Senin, 29 November 2010

How to Turn Off ABS Lights in the Dash of a 1992 Chevy Cavalier

How to Turn Off ABS Lights in the Dash of a 1992 Chevy Cavalier

The ABS light indicates that the computer has detected a fault and disabled the ABS system. This does not affect the normal hydraulic brake system unless the fault is in the hydraulic system itself. A large pot hole or acceleration on slick surface, anything that can allow one wheel to spin faster than the others, can cause the light to set without an actual fault being present. Resetting the light in these cases can save the average motorist around $100 in repair costs.

Instructions

    1

    Carefully clean any debris or oil buildup from the master cylinder cap, and remove the cap. Top off the master cylinder level with clean brake fluid. Gently tap the side of the master cylinder reservoir with a wrench to dislodge the float for the level sensor if it is stuck.

    2

    Remove the negative battery cable using an 8-millimeter wrench. Leave the battery disconnected for approximately 10 minutes to reset the ABS computer memory. Reconnect the negative battery cable.

    3

    Test drive the car for a few minutes to verify the light stays off. During the test drive, the ABS computer will run a self test to check for faults in the system. If the ABS light comes back on, repairs to the system are required before the light will stay off after a reset.

How to Install a Rear Brake in a 1995 Honda Civic DX

The rear disc brake assembly in your 1995 Honda Civic DX has pretty much the same configuration as the front assembly. Thus, installing new rear brake pads is much like installing new front pads except for the way you handle the caliper piston. However, even if you are not familiar with the front disc brake assembly, you still can replace those worn-out rear pads. With attention to detail and a few tools, you can restore braking power to the rear assemblies in your Civic DX in about an hour. This procedure applies to rear disc brake-equipped models.

Instructions

Removing the Brake Pads

    1

    Open the hood and locate the brake master cylinder. This is the assembly mounted on the brake booster, a drum-like component on the driver's side of the engine compartment. Remove the cap off the master cylinder reservoir, which is on top of the cylinder, and pump half the brake fluid with a hand siphon pump into a sealable container for later recycling.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on both rear wheels with a lug wrench.

    3

    Jack up the rear of your Honda Civic with a floor jack and support the vehicle with a jack stand under each side.

    4

    Remove both rear wheels and start the brake pad replacement on one of the brake assemblies and leave the other one as a visual reference in case you forget how a particular component fits into the assembly.

    5

    Unfasten and remove the two brake caliper mounting bolts from the back of the caliper with a ratchet and socket.

    6

    Work the brake caliper off the caliper bracket and brake rotor and secure the caliper to the suspension with heavy wire to avoid damage to the brake hose connected to the caliper.

    7

    Make a note of the position and mounting direction of each component as you remove the brake pads, shims and brake pad retainers from the caliper bracket.

Installing the New Brake Pads

    8

    Spray the caliper, bracket and rotor assembly with brake parts cleaner. Wipe the assemblies clean with lint-free towels.

    9

    Replace the pad retainers and coat both sides of each shim with disc brake pad lubricant and the brake pads mounting board. Install the shims and brake pads in position.

    10

    Set the caliper piston into the caliper cylinder by turning the piston clockwise with a disc brake piston tool. Notice the position of the tab on the back of the inner brake pad so that you align the cutout on the caliper piston with the brake pad tab.

    11

    Apply silicone grease to the rubber boot on the caliper piston and carefully lower the caliper piston over the caliper bracket, aligning the piston cutout with the tab on the back of the inner brake pad.

    12

    Install the two brake caliper mounting bolts finger tight and then tighten the bolts with the ratchet and socket.

    13

    Install the new brake pad set on the opposite wheel assembly following Step 5 from the previous section through Step 5 of this section.

    14

    Replace both rear wheel assemblies and install the lug nuts. Lower your vehicle and finish tightening the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    15

    Add new brake fluid to the master cylinder reservoir to bring the level up to the "Full" mark, if necessary, and replace the cap.

    16

    Pump the brake pedal slowly to help seat the new brake pads on the brake rotor. Check the fluid level again in the master cylinder reservoir and add if necessary. Close the hood.

How to Replace Brakes on a 1998 GMC Sierra

How to Replace Brakes on a 1998 GMC Sierra

In 1962, General Motors changed the name of Chevrolet and GMC pickups to C- and K-series. The C-series indicated two-wheel drive and the K-series indicated four-wheel drive. In 1975, the names of the trim levels on GMC trucks changed to Sierra, Sierra Grande, High Sierra and Sierra Classic with the Sierra trim level being the base level GMC C-K pickup. In 1999, the Sierra name became the model name of the GMC pickup, as GM phased out the C-K nomenclature altogether. The 1998 C-1500 Sierra came standard with a 4.3-liter V-6 engine that produced 200 horsepower; it also came standard with front disc brakes. Replacing the brakes on the 1998 GMC Sierra is a relatively easy task.

Instructions

    1

    Open the Sierra's hood and remove approximately half of the fluid from the brake master cylinder using a turkey baster. Place this fluid in a clean container for reuse.

    2

    Loosen the front lug nuts with a ratchet and socket, but don't remove them yet.

    3

    Raise the front of the 1998 Sierra with a floor jack and place jack stands under the frame rails. Lower the GMC until only the jack stands support it. Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheels from the truck.

    4

    Remove the two guide bolts from the rear of the brake caliper and pull the caliper from the torque plate -- the metal bracket the caliper bolts to -- using a ratchet and socket. Hang the caliper from the coil spring using a bungee cord to prevent damage to the brake hose.

    5

    Disengage the spring retainer on the rear of the outer brake pad, by prying upward on the spring with a flat-head screwdriver and pulling the pad from the caliper.

    6

    Place an 8-inch C-clamp over the caliper so the screw portion touches the inner brake pad and the fixed part touches the rear of the caliper. Tighten the C-clamp to compress the inner caliper piston. Loosen and remove the C-clamp from the caliper once the C-clamp stops moving.

    7

    Grasp the inner brake pad and pull it from the caliper, notice a small retaining spring that holds it in place inside the caliper piston.

    8

    Close the jaws of the micrometer and press the "Reset" button to calibrate it. Measure the thickness of the rotor's disc in four places and make a note of the thickest and thinnest measurements.

    9

    Compare the thinnest measurement of the rotor to the minimal machining specification of 1.230 inches on a 11.57-by-1.25 inch and 12.5-by-1.26-inch rotor and 1.480 inches on all other rotor sizes. If the rotor measures at or above this specification and has imperfections -- grooves, uneven wear or a mirror-like shine -- remove the rotor and have it resurfaced.

    10

    Replace the rotor if it is thinner than the specification indicated in Step 9 and requires resurfacing. Replacement is also required if the rotor is thinner than the measurement stamped on it, which is known as the discard specification, regardless of its condition.

    11

    Leave the rotor in place if it has no imperfections and is thicker than the discard specification.

    12

    Remove the rotor, as needed, by prying the metal cap from the center of the rotor. Pull the cotter pin from the spindle -- the shaft in the center of the rotor -- with needle nose pliers and remove the castle-shaped nut and washer from the spindle with a ratchet and socket. Pull the rotor toward you and from the spindle.

    13

    Pull the bearing from the front-center of the rotor with your finger. Flip the rotor over and remove the bearing seal from the rear-center of the rotor, by prying it with a flat-head screwdriver. Pull the inner bearing from under the bearing seal with your finger. Inspect the bearings for looseness or wear by placing your fingers through the center, like the spindle would and shaking the outer part of the bearing. A loose or worn bearing has a small amount of free play back and forth and makes a slight clicking noise when shaken. Replace loose bearings with new ones.

    14

    Discard or have the rotor resurfaced as needed based on the determination made in Step 9.

    15

    Pack the new or old bearings, by placing a liberal amount of multipurpose automotive grease in your palm and rotate the bearings in your hand until they are full of grease.

    16

    Place the inner bearing into the rear of the new or resurfaced rotor with the tapered end going in first. Place a new bearing seal on top of the inner bearing and seat the seal, by placing a bearing seal driver on the seal and tapping the driver with a hammer.

    17

    Slide the rotor on the GMC's spindle and place the outer bearing, tapered end first, into the hole in the center of the rotor.

    18

    Reinstall the washer and nut on the spindle and tighten the nut, while spinning the rotor, to 12 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket to seat the bearing. Loosen the spindle nut and tighten it to only hand-tight. Place a new cotter pin through the castle nut and through the hole in the spindle. Bend the cotter pins legs in opposite directions to lock it into place, using needle-nose pliers.

    19

    Place the inner brake pad in the caliper so the metal clip on the rear of the pad slides into the caliper piston. Press the brake pad until it sits flat against the caliper body.

    20

    Clean the caliper bolts with a wire brush, if rusted, and apply a coat of multipurpose automotive grease onto the bolts. Sit the caliper back onto the torque plate and tighten the caliper bolts to 37 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    21

    Repeat Steps 4 through 18 for the brakes on the other side of the GMC.

    22

    Reinstall the front wheels on the GMC Sierra and hand-tighten the lug nuts.

    23

    Raise the truck from the jack stands, with a floor jack, and pull the jack stands from under the GMC. Lower the Sierra to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts, in a crossing pattern, to 125 foot-pounds on all Sierras except the 3500 and 162 foot-pounds on the Sierra 3500 with a torque wrench and a socket.

    24

    Check the fluid level in the master cylinder. Add fluid from the small container to the master cylinder until the level reaches the "Max" line. Dispose of any unused brake fluid in the small container properly, most auto parts stores discard fluid free of charge.

    25

    Press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm. This extends the caliper pistons out so they contact the brake pads.

Sabtu, 27 November 2010

Wagner BD125400 Specs

Wagner BD125400 Specs

A disc brake rotor is an automobile part that is connected to the wheel axle that stops the rotation of the wheels. The Wagner BD125400 is a disc brake rotor manufactured by Wagner Automotive Parts. This product is designed specifically to reduce brake temperature and enhance the overall performance of the braking system. The BD125400 is built to reduce noise, increase rotor life and remove dirt, dust and debris.

Category

    This product is an automotive accessory. It is designed for use as an original equipment (OE) replacement within the braking system of a vehicle.

Rotor Type

    This is a full-cast rotor, meaning it can disperse heat from the disc pads quicker and much more efficiently than the composite rotors. Heat is stored in the hat section, away from the braking surface, allowing it to run cooler and decreasing the potential for overheating.

Manufacturer

    The title of this product is the Wagner BD125400 disc brake rotor. It is made by Wagner automotive parts, a subsidiary of Federal Mogul, which is based in Southfield, Michigan. The manufacturer's part number (MPN) is BD125400.

Packaging

    Each package contains one disc unless otherwise specified. Package height is 2.2 inches, weight is 9.45 lbs., length is 11.7 inches and width is 11.2 inches. The UPC code is 008536116912.

How to Repair the Front Brakes on a 2001 Jeep Wrangler

Though it went by a different name, the Jeep Wrangler's history stretches back to the release of the Willys-Overland-built Jeep CJ-2A, in 1945. In 1987, the Wrangler -- the YJ-series -- took over for the CJ-series of Jeeps, but was strikingly similar to its predecessors. The YJ remained for nine years, and the TJ-series replaced it. The TJ-series of Wranglers had even more styling cues taken from the CJ-series -- most noticeable being the round headlights. The 2001 Wrangler came standard with four-wheel drive and front disc brakes, so it could handle rough and mountainous terrain. Replacing the front brake pads on this rugged vehicle is a simple process that most weekend mechanics can complete in an afternoon.

Instructions

    1

    Open the Wrangler's hood, and unscrew the lid from the master cylinder reservoir. Siphon out about half of the brake fluid, using a turkey baster, and transfer this fluid to a small container for later disposal.

    2

    Loosen the front lug nuts, using a ratchet and socket. Raise the front of the Wrangler off the ground with a floor jack, and slide jack stands under the SUV's frame rails. Lower the Jeep onto the frame rails. Remove the front lug nuts, and pull the front wheels off the vehicle.

    3

    Remove the two caliper-retaining bolts, using a ratchet and socket, and pull the caliper off the caliper bracket. Suspend the caliper from a nearby suspension component, using mechanic's wire.

    4

    Press one side of the outer brake pad inward until the tab on the rear of the pad is free from the hole in the caliper, then pivot that side of the brake pad out of the caliper. Repeat this process on the other side of the outer brake pad to remove the pad from the caliper.

    5

    Position an 8-inch C-clamp over the caliper so its screw part touches the inner brake pad and its fixed part contacts the rear of the brake caliper. Tighten the C-clamp until the inner brake pad stops moving and the caliper piston behind it is fully retracted. Remove the C-clamp.

    6

    Grab the inner brake pad and pull it toward the outer part of the caliper -- notice a set of metal "fingers" secure it in the caliper piston. Remove the inner brake pad from the caliper once the "fingers" are free of the caliper piston.

    7

    Remove the screw securing the brake rotor to the front hub, using a Phillips screwdriver. If the screw does not turn easily, lightly tap the head of the screw with a hammer to free it. Pull the rotor from the front hub, and inspect it for defects, including deep grooves, mirror-like shine or stress cracks. If any defects exist, discard the rotor and replace it with a new one.

    8

    Set the rotor on the front hub, and tighten its retaining screw with a Phillips screwdriver.

    9

    Line the "fingers" on the rear of a new inner pad with the cavity in the caliper piston, and press the pad onto the caliper until the pad seat on the caliper.

    10

    Set the outer pad on the caliper body, and pry the metal clip on one side of the pad upward, using a flat-head screwdriver. Slide the pried side of the pad into the caliper until the tab on the rear of the pad inserts into the hole in the caliper. Repeat this step on the other side of the pad.

    11

    Apply a generous coat of disc brake grease onto the smooth part of both caliper bolts. Set the caliper back onto its bracket, and slide the caliper bolts into the caliper and bracket. Hand-thread the caliper bolts, then tighten them to 11 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and socket.

    12

    Repeat Steps 3 through 11 for the brake pads on the other side of the Wrangler.

    13

    Reinstall the front wheels onto the Wrangler's front hubs, and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Raise the SUV off the jack stands, using a floor jack, and remove the jack stands. Lower the Jeep to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts, in a crisscrossing pattern, to 110 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and socket.

    14

    Press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm. Add DOT 3 brake fluid to the master cylinder reservoir until the fluid level reaches the "Max" line on the reservoir. Tighten the cap onto the master cylinder reservoir.

    15

    Take the old DOT 3 fluid remove in Step 1 to a used auto fluid-recycling center. Some auto parts stores take old brake fluid free of charge.

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a 2006 Ford Freestyle

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a 2006 Ford Freestyle

The 2006 Ford Freestyle was Fords first venture into the crossover sector, where car meets sports utility vehicle. The Freestyle came with a 3.5L engine, automatic transmission and four-wheel anti-lock disc brakes. As with most passenger vehicles, the front brake pads wear down faster than the rear pads. With that in mind, you should anticipate changing the rear brake pads on your 2006 Ford Freestyle approximately every other time you replace the front pads. Its still best to have the pads checked for wear every time you have the tires rotated, however, and replace them once theyve worn down to three mm or less.

Instructions

    1

    Rotate the lug nuts on both rear wheels counterclockwise until they are finger tight using the lug wrench. Do not take them off yet. Put the wheel chocks on the ground directly in front of both front tires.

    2

    Raise the rear end of the Freestyle with the floor jack and then lower it onto the jack stands, placed under the rear frame on both sides.

    3

    Remove the rear lug nuts and wheels on both sides by hand. Keep all the lug nuts together so you dont lose any of them.

    4

    Put the drop pan directly underneath the right-rear brake rotor and spray the rotor and caliper with the brake cleaner to remove any visible signs of brake dust.

    5

    Remove the caliper bolts that hold the right-rear caliper to the caliper bracket using the socket set. Pick the caliper up and take it out of the bracket by hand.

    6

    Take the old rear brake pads out of the caliper by hand and then clean out the inside of the caliper with the brake cleaner. Make sure to get all the brake dust, road dirt and old grease out of the caliper.

    7

    Lubricate the caliper slides thoroughly with the white lithium grease.

    8

    Insert the caliper tool into the caliper and push the caliper pistons back into the caliper with the tool. Pull the tool out and insert the new rear brake pads by hand.

    9

    Slide the caliper back into the caliper bracket, thread the caliper bolts back through the bracket and caliper by hand and then tighten the bolts with the socket set.

    10

    Move to the left-rear and repeat steps four through nine on that side. Reinstall the wheels and lug nuts on both sides by hand.

    11

    Lower the Freestyle off the jack stands with the floor jack and then move the wheel chocks away from the front tires. Tighten the rear lug nuts to 85 ft-lbs. with the torque wrench.

Do it Yourself Toyota Corolla Brake Repair

Do it Yourself Toyota Corolla Brake Repair

The brakes in your Toyota Corolla eventually wear out and need changing every 60,000 to 80,000 miles. In most cases, brake repair is simply a matter of replacing the brake pads inside the calipers. Sometimes, however, the calipers might be damaged and will need to be replaced. This type of brake repair can be simple but not necessarily easy, and talking with your mechanic first is recommended.

Instructions

Removing Brake Pads

    1

    Remove the cap on the brake fluid reservoir. Raise the car's front end, support it on jack stands and remove the wheels.

    2

    Compress the caliper piston into its bore with a C-clamp. The brake fluid in the master cylinder will rise. Siphon fluid out with an unused syringe or turkey baster, if needed, to prevent overflow.

    3

    Clean off the brake assembly with brake cleaner spray; don't use compressed air. Keep a drain pan underneath the assembly to catch the residue.

    4

    Disconnect the caliper from the disc by removing its two bolts; hang it from the strut coil with a wire. Don't hang the caliper by the hose, and don't disconnect the hose unless you're replacing the caliper.

    5

    Pull the shims and brake pads out of the caliper mounting bracket on the disc. Remove the pad support plates and inspect them for damage. Pry off the wear indicator from the old inner pad, if equipped, and move it to the new pad.

Installing Brake Pads

    6

    Install the pad support plates, new brake pads and shims. Use new support plates and/or shims if the old ones are damaged.

    7

    Remove the sliding pins from the mounting bracket. Clean them off and apply a high-temperature grease to them before re-installing them.

    8

    Connect the caliper back on the mounting bracket and tighten the bolts.

    9

    Re-connect the wheels and lower the car once you've changed the brakes on both wheels.

Replacing Brake Calipers

    10

    Raise the car as described in the first section.

    11

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper by removing the banjo bolt. Plug the banjo fitting with a piece of rubber hose.

    12

    Disconnect the caliper from its mounting bracket as described above. Replace the pads if needed.

    13

    Mount the new caliper onto the mounting bracket, apply its bolts and connect the brake hose.

    14

    Bleed the brakes from that caliper as described below before you reconnect the wheels and lower the car.

Bleeding the Brakes

    15

    Fill the master cylinder reservoir with fresh brake fluid.

    16

    Connect a piece of clear tubing to the bleeder valve on the caliper. Submerge the tube's other end in a container of fluid.

    17

    Open the bleeder valve while another person presses the brake pedal in the car. Look for air bubbles in the container, then close the valve and release the pedal after a couple of seconds.

    18

    Repeat the previous step until there is no more air in the system, checking the master cylinder fluid level as you do so. Top off the reservoir once you are finished.

How to Repair the Front Brakes of a 2003 E500 Mercedes Benz

How to Repair the Front Brakes of a 2003 E500 Mercedes Benz

Brake maintenance is a routine activity in a vehicle's lifespan. Approximately every 60,000 miles, the brakes on a vehicle need to be checked and repaired if old or failing. The 2003 Mercedes Benz E500 utilizes disc brakes on all four wheels, so determining broken parts and replacing them can be done by mechanical novices.

Instructions

    1

    Open the E500's hood and locate the brake fluid reservoir in the upper right portion of the engine compartment. Check the outside of the reservoir to ensure the brake fluid inside reaches the "Full" line. Add brake fluid if necessary.

    2

    Lift the vehicle with a hydraulic lift at a structure point and place the jack stands under the left and right control arms. Lower the lift until the weight is evenly distributed between the lift and the jack stands. Remove the front wheels using a ratchet wrench and lug socket. Remove the caliper by removing the two retainer bolts with the appropriate sized Allen wrench.

    3

    Remove and replace the rotors if scoring or grooves are present--be sure to replace the brake pads at the same time. Inspect the interior of the caliper and look for oil or grease near the piston. Remove and replace with an after-market caliper if any fluid is present. Locate and trace the brake line and inspect the 2 foot-long rubber section. Look for pinholes or cuts--replace if any are present.

    4

    Check the brake pads for wear. Replace the pads if they are near the metal safety clip. Use pad glue to keep the new pads from rattling after installed. Use a C-clamp to extend the piston to it open position and slide the caliper onto the rotor. Secure the caliper by tightening the retainer bolts. Mount the wheels onto the hub assembly and hand thread the lugs. Lower the vehicle and tighten the lugs per torque specifications.

Kamis, 25 November 2010

How to Replace the Brake Rotors on a BMW 323I

How to Replace the Brake Rotors on a BMW 323I

The BMW 323I's brake rotors wear down just like rotors on any other automobile. If rotors become too thin, you need to replace them. The minimum safe thickness of the rotors is 17.4mm. You can measure the thickness using a standard tape measure. You might also notice damage from the brake pads, such as grooving in the surface of the rotor. Most mechanics replace the rotors when replacing the brakes, but there might be other times when you need to change the rotors.

Instructions

    1

    Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels and raise the car with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the vehicle near the jacking point and raise it up to the frame of the car.

    2

    Remove the wheel, using the lug wrench to remove the lug nuts. If you car has brake wear sensors, disconnect them from the caliper by unplugging the wire.

    3

    Remove the brake caliper using a socket and ratchet. The retaining bolts might be hard to break loose. Remove the caliper bracket using the socket and ratchet.

    4

    Remove the special recessed hex fastener from the shoulder of the rotor using the 6mm hex socket and ratchet. If there is corrosion, spray penetrating oil and let it soak in. Pull the rotor off of the wheel. If it doesn't come off easily, hit it several times with the rubber mallet until it breaks free.

    5

    Put the new rotor on the wheel. Install the hex fastener using the 6mm hex socket and a ratchet.

    6

    Put the caliper mounting bracket on the wheel assembly. Tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet. Place the caliper into the bracket. Tighten the retaining bolts using the socket and ratchet. Reconnect the brake wear indicator if you took one off. Plug it into the caliper.

    7

    Put the wheel back on the car. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the car. Lower the vehicle back to the ground. Repeat the process on the next wheel.

How to Replace the Rotor in a Dodge Intrepid

Rotors, also known as brake discs, are the disc that your brake pads press up against to slow your car down when you hit the brakes. If they become warped or worn down over time, then it's necessary to replace them. The installation is the same across all model years and is easy enough to do in your own garage with the right tools and a little know-how.

Instructions

    1

    Buy rotors for your Dodge Intrepid at your local auto parts store or online. Replace all of the rotors at once, or at least replace the front or rear pair at the same time for safe braking performance. This might also be a good time to install new brake pads.

    2

    Raise your Dodge Intrepid using jacks and jack stands and be sure to block the wheels to keep the car from rolling while you work. Remove the lug nuts, tire and wheel assembly at set aside.

    3

    Remove the two bolts that hold the caliper adapter to the knuckle with a socket wrench or air ratchet. You may need to retract the caliper piston into its bore using a c-clamp to get enough clearance to slide the caliper off of the rotor.

    4

    Use mechanic's wire to suspend the caliper and attached brake hose out of the way while you change the rotor. Avoid disconnecting the brake line or you must then add brake fluid and bleed the brake line.

    5

    Pull off the old rotor and clean the hub and nearby surfaces with a damp cloth. Slide the new rotor into place and tighten the retaining screws. Replace the caliper adapter and brake line and then tighten the two mounting bolts to 85 foot pounds (115 Nm) with a torque wrench or air ratchet with an appropriate adapter.

    6

    Put the wheel assembly and tire back on and then repeat this process for each additional rotor. Then, lower the vehicle and tighten the tire lug nuts to 110 foot pounds (150 Nm). Pump the brakes and then road test your Intrepid to make sure that the installation was successful.

Selasa, 23 November 2010

How to Repair Electric Trailer Brakes

Electric trailer brake systems utilize a magnet to spread the brake shoes against the brake drum, which slows the trailer down. In most cases problems with electric trailer brakes occur either because of corrosion in the trailer connector or a break on the wiring between the connector and the brakes themselves. In rare cases the magnets inside the drum brakes can fail and need to be replaced.

Instructions

Testing the Trailer Connector

    1

    Open the trailer connector. In most cases this will be done by removing a small flathead screw on the side of the connector and sliding the outer cover back.

    2

    Locate the wire that controls the electric brakes. In most cases this will be the blue wire.

    3

    Plug the trailer connector into the tow vehicle connector and have an assistant press the brake pedal.

    4

    Attach a 12-volt test light's ground clip to a bare metal portion of the trailer's frame.

    5

    Touch the probe on the test light to the screw where the blue wire connects to the trailer connector.

    6

    If the test light does not light up, the connector is faulty. Replace the connector, following the instructions provided with the new connector.

Testing the Electric Brake Wiring

    7

    If the test light illuminates, that means the trailer connector is in working order and there could be a break or fault in the wiring between the connector and the electric brakes themselves.

    8

    Reassemble the trailer connector and connect it to the tow vehicle.

    9

    Have an assistant depress the brake pedal.

    10

    Locate the wire that controls the electric brake where it enters the drum backing plate at each wheel.Connect the ground clip on the test light to the trailer's frame and use the probe to pierce the insulation on the wire at each wheel.

    11

    If the test light fails to illuminate, there is a break or fault in the wiring somewhere between the wheel and the trailer connector.

    12

    Examine the wiring; look for breaks in the wire as well as deep cuts in the insulation. Repair and replace any wires as needed.

    13

    If the test light illuminates but the trailer brakes fail to engage, the magnet inside the brake drum is defective and will need replaced.

Removing the Brake Drum Magnet

    14

    Lower the front of the trailer.

    15

    Place jack stands underneath the frame of the trailer at the rear.

    16

    Raise the front of the trailer enough to lift the wheels off the ground. Then remove the wheel and tire.

    17

    Remove the grease cap on the center of the hub. Then remove the cotter pin and castle nut. Remove the brake drum. The outer wheel bearing will come off with it; be careful not to damage it.

    18

    Examine the brake shoes. Trailer brake designs vary by manufacture but in general the magnet will be attached to one of the brake shoes. You will need to remove this shoe to disconnect the magnet. Draw a picture or take a photo of the brake shoes before you take them apart to aid in reassembly.

    19

    Remove the springs that connect the brake shoe to the brake drum backing plate at the top of the backing plate. Remove the self adjuster and spring at the bottom of the backing plate. Remove the pin and spring clip that attaches the brake shoe to the backing plate.

    20

    Remove the magnet from the brake shoe. Cut the wires connected to the magnet as close to the magnet as possible.

Installing the Brake Drum Magnet

    21

    Connect the wires on the new brake drum magnet to the wires removed from the old magnet, using barrel crimp connectors. Connect the magnet to the brake shoe.

    22

    Reinstall the pin and spring clip that connects the brake shoe to the backing plate, and reinstall the self adjuster and spring. Reinstall the spring that connects the brake shoe to the brake backing plate at the top of the backing plate.

    23

    Reinstall the brake drum and wheel bearing.

    24

    Reinstall the castle nut. Turn the wheel as you are tightening the nut. Don't tighten the castle nut so much that it binds the wheel.

    25

    Install a new cotter pin.

    26

    Reinstall the grease cap in the hub.

    27

    Reinstall the wheel and tire.

How to Bleed the ABS Braking System on a 1989 Silverado

The 1989 Chevrolet C/K 1500 was equipped with rear wheel antilock brakes, commonly known as RWAL. The antilock brake system or ABS require a primary and secondary bleeding to remove all air from the system. The system combines the ABS module with the primary brake system and also includes a combination valve and an isolation-dump valve. All of these components must be bled on the 1989 C/K 1500 RWAL system. Bleeding the brakes will create stronger stopping power by expelling air that weakens it from the system. The RWAL system should be bled any time a line is removed or after replacing any brake line components.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Chevrolet on a completely level driveway or surface. Open the hood of the 1500. Check the level in the brake fluid reservoir and fill it to the "Full" mark on the side, if needed. Install the fluid reservoir lid and diaphragm back onto the reservoir, and lock it when you are finished filling.

    2

    Locate the combination valve below the master cylinder and reservoir. The combination valve only has one wire going to it. Do not confuse this with the dump valve, which has four wires. Locate the pin on the top of the combination valve. Install locking pliers or tape around the combination valve to hold the pin down for the entire bleeding process.

    3

    Loosen the front wheel lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the front of the truck with a jack. Place jack stands beneath the front frame rails, just inward from the lower control arms. Lower the truck onto the stands. Remove the front lug nuts, then remove the front wheels from the truck.

    4

    Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the rear of the truck with a jack. Place jack stands beneath the rear axle housing, about 6 inches inward from the rear tires. Lower the truck onto the stands. Remove the rear lug nuts completely, then remove the rear wheels from the truck.

    5

    Spray all four bleeder screws on the front and rear brakes with aerosol rust penetrating spray. Spray the bleeders inward on the front calipers so you do not accidentally get the penetrating spray on any of your front brake components. Allow the penetrating spray to set on the bleeder screws for at least 10 to 15 minutes. Ask an assistant to sit in the driver's seat of the truck carefully after the penetrating spray has set.

    6

    Instruct your assistant to depress the brake pedal as far as it will go downward and hold it. Place a drip pan beneath the passenger rear brake assembly. Open the bleeder screw on the passenger rear brake assembly with an open-end wrench. Allow the combination of brake fluid and air to leave the system and enter the drip pan. Close the bleeder screw and instruct your assistant to release the brake pedal. Repeat this step three times on the passenger rear of the truck.

    7

    Repeat Step 6 on the driver's rear brake assembly. Check the brake fluid reservoir under the hood, and fill the reservoir if needed. Install the reservoir lid and diaphragm and lock it, when filling is completed.

    8

    Instruct your assistant to depress the brake pedal as far down as it will go and hold it. Place your drip pan beneath the passenger front caliper. Open the bleeder screw on the caliper with an open-end wrench and allow the combination of brake fluid and air to escape. Close the bleeder screw and instruct your assistant to release the brake pedal. Repeat this step three times on the passenger side of the truck.

    9

    Repeat Step 8 to complete the primary bleeding on the driver's front caliper. Check the brake fluid reservoir, and fill it if needed. Install and lock the reservoir lid and diaphragm when filling is completed.

    10

    Place your drain pan beneath the passenger rear brake assembly. Instruct your assistant to pump the brake pedal five to 10 times, or until the brake pedal becomes stiff and hard to depress. Tell your assistant to hold the weight of his foot on the pedal and follow the pedal to the floor of the truck. Open the passenger rear bleeder screw. Close the bleeder screw when the pressure from the line is released. Repeat this step until only brake fluid comes out of the rear bleeder, rather than air and fluid mixed.

    11

    Repeat Step 10 on the driver's rear, followed by the passenger front, then the driver's front of the truck, to complete the bleeding process. Check your brake fluid reservoir when you are moving from the rear to the front of the truck, and fill it if needed. Install the lid and diaphragm when filling is done, and lock the reservoir lid in place. Instruct your assistant to exit the vehicle carefully. Remove the locking pliers or tape from the combination valve pin.

    12

    Install all four wheels onto the truck and tighten the lug nuts snug using a tire iron. Raise the rear of the truck off of the jack stands, then remove the jack stands from beneath the truck. Lower the truck to the ground. Raise the front of the truck off of the jack stands, then remove the stands from beneath the truck. Lower the front of the truck to the ground. Tighten all four wheel lug nuts in a "star" pattern to 120 foot-pounds of torque, with a 1/2-inch-drive torque wrench and wheel nut socket.

    13

    Instruct your assistant to sit back in the driver's seat of the truck. Place a cup or empty butter container beneath the isolation-dump valve, which has four wires connected to it at the wiring harness. Instruct your assistant to pump the brake pedal until the pedal is stiff and to hold his foot on the pedal and follow it to the floor. Open the bleeder screw on the bottom of the isolation-dump valve to release air from the valve. Close the bleeder when pressure has been released, and tell your assistant to release the brake pedal.

    14

    Repeat the bleeding process in Step 13 until only brake fluid exits the isolation-dump valve. Check and fill the fluid reservoir. Install and lock the reservoir lid when you are finished filling.

Senin, 22 November 2010

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a Ford Focus

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a Ford Focus

You need to change your car's brake pads at 60,000 miles; they may need changing sooner depending on how hard you use the brakes. On any Ford Focus made after 2000, the brake pads are held within the brake calipers themselves on the front wheels. Older models may have them installed within the caliper's mounting bracket. Make sure you have the correct brake pads for your particular model.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Raise the car's front end with the floor jack and support it on axle stands. Remove both front wheels with the tire iron; only work on one brake assembly at a time.

    2

    Pry off the retaining clip from the brake caliper using a flat head screwdriver while holding the clip with pliers. Detach the brake hose's bracket from the strut assembly.

    3

    Remove the guide pin bolts for the brake caliper and lift the caliper off the bracket. On most newer models, the bolts require an Allen wrench and are covered with caps you must remove.

    4

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket or the caliper itself--if the pads are in the caliper, pull the inner pad and its spring clip out of the caliper piston and slide the outer pad out of the caliper with its retaining clip.

    5

    Compress the caliper's piston back into its bore slowly using a C-clamp. If necessary to prevent overflow, remove some brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir in the engine compartment using a syringe or unused turkey baster.

Installation

    6

    Insert the replacement brake pads into the brake caliper or the mounting bracket as needed; in the former's case, slide the outer pad and its clip into the caliper and insert the inner pad's spring clip into the piston.

    7

    Install the caliper back onto the bracket on the brake disc and then apply and tighten the mounting bolts with the wrench.

    8

    Re-connect both wheels and lower the car off the axle stands after changing both sets of pads.

    9

    Fill the master cylinder reservoir with fresh brake fluid if needed.

    10

    Press the brake pedal multiple times until it feels firm, thus seating the pads.

How to Update the 1968 Ford Galaxie Brake Rotor

How to Update the 1968 Ford Galaxie Brake Rotor

The brake rotor is the disc-shaped object used in disc brake systems that helps stop the vehicle when the brakes are pressed. The brake rotor goes over the lug nuts and hub assembly behind the wheel of the vehicle. There is a caliper located over it that squeezes it when the brake pedal is pressed. This squeezing creates enough friction to slow the wheel down. Brake rotors can get bad spots from worn brake pads scraping against them or due to environmental contamination. When brake rotors wear out, they need to be updated to keep your braking power efficient and safe.

Instructions

    1

    Jack up the front of the vehicle at the tire whose rotor you would like to update. Remove the wheel from the vehicle by unscrewing all the lug nuts and pulling the wheel off of the vehicle. Set the wheel out of the way.

    2

    Take the caliper off of the rotor by removing the caliper bolts. Set it out of the way making sure that it isn't hanging by the brake hose. You can hang it from the fender by using a small piece of wire or string.

    3

    Gently pry off the grease cap with a flathead screwdriver. Remove the nut retainer and the adjusting nut after removing the cotter pin.

    4

    Remove the outer wheel bearings and the washer by first pulling the rotor, and hub assembly, out towards you. Only pull enough to loosen the bearings and washer. Push the rotor, and hub assembly, back when the bearings and washer are loose enough to remove.

    5

    Completely pull the rotor and hub assembly off of the spindle after the bearings and washer have been removed. This is done by pulling them both toward you and off of the spindle.

    6

    Spray brake cleaner on the new rotor to remove the coating that the factory puts on new rotors to protect it. Put a new set of greased wheel bearings and inner roll bearings inside the inner cup of the hub and install a new seal, making sure it is lightly greased.

    7

    Reinstall the hub assembly and install the new rotor onto the spindle. Reinstall the outer wheel bearings, the washer, and adjusting nut, tightening it to .8 to 1.25 foot-pounds. Reinstall the nut retainer, cotter pin, and grease cap at the end of the spindle.

    8

    Replace the caliper back over the new rotor and reattach it to the brake assembly by screwing in the caliper bolts. Put the wheel back on the vehicle and lower it. Press the brake pedal a few times before driving the vehicle.

Minggu, 21 November 2010

How to Remove a Brake Booster for a 2001 GMC 2500

The braking system on a 2001 GMC 2500 equipped with a gasoline engine uses a traditional master cylinder and booster combination to stop the truck. The booster is vacuum operated, and it ceases to be effective if it develops a vacuum leak. The result is a heavy brake pedal, which can become tiresome over a long drive. The fix is to replace the booster, but first you have to remove the old one, which should take approximately 15 minutes to do.

Instructions

    1

    Pop the hood. Unbolt the master cylinder from the brake booster on the driver's side of the firewall using an open-end wrench. Pull the vacuum line off of the brake booster.

    2

    Go inside the cab, and shine the flashlight up the brake pedal until you locate the linkage between the brake booster and the brake pedal. Remove the spring clip holding the pedal to the linkage using the flathead screwdriver. Then slide the booster linkage off of the pedal.

    3

    Unbolt the brake booster from the firewall using the 3/8-inch ratchet, extension and sockets. If one of the bolts is difficult to access with the ratchet, use a 3/8-inch universal joint between the socket and the extension to gain more flexibility.

    4

    Move under the hood. Pull the master cylinder off of the brake booster. Then pull the brake booster off of the firewall.

Sabtu, 20 November 2010

How to Change the Front Brakes on a 1993 Ford Bronco

How to Change the Front Brakes on a 1993 Ford Bronco

The Ford Bronco debuted in the 1966 model year as a compact SUV and did not become a full-size SUV until Ford completely overhauled it in 1978. The 1993 Ford Bronco came standard with a 185-horsepower, 5.0-liter V-8 engine and four-wheel drive. Four-wheel drive is great on this rugged SUV, but it adds to the labor time to remove and install the brake pads. Replacing the front brakes pads and rotors on a manual locking hub-equipped 1993 Bronco requires removing the locking hub body in order to remove the brake rotor-and-wheel hub assembly.

Instructions

Brake Pad Removal

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels with a breaker bar and socket. Lift the front of the Bronco with a floor jack and sit jack stands under the SUVs frame rails. Lower the Bronco onto the jack stands, remove the lug nuts and remove the front wheels.

    2

    Sit a drain pan under the front caliper and place a box-end wrench on the bleeder valve, the 1/4-inch valve on the top, rear of the caliper. Tighten a C-clamp onto the caliper until the screw side contacts the rear of the outer brake pad and the fixed side contacts the rear of the caliper. Open the bleeder valve by turning the box-end wrench counterclockwise, then immediately tighten the C-clamp until it stops moving.

    3

    Tighten the bleeder valve immediately and remove the C-clamp. Clean around the caliper-retaining pins with a wire brush to eliminate any rust or mud.

    4

    Tap the outermost end of the upper caliper-retaining pin with a hammer until its tabs contact the caliper bracket. Insert a flat-head screwdriver between the caliper bracket and the innermost tabs on the upper caliper-retaining pin.

    5

    Squeeze the outermost end of the caliper-retaining pin with needle-nose pliers and pry the innermost edge of the caliper-retaining pin away from the caliper with the flat-head screwdriver until the outermost tabs on the caliper-retaining pin are between the caliper and its bracket.

    6

    Insert a 7/16-inch drift punch into outer side of the hole between the caliper and bracket until it contacts the caliper-retaining pin, then tab the drift punch with a hammer until the pin falls out of the inner part of the caliper.

    7

    Repeat steps 4 through 6 on the lower caliper pin to remove it.

    8

    Pull the caliper-and-brake pad assembly upward and off of the caliper bracket. Hang it from the front coil spring, using a bungee strap.

    9

    Pull the outer brake pad from the caliper. Press the inner brake pad downward in the caliper bracket to compress its anti-rattle clip and pull the inner brake pad from the abutment in the caliper bracket. Remove the inner brake pad. Pull the anti-rattle clips from the lower abutment on the inner brake pad and save it for reuse.

    10

    Repeat steps 2 through 9 to remove the brake pads on the other side of the Bronco.

Rotor Removal

    11

    Remove the six screws from the locking hub cap with a Torx screwdriver and remove the locking hub cap. Open the snap ring securing the axle in the inner hub, using snap-ring pliers, and remove the snap ring.

    12

    Pull the locking ring, which seats in the groove in the outer hub, using an O-ring puller or similar hooked tool.

    13

    Thread two of the locking hub cap-retaining screws into the inner hubs body and pull outward on the screws to slide the inner hub body from the outer hub. Set the hub body on a clean, lint-free cloth in a clean area to prevent contamination.

    14

    Pull the rotor-and-outer wheel hub assembly from the front axle.

    15

    Repeat steps 1 through 4 to remove the rotor from the other side of the Bronco.

Rotor Installation

    16

    Guide the new rotor-and-outer wheel hub assembly onto the front axle until it seats into place.

    17

    Align the inner hub body with the grooves in the axle shaft and guide the inner hub body into the outer hub. Remove the cap-retaining screws from the inner hub.

    18

    Press the locking ring into the rotor until it seats into its groove in the outer hub. Slide the snap ring onto the end of the axle shaft until it aligns with its groove in the axle shaft, using snap-ring pliers, then release the pliers to seat the snap ring in the groove.

    19

    Install the locking hub cap and hand-thread its retaining screws. Tighten the screws to between 35 and 50 inch-pounds, using an inch-pound torque wrench and Torx-bit socket.

    20

    Install the rotor on the other side of the Bronco.

Brake Pad Installation

    21

    Press the anti-rattle clip on to the lower abutment on the new inner brake pad. Guide the inner brake pads lower abutment into the lower abutment on the caliper bracket. Press downward on the pad to compress the anti-rattle clip, then slide the top of the pad into the upper caliper bracket abutment.

    22

    Place the outer brake pad in the caliper body and bend its ears around the calipers body with slip-joint pliers to secure it in place. Apply a coating of multipurpose grease onto the grooves in the top and bottom of the caliper and caliper bracket where the retaining pins slide in. Remove the caliper-and-brake pad assembly from the bungee strap and lower it onto the caliper bracket.

    23

    Position the new upper caliper-retaining pin so it aligns with the upper hole between the caliper and its bracket. Tap the caliper-retaining pin inward with a hammer until the outermost retaining tabs on the retaining pin seat on the face of the caliper bracket. Repeat this step to install the new lower caliper-retaining pin into the lower hole between the caliper and bracket.

    24

    Install the new brake pads on the other side of the Bronco.

    25

    Reinstall the front wheels on the Broncos front hubs and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Raise the SUV off of the jack stands and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground and tighten the lug nuts, in a crisscross pattern, to 100 foot-pounds on a five-lug nut setup or 140 foot-pounds on an eight-lug nut setup using a torque wrench and socket.

    26

    Press and release the brake pedal until it is firm, then refill the brake master cylinder to its Max level with new DOT 3 brake fluid. Take any old brake fluid to a used automotive fluid recycler for disposal. Some auto parts stores take old fluids for free.

How to Remove the Back Brakes on a Hyundai Accent

How to Remove the Back Brakes on a Hyundai Accent

Most cars have a brake proportioner that divides pressure from the master cylinder between the front brakes and the rear brakes, typically in a 70-percent front, 30-percent rear ratio. Although the rear brakes don't get much work, they do require replacement occasionally. In this case, the project vehicle is a 2005 Hyundai Accent equipped with rear disc brakes, but the process is similar in other vehicles as well.

Instructions

    1

    Lift up the vehicle using the jack and place it on jack stands. Make sure the vehicle is secure. Remove the rear wheels, using the tire iron, and place them to the side, out of the way.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper from the rear mounts using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, then support it on a spare jack stand.

    3

    Pull the pads out of the caliper using your hands.

    4

    Slide the rotor off the spindle on the rear suspension using your hands. If necessary, tap it from the backside using the rubber mallet.

Jumat, 19 November 2010

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Kia Spectra

The Kia Spectra comes available in two different braking styles. It comes with either disc or drum brakes. If your Spectra has disc brakes, read further to learn how to replace them in less than an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the car from the ground using a car jack. Verify that the area is clear of children and animals. Distribute the Spectra's weight evenly.

    2

    Disassemble the wheels from the Spectra. Use a torque wrench to loosen the lug nuts. Take off the wheel and set is face up on the ground to prevent scratching.

    3

    Take off the parking brake cable located behind the rear disc brakes. Use your torque wrench to loosen the bolts. Remove the clip.

    4

    Loosen the caliper lock bolts. Remove the caliper and set is aside. Disconnect the V-springs from the brake pads, and then remove the pads and shims.

    5

    Rotate the piston with a special tool. This is available at the Kia dealership, item number OK9A4263001. Rotating the piston will compress it into the bore.

    6

    Replace the pads and shims with the new ones. Replace the V-springs and install the caliper. Use the torque wrench to tighten the lock bolts between 22 to 29 foot pounds.

    7

    Put the park brake cable back on and replace the clip. Install the wheels.

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a 2000 Dodge Caravan

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a 2000 Dodge Caravan

Replace the brakes on your 2000 Dodge Caravan as often as the owner's manual advises, based on the number of miles you drive and the type of driving you do. If you don't change your brakes regularly, they will let you know they need to be changed by emitting an ear-piercing, fingernails-run-down-the-chalkboard squeal.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Dodge on a flat, level surface and engage the parking brake. Put two wedges of wood in front of your front wheels and two behind them.

    2

    Put the jack under the back frame of the car and lift it up until the wheels are off the ground. Slide the two jack stands underneath the car right under the axels, one next to each wheel. Use the jack to lower the car onto the two jack stands.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts with the lug nut wrench, and remove the lug nuts and the two back wheels.

    4

    Look for two bolts that are attached to the caliper. Remove them with the adjustable wrench. Lift up the caliper and set it on the axle, taking care not to let it fall and break.

    5

    Compress the brake pads which, in turn, will compress the underlying piston. If they won't budge, use a C-clamp to compress them.

    6

    Open the spring clips by prying with a screwdriver and take off the pads. And if the pads are stuck you can pry them off with the screwdriver as well.

    7

    Rub a little bit of silicone grease onto the back of each new pad and put the pads in the correct position. Put the spring clips back in place to hold the pads in place.

    8

    Put the caliper back in place and tighten the bolts.

    9

    Reinstall the wheel and tighten the lug nuts. Lift up the car a little with the jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the Dodge all the way to the ground. Retighten the lug nuts.

    10

    Lift up the hood and look for the master cylinder's brake fluid container on the driver's side of the car, closest to the driver. Top off the brake fluid, if needed.

How to Replace a 1965 Mustang's Wheel Cylinders

How to Replace a 1965 Mustang's Wheel Cylinders

The 1965 Mustang is a small, sporty car that was sold by the Ford Motor Co. The Mustang came with a six cylinder engine, a three-speed manual transmission, and four-wheel drum brakes. Drum brakes use internally expanding brake shoes to slow the car, which are activated by a hydraulic wheel cylinder mounted within the drum on each wheel. Worn brake cylinders may leak or cause the brakes to malfunction, making their replacement necessary.

Instructions

    1

    Place a floor jack under the lower suspension control arm or under the rear axle, depending on which wheel you are going to begin work first. Loosen the lug nuts with a lug wrench, then raise the jack until the wheel is off the ground. Place a jack stand under the control arm or axle, then lower the jack. Remove the lug nuts and the wheel.

    2

    Remove the brake drum retaining clips from the wheel lugs with a flat blade screwdriver. Pull the brake drum straight off of the wheel hub and place it aside. Loosen a stubborn brake drum from the hub with a rubber mallet, if necessary.

    3

    Remove the brake line from the back side of the wheel cylinder at the top of the brake backing plate by twisting off the fitting with a tubing wrench. Remove the two wheel cylinder retaining bolts from the front of the cylinder with a socket and ratchet wrench.

    4

    Make a note of which holes or mounting studs the ends of the upper brake shoe springs are looped around. Remove the brake shoe springs from the top of the brake backing plate with a pair of brake spring pliers, which are available where automotive tool are sold. Pull the top of each brake shoe away from the wheel cylinder slightly, then pull the wheel cylinder straight off of the backing plate.

    5

    Mount a new wheel cylinder to the backing plate using the original retaining bolts. Connect the brake line to the backside of the cylinder by tightening the fitting with a tubing wrench. Replace the brake spring by stretching them over their mounting holes or studs with the brake spring pliers.

    6

    Push the brake drum back into place, then push the retaining clips back over the wheel studs. Replace the wheel and tighten the lug nuts. Raise the floor jack and remove the jack stand. Lower the floor jack and tighten the lug nuts again in a criss-cross manner.

    7

    Repeat the entire procedure for each wheel where you will be replacing the brake cylinder.

How to Fix Bent Brake Lines

When it comes to your brake lines, it is best to leave nothing to chance. When a brake line sustains damage, whether it is a hole or a kink in the line, the only safe thing to do is to change it for a new line. If you try to un-bend a brake line, it will usually just crack. Even if it doesn't, whatever you do to unbend the brake line is going to weaken it. It does not take very long to replace a brake line, and in the end, it is well worth the effort when it comes to safety.

Instructions

    1

    Drain the fluid from the master brake cylinder using the turkey baster. Put the fluid in the drain pan for recycling. Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels or in front of the front wheels depending on the location of the bad brake line. Lift the automobile with the jack. Place a jack stand under the car near the jacking point and raise it to the frame.

    2

    Remove the wheel using the lug wrench to remove the lug nuts. Locate the bad brake line under the vehicle. Thoroughly clean the fittings on the brake line with the wire brush. The area must be completely clean before you remove the brake line to prevent contaminating the system. Loosen the fitting with a wrench and separate the brake line.

    3

    Place a drain pan under the fitting to catch any fluid that is still in the lines. Move to the other end of the brake line. Clean the fitting thoroughly with the wire brush. Loosen the fitting with the wrench and separate the brake lines. Place the drain pan under the separation to catch any remaining fluid.

    4

    Remove the brake lines from the retaining clips by pulling it out of them. Discard the brake line and put the new one in its place. Push the brake line into the retaining clips. Secure both fittings into the brake line system and tighten the fittings with a wrench. Place the wheel on the car and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    5

    Remove the jack stand from under the vehicle. Lower the car to the ground. Fill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid. Bleed the brake lines by having a helper to pump the brakes several times and then hold them while you open the bleeder valve on the wheels with a wrench to expel the air. Continue until the air is gone from the lines. You may need to add brake fluid several times throughout the process.

Kamis, 18 November 2010

How to Measure Dana Backing Plates

How to Measure Dana Backing Plates

You can replace the backing plate on older Corvettes, Thunderbirds and Jeeps with a Dana backing plate. Dana backing plates are made for vehicles with Dana axles. These backing plates hold the braking assembly so the brake pads can squeeze the rotor and force the vehicle to stop. These backing plates can be removed from one model of vehicle and mounted on another as long as they are the same size. Automotive knowledge and mechanical experience are required to remove the tires and braking assembly in order to complete this task.

Instructions

    1

    Position the two jacks underneath the rear axle of the vehicle so there is one jack beneath each shock. Jack up the vehicle and remove one of the tires with your wrench set to expose the rotor and brake pads. Refer to your owner's manual if you are unsure of how to remove the tire.

    2

    Remove the brake pad, rotor and brake shoe. Your owner's manual will give you clear instructions on the assembly of these parts. Set the brake shoe on top of the axle. Do not let it hang down because it will put stress on the hydraulic cables. Remove the backing plate from the axle.

    3

    Measure the inside holes of the backing plate with the internal slide gauge. These are the holes that were used to mount the backing plate to the axle. If you are using this backing plate for another vehicle, make sure it will fit the bolts on your axle. The larger hole in the center of the backing plate leaves room for the spindle of the axle. Use your caliper to measure the diameter of the spindle to make sure it will fit on your vehicle's spindle.

    4

    Measure the outside circumference of the Dana backing plate using your caliper. This measurement will let you know if you have enough room to fit the backing plate underneath your vehicle.

Rabu, 17 November 2010

How to Replace the Front Brake Line on a Ford F-150

How to Replace the Front Brake Line on a Ford F-150

The front brake lines on your Ford F-150 truck carry brake fluid pressure to and from the front disc calipers. Over time, the brake lines may leak. If the hose leaks, you will lose brake fluid pressure when trying to stop, making it harder for you to stop your truck. A leaking or cracked brake line can be changed in less than an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Slide the jack under the frame of the truck just behind the front wheel being worked on. Lift the truck until the wheel is just making contact with the ground. Loosen the lug nuts by turning them counterclockwise with the lug wrench. Lift the truck high enough for the wheel to clear the ground. Place the jack stand under the frame behind the jack and carefully lower the truck onto the jack. Remove the wheel and set it aside.

    2

    Turn the steering wheel to expose the brake line fitting on the caliper and the connection at the frame. Remove the brake line from the brake caliper by turning the fitting counterclockwise with a flare nut wrench.

    3

    Grip both sides of the connection to the metal brake tubing with flare nut wrenches and turn the brake hose fitting counterclockwise to remove it. Using the new copper seal provided, connect the new line to the tubing by turning it clockwise. Tighten the flare nut to the tubing to between 20 and 30 foot-pounds.

    4

    Slide a new copper seal over the caliper connector and thread it onto the caliper. Tighten it to between 20 and 30 foot-pounds. Straighten the steering wheel.

    5

    Install the wheel and thread the lug nuts onto the studs by turning them clockwise until finger tight. Lift the truck off the stand and remove the stand. Lower the truck until the wheel just contacts the ground. Torque the lug nuts to 120 foot-pounds in a crossover or star pattern. Lower the truck and remove the wheel chocks.

Selasa, 16 November 2010

How to Replace & Install a 1995 Civic Master Cylinder

The Honda Civic began its production life in 1973 as a simple and economical compact vehicle. Though it has become much more complex over the years, it retains its relative simplicity. The 1995 Civic came standard with typical-for-the-era front disc brakes and rear drum brakes, but had optional disc brakes available on premium trim levels -- EX and Si. The hydraulic system used to power these brakes is sensitive to air pockets, but there is a small valve on each caliper or wheel cylinder that allow you to bleed air from the system.

Instructions

Replacing Master Cylinder

    1

    Unscrew the cap from the master cylinder and siphon out as much of the brake fluid from the reservoir as possible with a turkey baster. Transfer this removed fluid to a small, sealable container and seal the container.

    2

    Press and hold the unlocking button on the brake fluid sensor wiring harness and unplug the harness.

    3

    Hold a small drain pan under the master cylinder. Loosen the brake line fittings with a line wrench and pull the lines from the master cylinder. Allow the fluid to drain into the drain pan. Remove the pan once the fluid stops draining.

    4

    Wrap clean, lint-free cloths around the ends of the two brake lines to prevent debris from getting in them.

    5

    Loosen the two master cylinder-retaining nuts with a ratchet and socket, and pull the master cylinder off the brake booster.

    6

    Position the new master cylinder in a bench wise with rubber jaw protectors. Tighten the vise until it has a firm grip on the master cylinder -- do not over-tighten the vise, as you risk cracking the master cylinder.

    7

    Hand-thread the two bleeder hoses included with the master cylinder bleeding kit into the ports on the new master cylinder. Snug the bleeder lines into the master cylinder with a line wrench. Fill the reservoir in the new master cylinder with fresh DOT 3 brake fluid, and bend the bleeder hoses so their ends go into the fluid in the master cylinder reservoir.

    8

    Press and release the plunger on the rear of the master cylinder with a wooden dowel rod and watch the submerged ends of the bleeder hoses for air bubbles. Continue pressing and releasing the plunger until no air bubbles come from the bleeder hoses.

    9

    Loosen the bleeder hoses with a line wrench and remove the bleeder hoses from the master cylinder.

    10

    Loosen the bench vise and pull the master cylinder from the vise. Set the master cylinder on its mounted studs on the brake booster and hand-thread its retaining nuts. Tighten the master cylinder retaining nuts to 11 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    11

    Hand-thread the brake lines into the ports on the master cylinder and tighten them to 14 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and crows foot attachment.

    12

    Fill the new master cylinder to the Max line with new DOT 3 brake fluid. Connect the brake fluid level sensor wiring harness to the level sensor receptacle on the master cylinder.

Bleeding Brake System

    13

    Raise the rear of the Honda off the ground with a floor jack and slide jack stands under its rear lower control arms. Lower the Honda onto the jack stands. Raise the front of the Civic off the ground with a floor jack and slide jack stands under its sub-frame. Lower the Honda onto the jack stands.

    14

    Crawl under the rear of the vehicle, so you are just behind the right rear wheel. Press one end of a -inch-diameter rubber hose onto the bleeder valve -- the -inch metal valve -- on the top of the drum backing plate or caliper, depending on options.

    15

    Set the free end of the rubber hose into a clean, clear container and fill the container with fresh DOT 3 brake fluid until it submerges the end of the rubber hose.

    16

    Instruct an assistant to press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm, then hold pressure on the pedal. Open the bleeder valve by turning it counterclockwise a quarter-turn with a combination wrench. Look at the submerged end of the hose and watch for air bubbles. Tighten the bleeder valve, then instruct your assistant to release the brake pedal. Repeat this step until no bubbles come from the hose.

    17

    Pull the -inch-diameter rubber hose from the bleeder valve. Refill the brake master cylinder with DOT 3 brake fluid until it reaches the Max line.

    18

    Repeat steps 2 through 5 on the remaining three wheels, in the following order: left front, left rear, then right front.

    19

    Raise the front of the Civic off the jack stands with a floor jack, then remove the jack stands. Lower the front of the Civic to the ground. Raise the back end of the Civic off the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the rear of the car to the ground.

    20

    Take any old brake fluid to a used automotive fluid recycling center. Some auto parts stores take old fluid free of charge.

How to Remove Rusted Brake Drums

How to Remove Rusted Brake Drums

The external contracting brake was the original drum brake used on vehicles in the late-1800s to early-1900s. This braking system had a single strap or cable made of steel that wrapped around a drum on the rear axle or transmission shaft. When the driver pulled the brake lever, the strap tightened around the drum and slowly brought the car to a halt -- 14-to-0 mph in 21.5 feet in an early-1900s Oldsmobile. Modern drum brakes use a set of shoes coated with friction material that press outward against a drum to stop the vehicle. Over time, rust can accumulate inside the brake drum, causing the drum to seize on the other components in the braking system. This makes removing the drum a tricky task.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the front or rear lug nuts from the vehicle -- depending on where the rusted drums are -- using a ratchet and socket. Raise the rear of the vehicle with a floor jack and position jack stands under a solid part of the vehicle -- subframe, rear axle, frame rails or control arms. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stands.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts, and pull the wheels from the vehicle.

    3

    Tap all around the entire outer edge of the brake drum with a hammer. Do not strike the drum too hard, or you may crack it.

    4

    Grab the outer edges of the drum and pull away from the vehicle's hub with a slight wiggling motion. If the drum is still stuck, repeat Steps 1 and 2. If, after two attempts, the drum still will not come off, proceed to Step 3.

    5

    Place a brake drum puller -- a large jawed puller -- over the brake drum, so the screw part contacts the vehicle's spindle or axle in the center of the drum and the pullers claws grab the rear lip of the drum.

    6

    Tighten the drum puller's center screw, using a ratchet and socket, until the drum pops free. Pull the drum off the rear hub. Remove the drum puller from the drum.

    7

    Line the lug stud holes on a new drum up with the lug studs on the vehicle's hub. Push the drum onto the hub, until the drum seats fully on the brake shoes -- slightly wiggling the drum while pushing it may aid in the installation process.

    8

    Install the wheels back onto the vehicle's hubs and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Raise the vehicle off the jack stands, using the floor jack, and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground.

    9

    Tighten the lug nuts, in a crisscrossing pattern, to the manufacturer's recommended torque specification -- available in your vehicle's owner's manual -- using a torque wrench and socket.

What Does Burnishing Brakes Do?

So you have successfully replaced your brake pads -- along with the rotors, if needed -- and your ready to call it a day, but if you think the job is done you couldnt be more mistaken. You may have fresh pad and rotors, but you must burnish the brake pads so that an even layer of pad material is transferred to the surface of the rotors, otherwise you could end up with a slight jitter or vibration when you apply the brakes. Burnishing your brake pads is a pretty simplistic process and is also known as brake pad break-in or new pad conditioning.

The purpose

    The purpose of burnishing is to prepare the brake system for optimal efficiency and comfort. Burnishing is a multi-step process that has to be performed properly to be effective. Failure to follow the process correctly will slowly build up an uneven layer of pad material on the brake rotor, causing your vehicle to develop a pulse or vibration anytime the brakes are applied.

What Happens

    In a nut shell, you drive the vehicle and perform several light stops to thoroughly and evenly heat the brake pads and rotors. Once the brakes are sufficiently warmed, you will repeatedly perform more aggressive braking at a higher speed without stopping followed by a brief sustained driving period to allow the brakes to cool evenly. As the process is completed, a very fine, even layer of pad material is transferred to the rotors, allowing your brakes to perform at their best when the time comes.

The Effects on the Pad

    It is commonly thought that burnishing the brakes would cause quick brake wear or eat up a large portion of the brake material at an early stage in the pads' life. While these concerns may seem completely logical due to the initial rough use of the pad, the amount of material that is transferred from pad to rotor is actually very little. It is actually more important to know how to burnish brakes properly than it is to know what it does or why. Improper burnishing procedures could overheat the pads or not heat them evenly, causing an uneven initial wear. Keep in mind that it doesnt create a lot of danger if the pads wear unevenly at first, but the effects will be annoying and could cause your pads to wear out sooner than normal. When you replace your pads and perform the procedure you should always use OEM, or factory-replacement, style brake pad utilizing the pad material; in other words, dont replace stock ceramic pads with a cheap semi-metallic pad, if at all possible.

Proper Technique

    There is a lot of speculation around what is actually the proper procedure to burnish new brakes. Truth is, it really depends on the brake pad and the vehicle they are on. Larger and smaller surfaces will create different amounts of heat, as will different pad materials. A good rule of thumb is to perform about 10 stops from between 20 and 30 miles per hour. Repeat the procedure, but be within the speed range of 35 to 45 miles per hour for the second set of braking runs. Continuously drive for the next 10 to 15 minutes to allow the system to completely cool. You always want to use a steady foot without dragging the brakes; apply firm pressure against pedal until the vehicle stops and immediately continue to the next stop, but do not lock up the brakes. Never attempt to perform this procedure on the road and always use a spot where you can safely accelerate and stop in this fashion; a large empty parking lot is ultimately best.

Senin, 15 November 2010

How to Repair the Front Brakes in a 2000 Acura TI

How to Repair the Front Brakes in a 2000 Acura TI

The Acura TL was first released in the 1996 model year and became the first Acura to bear an alphanumeric name, which all current Acuras have. The 2000 Acura TL came fitted with front, ventilated disc brakes with semi-metallic brake pads. Over time, the brake pads and rotors may become worn out and need to be replaced. When the pads begin wearing out, a small tab that's connected to the inboard brake pad contacts the rotor, creating a high-pitched squeal. If the brake pads are not repaired in a timely manner, more brake damage may occur.

Instructions

    1

    Open the TL's hood and remove the lid from the master cylinder reservoir, the plastic container near the rear driver's side of the engine compartment. Siphon out about half of the fluid, using the turkey baster. Transfer this fluid to a small container to refill the master cylinder.

    2

    Loosen the TL's front lug nuts, using a ratchet and socket.

    3

    Raise the front of the vehicle, using the floor jack, and place the jack stands beneath it to secure the vehicle. Position these stand under a secure, non-mechanical part of the vehicle, such as the sub-frame. Lower the TL so the weight of the vehicle is supported by only the jack stands.

    4

    Remove the front lug nuts and pull the front wheels from the vehicle. Place the lug nuts in a secure location, away from your work.

    5

    Loosen and remove the upper and lower caliper bolts, on the rear of the caliper, using the ratchet and socket. Pull the caliper up and off of the brake assembly. Support the caliper by connecting it to a suspension component, with the bungee strap.

    6

    Grab the inner and outer brake pads and pull them from the caliper bracket, the metal component the caliper bolts to.

    7

    Loosen and remove the two bolts on the rear of the caliper bracket, using the ratchet and socket. Pull the caliper bracket up and away from the brake assembly.

    8

    Loosen and remove the retaining screws holding the brake rotor, using a screwdriver. Tap the screw heads lightly with the hammer if they do not loosen easily. Pull the rotor toward you and off the vehicle.

    9

    Place the new rotor on the TL in the same fashion the old one was positioned and tighten the retaining screws using the Phillips screwdriver.

    10

    Remove the two caliper slide pins, the components the caliper bolts screw into, from the caliper bracket. Apply a light coat of caliper grease to the pins and press them back into the caliper bracket.

    11

    Apply a thin coat of an anti-seize chemical to the thin metal clips that hold the brake pads on the caliper bracket. This allows smooth movement of the pads.

    12

    Place the 8-inch C-clamp over the brake caliper. Position the fixed part of the clamp so it contacts the rear of the caliper, and the line the screw portion up with the caliper piston, the cylinder inside the caliper. Place the old inner brake pad between the screw part of the C-clamp and the piston, to prevent damage. Tighten the C-clamp until the piston fully presses into the caliper.

    13

    Place the caliper bracket over the rotor and tighten its two bolts to 41 foot-pounds, using the torque wrench and socket. Place the new brake pads into the caliper bracket. Remove the caliper from the bungee strap and place the caliper over the new brake pads, tighten the upper and lower caliper bolts to 17 foot-pounds using a torque wrench and a socket.

    14

    Repeat steps 5 through 13 for the brakes on the other side of the Acura TL.

    15

    Place the front wheels on the vehicle and hand-tighten the lug nuts.

    16

    Raise the TL, using the floor jack, and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground.

    17

    Tighten the lug nuts, in a star-pattern, to 80 foot-pounds, using the torque wrench and a socket.

    18

    Pump the brakes by pressing and releasing the brake pedal until it feels firm. Check the brake fluid level by comparing it to the "Max" and "Min" lines on the side of the master cylinder reservoir. Fill the reservoir to the "Max" line, using the fluid stored in the small container and close the TL's hood. Dispose of any remaining fluid properly. Many auto parts stores will dispose of old fluids free of charge.

How to Fix 2003 VW Jetta Rear Brakes

How to Fix 2003 VW Jetta Rear Brakes

The 2003 Volkswagen Jetta uses brake calipers and pads on its rear wheels along with the front ones. In most cases, fixing the rear brakes means changing the brake pads, which you usually need to do at 60,000 miles. The brake disc, however, may also need service, especially if you used worn-out brake pads for tool long. You should always check the disc's condition at the same time that you change the pads.

Instructions

Preparation

    1

    Loosen the bolts on the rear wheels with your tire iron, then raise the car's rear end with the floor jack and support it on jack stands.

    2

    Remove both rear wheels with the tire iron.

    3

    Wash off both brake assemblies using an aerosol brake cleaner and a drip pan underneath to catch the dripping residue.

Brake Pads

    4

    Unscrew and remove the brake caliper mounting bolts--grip the slide pin with an open-ended wrench while unscrewing the bolt with a flare-nut wrench--and remove the caliper. Hang the caliper by a length of strong wire so it won't hang by the hose.

    5

    Pull the inner and outer brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket.

    6

    Remove the retaining springs from the mounting bracket, using needle-nose pliers, and install new ones.

    7

    Peel off the foil backing on the replacement brake pads if they have them; these pads have an adhesive backing. Apply an anti-squeal compound to the backing plates if they do not have adhesive.

    8

    Install the replacement pads in the caliper mounting bracket.

    9

    Rotate the caliper piston clockwise with a rotation tool while pushing in on the piston with the end of the flare-nut wrench to retract the piston.

    10

    Remove the slide pins from the caliper, clean them and apply high temperature grease before re-installing them.

    11

    Install the caliper with its mounting bolts, then reconnect both wheels and lower the car after changing the brakes on both sides.

Brake Disc

    12

    Inspect the condition of the brake disc while the wheels and caliper are removed, looking for cracks or deep grooves. Proceed with the remaining steps if the disc needs replacing.

    13

    Unscrew the mounting bolts for the caliper mounting bracket with your wrench and remove the bracket from the disc.

    14

    Remove the retaining screw for the disc, if there is one, using an impact screwdriver, then slip the disc off the wheel studs.

    15

    Place the replacement brake disc on the hub flange and line up the bolt holes. Install and tighten the retaining screw.

    16

    Install the caliper mounting bracket and caliper with their mounting bolts.

How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a Jeep Liberty

How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a Jeep Liberty

It is possible that you won't need to change the rear brake pads on your Jeep Liberty as often as the front pads. Nevertheless, you should inspect the rear brake pads whenever you change the front pads. The brake calipers on the Liberty's rear wheels are slightly different than the front ones; thus, changing the pads requires a different procedure.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Open the cap on the brake fluid reservoir in the engine compartment. If the brake fluid level is at or near the maximum level, siphon out up to two-thirds of it using an unused turkey baster or similar suction device.

    2

    Raise the vehicle's rear end, support it on jack stands and remove the rear wheels. It will help to loosen the lug nuts with the tire iron before you raise the vehicle.

    3

    Wash off the brake caliper assembly with aerosol brake cleaner.

    4

    Compress the caliper piston using a C-clamp; the piston is located under the center arch of the caliper. Watch the brake fluid level in the master cylinder as you compress the piston, and make sure it doesn't overflow.

    5

    Remove the two mounting bolts from the caliper with a wrench; don't remove the banjo bolt for the brake hose. Swing the caliper up and remove it from the disc, and tie it to the coil spring with a wire.

    6

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper. Pry the outer pad out with a flat screwdriver; the inner pad is seated in the caliper piston with a prong-like retaining clip.

    7

    Remove the anti-rattle clips from the caliper's mounting bosses. Clean and reinstall them.

Installation

    8

    Install the new inner brake pad into the caliper piston using its clip. Line up the outer pad's protrusions with the slots on the caliper frame, and push the caliper in until it seats in the caliper.

    9

    Pull out the bushings from the caliper and clean them. Apply an anti-seize compound to the bushings and install them back in the caliper.

    10

    Reconnect the brake caliper to its mounting bracket--engage the upper end with the anti-rattle clip at the bracket's top end, and swing the caliper down onto the bracket. Install and tighten the mounting bolts.

    11

    Reconnect the rear wheels and lower the vehicle after changing both sets of brake pads.

    12

    Refill the brake master cylinder reservoir with brake fluid as needed.

    13

    Press the brake pedal multiple time until it feels firm to seat the brake pads.

Minggu, 14 November 2010

What Happens When a Brake Rotor Breaks?

What Happens When a Brake Rotor Breaks?

Modern disc brakes are very effective and reliable. From time to time, a brake rotor can break, creating an immediate threat to motoring safety. A broken rotor must be replaced as soon as possible to protect the driver and all around him.

Types

    Most rotor breaks take the form of cracks, usually around the base of the disk where it joins the hub section. Radial cracking outward can also occur. Other occasional rotor problems include warping, heat-checking, and rotor bluing, which happens when a rotor has been subjected to high heat.

Causes

    Rotor cracks are usually the result of poor manufacturing. Low-quality rotors are often poorly cast from non-homogeneous cast iron, and these defects leave weak spots that cannot withstand the forces generated during braking. A rotor that is still in service long after it has worn out will also be susceptible to cracking.

Effects

    Even the slightest defect on the rotor will cause low-frequency vibrations, known as judder, during braking. Serious rotor failures can easily cause a complete wheel lock-up and loss of control of the vehicle.

How Brake Rotors Work

The Rotor or Disc

    Disc brakes are named after the rotor. Most vehicles have used disc brakes in the front of vehicles for many years. Now, many vehicles are offering four-wheel disc brakes which are more effective and easier to replace than drum brakes. Front discs or rotors are two flat pieces of forged metal plated together with vents in between. The vents assist the rotor in cooling since the friction of the pads against the surface of the rotor creates intense heat. Think of the rotor as a front wheel on a ten-speed bicycle or a mountain bike. The rotor is mounted to the knuckle under the wheel and it moves in a rotating motion with the wheel. When you pull the caliper hand brake on the handle bars of your bicycle, two hard rubber pads, one on each ride of the rim of the bicycle tire, press together and slow the bicycle down. When the brake is applied, the caliper sitting over the rotor activates a hydraulic piston which squeezes the brake pads, one on each side of the rotor, against the plate of the rotor applying even pressure and slows the vehicle down.

The Caliper

    Although all of the components of disc brakes are important, the most important one of all is the caliper. This is the device that activates the pads against the rotor. The caliper works from a series of hydraulics that start with the master cylinder located in the engine compartment. The hydraulic fluid is brake fluid. The fluid is plumbed to the braking system of each wheel through a series of steel lines. These lines carry the hydraulic fluid to the hydraulic components of each wheel. By pressing on the brake pedal, a power brake booster applies hydraulic pressure from the master cylinder, through the steel lines, to each hydraulic component at each wheel. The caliper is used in disc brakes and covers the rotor, hugging it as it stands vertically with the wheel. Brake pads are inside the caliper, but one on each side of the rotor. As the hydraulic pressure activates, the piston of the caliper extends in an outward motion and squeezes the pads and the plated flat surface of the rotor, slowing down the vehicle.

The Brake Pad

    The most commonly worn part of the disc braking system is the pad. The friction material mounted on the face plate of the pad is less aggressive in composition to the surface of the rotor. Just the like bicycle uses hard rubber pads, because if it used something more aggressive, it would harm the wheel of the bike. After time, the friction material of the pad wears down, as does the rotor to a degree, but a whole lot more slowly than the pad material. However, nowadays, the rotors are made thinner and more affordable so to properly replace pads, many mechanics opt to replace the rotors opposed to machining them (or matching them) on a lathe to resurface them.

Sabtu, 13 November 2010

How to Remove Brake Rotors Off of a Dodge RAM

Considering what local auto repair shops and dealerships charge in labor fees, think of the money you could save removing the brake rotors off your Dodge Ram. Even if it takes you an hour or longer to remove the brake rotors, you'll still come out cheaper even if you have to buy the tools to do the job.

Instructions

How to Remove Brake Rotors Off of a Dodge RAM

    1

    Park the Dodge Ram on a flat paved surface. Apply the parking brake and release the hood latch. Place a wheel chock behind one of the rear tires. Open the hood and remove half the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir with a turkey baster and discard responsibly. Replace the master cylinder cap securely.

    2

    Break the lug nuts loose on both front tires using the breaking bar and a socket. Some lug nuts on Dodge Rams may take a 7/8-inch socket or a 22 mm can be used.

    3

    Lift the front of the Dodge Ram with the floor jack and place the jack stands under the axle for 4-wheel drive or under the control arms for 2-wheel drive. Remove the lug nuts and wheels.

    4

    Remove the caliper bolts, using the ratchet and a socket. Pry the caliper off with the flathead screwdriver and hang with the bungee cord to support it to the coil spring or frame. Remove the pads and compress the piston of the caliper inward using the C-clamp. Tighten the C-clamp slowly until it bottoms out.

    5

    Remove the caliper anchor bolts and the caliper anchor using the ratchet and a socket. The bolts will be tight.

    6

    Remove the rotor retainer rings (if present) on two of the lug studs. You can cut these off with a pair of dikes and not have to replace them for reinstallation.

    7

    Remove the rotor. If the rotor is rusted stubbornly to the hub, you're going to have to decide how to separate it.
    If you're replacing the rotor, you can be more successful knocking it off using a ball-peen hammer and striking it on the flat of the fins in an outward and inward motion with the hammer.
    If you're removing it to machine it or reusing the rotor, you're going to have to be much more delicate so you do not damage it. Strike it in the same fashion but use a heavy rubber mallet instead of a hammer. Your success is going to be lower and you're going to have to apply more tenacity and determination, but diligence will pay off.

    8

    Repeat Step 4 through Step 7 for the rotor on the other side, if so desired.

    9

    Put everything back together in order by reversing the steps. If you're replacing the rotors, be sure to spray them with a quality brake cleaner to wash off the sticky coating that comes on them. Torque the caliper anchor bolts with the adjustable wrench and a socket at 110 foot-pounds for a 1500 Ram or 230 foot-pounds for a 2500 Ram. Place the wheels and lug nuts back on when finished and tighten the lug nuts snug. Lower the Ram and torque the lug nuts 140 foot-pounds with the torque wrench and a socket.

    10

    Pump the foot brake pedal until it feels normal when you're finished. This helps to restore hydraulic pressure to the caliper pistons. After you've pumped the pedal, recheck and adjust the brake fluid in the master cylinder by only adding new DOT 3 brake fluid. Release the parking brake, remove the wheel chock and test drive.

Jumat, 12 November 2010

How to Inspect and Remove the Brake Pads on Your Car

Brakes are a key safety feature on any automobile. It is necessary to periodically inspect and remove the brake pads from your car to make sure the brakes are wearing properly. Follow these general guidelines to inspect your brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Jack your car up on the jack stands. Remove the hubcaps from the wheel. Remove the tire from the car by using the lug wrench to loosen and remove the lug nuts.

    2

    Locate the return springs on either end of the brakes. Squeeze the return springs together to release the brake pads. Set the springs aside in a safe place because you need them to put the brakes back together.

    3

    Remove the inside brake pad. Brush any dust from the pad.

    4

    Visually inspect the portion of the brake pad that comes in contact with the wheel. The brake pad should be the same thickness throughout with no scratches or marks.

    5

    Make sure the brake pad connections that hold the brake pad together are intact and not loose. The shim, or backside, of the brake pad should not show any signs of wear either.

    6

    Repeat Steps 3 through 5 on the outside brake pad. Again all pieces should show even wear and not have any loose parts. There should be no signs of separation in the metallic pieces.

    7

    Put the brake pads back in place. Securely reattach the return springs. Put the wheel back on the car and lower it to the ground. Check the brakes before entering traffic to make sure the brakes are working properly.