1.8-liter, in-line four-cylinder engine that produced 170 horsepower. The Toyota Matrix was a joint venture between Toyota and General Motors. The General Motors version of the Toyota Matrix was the Pontiac Vibe. The rear drum brakes on the 2005 Matrix are a complex set of brake components and springs. Drum brakes are usually removed to replace the brake shoes or drums, but wheel cylinders and hardware may need replaced as well.

Instructions

Replacing Rear Brakes

    1

    Loosen the rear lug nuts on the Matrix. Raise the rear of the car with a jack under the axle beam. Place jack stands about six inches inward from the back of the tires to allow access to the brake backing plate. Lower the car onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and wheels.

    2

    Remove the brake drum. If the drum is stuck, remove the oval-shaped rubber stopper from the backing plate with a flat-head screwdriver. Insert the screwdriver through the hole in the backing plate, and push downward on the self adjuster wheel. This will retract the brake shoes from the drums. Tap the sides of the drum with a rubber mallet and wiggle the drum from side to side, if necessary.

    3

    Remove the return spring between the shoes, wrapped around the self adjuster wheel. Use pliers to pull the spring free of both shoes. Remove the two circular hold-down springs and clips for the forward mounted brake shoe. Use a pair of needle-nose pliers or a nut driver to turn the circular clip at the end of the spring to align with the flattened tip of the pin. Remove the front brake shoe. Remove the self adjuster wheel and bar from the assembly.

    4

    Remove the hold down spring and pin for the rear shoe with the pliers or nut driver. Remove the parking brake cable from the rear shoe with pliers. Remove the rear shoe from the brake assembly. Remove the anchor spring from the rear shoe. Remove the C-clip that holds the parking brake lever on the rear shoe with a flat-head screwdriver. Remove the parking brake lever from the rear shoe.

    5

    Check the seals on either end of the wheel cylinder at the top of the brake assembly. If the seals are wet with brake fluid or look dry and cracked, replace the wheel cylinder. Remove the brake line from the rear of the wheel cylinder with a line wrench. Remove the two bolts that hold the wheel cylinder to the backing plate. Install the new wheel cylinder. Tighten the mounting bolts snug, then turn the wrench about 1/4 turn farther. Install and tighten the brake line to the wheel cylinder so that it is snug.

    6

    Install the parking brake lever and C-clip onto the new rearward shoe. The rear shoe is fitted with a small metal tube to hold the parking brake lever. Install the shoe onto the backing plate. Insert a new hold-down pin through the rear of the backing plate and the shoe. Install a new hold-down spring clip, the spring, then the second clip onto the pin. Turn the outer clip so it forms a "+" shape with the flattened end of the pin. Install the adjuster assembly on the rear shoe in the recess provided in the shoe.

    7

    Install the front shoe onto the backing plate and align it with the self adjuster assembly. Install the pin, clips, and hold-down spring for the forward shoe. Make the same "+" sign with the outer clip and the pin to lock the spring in place. Install the anchor spring between both brake shoes with needle-nose pliers. Install the return spring between both shoes.

    8

    Place a tape measure across the opening on the inboard side of the brake drum, to measure the distance between two sides of the drum. If the measurement of the drum gap is equal to or greater than 9 1/16 inches wide, then replace the drum.

    9

    Install the brake drum over the new shoes. Use the adjuster wheel to accommodate the size of the new shoes inside the drum if necessary. Install a single lug nut onto one of the lug studs, to hold the drum in place. Turn the self adjuster with a flat-head screwdriver to adjust the shoes outward to the drum, using the hole in the backing plate. Remove the single lug nut from the face of the brake drum when you are finished with installation.

    10

    Repeat steps 2 through 8 to complete the brake shoe and wheel cylinder (optional) replacement on the other side of the Matrix. If you replace either of the wheel cylinders, you must bleed the brake system. This is outlined in Section 2. If you did not replace the cylinders, move directly to Section 3.

Bleeding the Brakes

    11

    Open the hood. Check the brake fluid level and make sure the reservoir is filled to the "Full" mark. Fill the reservoir with fresh brake fluid if needed. Ask your assistant to sit in the driver's seat of the Matrix.

    12

    Ask your assistant to pump the brake pedal on the car until it is firm, then hold it with the weight of his foot. Open the bleeder screw while he is holding the brake pedal down and tell him to slowly push the pedal to the floor. Close the bleeder when the pedal is to the floor. Repeat this step three times, or until no bubbles come out of the bleeder screw. Check and fill the brake fluid reservoir. Repeat for the other side, if applicable. Install and tighten the reservoir lid.

Adjusting the Brakes

    13

    Install both rear wheels on the Matrix and tighten the lug nuts snug with a tire iron.

    14

    Turn one rear wheel with your hand. If the rear wheel does not make a complete rotation then the brakes are over-adjusted. If the rear wheel makes more than one complete rotation, then the rear brakes are under-adjusted. Use the self adjuster wheel through the rear backing plate to adjust the brakes in or out. Turn the wheel again to test your brake tension against the drums. Repeat this step on the other side of the car to make the final rear drum adjustment.

    15

    Raise the Matrix off of the jack stands with your jack. Remove the stands from beneath the car. Lower the car to the ground. Tighten the rear lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds with a 1/2-inch-drive torque wrench and wheel socket.

    16

    Sit in the driver's seat of the Matrix. Pump the brake pedal several times. This will seat the brake shoes against the drums for initial braking.

Jumat, 21 Januari 2011

How Do I Install Front Disc Brakes on a 1998 Dodge Ram?

Replacing the front brakes on the Dodge Ram truck is easy. The process is the same for both the two- and four-wheel drive models. You can expect each wheel to take about 30 minutes to do. You can replace the brakes in your driveway, so there is no need to spend money on a mechanic. You want to make sure that you examine the brake rotors, when you change the brake pads, to be sure there is no damage to them.

Instructions

    1

    Pop the hood of the Dodge. Locate the master cylinder at the back of the engine compartment on the driver's side. Siphon enough brake fluid from it so that the level is halfway between the minimum and maximum lines with a turkey baster. Put the fluid in a drain pan for recycling. Place a set of wheel chocks behind the rear tires. Raise the Ram with an automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the truck near the jacking point and raise it up to the frame. Remove the lug nuts with a lug wrench and pull the wheel off the vehicle.

    2

    Remove the caliper bolts with a socket and ratchet. Pull the caliper away from the wheel assembly. Remove the brake pads from the caliper. Insert a piston tool into the caliper and turn it until the piston seats itself inside the caliper housing.

    3

    Insert the new brake pads into the caliper. Place the caliper onto the mounting bracket and tighten the retaining pins with the socket and ratchet. Remount the wheel and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Ram and lower the truck to the ground. Repeat the process for the other wheel.

    4

    Add brake fluid to the master cylinder to bring it to the proper level once the brake job is complete. Pump the brake pedal until it feels firm.

Kamis, 20 Januari 2011

How to Take the Pressure Out of the Brake Drums

How to Take the Pressure Out of the Brake Drums

The drum brake system has been incorporated on many vehicles. Most of the vehicles on the road today offer a choice of four wheel disc brakes, or front disc brakes and rear drum brakes. Drum brakes are found mostly on the rear of vehicles. At the bottom of the drum brake assembly, there is an adjuster known as a star-wheel adjuster. Over time this adjuster can over expand due to such things as consistent use of the parking brake. Every time the parking brake is set, the adjuster wheel tightens the drum brakes a little more.

Instructions

    1

    Lay beneath the rear bumper of the vehicle you are working on, and position your body so that you can physically access the back wheel of the car. With the rear of the vehicle raised and the rear wheels off of the vehicle, remove the small rubber grommet from the rear of the brake backing plate. The backing plate is the metal plate that covers the back side of the drum brakes, and the rubber grommet is located on the rear of the plate. This grommet fills the adjuster hole, which will give you access to the star-wheel adjuster.

    2

    Insert a thin flat head screwdriver into the hole in the backing plate. Insert the tip of the screwdriver onto the star-wheel adjuster teeth. Pry the teeth of the adjuster downward from behind the brakes. This motion will force the star-wheel to collapse inward and release the pressure on the drum.

    3

    Tap the sides of the drum toward the front and back of the car with a large rubber mallet. This hammering motion will move the drum side to side, and push the brake shoes inward. This procedure can also assist in the removal of the brake pressure from the drums. Try removing the drum by hand. If this procedure has not worked thus far, continue to the next step in this project.

    4

    Place a small pry bar in between the bottom inner lip of the drum, and the backing plate. Pry the drum outward. Move the pray bar to the side lips of the drum, and pry between the drum and backing plate on either side of the drum. Use this method, alternating between the bottom and two sides at least five consecutive times. The more you pry on the drum, the further it should come out. The object of this step is to pull the drum out to physically access the star-wheel adjuster with a screwdriver.

    5

    Pry the drum outward again in between the drum and rear backing plate. This time place the tip of the pry bar at a diagonal angle both downward and towards the rear of the car (at about the 4 or 5 o'clock position of you are facing the front of the brake drum). Insert a thin flat head screwdriver above the star wheel adjuster or either one of its extending cylinders. Push the handle of the screwdriver upward to pry down on the star-wheel adjuster. This prying motion with the screwdriver should remove the adjuster from the inside of the brake assembly completely. Once the adjuster is completely removed, you should have no problem pulling the brake drum off by hand.

How to Change Brakes on a Pontiac G6

Changing the brakes on either the front or rear wheels of a Pontiac G6 is a similar process, with only slight differences depending on which brakes you are changing. This is also a similar process to changing the brakes on most vehicles. Depending on your driving habits, you need to change your brakes every 60,000 to 80,000 miles. The surest sign that your brakes need to be changed is a grinding and squealing sound.

Instructions

    1

    Open up the brake master cylinder in the engine and remove at least two thirds of its fluid using a hand-held siphon tool such as a turkey baster. Pour the fluid into a container for later disposal..

    2

    Raise the G6's front or rear end with a floor jack. Lower the vehicle onto jack stands. Block the wheels opposite the ones that are raised. Remove both of the wheels on the raised end.

    3

    Compress the brake caliper's piston using a C-clamp inserted onto the arch of the caliper. This will force fluid back into the master cylinder and reservoir.

    4

    Unscrew and remove the lower bolt on the brake caliper using a wrench. Pivot the caliper on its upper pin and tie it the strut spring with a wire. You might need to remove both bolts on a rear caliper if the parking brake cable is in the way.

    5

    Pull both brake pads out of the bracket on the brake disc.

    6

    Pull the guide pins out of the caliper. Clean the pins and coat them with high-temperature grease before reinserting them.

    7

    Insert the new brake pads and shims into the bracket.

    8

    Grasp and rotate the caliper piston all the way to the bottom with needle-nose pliers. Line up the piston's notches with the openings in the caliper. You will need to do this only on a rear caliper.

    9

    Reposition the caliper on its bracket and screw the bolt or bolts back into place.

    10

    Repeat the steps for the other wheel. Remount both wheels and lower the car to the ground.

What Are the Functions of a Brake Master Cylinder on a 1993 Ford E350?

The brake master cylinder is the heart of any hydraulic braking system. The master cylinder provides the fluid to pressurize the system in your 1993 Ford E-350. The master cylinder does this in a few simple ways.

The Actuator Rod

    The master cylinder is the component in the braking system that is first triggered by pressure on the brake pedal. The actuator rod presses a piston in the master cylinder, which compresses the fluid and sends it on its way through the system.

The Sealed Reservoir

    The master cylinder provides a sealed, airtight chamber for the fluid to reside in. This allows it to be pressurized, and does not allow it to escape. The sealed master cylinder reservoir ensures that when the brakes are activated, the piston has enough fluid to deliver to the brake components.

The Return Stroke

    The piston also has a return stroke that allows the brake components to release. The reservoir gives the fluid a place to return to as well, so that the brakes can release. Otherwise, once the brakes were engaged, they would stay engaged.

DIY: Brake Repair for a Chevy Truck

DIY: Brake Repair for a Chevy Truck

Properly functioning brakes can mean the difference between life and death on the highway. Heavy payloads, towing and a higher gross vehicle weight compared with cars all put increased stress on your Chevy truck's braking system. Brake repairs can easily be performed by the home mechanic with few special tools, and in a relatively short period of time.

When to Repair

    The first sign that your Chevy truck's brakes need service will be an audible grinding or scraping noise coming from the front of the vehicle whenever you apply pressure to the brake pedal. The sound may change while braking in a turn and it may lessen or completely stop as the brake pedal is fully depressed. The sound is caused by the brake pad's wear indicator, a thin strip of metal that contacts the brake rotor once a certain percentage of the brake pad's thickness is lost due to normal wear. If you suspect that your brake pads are worn, check them immediately. Allowing prolonged contact between the wear indicator and the rotor can damage the rotor.

Removing the Caliper and Pads

    Begin by parking the truck on a level surface. Put the transmission in Park (automatic transmissions) or first gear (manual transmissions) and set the parking brake. Put wheel chocks or wooden blocks around the rear wheels to prevent the vehicle from rolling away. Use a jack to lift the front of the vehicle and support it with jack stands placed underneath the frame or front axle (four wheel drive trucks). Remove the front wheel to reveal the break assembly. Look for the wear indicator; if it is in contact or close to being in contact to the brake rotor, the pads on either side must be replaced. The caliper will be mounted with two bolts that pass through the caliper mounting bracket on the inboard side of the brake rotor, and are secured by machined threads in the outboard side of the caliper. Remove those bolts. Then place a c-clamp over the caliper. Set the bottom of the c-clamp on the raised curricular cup on the inboard side of the caliper, which houses the piston. Set the top of the c-clamp on the outer brake pad. Tighten the c-clamp until the piston is driven all the way back into the caliper. Then pull the caliper off the rotor. While the brake caliper is disconnected from the rotor, do not let it hang from the hydraulic brake line; secure it with a wire or a plastic tie to the vehicles frame, as stress on the hydraulic line could damage the line or cause air to leak into the system, resulting in brake failure and/or poor brake performance.

Rotor and Pad Inspection

    Inspect the brake pads, you will see a series of rivets that secure the pad material to the steel backing plate. If there is less the 1/32 in. of material between the pad surface and the rivets or if there are any cracks or gouges in the pad surface, the pads must be replaces. Inspect the brake rotor. The surface should be even with no irregular grooves or gouges (some brake discs are made with grooves machined into the surface to aid in cooling. Run your finger across the surface of the disc, starting from the center and moving outward. The surface should be flat. If the disc becomes thinner toward its outer edge or is worn, it must be replaced.

Brake Rotor Removal (if necessary)

    On four-wheel-drive models, the rotor can simply be pulled off the wheel hub. On two-wheel-drive models, use a flat blade screwdriver to pry the grease cap off the rotor, then remove the cotter pin and castle nut. Pull the brake rotor off the spindle, but be careful not to drop the wheel bearings.

Brake Rotor Installation (if necessary)

    On four-wheel-drive vehicles, the rotor can simply be pushed back onto the spindle. Just make sure you line up the holes in the brake rotor with the wheel studs. On two-wheel-drive models, you must carefully drive the outer wheel bearing races out of the old rotor using a wheel-bearing removal tool. Then use a wheel bearing installation tool to drive the outer race into the new brake rotor. Pack the bearings with grease before loading them into the rotor and sliding the rotor back onto the spindle. Reinstall the outer bearing, washer and castle nut and torque the nut to 12 ft. lbs. Reinstall the cotter pin and the grease cap.

Brake Pad Installation

    Load the brake pads into the caliper. The inboard pad will have a steel clip that gets seated in the caliper piston. The outer pad will have a steel clip with tabs that slide over the edges of the caliper. Slide the loaded caliper over the brake rotor and reinstall the two mounting bolts. Reinstall the wheel and lower the vehicle. Do not attempt to drive the vehicle until you restore brake pressure. When you drove the piston into the caliper with a c-clamp, the brake fluid flowed out of the caliper and into the master cylinder. Press down on the brake pedal, it will most likely fall to the floor with little resistance. You must keep pumping the brake pedal until the hydraulic fluid works it's way back into the caliper and pushes the piston out far enough to contact the rotor. Then check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder and make sure it is full.

Warning

    Always remember that when you work on automotive brake systems, each axle must be serviced on both sides; if you must replace the pads on the front left wheel, you also must replace the pads on the right front wheel. If you replace the pads and rotors on the left front wheel, then you must replace the pads and rotors on the right front wheel, regardless of the condition of the brakes on the other wheel.

Tools Needed to Repair a 1998 Dakota's Brakes

A 1998 Dodge Dakota has a brake structure similar to other American-made vehicles and only requires a few basic tools to repair the brakes. While the tools are simple, it's important to gather everything you need before you get started. Having the tools in front of you makes it easy to concentrate on properly changing the brakes and creating a safe environment for you to work in.

Lug Wrench

    When you're working on Dakota brakes, the first thing you have to do is loosen the lug nuts on the back tires. Since the brakes run behind the tires, they need to be removed. Using a lug wrench to loosen the lug nuts before the truck is lifted, ensures that the tires won't spin during the process. Simply place the head of the lug wrench over the lug nut and turn until the lug nut is approximately halfway off.

Jack and Jack Stands

    In order to get to the brakes the car needs to be lifted off the ground. In order to do this safely, you need to have a jack and two jack stands. After you loosen the lug nuts on the rear tires, place the jack under the rear frame of the car and slowly raise the back end high enough for you to get under the car and comfortably work. Next, place a jack stand on either side of the truck to hold it in place. The jack stands give the truck more support and help ensure the vehicle won't fall on top of you.

Wrenches

    You need two different wrenches to repair the brakes on a 1998 Dodge Dakota. A 17mm wrench is used to remove the brake caliper bracket. To loosen the bleeder you need a 9mm wrench and to take the caliper apart to replace the brake pads you need a 14mm wrench. A torque wrench is also used to put the tire back on the car, because it ensures the correct amount of pressure is on the lug nuts.

Adhesive

    Adhesive is used when you replace the brake pads. While regular adhesive works fine, using an anti-squeak brake adhesive helps you avoid that embarrassing sound new brake pads typically make.

Lubricant

    If you're working on the wheel cylinder or brake drum, it's important to have a penetrating lubricant on hand. This should be placed on the brake line that runs from the brake drum to the wheel cylinder and on the brake fitting. The lubricant helps you remove parts and pieces without damaging them.

Rabu, 19 Januari 2011

How to Replace Front Brakes on a 2000 Dodge Grand Caravan

How to Replace Front Brakes on a 2000 Dodge Grand Caravan

Brake pads work with the brake rotors to create friction, which slows and stops your 2000 Dodge Grand Caravan. The friction also wears down the brake pads. How often you must replace the brake pads is relative to the amount of use they get. The new brake pads are not expensive, and each wheel will take about 30 minutes to install the new brake pads. If you do the project yourself, you can save money on high labor costs at the repair shop.

Instructions

    1

    Drain about half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster. The master cylinder is in the engine compartment on the driver's side, in the back. Place the fluid in the drain pan, and take it for proper recycling. Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Raise the Grand Caravan with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the van near the jacking point, and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts from the wheel with the lug wrench. Pull the wheel away from the van.

    2

    Loosen the caliper retaining pins with the socket and ratchet. Lift the caliper off the wheel assembly. Remove the brake pads from the caliper, and discard them. Insert the piston tool into the brake caliper, and turn it until the piston seats itself in the caliper housing.

    3

    Install the new brake pads into the caliper. Place it on the mounting bracket, and tighten the retaining pins with a socket and ratchet. Place the wheel on the Caravan, and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the van. Lower the vehicle to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

    4

    Add brake fluid to the master cylinder as needed when the project is complete. Pump the brakes several times until the pedal is firm.

Selasa, 18 Januari 2011

How to Replace the Rotor in a Nissan Altima

If the braking performance of your Nissan Altima is suffering but you know that the pads and calipers are in good shape, it may be time to resurface or replace the rotors. Rotors only need to be replaced if they are too worn down to be resurfaced or if they are warped from excessive braking. The process is the same across all Nissan Altima model years and is surprisingly simple.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase a new set of rotors for your Nissan Altima online or at the auto parts store. Never replace rotors individually, as this leads to uneven braking and damages your car.

    2

    Raise your Altima using a jack and jack stands. Once it's up, remove the lug nuts, tire and front end assembly of the first wheel you need to work on with a socket wrench or an air ratchet with an appropriate adapter.

    3

    Remove the caliper being careful not to disconnect it from the brake line. Suspend the caliper and brake hose out of the work area with mechanic's wire.

    4

    Take off the old rotor. For the front rotors, thread two bolts into the threaded holes on the rotor and tighten the bolts to loosen the old rotor. For rear rotors, just pull the old rotor off of the hub.

    5

    Clean the area around the hub with a damp cloth to remove any debris and corrosion. Apply a coating of anti-seize compound to the hub to keep the new rotor from rusting to the hub. Slide the new rotor onto the hub in the correct position.

    6

    Replace the caliper and discard the mechanic's wire. Tighten the caliper bolts with a torque wrench to 53 to 72 ft. lbs. (72 to 97 Nm) on front brakes or 28 to 38 ft. lbs. (38 to 52 Nm) on rear brakes. Reinstall the wheel assembly and tire. Continue on and replace each additional rotor.

    7

    Lower the vehicle after you install the new rotors. Tighten the lug nuts on the tires with a torque wrench. Be sure to pump the brakes and then road test the vehicle to make sure that the installation was successful.

Senin, 17 Januari 2011

How to Replace a Caliper in a Pontiac Bonneville

Replacing a brake caliper is even more difficult than on other model cars. This is for two main reasons. The Bonneville has been discontinued, and the removal and installation process varies for its front and rear calipers.

Instructions

Removing an Old Caliper

    1

    Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir. Remove fluid to the midway point between the maximum and minimum levels if the fluid level is above this point.

    2

    Raise and stabilize the vehicle with a jack stand suitable for a Bonneville. Remove the wheel for the caliper that must be replaced. Screw two of the lug nuts back onto the rotor to keep it on the hub.

    3

    Go to the front parking brake cable on the rear caliper if this is one you are replacing. Pull down on the cable and remove it from the park brake cable connector.

    4

    Compress the caliper piston into the bore with a C-clamp. Place the clamp over the top of the caliper housing and against the outboard brake pad's back end. Don't make the piston travel further than a millimeter.

    5

    Disconnect the brake hose by removing the caliper bolt. Toss away the two copper gaskets. Plug the hose and the opening in the caliper with rubber.

    6

    Detach the parking brake cable bracket from the caliper. Remove the parking brake cable from the parking brake lever on the caliper while leaving the cable attached to the cable bracket.

    7

    Remove the caliper, starting with the pin bolts. This procedure varies depending on a front or rear caliper.

Installing a New Caliper

    8

    Wipe the old grease from the pin bolts and apply a fresh, thin cost. Don't grease the bolt treads, though, nor to any part of the brake pad hardware.

    9

    Install the replacement brake caliper and pin bolts, using the reverse procedure as removal. For rear calipers, this means installing it to the upper pin bolt and rotating it down over the brake pads.

    10

    Connect the brake hose onto the caliper, unplugging all the openings first. Use new gaskets with the bolt.

    11

    Reconnect all parking brake components to the rear caliper if needed. This includes connecting the brake cable to the lever on the caliper, the cable bracket to the caliper and the front park brake cable to the cable connector

    12

    Bleed the brake system. Attach a rubber hose to the open bleeder valve and place the other end in a container of brake fluid. Have an assistant slowly depress the pedal multiple times until all air is removed from the system.

    13

    Set the brakes while the engine is off. Push the pedal two-thirds of the way down and slowly release it. Repeat this at 15-second intervals until the brakes feel firm.

    14

    Replace the wheel, removing the lug nuts first that were supporting the rotor to the hub.

How to Replace the Brake Light Switch in a 1997 Accord

How to Replace the Brake Light Switch in a 1997 Accord

You can replace the brake light switch on your Accord without taking the car to a repair shop. Damage to the switch happens over time--it can fail or cause a short circuit. If none of the brake lights come on when the pedal is pressed, the switch may have failed. An improperly installed brake light switch can cause the brake lights to stay on constantly. In other instances, the Accords horn may sound every time you press the brake pedal, indicating a short in the brake light switch. You can replace the brake light switch in 15 minutes or less.

Instructions

Removing the Brake Light Switch

    1

    Locate the brake light switch under the dashboard. You can find it by following the brake pedals metal shaft all the way to the top. The brake light switch will be directly behind the metal shaft connection for the brake pedal. The switch will be either bronze or silver colored and about 3 inches long.

    2

    Draw a line with your black marker on the threads of the brake light switch. The line is to mark the place of the retaining nut that secures the switch in position. Therefore make your line right at the base of the nut on the plunger side, not the harness side, of the brake light switch.

    3

    Detach the brake light switch's wiring harness. If you cannot do this by hand use your flat-head screwdriver to carefully pry the plug loose from the harness. Remove the harness by its plug--do not pull it off by its wires.

    4

    Remove the retaining nut from the brake light switch with your wrench. Carefully remove the switch from its position under the dashboard by sliding it out of its shaft.

Installing the Brake Light Switch

    5

    Inspect the new brake light switch for any visible signs of damage. Do a side-by-side comparison with the old switch to make sure your new switch is identical. Set both brake light switches side by side on a flat surface. Mark the new switch with a black line on its threads in the same spot as on the old brake light switch.

    6

    Return the new brake light switch to its shaft underneath the dashboard.

    7

    Install the retaining nut. Wind the retaining nut down until you see the black line that you made on the shaft. The switch's plunger should not be in direct contact with the brake pedals metal shaft--there should be a small gap in between the plunger and the shaft. To be sure that the gap is sufficient, slide the tip of your butter knife between the two. If you cant pass the knife in between the brake pedal shaft and plunger, the switch is too close. Turn the retaining back nut 1/2 turn and try again. Repeat until the knife passes through the gap freely.

    8

    Secure the brake light switch retaining nut with your wrench. Gently plug the switch's wiring harness back in. Test the switch to make sure the brake lights go on and off when the brake pedal is pressed and released. Ask a friend to stand at the rear of the car, or back the car near a vertical surface like a garage door, and watch through your mirror.

Minggu, 16 Januari 2011

How to Change 2005 Mustang GT Rotors

The braking system on a 2005 Ford Mustang GT has disc brakes mounted on the suspension. The rotors wear down as do the brake pads, and it's recommended that every time you change the brake pads that you also take off and either have the rotors resurfaced at a professional shop or replaced with new ones. In either case, the rotors need to come off of the Mustang, which takes about an hour to do.

Instructions

    1

    Put the front of the Mustang on jack stands using a jack. Take off the front wheels using the tire iron and set them out of the workspace.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper anchor plate from the from spindle using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Hang the brake caliper on the fender of the Mustang using the heavy duty bungee cord.

    3

    Pull off the retaining clips around the lugs of the wheels using the needle-nose pliers. Take the rotor off of the front hub/bearing assembly using both of your hands.

The Rear Brakes on My 1991 Chevy Pickup Won't Bleed & Just Air Comes Out

The Rear Brakes on My 1991 Chevy Pickup Won't Bleed & Just Air Comes Out

Brake problems on any vehicle poses a major safety issue. When brakes have air trapped in the line, the brakes fail to properly engage, thus diminishing your stopping power. If no fluid is in the line, you lose all stopping power. The 1991 Chevrolet truck series uses a master cylinder and brake booster to supply additional power to the brakes. Bleeding the brakes frees trapped air from the line. Sometimes extensive amounts of air are trapped, making it appear as though no fluid is in the line.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the rear of the vehicle one wheel at a time. Place jack stands under each wheel at the axle as you raise the wheel. Remove the lug nuts with a lug wrench and remove the tires. Place them to the side.

    2

    Visually inspect the brake lines coming from both rear brakes. Trace these back to the engine while looking for signs of leaks or breaks in the line. Make sure to check the drums also for signs of leaks. You will need to carefully pull off the drum and inspect the caliper for signs of leaking. You should see no signs of fluid within the drum cylinder. Replace the drum onto the drum cylinder. If no breaks in the line or leaks are identified, remove the top off of the brake fluid reservoir and fill to the full line.

    3

    Loosen the bleed screw on the passenger rear tire first. When bleeding brakes, always start from the brake farthest from the reservoir to make sure trapped air does not leak back into the system. Place the rubber tubing onto the bleed screw and into the clear plastic bottle. Make sure the bottle has a small amount of brake fluid in the bottom and the end of the rubber tubing is immersed in the fluid.

    4

    Check for vacuum pressure on the line. Have an assistant depress the brake pedal and hold it in place. Loosen the bleed screw fully so that the air can escape. You should see bubbles come out the end of the tubing. Have the assistant release the brake pedal. If a vacuum exists, which is necessary for proper operation, the tubing will suck fluid out of the bottle. If that is the case, then you just have extensive amounts of air trapped in the line.

    5

    Close the bleed screw and build up pressure in the brake lines. Have your assistant firmly press the brake pedal down three to five times. On the last time, have him hold it down while you loosen the bleed screw. If no air was coming out previously and no vacuum was identified, you have a clogged bleed screw. Increasing the pressure in this manner will force any blockage out. Make sure you have vacuum in the line after clearing out obstructions by repeating step four.

    6

    Bleed the passenger rear tire. Have the assistant press the brake pedal to the floor and hold it there. Loosen the screw and allow the air to escape. Once the bubbles stop, tighten the screw and have the assistant release the pedal. Repeat the process until no air is coming out of the line. Tighten the bleed screw firmly. The process may take an extensive amount of time if a lot of air is present. Monitor the fluid reservoir and refill it as necessary. Do not let the reservoir get less than half full.

    7

    Bleed the remaining brakes (repeat step 6) starting with the driver rear, then the passenger front and then the driver front. When you have completed the rear tires, replace the wheels and lug nuts and lower them to the ground. Raise the front wheels and remove those wheels in the same fashion. Once complete, install the wheels and lower the vehicle to the ground. Test the brakes.

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a 1999 Taurus

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a 1999 Taurus

The 1999 Ford Taurus uses brake pads on the front and rear wheels, giving the Taurus better braking power than it would have if the rear brakes were drums. Another advantage of rear pads is that they're easier to change than drums. While front brake pads generally wear out faster than rear ones, you should inspect the rear brake pads at the same time you change the front ones and replace the rear pads if necessary. Changing rear brake pads is slightly different than changing the front ones since the rear brake calipers are connected to the parking brake.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Loosen the rear-wheel lug nuts using your tire iron. Raise the rear of the car and support it on jack stands. Remove both of the rear wheels. Block the front wheels with wheel chocks and release the parking brake.

    2

    Wash the brake assembly with brake cleaner spray; keep a drip pan or tray underneath the brake assembly to catch dripping cleaner.

    3

    Detach the cable connected to the lever on the caliper: Compress the lever and spring with slip-joint pliers; disconnect the cable from the lever with locking pliers; pry the retainer clip off the cable with a screwdriver; and pull the cable's end free of the caliper.

    4

    Remove the caliper's upper mounting bolt with a wrench and swing the caliper out of the way, prying the caliper's top end free of the mounting bracket.

    5

    Pull the inner and outer brake pads out of the caliper mounting bracket.

    6

    Compress the caliper piston into its bore: Rotate the piston clockwise with needle-nose pliers or a special caliper adjusting tool from an auto parts store, and make sure one of the slots on the piston face will engage the tap on the new inner pad's backing plate.

    7

    Press the caliper's sliding pins and make sure they can freely move within their bores. If not, remove the sliding pins, clean them with the brake cleaner, and lubricate them with high-temperature brake grease before reinstalling them.

Installation

    8

    Install the new inner and outer brake pads into the caliper mounting bracket.

    9

    Swing the caliper back down into place on the mounting bracket. Apply a drop of thread-locking compound to the threads on the mounting bolt and install the bolt, tightening it to between 23 and 25 foot-pounds.

    10

    Reconnect the rear wheels and lower the car off the jack stands after changing the brakes on both sides.

    11

    Fill the master cylinder reservoir in the engine compartment with fresh DOT3 heavy-duty brake fluid as needed.

    12

    Pump the brake pedal multiple times to seat the brake pads.

Sabtu, 15 Januari 2011

How to Adjust E Brake on a Jetta 2001

How to Adjust E Brake on a Jetta 2001

You can adjust the e-brake on your 2001 Volkswagen Jetta right from your home garage, saving yourself money and time. The parking brake cable stretches out over time and the slack needs to be taken up in order to keep it functioning properly. You need to adjust the emergency brake when your Jetta slips when it's in park on a downhill slope.

Instructions

    1

    Find the center console cover between the driver's seat and the front passenger's seat. Lift up on it and remove it.

    2

    Step down on the brake pedal all the way to the floor, then release it. Do this a total of three times.

    3

    Lift up on the parking brake handle until it reaches its highest position, then release it to the lowest position. Repeat this two more times.

    4

    Locate the adjuster nut on the rod that is sticking out of the parking brake lever. Turn it with a wrench until it is 1/10 of an inch from the brake caliper stop.

    5

    Put wheel chocks in front of and behind the front wheels of the Jetta. Raise up the rear end of the vehicle with a jack and put jack stands in place underneath and near the rear wheels. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stands. Spin the rear wheels forward, verifying that they spin freely without drag. If they don't spin freely, repeat step 4.

    6

    Raise the vehicle, remove the jack stands, lower the vehicle to the ground and remove the wheel chocks.

How to Replace a Caliper in a Honda Accord

Replacing major parts like brake calipers on a Honda Accord, or any car, is a task not to be taken lightly. If you insist on replacing your Accord's calipers yourself, make sure you know all about the whole car and talk with your mechanic or another expert.

Instructions

Remove the Old Caliper

    1

    Drain and discard brake fluid from the master cylinder. You should drain about two-thirds the amount, or to the midway point between the minimum and maximum level.

    2

    Raise and support the car on a jack stand. Remove the wheel to get to get to the caliper you need.

    3

    Disconnect the brake hose at the bracket mounting bolt. Plug the line with a piece of plastic to avoid contaminating the fluid.

    4

    Remove the caliper flange bolts and remove the caliper from the rotor or bracket. Remove the brake pads, shims, and pad retainers.

Install the New Caliper

    5

    Connect the brake pads, shims and retainers to the new caliper. (You should probably use new ones.) Before connecting, apply a thin coat of assembly paste to the pad sides of pad shims and the back of the pads.

    6

    Rotate the caliper piston into the cylinder clockwise. Turn the piston back to align the piston cutout with the tab on the inner pad by so the caliper can be installed. Lubricate the boot with rubber grease so the piston boot won't twist.

    7

    Reconnect the caliper mounting bolts. Connect the brake line hose, using new washers with the banjo bolt.

    8

    Refill the master cylinder with fresh fluid if needed. Attach the wheel and lower the vehicle.

    9

    Check the parking brake adjustment. Pump the brake pedal multiple times to set the pads until the pedal feels firm. Test the brakes on the road.

Jumat, 14 Januari 2011

How to Change Brakes in a 2000 Mercury Cougar

How to Change Brakes in a 2000 Mercury Cougar

The brake system components on the 2000 Mercury Cougar includes the brake calipers, brake pads and the brake rotors. The brake pads are applied to the brake rotors by the brake caliper. When the brake pads are compressed against the sides of the brake rotors, the friction from the pads against the turning rotors slows and stops the Cougar. Replace the brake pads before the pads wear down to the wear indicators inside of each pad. Also, replace the rotors or have the rotors machine turned each time the brake pads are replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 2000 Mercury Cougar and apply the emergency brake.

    2

    Open the hood and locate the brake fluid reservoir under the brake master cylinder. Remove the lid from the reservoir and insert the basting syringe. Pull enough brake fluid out of the reservoir to fill the syringe. Place the syringe of brake fluid in a safe area. Lower the hood.

    3

    Loosen all of the lug nuts from the front tires with a tire tool. Then, jack the front of the Cougar up in the air. Once the car is high enough, position the car stands under the proper jacking points, located on both sides of the Cougar. Lower the Cougar to the car stands and leave the jack in the up position.

    4

    Pull both front tires off and place them near the front of the Cougar. Move back to the front driver-side wheel hub and locate the brake caliper mounted to the side of the brake rotor.

    5

    Pry the outer brake pad against the brake rotor with the flat-head screwdriver until the caliper has enough slack in it to remove.

    6

    Locate the two upper and lower mounting pin bolts on the back of the caliper. Remove the two pin bolts with the 3/8-inch drive ratchet and a socket.

    7

    Pull the brake caliper from the brake rotor. Then, hang the brake caliper to the front shock with a piece of small rope.

    8

    Pry the inner brake pad out of the brake caliper with the flat-head screwdriver. Insert the C-clamp into the caliper and position the C-clamp so that the adjustment bolt is facing the caliper cylinder. Turn the C-clamp clockwise to compress the outer brake pad against the caliper cylinder. Continue to compress the caliper cylinder until it is fully inside of the caliper.

    9

    Unscrew and remove the C-clamp. Pry the outer brake pad out of the caliper with the flat-head screwdriver. Then, remove any other brake pad accessories from the brake caliper.

    10

    Position the new brake pads and any brake pad accessories into the brake caliper. Make sure that the new pads are behind the locking clips inside of the brake caliper. Remove the rope from the caliper and position the brake caliper back on the side of the brake rotor.

    11

    Screw the two pin bolts back into the rear of the brake caliper. Tighten the pin bolts tight with the ratchet and a socket. Slide the wheel onto the wheel studs and screw the lug nuts in place. Tighten the lug nuts with the tire tool.

    12

    Move to the passenger-side front wheel hub assembly and follow the same outline above for replacing the brake pads. Once the brake replacement is complete, open the hood back up and pull the lid back off the brake fluid reservoir. Squirt the brake fluid back into the reservoir and reinstall the lid. Then, close the hood.

    13

    Crank the engine and pump the brake pedal a couple of times to seat the new brake pads to the brake rotors. Then, turn the engine off.

    14

    Jack the Cougar back up and remove the car stands. Lower the Cougar and remove the jack.

How to Replace the Rotor in a Dodge Ram

If your Dodge Ram seems to be shuddering to a stop more often than not, it's probably time to replace the rotors. Rotors don't need to be changed often, but hard braking and letting the brake pads wear down can warp and wear down the surface of the rotor over time. If they can't be resurfaced, then you should replace them with new rotors.

Instructions

    1

    Find the right rotors for your Dodge Ram at your local auto parts store or online. Change all four rotors at once for the best braking performance, or at very least change the front or rear pair or rotors at the same time for even braking.

    2

    Jack up your Dodge Ram. Block the wheels to keep it from rolling as you work. Get started by removing the first tire and wheel assembly. Remove the hub extension and the brake caliper as well as the caliper adapter.

    3

    Remove the grease cap, cotter pin, nut lock, nut, washer and outer wheel bearing. Now, pull the old rotor off of the spindle. Clean the area with a damp cloth to remove any debris. Pack the wheel bearings with grease.

    4

    Install the new rotor and hub onto the spindle. Replace the outer wheel bearing, washer, and then the retaining nut. Torque the nut to 30 to 40 ft. lbs. (41 to 54 Nm) while rotating the hub and rotor. Then tighten the nut and install the nut lock and a new cotter pin.

    5

    Clean the grease cap and then coat it with new wheel bearing grease and replace the cap. Put the caliper adapter back into place and then tighten the two mounting bolts with a torque wrench. Install the wheel and tire assembly.

    6

    Repeat this process for each additional rotor and then lower the vehicle, tighten the lug nuts and test drive your Dodge Ram to make sure that the installation was successful.

How to Change Brakes on a 2002 Ford Focus

Doing regular maintenance on a car consists of more than just an oil change? The brakes are the most important safety feature on a car and should not be overlooked. If you hear grinding or squealing coming from the brakes when driving, it is time to change them. The brake pads are an easy maintenance repair that can be done right in your own driveway in less than an hour. Make sure to purchase the correct pads for a 2002 Ford Focus.

Instructions

    1

    Place car in park and emergency brake on. The car should not be running.

    2

    Place the jack under the car so that lift head is positioned in the designated lift area. Jack the car up so that some of the weight is on the tire and some weight is on the jack. Loosen the lug nuts with a tire iron. Jack the car completely up so that tire is off the ground and remove lug nuts completely. Take the tire off and place it so that half sticks under the car and half sticks out from under the car. If the jack fails, the tire will stop the car from falling all the way to the ground.

    3

    Use a wrench to loosen and remove the top bolt on the caliper. Pull back on the caliper so that it swings away from the rotor. Remove the old brake pads from the caliper.

    4

    Place a C-clamp on the caliper so that when you tighten the clamp, the brake piston will be pushed back into the caliper; this reduces the need to either drain the caliper or bleed the brakes when completed. The C-clamp should be big enough so that one end of the clamp will rest on the back of the caliper while the other end will push on the brake piston.

    5

    Clip the new brake pads onto the caliper. The pads are manufactured so that they can only be attached to the caliper the correct way; you cannot make a mistake. Swing the caliper with the brake pads attached back over the rotor. Insert the top bolt and tighten it with a wrench or socket wrench.

    6

    Place the wheel back on hub and tighten the wheel nuts. Finally, lower the car back to the ground and make sure that the wheel nuts are tightened completely.

Kamis, 13 Januari 2011

How to Change Rear Brake Shoes

Changing brakes shoes within the brake drums on the rear of a vehicle is not as simple as changing disc brake pads on the front. There are many more components, like springs and cables, that must be disconnected in order to change them. Nonetheless, brake shoes need to be replaced over time, especially if they are cracked, glazed or have less than 1/16 inch of material beyond their outer surface.

Instructions

    1

    Jack up the rear end of the vehicle, and place the jack stands to safely secure the vehicle. Block the front wheels and set the parking brake.

    2

    Using the lug wrench, remove both rear wheels.

    3

    Mark the drum with chalk or washable paint to show its relationship with the axle. Then remove the brake drum from the wheel studs. You may need to cut off the pressed washers on the studs (if there are any). Then release the parking brake and slip the drum off.

    4

    Disconnect the wheel hub and bearing assembly by removing the retaining bolts for easier access to the brake shoes. Clean the whole assembly with brake cleaner spray, catching the residue in a drain pan.

    5

    Use pliers to remove the springs from both brake shoes. Disconnect the adjuster screw assembly and remove the leading shoe, then disconnect the trailing shoe from the parking-brake lever.

    6

    Lubricate the assembly's backing plate where the shoes make contact using a high-temperature grease. Also lubricate the threads and socket end of the adjuster screw assembly.

    7

    Connect the replacement trailing shoe to the parking brake lever, insert it onto the backing plate and connect the retractor spring to the hole on the shoe. Connect the adjuster screw assembly to the shoe and reinstall the adjuster level.

    8

    Install the leading shoe onto the backing plate, engaging with the adjuster screw assembly. Reconnect the springs.

    9

    Check to make sure everything is connected. Then slip the brake drum onto the wheel studs. Turn the star wheel on the adjuster screw to make sure the drum fits over the brake shoes without rubbing them.

    10

    Repeat the above steps for the other side, then replace the wheels and lower the vehicle. Press the brake pedal to seat the new shoes.

Rabu, 12 Januari 2011

How to Change Brake Rotors on an Acura TL

How to Change Brake Rotors on an Acura TL

The brakes on your Acura TL are a caliper and rotor design. This design maximizes clamping force and helps to slow the vehicle down quickly. Over time, the rotor thickness will be compromised as the brake pad material is pressed against the rotor's surface. When the rotor becomes excessively scored (you will be able to feel the score marks on the rotor surface), you must change the rotor. You should also change the rotor on your TL if you feel any feedback in the steering wheel while braking, as this can indicate uneven contact with the brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the TL's front wheels by turning them 30 to 45 degrees counterclockwise with a tire wrench.

    2

    Raise the TL onto jack stands. Lift up on the Acura TL's front cross member or jack point behind the radiator. Place jack stands under the front pinch welds under the driver's- and passenger-side doors, and lower the TL onto the stands.

    3

    Finish removing the wheel lug nuts, and pull the wheel off the wheel hub.

    4

    Remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts, and slide the caliper off the rotor. Then secure it to the coil springs above it with zip-ties.

    5

    Remove the two screws holding the rotor to the wheel hub, using a screwdriver.

    6

    Slide the rotor off the wheel hub, and slide the new rotor onto the hub and spray the brake assembly down with brake parts cleaner.

    7

    Reassemble the brakes. Assembly is the reverse of disassembly. Tighten the caliper mounting bolts to 53 foot-pounds with a torque wrench.

    8

    Lower the Acura to the ground, and tighten the lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds with a torque wrench.

Selasa, 11 Januari 2011

How to Replace a Caliper in a Chrysler Town & Country

A Chrysler Town & Country is a luxury car, but its brake quality is priceless. Replacing arts like the brake calipers is best left in the hands of an expert. Consult with your mechanic before attempting to replace a caliper on a Chrysler or any other vehicle.

Instructions

Removing the Old

    1

    Cut off the car's power supply by disconnecting the cable from the negative battery terminal. This is recommended before any type of maintenance.

    2

    Raise and safely support the vehicle on the side you'll work on. Remove the wheel in front of the brake assembly you're targeting.

    3

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper by removing the attaching banjo bolt. Discard the seal washers. Plug the brake hose with a piece of rubber to prevent fluid leakage and contamination.

    4

    Remove the guide pin bolts securing the caliper to the steering knuckle. Slowly slide the caliper away from the knuckle. Slide the caliper's opposite end out from under the machined abutment on the knuckle.

Installing the New

    5

    Lubricate the abutment surfaces on the steering knuckle. Use silicone grease or any multipurpose lubricant.

    6

    Position the new caliper over the brake pads and disc rotor. Be sure not to damage the caliper seals or guide pin bushings with the steering knuckle bosses.

    7

    Install the caliper guide pin bolts, making sure you don't cross thread them. Torque the front caliper bolts to 195 inch pounds and the rear caliper bolts to 192 inch pounds.

    8

    Attach the brake hose to the caliper with new washers. Tighten the banjo bolt to 35 foot pounds.

    9

    Bleed the brake system. Open the bleeder valve, attach a transparent hose to it and have another person hold down on the pedal to remove air from the system.

    10

    Reconnect the wheel and tire. Torque the lug nuts to 100 foot pounds. Torque all the nuts in a star pattern sequence to half specifications, and then repeat to the full 100.

    11

    Pump the brake pedal multiple times to make sure the brake pedal is firm. Then test the vehicle and brakes on the road.

How to Change the Brakes on a 2002 VW Beetle

How to Change the Brakes on a 2002 VW Beetle

You should change the brake pads on a 2002 Volkswagen Beetle every 60,000 to 80,000 miles. The replacement process depends on if you're changing the brakes on the front or the rear wheels. It can also vary slightly depending on the type of calipers the car uses. In any case, you must change all the brake pads at the same time.

Instructions

Accessing the Brakes

    1

    Use a turkey baster or other suction tool to siphon two-thirds of the brake fluid out of the master cylinder reservoir.

    2

    Raise the front or rear end of the car--whichever end you are changing the brakes on--and remove both wheels.

    3

    Clean the brake assembly with brake cleaner, letting the residue drip into a drain pan.

Changing Front Brakes

    4

    Depress the caliper piston into the caliper with a "C" clamp. Watch the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir and make sure it doesn't overflow.

    5

    Disconnect the brake caliper from the disc by removing the caps on the guide pin bolts and unscrewing the guide pins with an allen wrench. You may also need to pry off the retaining spring with a flat screwdriver and unplug the wear sensor electrical connector.

    6

    Remove the inner and outer brake pads from the caliper. On some calipers, you'll need to pry off the pads' spring clip or adhesive backing with a flat screwdriver.

    7

    Peel the foil from the replacement calipers to expose their adhesive backing; if they have no adhesive, apply an anti-squeal compound to the backing plates.

    8

    Install the pads into the caliper, starting with the inner one.

    9

    Connect the caliper back on the disc. Clean the guide pins and lubricate them with high-temperature grease before installing them back in the caliper, tightening them to 21 foot-lbs.

Changing Rear Brakes

    10

    Hold the caliper slide pins with an open-end wrench while unscrewing the mounting bolts with another wrench. Remove the caliper and hang it somewhere secure with a length of wire.

    11

    Pull the inner and outer brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket. Remove and replace the retaining springs from the mounting bracket, too.

    12

    Apply anti-squeal compound to the new brake pads' backing plates, or peel back the foil on the plates if they have an adhesive backing.

    13

    Install the inner and outer pads into the caliper mounting bracket.

    14

    Retract the caliper piston by rotating it clockwise while pushing in on it. This requires piston rotating tools, which are available at many auto parts stores.

    15

    Clean the caliper's slide pins, lubricate them with high-temperature grease and install them in the mounting bracket.

    16

    Connect the caliper and tighten the mounting bolts to 26 foot-lbs.

Sabtu, 08 Januari 2011

How to Change Brakes on a 2001 Ford Escape

How to Change Brakes on a 2001 Ford Escape

The 2001 Ford escape has anti-lock disc brakes. The braking system includes the rotor, the caliper, caliper bridge and the brake pads. Each component needs to be replaced properly when changing the brakes. New rotors are packaged with a preservative spread on the surface. The packing oil needs to be removed before the new rotor can be put to use. Pay specific attention to the brake line when replacing the caliper to avoid damaging the line and needing more extensive brake repair.

Instructions

    1

    Put the Ford transmission in "Park" and apply the parking brake. Place tire blocks behind the rear tires.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels with the lug wrench.

    3

    Lift the Escape with a lifting jack and place jack stands under the frame. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stands to support the Ford during the brake change.

    4

    Remove the two caliper slide bolts with the 13mm wrench. Remove caliper from the caliper bridge and place it on top of the steering arm above the wheel hub.

    5

    Remove the two bolts on the caliper bridge with a 15mm wrench. Pull the brake pads (held in place by the caliper bridge) from either side of the rotor.

    6

    Pull the rotor from the wheel bolts. Spray the rotor with chain lubricant at the point that connects to the steering knuckle. Tap the "top hat" section (center ring of the rotor) with a hammer to relieve the bond of rust.

    7

    Spray the new rotor with brake cleaner. Wipe the rotor clean and place it onto the wheel bolts, with the top hat section facing outward.

    8

    Unscrew the brake line from the old caliper. Place a drip pan below the line to catch any leaking brake fluid. Screw the brake line onto the new caliper. Apply brake grease to the inside of the caliper.

    9

    Place the caliper bridge onto the new rotor and screw in the caliper bridge bolts with the 15mm wrench. Insert the new brake pads into the caliper bridge on either side of the rotor.

    10

    Place the new caliper (connected to the brake line) onto the caliper bridge. Screw in the caliper slide bolts with the 13mm wrench.

    11

    Replace the wheels and lug nuts.

    12

    Lift the vehicle with the lifting jack to remove the jack stands before returning the Ford to the ground.

    13

    Lift the hood and remove the lid to the master cylinder. Press the brake pedal three times.

    14

    Fill the master cylinder with brake fluid until the reservoir is full. Replace the lid to the master cylinder and close the hood.

How to Remove a Rear Wheel Rotor on a 1997 Ford Explorer

How to Remove a Rear Wheel Rotor on a 1997 Ford Explorer

Premiering in 1991, the Ford Explorer replaced the Ford Bronco II as a mid-sized SUV. It featured either rear drum or rear disc brakes. While the rear disc brakes were more effective, having to replace them was less frequent than the front disc brakes which compensated for 75 percent of the braking power for the vehicle. Monitor the thickness of the rear pads every time the wheels are off or rotated to add to the longevity of the rear brake rotors and caliper pistons.

Instructions

    1

    Place a wheel chock in front of one of the front tires on the Explorer after parking it on a hard, level surface. Do not apply the parking brake.

    2

    Crack the rear wheel nuts loose on the tire or tires that you intend to remove from the rear wheel rotors. Use a lug wrench to turn the wheel nuts 1/4 turn only counterclockwise to break them loose.

    3

    Hoist the rear axle of the SUV with a hydraulic or scissors jack, then support one or both sides on jack stand(s). Completely remove the wheel nuts and tire.

    4

    Remove the two rear caliper mounting bolts with a closed-end hand wrench.

    5

    Pry the caliper off of the pads and rotor assembly. Use a slotted screwdriver if necessary. Hang a small length of rope through the caliper and tie it to the rear chassis to prevent it from hanging from the rubber brake hose.

    6

    Remove the rear rotor retaining washers on the lug studs if applicable. Pry them off with the screwdriver. These keep the rear rotor stationary and do not need to be replaced.

    7

    Remove the rear rotor. If stuck onto the rear parking brake shoe assembly, remove the rubber adjuster plug on the backing plate of the rear axle and use an adjuster spoon to back down on the adjustment of the parking brake shoes.

    8

    Spray the center of the rotor around the axle hub with penetrating lubricant if the rotor is stuck to the hub with rust. Sharply strike the plate of the rotor with a dead-blow rubber mallet to break it free from the hub. Remove the rotor.

Jumat, 07 Januari 2011

How to Change Brake Shoes on a 2000 Ford F-150

How to Change Brake Shoes on a 2000 Ford F-150

Changing brake shoes on any vehicle is not an easy task, and the 2000 model Ford F-150 is no exception. There are multiple springs and levers connected to the pair of brake shoes on each drum assembly, and multiple special tools are needed. Study the entire assembly on each brake drum and make sure you know how each spring and lever is connected before you begin. You might also consult a mechanic.

Instructions

Opening the Assembly

    1

    Loosen the rear tires' lug nuts with a lug wrench, but do not remove the lug nuts.

    2

    Raise the F-150's rear end, using a jack, support the rear end on jack stands, and remove the lug nuts and rear wheels.

    3

    Take off the brake drum. You can normally just pull it off, but if it's stuck, apply penetrating oil to the flange and studs, loosen the drum by tapping around the studs with a hammer, and tapping around the drum's back edge to loosen it.

    4

    Clean off the brake assembly with brake cleaner and catch the residue with a drain pan.

Removing the Brake Shoes

    5

    Remove the secondary and primary retracting springs with a spring tool from an auto parts store.

    6

    Disengage the brake shoe adjusting lever from its cable and remove the lever; then remove the adjusting lever spring, adjuster assembly, adjusting lever cable and anchor pin guide from the anchor pin, the cable guide and the parking brake link and spring.

    7

    Disconnect the front hold-down spring with its washers, spring and pin using a hold-down spring tool. Separate the adjusting screw spring from the brake shoes and remove the rear hold-down spring. Remove the shoes.

    8

    Disengage the parking brake lever from the rear shoe by prying off the E-clip retainer with a small screwdriver.

    9

    Lubricate the contact points on the backing plate with high-temperature grease, using a brush.

Installation

    10

    Place the washer on the parking brake lever pin and connect the replacement rear shoe by inserting it on the pin, installing the E-clip retainer and installing the hold-down pin and hold-down spring assembly.

    11

    Install the guide plate onto the anchor pin, followed by the brake shoe adjusting lever cable. Then install the cable guide on the rear shoe.

    12

    Hook the short end of the secondary retracting spring into the cable guide's hole and rear shoe, then use a hooked tool to hook the spring's long end over the anchor pin.

    13

    Thread the adjusting lever cable over the cable guide and then insert the parking brake link in position between the backing plate and the front disc, making sure the link is properly engaged with the parking brake lever and rear shoe.

    14

    Place the front shoe in position and make sure it engages with the parking brake lever link, then install its hold-down pin and spring assembly. Hook the short end of the primary retaining spring into the shoe's top hole and hook the other end over the anchor pin.

    15

    Reinstall the brake shoe lever by installing its spring with the hooked end facing forward, connecting the lever, hooking the spring's end over the lever and hooking the lower end of the adjusting lever cable over the lever.

    16

    Connect the lower retracting spring by hooking its short end into the front shoe and the long end into the rear shoe.

    17

    Engage the adjuster assembly's rear end with the notch in the rear shoe, pull the front shoe slightly forward and engage the adjuster assembly's front end with the notch in the front shoe.

After Installation

    18

    Install the brake drums after changing the brake shoes on both sides.

    19

    Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brakes.

    20

    Turn the star wheel on each brake assembly by inserting a screwdriver into the hole in the backing plate. Turn the wheel until the shoes drag against the drums, then turn it the other way until they just stop dragging.

    21

    Put the wheels on the hubs and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Lower the F-150 to the ground and tighten the lug nuts securely with the lug wrench.