Minggu, 31 Oktober 2010

Instructions to Remove the Rear Brake Rotors on a 93 Toyota Camry

The Toyota Camry debuted in 1983 and began a long-standing rivalry with the Honda Accord. The 1993 Toyota Camry was equipped with a 130-horsepower 2.2-liter, inline four-cylinder engine in the base model. A stronger 185-horsepower V-6 was optional for all four sub-models, the DX, LX, SE and XLE. The 1993 Camry was available with optional four-wheel disc brakes. Replacing the rear rotors on the 1993 Camry is similar to replacing the front rotors, with the exception of the internal parking brake shoe inside the rear rotor.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the hood of the Camry and set the hood prop. Remove brake fluid from the fluid reservoir with a turkey baster or bottle siphon, until the fluid level is about 1/2 inch below the "Full" mark. Install the reservoir lid and lock it in place.

    2

    Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts on the Camry with a tire iron. Raise the rear of the car with a jack. Place jack stands beneath the rear axle beam, about 6 inches inward from the rear wheels. Lower the Camry on the stands. Remove the lug nuts completely from the car, then remove the rear wheels.

    3

    Remove the brake-line support clip from the rear strut on one side of the car, with a ratchet and socket. Install an open-end wrench onto the caliper guide pin, between the rear of the caliper and the caliper bracket. Hold the guide pin still while removing the caliper bolt with a ratchet and socket. Repeat this step to remove the second caliper bolt. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using a small pry bar if necessary. Hang the caliper from the rear strut spring with a metal clothes hanger or hook.

    4

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper-mounting bracket by hand. Insert one of the old pads against the piston on the inside of the rear caliper. Wrap a C-clamp around the old brake pad and the rear of the caliper. Tighten the C-clamp slowly, until the caliper piston completely compresses in the caliper bore. Remove the C-clamp and the old brake pad, then discard your old brake pads.

    5

    Remove the caliper-mounting bracket with a ratchet and socket. Remove the rear brake rotor by hand. If the rotor is hard to remove, hit the rotor from side to side on the raised sides with a rubber mallet. This will release the brake rotor from the parking brake shoe, located inside the rotor. Tap the rotor on the inboard side outward, if necessary, to remove the rotor.

    6

    Inspect the parking brake shoe. If the shoe is less than 1/16-inch thick or worn down to the bare metal, replace the parking brake shoe. Spray the internal components of the parking brake shoe assembly thoroughly using aerosol brake cleaner.

    7

    Install the new brake rotor onto the hub assembly. Install two wheel lug nuts with your fingers and tighten them to the face of the rotor. This will hold the rotor in place for installation of the remaining brake components. Thoroughly spray the new rotor on both sides with brake cleaner to remove the anti-rust oil applied at the factory. Use about half of the can for one rotor. Install the caliper-mounting bracket and tighten the bolts to 34 foot-pounds with a 1/2-inch-drive torque wrench and socket.

    8

    Install new brake pads onto the caliper-mounting bracket. Insert the pad with the metal U-shaped clip on the inboard side of the rotor, so the clip faces upward. Lubricate the outer shim plates on both new pads lightly with caliper grease.

    9

    Pull the caliper guide pins by hand from the rear of the hanging caliper. Lubricate the pins thoroughly with caliper grease, then install them back into the caliper. Remove the caliper from the hanger and set the caliper onto the brake assembly. Install and tighten the caliper bolts to 14 foot-pounds with the torque wrench and a socket. Hold the caliper guide pins with an open-end wrench while you torque the caliper bolts. Install the brake-line bracket onto the strut, and tighten mounting bolt to 21 foot-pounds.

    10

    Repeat steps 2 through 9 to complete the rear rotor replacement on the second side of the Camry. Install the rear wheels and tighten the lug nuts snug with a tire iron. Raise the car off the jack stands, then remove the stands from beneath the car. Lower the Camry to the ground and tighten the rear lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds with the torque wrench and a wheel-nut socket.

    11

    Check and fill the brake fluid reservoir once the car rests on the ground. Install the reservoir lid and tighten it. Sit in the driver's side of the Camry and depress the brake pedal slowly about 2/3 of the way to the floor, then release the pedal to its upright position. Depress the pedal again and release it. If the pedal does not stiffen after three pumps, stop pumping and bleed the rear brakes.

Jumat, 29 Oktober 2010

How to Change Brakes on a 2002 Super Duty

How to Change Brakes on a 2002 Super Duty

The brakes are one of the most important systems in any vehicle. If you hear your brakes squeaking or grinding on your 2002 Ford Super Duty truck, you should replace them. While some trucks have upgraded or unusual brake systems, on most Ford trucks the brakes are easy to replace yourself, which can save you an expensive trip to the dealer or repair shop.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug bolts on the wheel with the truck still on the ground. Jack the vehicle in the air and place it on jack stands. Remove the lug bolts and remove the wheel.

    2

    Remove the single large bolt holding the caliper in place. Once this is removed the caliper will swing back away from the brake rotor.

    3

    Pull the brake pad from the caliper while the caliper is away from the rotor. The old pad may be hard to pull off, so be firm.

    4

    Compress the piston of the caliper so the sides of the caliper move away from the rotor. Place a little of the high-temperature grease on the back of the brake pad and side it in to place on the caliper. Release the caliper and slide the caliper back over the rotor.

    5

    Replace the bolt on the caliper and torque it to spec. The torque on the caliper bolt should be 16 foot-pounds.

    6

    Replace the wheel and hand-tighten the lug bolts. Lower the truck from the jack. Once it is on the ground, you can tighten the lug bolts to the correct torque. The torque will depend on the wheel package on your truck. Consult your owner manual for more details.

Kamis, 28 Oktober 2010

How to Change Brakes in a Chevy Avalanche

How to Change Brakes in a Chevy Avalanche

When driving down the road in your Chevy Avalanche, if you hear a grinding sound as you brake, if your brakes grab and stop abruptly, or if there is a squealing sound while you drive, it may be time for you to change your brake pads. Luckily, the Avalanche comes with all-around disc brakes which are not only reliable but easy to take off and replace. The whole process for all four tires usually takes less than two hours.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen all of the lug nuts -turn counter-clockwise with the tire iron. Do not remove the lug nuts before raising the Chevy Avalanche in the air. Set the wood blocks in front of the front tires.

    2

    Set the floor jack under the rear axle of the Avalanche. Raise the vehicle until the rear tire is two inches from the ground. Set the jack stand under the rear axle. Remove the tire.

    3

    Loosen the bottom bolt in the brake caliper mounting bracket with the socket wrench. Lift the bottom half in the air and tie it to the wheel well with the twine. The mounting bracket is attached to the rotor.

    4

    Pull the brake pads out of the mounting bracket.

    5

    Clamp the movable end of the c-clamp to the cylinder in the center of the mounting bracket and set the stationary end against the back of the mounting bracket. Compress the cylinder until it is flush with the bracket.

    6

    Insert the new brake pads in to the proper slots.

    7

    Bolt the bottom half of the mounting bracket back on to the rotor and put tire back on as well. Lower the truck and tighten all of the lug nuts with the tire iron.

Rabu, 27 Oktober 2010

How to Do a Brake Job on a Ford Focus

How to Do a Brake Job on a Ford Focus

The Ford Focus anti-lock braking system has been designed to exceed governmental safety standards for braking distance. In order to maintain the intended level of braking performance, the Ford Motor Company recommends that you regularly service your braking system every 30,000 miles. Proper maintenance of the braking system includes: replacing worn brake pads, replacing scored or warped rotors, replacing damaged calipers and ensuring that the brake fluid remains at the proper level. A repair shop can maintain your brakes and charge you for labor, or you can do it yourself and save money.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Focus on a flat surface and engage the emergency brake.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels with a lug wrench.

    3

    Lift the Ford with a jack and lower the vehicle onto jack stands. Remove the lug nuts by hand and pull the wheels from the wheel bolts.

    4

    Place a 13 mm wrench onto the caliper slide bolts and rotate them counterclockwise. Remove the two bolts.

    5

    Place a 15 mm socket onto the upper caliper bridge bolt. Connect the ratchet to the socket and remove the bolt. Remove the second (lower) caliper bridge bolt with the socket and ratchet.

    6

    Disconnect the caliper and caliper bridge from the rotor. Twist the fastener that connects the brake line and the caliper to disconnect the brake line. Place a drip pan beneath the brake line to catch any leaking fluid.

    7

    Pull the rotor from the wheel bolts.

    8

    Spray the new rotor with brake cleaner and thoroughly clean the packing oil from all surfaces of the rotor.

    9

    Place the new rotor onto the wheel bolts. Replace the caliper bridge onto the rotor.

    10

    Place the new brake pads onto the sides of the new caliper. The brake pads are held to the caliper by metal clips on the back of each pad.

    11

    Connect the brake line to the new caliper and twist the fastener to tighten the line to the caliper.

    12

    Place the new caliper, with brake pads installed, over the caliper bridge. Screw in the caliper slide bolts by hand then tighten them with the 13 mm wrench.

    13

    Place the wheel and the lug nuts onto the wheel bolts.

    14

    Remove the jack stands and lower the Ford Focus to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    15

    Press the brake pedal slowly and hold it down for 10 seconds. Repeat two more times.

    16

    Lift the hood of the Focus and remove the cap to the master cylinder. Replenish the supply of brake fluid in the container then replace the cap.

Selasa, 26 Oktober 2010

How to Replace Brakes on a 2000 Buick Lesabre

How to Replace Brakes on a 2000 Buick Lesabre

The Buick LeSabre was a full sized automobile produced until 2005. The procedure for changing the brakes on the 2000 model remains virtually the same as on earlier models. With normal wear and tear, the brake pads wear down and must be replace to retain slowing and stopping power. Driving with brake pads that are too badly worn could cause a serious accident. Be sure to purchase new brake pads from a reputable auto parts store.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Remove the cap from the brake fluid reservoir and use the siphon to remove fluid from the reservoir until about 1/3 remains.

    2

    Use the lug wrench to break the lug nuts loose, but do not remove. Place a jack under the frame and lift the car until the tire clears the work surface.

    3

    Using the lug wrench, remove the lug nuts the rest of the way. Pull the tire and rim straight out to remove it from the lugs. Place at least two of the lug nuts back on the lugs to help help the rotor in place.

    4

    Place the stationary end of the C clamp into the caliper bore. This is a hole on the side of the caliper towards the fender. Tighten the screw end of the C clamp until it is snug against the outside brake pad. This will hold the caliper piston in place during removal.

    5

    Find where the brake hose comes into the caliper. There will be a bolt holding the hose in place. Use the wrench to loosen and remove the bolt. Place the line in a safe place with the open end up, or use a piece of plastic to block the fluid.

    6

    Remove the two bolts securing the caliper to the steering knuckle with the socket and ratchet. Remove the calipers from the rotor and slide the old brake pad from the brackets in the caliper.

Installation

    7

    Slide the new brake pad into the brackets on the caliper. Place the caliper back over the rotor and replace the two bolts. Tighten the bolts back into the steering knuckle.

    8

    Replace the hose onto the caliper and secure in place using the bolt removed.

    9

    Remove the lug nuts that were holding the rotor in place. Place the tire and rim back on the lugs, and hand tighten the lug nuts in place. Use the lug wrench to tighten the lug nuts the rest of the way. Lower the jack until the car is back on the ground.

    10

    Fill the brake fluid reservoir to the full line. Place the small hose on the bleeder control valve for the brake you just replaced. This is located on the top of the caliper, and is easily accessible behind the wheel.

    11

    Place the other end of the hose in a small jar and fill with enough brake fluid to submerge the end of the hose. Turn the screw on the opposite end of the bleeder valve from where you attached the hose a 1/2 turn. Have the assistant slowly press the brake pedal to the floor. Close the screw on the valve and then have the assistant release the brake pedal. Repeat this process until air no longer bubbles from the end of the hose in the jar.

    12

    Repeat steps as necessary for the other brake pads.

Senin, 25 Oktober 2010

How to Change the Brake Rotors on a 2007 Chevy 1500

How to Change the Brake Rotors on a 2007 Chevy 1500

The Chevrolet Silverado 1500 was introduced in 1998, replacing the C/K series nameplate. The 2007 Chevrolet 1500 featured a 4.3-liter V-6 engine in the base model. A 4.8-liter V-8, two-versions of a 5.3-liter V-8 and a 6.0-liter V-8 were all upgraded options in the 2007 Chevrolet 1500 series. The rotors on the 2007 Chevrolet 1500 can become thin or pitted over time, depending on the severity of the conditions each driver faces in the truck. When replacing the rotors, always install a new set of brake pads to ensure even braking.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the hood of the truck. Check the brake fluid reservoir. Remove fluid using a turkey baster or hand siphon, until the fluid is about a half inch below the "Full" mark on the reservoir. The fluid will be displaced in your brake lines when you add new rotors and pads, and the reservoir will fill back up.

    2

    Loosen the front lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the front of the truck with a jack. Place jack stands beneath the front sub-frame rails, just inward from the lower control arms. Do not support the truck using the control arms. Remove the front lug nuts then remove the wheels completely from the vehicle.

    3

    Remove the caliper bolts from the rear of the caliper, using a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and a socket. Use pliers to help pull the bolts by the head. Remove the caliper using a small pry bar, if necessary. Hang the caliper from the front coil spring with a metal clothes hanger or rod.

    4

    Remove the caliper bracket bolts from the steering knuckle, using a 1/2-inch drive ratchet and socket. Remove the caliper bracket and the attached brake pads from the steering knuckle. Remove the front rotor from the truck and set it outside your work area.

    5

    Insert one of the old brake pads against the caliper piston, on the inside of the caliper. Place a large C-clamp around the old brake pad and the outside rear of the caliper. Tighten the C-clamp slowly to compress the caliper piston completely into the caliper. Remove the old brake pad and C-clamp when the caliper is compressed.

    6

    Install a new rotor onto the wheel hub of the truck. Spin a lug nut on one of the wheel studs by hand to secure the rotor in place temporarily. Install the caliper bracket over the rotor and onto the steering knuckle. Install and tighten the caliper bracket bolts to 105-foot-pounds of torque, with a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket.

    7

    Install new brake pads into the caliper bracket. There are two types of pads in a set. One type has an "L" shaped metal bracket called a wear indicator. Place the wear indicator pad on the inboard (toward the engine) side of the rotor. Place the non-wear indicator pad on the outboard side of the rotor. Add a thin layer of caliper grease to the metal backing plates on both pads, to eliminate preliminary brake squealing as your pads and rotors are worn in.

    8

    Place the compressed caliper over the new pads and rotor. Dip your caliper bolts directly into the tub of caliper grease, to thoroughly coat them with the grease. These bolts serve a double function in holding the calipers on, as well as being the caliper slide pins. Thorough lubrication will help ensure your new brakes wear evenly. Insert the caliper bolts and tighten them to 74-foot-pounds, using the torque wrench and a socket.

    9

    Repeat Steps 3 through 8 to complete the pad and rotor replacement on the second side of the truck. Double check your torque on all of the caliper bolts and caliper bracket bolts, once you have installed the second brake assembly. Remove the single lug nut which you placed against the face of the rotor.

    10

    Install the front wheels onto the truck. Tighten the lug nuts snug with a tire iron. Raise the truck off of the jack stands, and remove the stands from beneath the truck. Lower the truck to the ground and tighten the front wheel lug nuts to 140-foot-pounds of torque, using the torque wrench and a wheel nut socket.

    11

    Proceed immediately to the driver's seat of the truck. Pump the brake pedal five times consecutively. If the brake pedal goes to the floor of the truck after five pumps of the brakes, stop pumping and bleed the front lines. If the pedal begins to stiffen after five pumps, pump the brakes five to ten more times, to ensure the brake pads set on the new rotors tightly.

Minggu, 24 Oktober 2010

How Long Does it Take to Change Brakes?

Changing the Brakes

    While changing brakes is a common automotive repair, there is no clear cut way to say that it will take "X" amount of time. Labor guides are often used to prepare an estimate for vehicles by reputable repair facilities.
    People fail to realize that calling for quotes over the phone for brake repairs is not a very accurate way to determine the time and price that will be involved in the job. If someone wants to buy the parts and tackle the job on his own, the lack of the proper tools can become an issue, and other variables can impose setbacks and major challenges to the time involved in replacing the brakes. Another person's perception of replacing brakes may not be an acceptable service to another. Taking wheels off, removing calipers, and removing and replacing pads is a typical backyard mechanic's perspective on a brake repair. It may take the backyard mechanic 45 minutes, when the repair facility quoted them two to three hours. When repair facilities quote repairs, there are more variables involved in what is commonly referred to as a "pad-slap." Caliper slides are extracted, cleaned, re-lubricated and then replaced. Rotors are also often machined or replaced when replacing pads, and that's something a backyard mechanic most often disregards. The repair facility most often removes hardware clips that hold the pads in the caliper anchor. A tool is used to grind off the excessive rust and corrosion. Lubricant is applied, the hardware cleaned and then replaced, and then another application of lubricant is put on top of the hardware. The backyard mechanic might squirt a little silicone lubricant that comes in the box with the pads he bought on the surface of the corroded and rusty hardware, or he may disregard it altogether. Although the backyard mechanic may have beaten the time estimate of the repair facility, chances are that he did not perform all the recommended services to the brakes to ensure quality and safety.

Variables

    A stripped lug nut or lug stud when trying to remove a wheel, a seized caliper bolt that snaps under torque, a caliper bolt head that rounds off when trying to remove, a caliper piston that will not budge locking the pads against the rotor(s), caliper bridge bolts seized in the knuckle, a rotor that will not come off the hub, a bleeder screw that snaps off the caliper when trying to bleed the hydraulic braking system, are just the beginning of what can happen during a routine brake repair replacement. The list can go on and on. Variables involve a large part of estimating and then "eating" time when it comes to brake repairs. Geographical regions also apply a degree of challenges to the mix. Areas that endure severe winters are most likely going to show the effects of rust and corrosion to components exposed to the elements more than to vehicles that are used in more temperate climates.

Flat Rate Labor Time

    Labor guides such as Chilton's or ALLDATA are used to apply "flat-rate" labor charges in the automotive industry for two reasons: to protect the customer and the repair facility. While this may sound contradictory in terms, review a couple of different scenarios of the same brake repair: Technician "A" inspects the car and gives a quote for replacing brake pads, servicing the calipers and machining the rotors; 1.3 hours of labor is applied to replacing the pads and servicing the calipers, while an additional hour is applied for machining each rotor. That's 2.3 hours to replace the pads and machine the rotors. This time is then applied to the shop's hourly labor rate. If the labor rate is $80 and hour, that's $184 of labor plus the price of the parts. The technician completes the job in just over an hour. While the customer may feel that she just got ripped off, she fails to realize that repair facilities are not non-profit organizations. The technician is not making $80 an hour--the shop is. The technician most likely has years of qualified experience, knows how to manage his time,and has the necessary tools to do the job right. Now take the exact same scenario, but this time with Technician B. The exact same quote and repair for the brake repair takes Technician B four hours to complete. The technician may not be as skilled, may not have the necessary tools and therefore has to improvise, or may simply work more slowly. A reputable repair facility will still apply the 2.3-hours quoted to you from the original estimate.
    Some shops apply "real-time" hourly rates and may offer significantly less hourly labor charges. The problem there is that you may be paying for the four hours it took technician "B" to do the job that technician "A" had done in just over an hour.

Jumat, 22 Oktober 2010

How to Eliminate Brake Squealing

How to Eliminate Brake Squealing

Brake squeal by itself is not a serious problem, but it can be symptomatic of a problem that, if left unattended, could develop into a much larger issue. Squealing brakes are also annoying for the driver, the vehicle passengers, and any nearby pedestrians. Diagnosing the brake squeal is the first step in eliminating the underlying cause.

Instructions

    1

    Determine if the brake noise is constant or only audible when the brakes are applied. Identify if the noise has always been there or has slowly developed over time. Consider if the noise started suddenly and, if so, whether it was after a brake servicing. Make a list of everything you know about the problem to help in the diagnosis.

    2

    Wait for new pads and shoes to wear in. If the brakes have been recently serviced it will take about 300 to 400 miles of city driving before any new pads and shoes wear in with the rotors, and a tolerable amount of noise during this period is not unexpected. If the squeal does not go away during this period, it is possible that the problem lies in the brake pad or shoe linings. Some linings are made with harder material than others, and brake squeal is elevated when harder linings are used. Replacing the pads or shoes with ones that have a softer lining material may make the noise go away.

    3

    Check disc brake pads to see if they are fitted with soft noise-dampening shims. Lower cost pads often come with lower quality shims, and if these are replaced with high quality shims the squeal will often be reduced or eliminated. If no shims are present then installing high quality shims will likely resolve the issue.

    4

    Check that disc brake pads are not worn out. Many pads incorporate a looped metal leaf wear indicator that will rub on the disc when the pad reaches minimum thickness. This produces a loud metallic squeal to audibly warn the driver that the pads are nearly worn out. Wear indicators are normally found on the inside pads only. Replacing worn-out pads will solve this problem.

    5

    Inspect the pad and shoe linings to see if they are damaged or unevenly worn. Uneven lining wear can result in uneven pressure against the rotor, sometimes causing a squeal during braking. For disc brakes this is normally the result of a seized caliper. In this case, the caliper guide bolts should be thoroughly lubricated and new disc pads installed. On drum brakes this normally means that the shoe hold-down pins are bent or damaged, in which case the brake should be fitted with new shoes and hold-down pins.

    6

    Examine the parking brake. If there is a continuous faint squeaking or squealing from one or both of the rear wheels while the car is moving, and the sound disappears when the brakes are applied, then it is possible that the parking brake is stuck in a partially applied position. Check for proper operation of the parking brake handle or pedal and be sure that it is releasing properly. Check the cable at either the handle or pedal end in the passenger compartment and at the brake end at the rear wheels and look for signs of rust or corrosion. Corroded cables should be replaced.

Selasa, 19 Oktober 2010

About Car Reupholstering

Car reupholstering includes the full replacement and/or repair of the seats and cushions inside a vehicle. With time, the fabrics, springs and stuffing of these seats can take considerable wear and tear. Though there are sometimes inexpensive ways to cover up smaller amounts of wear, reupholstery is a fine way to restore a car to its original condition, or even improve on its factory state.

Contracting

    When it comes time to reupholster a car, most people will look to professionals. It won't be difficult to find someone, no matter what type of area you live in. There are two excellent places to start when on the hunt for a good car reupholstering business. First is the dealership. It often farms out its car reupholstering to outside agencies, and will know at least one good contractor to recommend. If you don't have any luck there, try a local car audio specialist. These places will often include car reupholstering in their services and will farm out this work to outside businesses. If not, maybe they can refer you to someone who can do the work.

DIY

    The second option is to do it yourself. With some instructions from the Internet (eHow offers several articles that cover the basics of car reupholstering), replacing the fabric of your car seats can be less difficult and expensive than one might think. Of course, if you choose to go this route, make sure you understand the breadth of the job before you begin. It will make things go much more smoothly to have all of the materials in place ahead of time. This also prevents your car from being out of commission longer than necessary.

Cost

    The cost of reupholstering a car can run the gamut. If taking the car to a professional, the cost usually will be somewhere in the $1,000 range if the car is a common model. This price can go higher due to several factors. One is the size of the car. A minivan will obviously cost more to reupholster than a small Hyundai. The rarity of the model is also a price factor. If you are trying to get a 1967 Ferrari reupholstered, you can expect to pay as much as $5,000. If doing it yourself, it will all depend on how much fabric you need and how picky you are about matching the fabric to the original. Fabric can run from $5 a yard to $75 a yard. With a good eye and color matching, however, a do-it-yourselfer can save a lot of money.

Considerations

    There are a variety of ways in which to reupholster a car, but one of the most popular methods is to switch out fabric upholstery with leather. There are a number of benefits from this. For one thing, leather upholstery can add $1,000 to the resale price of a car. Leather is soft and supple, and to many people it screams luxury. Also, leather is highly stain resistant and is less apt to soak up smells and moisture that accumulate over the life of the car. If leather is too expensive, many people are happy to go with a vinyl treatment, which looks and acts quite a bit like genuine leather but is far less costly.

Dashboard

    Over time, the dashboard of a vehicle can begin to wear through, crack and generally look terrible. But there are a number of ways to restore luster and life to the dashboard without replacing it from scratch. Many auto shops offer spray cans of vinyl paint, which can be easily color matched and used to fill in scratches, restore shine and protect dashboard vinyl from further wear. Custom auto shops also offer replacement dials for the speedometer, fuel indicator and various other gauges. Some of these replacement dials can really change the look of a car, so it might be worth a thought if you plan an overhaul.

Ford F-250 Front Brake Rotor Removal

You can access and detach the front brake rotors on your Ford F-250 by removing the tire/wheel assembly. You should take the necessary precautions, however, to avoid damaging the brake caliper. Also, if you are installing a new rotor, make sure you have the correct replacement, especially if you have a 2005 model; Ford delivered two designs for the brake rotor and pads for this model.

Removing the Rotor

    Remove at least half of the brake fluid from the brake master cylinder, using a hand siphon pump. This will prevent spilling the fluid when you are taking the brake caliper off the rotor. Place the brake cylinder lid on top, but do not replace it yet. Then place some shop rags underneath the master cylinder in case some of the fluid spills over.

    After you have raised the truck and removed the tire/wheel assembly with the rotor you must replace, place a large C-clamp over the brake caliper so that the back end of the tool touches the back of the caliper and the screwing bolt rests against the back of the front brake pad. Now thread in the C-clamp screw to force the caliper piston into its bore. This will let you easily remove and reinstall the caliper and brake pads after servicing the rotor.

    Unfasten the brake caliper and secure it to the coil spring with a wire. Do not let the caliper hang loose, or it will damage the rubber brake hose attached to it. If you plan to use the same rotor, match-mark it to one or more of the wheel studs so that you reinstall it in the same position. Then you can remove the rotor.

    Use 80-grit sand paper to thoroughly clean the wheel-bearing flange and the brake rotor mating surfaces from rust and debris to prevent rotor run-out and brake pulsation (see Resources for more information).

    When ready, install the rotor on the wheel hub. If you are reinstalling the same rotor, use the match marks to mount the unit in the position it was in before removal. Then reinstall the brake caliper and tire/wheel assembly and refill the brake master cylinder.

Burnishing the Rotor

    Use this procedure only if you have replaced or resurfaced the rotor or installed new brake pads on the front of your Ford F-250. The system will transfer brake pad material on the surface of the rotor for better brake performance.

    Choose a road with very low or no traffic if possible. Then accelerate your pickup to 30 mph, and lightly depress the brake pedals so that the brake pad drags against the surface of the rotor. When coming to a stop, allow a couple of minutes for the brake pads and rotor to cool down. Repeat the process at least 20 times. After finishing, your brake pads and rotor will have been burnished.

How to Replace Front Rotors on the 2000 Explorer

How to Replace Front Rotors on the 2000 Explorer

The front brakes on the 2000 Ford Explorer provide the bulk of the vehicle's stopping power. Reliable braking depends on good brake pads and smooth, flat rotors. If your Explorer shudders, pulls to one side or makes strange noises while braking, it may be time to replace the rotors. Brake rotors are inexpensive and you can replace them in a driveway or garage using basic hand tools.

Instructions

Preparation

    1

    Park the Explorer on a flat surface, preferably on concrete or asphalt. Engage the parking brake and securely chock the rear wheels. Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheel/tire assemblies with a lug wrench to make removal easier once the wheels are in the air. Jack up the front of the Explorer and support the vehicle using jack stands under the front cross member. Do not rely on the jack to support the vehicle during repairs.

    2

    Finish removing the lug nuts and remove the wheel/tire assemblies from the vehicle. Using the socket wrench or breaker bar, remove the two bolts holding the brake caliper to the anchor plate. Remove the brake caliper from the rotor and secure it out of the way with a piece of wire. Be careful not to kink or otherwise damage the brake line.

    3

    Continue the repair by following the steps in the section following that pertains to your vehicle. The preparation steps are the same for 4X4 and 4X2 Explorers, however, the steps for removing and replacing the brake rotors are significantly different.

Explorer 4X4

    4

    Remove the brake caliper to free the brake rotor for removal. If the brake rotor does not pull off easily, spray penetrating oil around the threaded studs and in any areas where the rotor contacts the hub. Allow the penetrating oil to soak in for 20 minutes and then try to tap the rotor loose with the hammer. It may be necessary to repeat this step several times to remove a severely corroded rotor.

    5

    Clean the new rotor thoroughly with brake cleaner to remove any dirt and shipping oil. Align the holes in the new brake rotor with the threaded studs on the hub and push the rotor firmly onto the hub.

    6

    Place the caliper on the new rotor and reinstall the two mounting bolts through the anchor plate. Use the torque wrench to tighten the bolts to between 72 and 97 foot-pounds. Repeat steps 1 and 2 on the other front wheel. Align the holes in the front wheel/tire assemblies with the threaded studs on the hub and push the assembly onto the hub. Screw the lug nuts onto the threaded studs and tighten them to 100 foot-pounds. Raise the vehicle off the jack stands with the jack, remove the stands and lower the vehicle to the ground.

Explorer 4X2

    7

    Remove the grease cap in the center of the rotor. Use pliers to remove the cotter pin from the nut retainer then remove the nut retainer. Use a socket wrench or breaker bar to remove the spindle nut located in the center of the rotor. Remove the outer wheel bearing washer and the outer bearing. Pull the brake rotor off the spindle. Remove the hub grease seal and inner wheel bearing from the back of the rotor.

    8

    Clean the wheel bearings thoroughly with brake cleaner and examine them for damage or excessive wear. Replace any bearings that appear damaged with new ones.

    9

    Coat the wheel bearings with high-temperature bearing grease; use the palm of your hand to work grease into all parts of the bearing. Install the inner bearing in the back of the new rotor and install a new grease seal to hold it in place. Slide the rotor onto the spindle and slide the outer bearing over the spindle and into the center of the rotor. Reinstall the outer bearing washer and spindle nut.

    10

    Use a torque wrench to tighten the spindle nut to between 17 and 24 foot-pounds while turning the brake rotor by hand. Continue turning the rotor and loosen the spindle nut until the rotor turns freely, then tighten the spindle nut to 17 inch-pounds. Place the nut retainer over the spindle nut and push the cotter pin through the hole in the spindle; bend the ends of the cotter pin back until they are flat against the spindle nut. Replace the hub grease cap. Thoroughly clean the rotor with brake cleaner to remove any dirt or shipping oil.

    11

    Place the caliper on the new rotor and reinstall the two mounting bolts through the anchor plate. Use the torque wrench to tighten the bolts to between 72 and 97 foot-pounds. Repeat steps 1 and 2 on the other front wheel. Align the holes in the front wheel/tire assemblies with the threaded studs on the hub and push the assembly onto the hub. Screw the lug nuts onto the threaded studs and tighten them to 100 foot-pounds. Raise the vehicle off the jack stands with the jack, remove the stands and lower the vehicle to the ground.

Senin, 18 Oktober 2010

How to Replace Brake Rotors in a 2000 4-Runner

How to Replace Brake Rotors in a 2000 4-Runner

The 2000 Toyota 4Runner comes equipped with an anti-lock braking system that is reliant upon properly functioning brake rotors. The rotors can become damaged as a result of failing to promptly replace worn brake pads. Scored brake rotors will cause the brakes to perform poorly (slower response, greater stopping distance). They will also wear brake pads at a faster rate. Replace damaged rotors to ensure consistent braking and to protect the brake pads from premature wear.

Instructions

    1

    Place tire blocks behind the 4Runner's rear tires.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels of the Toyota with the lug wrench.

    3

    Place the lifting jack beneath the axle in the front of the vehicle. Lift the front end of the Toyota and place jack stands beneath the frame for support.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts on the front wheels and take the front wheels off the 4Runner.

    5

    Turn the steering wheel to the left.

    6

    Remove the caliper bolts on the front right brake with the 13 mm wrench. Lift the caliper from the caliper bracket and rest it on top of the steering arm above the Toyota's front brake assembly.

    7

    Remove the caliper bracket bolts with a 15 mm wrench. Remove the bracket from the rotor.

    8

    Slide the rotor off the wheel bolts. Use a dead blow mallet to strike the raised center section of the rotor (called the top-hat section) if the disc will not easily slide from the steering knuckle.

    9

    Clean the area behind the rotor with a wire brush. Rust and leaked brake fluid can build behind the brakes.

    10

    Clean the new rotor with brake cleaner and a cloth towel, then slide it onto the wheel bolts. The top-hat section should face outward when the rotor is on the 4Runner.

    11

    Replace the caliper bracket and bolts to the rotor.

    12

    Place the caliper back onto the caliper bracket and screw on the caliper bolts with the 13 mm wrench.

    13

    Turn the steering wheel to the right and repeat the process for the left brake rotors.

    14

    Turn the steering wheel so that the front wheels are neutral (facing forward). Place the wheels back onto the wheel bolts and screw on the lug nuts.

    15

    Lift the front end of the 4Runner and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    16

    Place the tire blocks in front of the front tires.

    17

    Repeat the entire process for the rear rotors save for the turning of the steering wheel. You will not be able to angle the rear wheels to more easily access the caliper and caliper bracket bolts.

Minggu, 17 Oktober 2010

How to Compress Rear Brake Calipers on a 2004 Mazda3

How to Compress Rear Brake Calipers on a 2004 Mazda3

The 2004 Mazda 3 came standard with two-wheel anti-lock brakes. Four-wheel anti-lock brakes were an option for the 2004 Mazda 3. The rear calipers in the Mazda 3 have rotating pistons, which require rotation while compressing the piston. The tools needed for this project are available at most auto parts stores.

Instructions

    1

    Install a caliper compression tool on the end of a ratchet extension. Use a 3/8-ratchet and extension for this process.

    2

    Align the points on the compression tool with the brake caliper piston.

    3

    Rotate the ratchet clockwise or counterclockwise, depending on which side of the vehicle you are on, while simultaneously applying pressure onto the caliper piston. Mazda rear calipers rotate in opposite directions on either side of the vehicle. When compressing the driver's side rear caliper, you are going to turn clockwise. When compressing the passenger side rear caliper you are going to turn the ratchet and tool counterclockwise. Turning the caliper piston while applying pressure will cause the caliper piston to retract into the caliper.

About Car Brake Parts?

About Car Brake Parts?

It is essential to keep car brake parts in good working order so you do not get into an accident. It is extremely import to keep the brake system maintained because failure leads to dire consequences. There are many elements to a brake system, and they should be checked every four to six months.

Function

    The various parts of the brake system work together to slow down and stop the vehicle. If one of the pieces is faulty, the entire braking system may fail. The system includes an emergency brake, which is meant to hold the car in place, not to stop or slow it down.

Warning

    Disc Brakes - Caliper, Rotor and Brake Pads (Wikimedia Commons)

    In time, certain parts of a brake system wear out from normal use. Brake pads and shoes wear out faster than the rest of the system. If not replaced, these parts can cause damage to the rest of the brake system.

Types

    Drum Brakes - Drum and Shoes (Wikimedia Commons)

    The brake system consists of the brake pedal, the master cylinder, brake hoses, ABS (anti-lock braking system) computer, brake sensors, pads, shoes, calipers, drums, wheel cylinders, a power booster and rotors. Depending on the year, make and model of the vehicle, it may contain all or some of these parts. Cars that do not have ABS brakes do not have an ABS computer or brake sensors. Some cars have pads and calipers on the front and rear; others have pads and calipers on the front and shoes and drums on the rear. All cars have a master cylinder, brake hoses, and some combination of pads, calipers, shoes and drums.

Features

    An ABS system uses sensors and an computer. The system senses when a wheel locks up and releases the brakes on that wheel, then engages the brakes again. It will release and engage as long as it senses the wheel is locking up. A locked wheel can cause a car to go into a skid and spin out of control.

    Brake pads and calipers work with brake rotors. When the driver steps on the brake pedal, the master cylinder pushes brake fluid through the lines to the calipers. The calipers push the brake pads against the rotor, which creates friction and slows the car down. Wheel cylinders work with shoes and drums. When the brake pedal is pushed, fluid travels through the brake lines, engaging the wheel cylinders, which then press the shoes against the drum to slow the car's speed.

    A power booster is what gives you power brakes. Without the power booster, the driver would have to press on the brake pedal very hard to get any response. The power booster helps push the fluid through the lines so the driver does not have to put all of his weight into the brake pedal.

Considerations

    Check your brakes regularly. The pads and shoes wear out from the friction. Once they wear down to the metal, the metal scrapes the rotors or drums and wears them down. It can also cause the calipers or wheel cylinders to over-extend. Once they over-extend, they will need to be replaced, as they tend to stick in one position (open or closed). If the calipers stick closed, they can hold the backing of the brake pad against the rotor, which can grind a large groove into the rotor. The rotor needs to be smooth in order for it to work efficiently.

Jumat, 15 Oktober 2010

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Plymouth Voyager

The Plymouth Voyager, like many vehicles, always has disc brakes in the front of the vehicle. However, the rear braking system is either disc or drum brakes. If your Voyager has disc brakes in the rear, read further to learn how to replace them in a couple of hours or less.

Instructions

    1

    Drain half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir. Use a suction gun or syringe to siphon out the brake fluid. Empty it into an approved sealed container and discard of it properly.

    2

    Lift the vehicle from the ground with a car jack. Use jack stands to support it on all sides to keep it from tipping. Keep kids away while replacing the rear disc brakes to prevent any accidents.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts of the wheel assemblies with a torque wrench. Remove the wheels and set them aside, face up, to prevent damage.

    4

    Disconnect and remove the brake caliper assembly. Secure the caliper to the frame of the voyager with mechanical wire, but be sure to not hang it from the brake hose as the weight may cause the hose to break.

    5

    Retreat the caliper piston into the bore with a C-clamp. Protect the piston by placing a wood block between it and the C-clamp. Remove the C-clamp after you fully compress the piston.

    6

    Remove the inboard and outboard brake pads. Install the new inboard brake pads, making sure they sit against the piston. Slide the outboard brake pads onto the caliper assembly and install it in place.

    7

    Replace the wheel assemblies on the Voyager. Torque the lug nuts to 95 feet/pounds and then lower the vehicle to the ground. Pump the brakes to seat the pistons after you replace the brakes.

Instructions for Replacing a Brake Shoe

Brake shoes are much more difficult to replace than brake pads. Used mainly on rear wheels, drum brakes use shoes that work with the parking brake and are part of an assembly that uses multiple springs and levers. The exact setup and how you remove and install the shoes can vary slightly on a particular model. Check with your mechanic before working on your vehicle's brakes.

Instructions

Removing Brake Shoes

    1

    Raise the rear end of the car and support it on jack stands, then remove both of the rear wheels.

    2

    Mark the brake drum's relationship to the hub with washable paint or chalk to make sure its dynamic balance isn't altered upon reinstallation. Slip the drum's front end off the studs.

    3

    Clean the rear brake assembly with brake cleaner spray, using a drain pan to catch the residue.

    4

    Disconnect the actuator spring, which is near the top of the brake assembly, on the adjuster lever at the rear shoe using needle-nose pliers. Remove the retractor spring near the bottom of the assembly from the shoes.

    5

    Remove the rear shoe (which is connected to the adjuster lever), the adjuster screw assembly from the top and then the front shoe.

    6

    Disconnect the parking brake lever from the old rear shoe and remove the adjuster lever from the shoe.

Installing Brake Shoes

    7

    Lubricate the brake drum's backing plates with high-temperature brake grease at the areas where the shoes come in contact. Lubricate the adjuster screw assembly's threads and socket end.

    8

    Install the new rear shoe by connecting it to the parking brake lever, placing it on the backing plate and connecting the retractor spring to its hole. Install the adjuster screw assembly and adjuster lever to the shoe.

    9

    Place the new front shoe on the backing plate, making sure it engages with the adjuster screw assembly, and connect the retractor spring to the shoe with the pliers.

    10

    Connect the actuator spring to the front shoe and stretch it with the pliers to connect with the adjuster lever.

    11

    Install the brake drum back onto the studs.

    12

    Adjust the brake shoes by using a screwdriver to turn the star wheel--the star wheel is usually inside a hole on the assembly with a rubber plug you must remove. Turn the wheel until the shoes drag against the drum as it rotates, then turn it the other way just enough for the drum to turn freely.

Rabu, 13 Oktober 2010

How to Change the Front Brake Pads on a Ford ZX2

How to Change the Front Brake Pads on a Ford ZX2

The Ford ZX2 (also known as the Escort ZX2) replaced the Ford Probe in 1998 as the sporty coupe geared towards the younger generation. It remained on the Ford/Mazda chassis, and replacing the front brake pads in the ZX2 employed the same procedure as the regular Escort. The unique feature in the Ford Escort ZX2 (and other Escorts) was that if you were just replacing the front brake pads and not the rotors, unlike a lot of other vehicles on the road at the time, you didn't have to remove the calipers in order to do the service.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood and remove half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir using a brake fluid suction pump. Discard the old fluid.

    2

    Apply the parking brake on the Escort. Make sure the vehicle is parked on a hard, flat surface suitable for lifting and supporting the vehicle.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels 1/4 turn with the lug nut wrench.

    4

    Use the lifting jack to lift one side first then support the Escort onto a jack stand placed under the front frame rail. If desired, lift the other side as well, or you can just do one side at a time.

    5

    Remove the lug nuts then remove the wheel. Set the wheel and lug nuts out of the work area.

    6

    Disconnect the top brake pad W-spring by pulling it out from the center holes of the pad backing plates on both sides. Disconnect the bottom brake pad M-spring in the same manner.

    7

    Remove the top and bottom pad retaining pins. Use a hammer and small punch to dislodge and loosen them if necessary. Once removed, the W- and M-springs will fall out. Be careful not to damage them.

    8

    Use a screwdriver to dislodge the pads from the caliper if necessary. Extract both pads.

    9

    Use a 12-inch pair of channel locks to compress the caliper piston inward until it's fully seated and even with the surface of the caliper.

    10

    Install the replacement shims onto the backing plates of the new pads then apply some anti-squeal compound onto the surface of the shims. Insert the pads respectively, inboard and outboard, on both sides of the rotor.

    11

    Grab the top pad retaining pin and insert it into the hole of the caliper housing, then into the top W-spring and through the top hole of the pad backing plate. Push it toward the inboard pad backing plate hole, then through the W-clip and finally through the inboard caliper housing. Lock the clip into place with the center pad backing plate holes. Do the same thing with the bottom retaining pin and M-spring.

    12

    Replace the wheels and lug nuts and tighten snugly. Once you've lifted the vehicle slightly with the jack and removed the jack stand, retighten the lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. Repeat the procedure for the other side.

    13

    Ensure that the master cylinder cap is secure then pump the foot brake pedal several times to seat the pads to the rotors and verify that the brake pedal feels firm.

    14

    Add brake fluid to the master cylinder to the top/full line stamped on the side of the cylinder housing. Release the parking brake then test-drive for proper braking operation.

Selasa, 12 Oktober 2010

How to Replace the Brakes on a 2000 Pontiac Grand Am

How to Replace the Brakes on a 2000 Pontiac Grand Am

The brake pads on the 2000 Pontiac Grand Am are designed to stop the car by applying friction to the brake rotors as they are turning. The pads are enclosed inside of the brake caliper. When the brake pedal is pushed in, the cylinder inside of the brake caliper pushes the outer brake pad against the facing of the rotor. This, in turn, pulls the inner brake pad against the inner facing of the rotor. The friction of the pads sliding against the rotors is the process that stops the Grand Am.

Instructions

    1

    Park your 2000 Pontiac Grand Am in a safe working location on a level surface. Set the emergency brake and open the hood.

    2

    Remove the lid from the brake fluid reservoir. Insert the tube of a brake fluid syringe into the brake fluid and suck out a syringe full of brake fluid. Put the lid back on the reservoir and lower the hood.

    3

    Loosen each of the lug nuts from the front wheels by turning the lug nuts counterclockwise about 1/4 of a turn with a tire tool. Do not remove the lug nuts.

    4

    Slide a floor jack under the front end of your 2000 Pontiac Grand Am and position the jack under a jacking point. Raise the Grand Am high enough for the jack stands to fit under the car. Position the jack stands underneath the frame rail on both sides of the car. Lower the Grand Am to the top of the stands. As soon as the weight of the car is on the stands, stop the jack and leave it in the upright position.

    5

    Remove all of the lug nuts from the front wheels and pull the wheels off of the wheel hubs.

    6

    Move to the front driver's side wheel and locate the guide pin bolts on the back of the brake caliper. The caliper has a lower and an upper guide pin bolt. Remove the bolts from the back of the caliper with the ratchet and a 1/2-inch socket.

    7

    Locate the access hole on the side of the brake caliper. Slide a pry bar into the access hole between the brake rotor and the outer brake pad. Pry against the outer brake pad until the cylinder retracts into the caliper enough to loosen the caliper from the rotor. Remove the pry bar.

    8

    Pull the brake caliper off of the brake rotor by hand. If the rotor is stuck, pry the top and bottom of the caliper with the pry bar. Hang the brake caliper on of the steering components behind the wheel hub plate with a piece of rope.

    9

    Pull the outer pad out of the retaining clip inside of the caliper. Then position a 6-inch C-clamp into the caliper with the adjustment bolt facing the outer brake pad. Turn the C-clamp handle clockwise to push the outer brake pad against the caliper cylinder. When the cylinder is fully retracted into the caliper, unscrew and remove the C-clamp. Then pull the outer brake pad out of the other retaining clip.

    10

    Inspect the brake rotor for wear and grooves. If the rotor has minimal wear or grooves, take the rotor to a machine shop or an auto repair facility to have the rotor turned. If the rotor has excessive wear or grooves, replace the brake rotor.

    11

    Position the two new brake pads into both retaining clips inside of the caliper. Remove the rope from the caliper and slide the caliper back over the side of the rotor. Secure the caliper with the two guide pin bolts and tighten it with the ratchet and socket. Position the wheel back onto the hub along with the lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts with the tire tool until the wheel turns.

    12

    Move to the other front wheel and repeat the same steps for replacing the brake pads. After the brake pads have been replaced, jack your 2000 Pontiac Grand Am back up and slide the stands out from the bottom of the frame rails. Then lower the Grand Am and remove the floor jack.

    13

    Open the hood and remove the brake fluid reservoir lid. Squirt the brake fluid back into the reservoir from the syringe and put the lid back on. Then close the hood.

    14

    Crank your 2000 Pontiac Grand Am and pump the brake pedal in and out five or six times to properly seat the brake pads to the brake rotors. Then drive the Grand Am around to test the brake pads.

How to Adjust the Rear Brake Shoes on a Ford ZX2

If you are like many drivers, you don't use your parking brake on a regular basis. The rear drum brake system, on the Ford Escort ZX2, comes equipped with a self adjuster mechanism that helps keep the brakes adjusted when the parking brake is applied. Over time, the rear brakes will become mis-adjusted, and no amount of parking brake application will correct the problem. So, if you are experiencing the low brake pedal blues, a simple rear brake adjustment may be all that is needed to restore the feel and function of the rear brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Position the wheel chocks behind the front wheels, and lift the rear wheels using the floor jack. Place jack stands under the rear sub-frame, and lower the ZX2 onto the jack stands. Remove the rear wheels by removing the lug-nuts with the lug-wrench. Place the wheels and lug-nuts out of the work area.

    2

    Release the parking brake and remove the rear drum. If the drum is difficult to remove because of rust, a few blows with a hammer will break them loose enough to slide off the rear hub. Using a brake adjusting gauge, measure the inside of the rear drum and tighten the thumb screw on the tool. Compare the drum measurement to the outside measurement of the rear shoes by sliding the brake adjusting gauge over the shoes. Move the knurled quadrant adjuster located on the parking brake equalizer bar until the shoe diameter and drum diameter match.

    3

    Reinstall the drums over the rear shoes, and reinstall the rear wheels. Lift the car off the jack stands and remove the stands from under the car. Slowly lower the floor jack until the car is on the ground. Make the final adjustment by performing several hard stops alternating forward and reverse.

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Honda Accord

Replace your Honda Accord's rear disc brakes easily with the basic tools you can find in the average person's toolbox. The only special item needed to replace the Accord's brakes is a specific assembly paste, part number o8798-9010, which you can buy at the Honda dealership.

Instructions

    1

    Drain at least half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir with a syringe or suction gun. Discard the brake fluid in an approved, sealed container.

    2

    Engage the parking brake and lift the rear of the Honda Accord from the ground with a car jack. Support it safely on all sides with jack stands when you service the vehicle to replace the brakes.

    3

    Remove the rear tires by loosening the lug nuts with a torque wrench. Take off the tires and set them aside. Release the parking brake.

    4

    Unscrew the caliper bolts and take the caliper off the caliper bracket. Slide out the pad shims and brake pads. Disconnect the pad retainers and verify that the caliper pins move freely.

    5

    Rub a thin coat of M-77 assembly paste, part number o8798-9010, to the side of the shims that attach to the brake pads. Apply the same paste to the back of the brake pads, making sure to wipe off any excess. Attach the shims to the brake pads.

    6

    Turn the caliper piston clockwise to retreat it into the cylinder. Line up the groove on the piston with the tab on the inner pad, allowing the caliper to fasten to the brake pad. Apply lubrication to the piston boot.

    7

    Fasten the new pad retainers to the caliper bracket. Install the pad assembly, and then attach the caliper bracket to the caliper. Lower the vehicle and pump the brakes to seat the brake pads.

Senin, 11 Oktober 2010

How to Remove Brake Calipers on Car Wheels

Disc brakes utilize a heavy disc, called a rotor. The disc is bolted to the wheel hub and the brake caliper surrounds the disc. The brake caliper is attached to the wheel spindle assembly. Brake fluid pressure from the master cylinder causes the caliper piston to move toward the disc. The seal around the piston moves sideways forcing the brake pads into the rotating disc. When brake fluid pressure decreases, the piston seal pulls the caliper piston away from the disc.Over time, the piston seals become rigid and fail to push the caliper pistons into the disc or pull the piston back when pressure is released. The driver will experience longer stopping distance and hear scraping noises coming from the affected caliper. Once you determine the caliper is not functioning properly, take the steps that follow to remove the defective part.

Instructions

    1

    Use a large flat tip screwdriver to remove the hub cap exposing the lug nuts. Use an impact wrench and socket or lug wrench to loosen all lug nuts on the wheel you are working on. Make sure you use the wheel lock fitting to remove the lug nut with the wheel lock.

    2

    Block the wheels opposite the ones you are working on. Use a hydraulic jack to raise the car up far enough to position jack stands at the jacking points. Use the service manual for your year model vehicle to locate the jacking points.

    3

    Let the hydraulic jack down a little at a time, once the jack stands are set under the vehicle, making sure the vehicle sits down on the jacks squarely. Remove the jack and move it out of your way.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts by hand or with your lug wrench. Put all the lug nuts and the wheel lock key in the hub cap to prevent losing them. Pull the tire free from the wheel hub and move out of your way.

    5

    Use a creeper to move under the car next to the wheel hub. Locate the caliper bolts (two) and spray WD-40 on the bolts. Allow the WD-40 to soak into the bolt threads for about 15 minutes.

    6

    Position the drip pan under the wheel hub. Use your line wrench and open end box end wrench to disconnect the flexible brake hose from the fitting on the caliper and brake line. Use the open end box end wrench to hold pressure on the hose and the line wrench to loosen the connection to the caliper. Do not twist the brake hose or let the caliper hang by the hose. This will cause damage to the hose and leaks later on.

    7

    Use your impact wrench or breaker bar and 12-point socket to loosen the caliper mount bolts. Keep one hand on the caliper (to prevent the caliper from hitting the floor). Use the other hand to unscrew the bolts. (Put them in the hub cap with the other hardware.) The caliper will now be free to remove. Observe how the break pads are installed in the caliper. This will make installation of the new parts easier.

How to Install Shims for Front Brake Pads

How to Install Shims for Front Brake Pads

Most automobiles today have front and rear disc brakes. Disc brakes are more reliable and more effective than drum brakes, making them a natural choice for safety-conscious motorists. Disc brakes sometimes generate high-pitched vibrations that result in annoying brake squeal. Adding soft, vibration-absorbing shims to the back of disc brake pads is an effective means of stopping brake squeal. This task is well within the capabilities of the novice mechanic.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a firm and level surface. Put a automatic transmission in park or a manual transmission in first or reverse gear. Set the parking. Slightly loosen the lug nuts; jack the vehicle and securely support it on a jack stand. Finish removing the lug nuts and pull off the wheel.

    2

    Remove the two caliper-guide-rod bolts. Firmly grip the caliper and roll it back and forth a few times to spread the brake pads slightly. Pull the caliper off the disc and suspend it out of the way on a wire hook or a bungee cord. Be very careful to not kink or stretch the flexible brake line.

    3

    Remove any retaining clips that hold the brake pads in the caliper; slide the brake pads out from the caliper. Shims on the backs of the pads should be removed.

    4

    Retract the caliper piston with a brake-piston retractor. Place the retractor's spindle-swivel on the piston face; place the retractor's metal plate on the inner surface of the outer caliper frame opposite the piston. Tighten the spindle to force the piston back into the cylinder bore. Be careful not to damage the rubber piston-boot seals.

    5

    Apply the shim to the back of the brake pad. Most shims are self-adhesive. Remove the protective paper from the shim's adhesive surface and press firmly onto the back of the pad. The shim should be placed so that the piston contacts the middle of the shim. The shim should not extend beyond the edge of the pad or it will interfere with the pad movement in the caliper. Follow the shim manufacturer's instructions. Apply shims to both pads.

    6

    Reassemble the brake by following the same procedure in reverse order. Lubricate the caliper-guide-rod bolts with brake grease before reinserting them into the caliper mounts. Start the vehicle and test the brake operation. Replace the wheel and lower the vehicle.

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 1996 Acura

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 1996 Acura

There were five Acura models available in 1996. While the Integra was one of the most popular models, the NSX, the RL, the SLX and the TL were also available in coupes and sedans. The different models employed different types of brake pads; however, the procedure to change the brake pads remained standardized. Some of these models also featured rear disc brake pads (instead of drum brakes, which use brake shoes to provide braking power). Brake pads need to be changed periodically to ensure the proper functioning of the vehicle's braking system.

Instructions

    1

    Use the clean siphon to remove approximately half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder. Replace the cover to the master cylinder and then discard the old brake fluid.

    2

    Apply the parking brake (if replacing the front pads, but do not apply it if you're replacing the rear pads) and then place a tire block behind one of the rear tires (or in front of one of the front tires, if you're replacing rear brake pads).

    3

    Use the lug wrench to turn the lug nuts on the wheels on which you are working to replace the brake pads (turn them a half turn counterclockwise).

    4

    Lift the axle on which you are working to replace the brake pads with a service jack, then place the the Acura onto jack stands.

    5

    Remove the lug nuts and then remove the wheels.

    6

    Remove the lower caliper mounting bolt with a metric closed-end wrench (front brake pads) and then pivot the caliper upward. Remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts with a metric wrench (rear brake pads) and then rest the caliper on top of the knuckle.

    7

    Compress the caliper piston inward. Use the C-clamp and the inner brake pad (as a cushion against the piston) to slowly squeeze the piston inward. Use the caliper piston reset tool kit to match up the correct sized adapter and then turn the piston inward in a clockwise motion until it is fully seated in the bore.

    8

    Remove the brake pads (inner and outer) from the caliper mount.

    9

    Apply a light coat of synthetic disc brake caliper grease on the upper and lower brake pad clips on the caliper mount.

    10

    Insert the replacement brake pads (inner and outer) into the caliper mount.

    11

    Pivot the caliper downward (front brake pads) over the brake pads (or replace the caliper over the rear brake pads) and then lubricate the caliper mounting bolt(s) with the synthetic disc brake caliper grease. Insert the bolt(s) into the caliper and tighten to 28 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and a socket.

    12

    Repeat the same steps for the other side of the same axle, then replace the tires and lug nuts. Snug the lug nuts to the wheel hubs and then lower the Acura (slowly) to the ground with the service jack after removing the jack stands.

    13

    Torque the lug nuts in a crisscross pattern to 80 foot-pounds with the torque wrench and a socket.

    14

    Pump the brake pedal several times to set the brake pads onto the rotors. The brake pedal should feel firm when the pads are seated properly.

    15

    Top the master cylinder off with brake fluid, if necessary. Replace the cover and then remove the tire block. Release the parking brake, if applicable, and then test-drive the Acura.

Minggu, 10 Oktober 2010

How to Tune Up the Rear Brakes on a Saturn S-Series Car

How to Tune Up the Rear Brakes on a Saturn S-Series Car

The Saturn S-Series cars were first introduced in 1991, with the SC, SL, and SW. The base model S-Series was equipped with front ventilated disc brakes and rear drum brakes. The rear drum brake system has brake shoes, which press against the drums when the brake pedal is depressed. Tuning up the rear brakes consists of performing a cleaning and adjustment. Cleaning and adjusting the rear brakes at least once a year can help add longevity to the major parts of the brake system, by removing the debris that hinders the rear drum brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the rear lug nuts on both sides of the car, using a tire iron. Raise the rear of the Saturn with a jack. Place jack stands beneath both ends of the rear axle housing, just inside the rear wheels. Remove the rear wheel lug nuts, then remove the rear wheels from the car.

    2

    Remove the small rubber stopper on the lower rear of the brake backing plate, using a flat-head screwdriver. Insert the screwdriver into the hole in the rear of the backing plate and push the teeth of the self-adjusting wheel downward. This will loosen the brake shoes from the brake drums.

    3

    Remove the brake drum from one side of the Saturn, and set the opening downward to allow excess brake dust to fall out. Inspect the brakes for excess wear. Look at the wheel cylinder at the top center of the brake assembly to ensure there is no moisture on or around the cylinder. If moisture is on the cylinder, the wheel cylinder will need to be replaced.

    4

    Measure the brake shoes with a tape measure. If the shoes are less than 3/16 inch thick, then replace them. Inspect the springs and hardware for rust or corrosion. If the springs are rusted or corroded, replace them. Measure the inside diameter of the brake drum, in three different places. If the measurement is more than 7-7/8 inches wide, replace the drum.

    5

    Spray the entire brake assembly with aerosol brake spray. You should use about 1/2 of the can for the brake components. Spray the inside of the brake drum, using the remainder of the can of brake spray.

    6

    Install the brake drum over the brake shoes. Insert the flat-head screwdriver into the backing plate hole, and turn the self adjuster teeth upward. This motion will tighten the brake shoes against the drum. Attempt to remove the brake drum. The optimal amount of pressure you should have to put on the drums is about 5 pounds. If it requires more pressure to move the drum, back off the adjustment. The opposite is true if the drum moves too easily. Repeat this step until the drum has the proper tension.

    7

    Repeat Steps 2 through 7 to perform the cleaning and adjustment on the the other drum. Insert both rubber stoppers into the backing plates when you are done, using the handle of the screwdriver to push them in if needed.

    8

    Install the rear wheels and snug the lug nuts with the tire iron. Raise the Saturn off of the jack stands, and remove the stands from beneath the car. Lower the car to the ground and immediately tighten the lug nuts to 95 foot-pounds of torque with a 1/2-inch-drive torque wrench and socket.

Tips on Changing the Brakes on a 1998 Nissan Altima

Tips on Changing the Brakes on a 1998 Nissan Altima

Nissan released the Altima in the 1993 model year as the replacement for the Nissan Stanza. A total of four generations has passed for the Nissan Altima as of 2011, and it still continues strong. The 1998 Nissan Altima was the first model year of the second generation. The 1998 Altima came fitted with a 2.4-liter in-line four-cylinder engine that produced 150 horsepower. Changing the 1998 Altima's brakes is something the do-it-yourself can do at home, and there are a few tips that help get the job done quickly and correctly.

Just One Bolt

    After removing the tire and when attempting replacement of the brake pads, first remove the caliper to get to the brake pads. There is no need to completely take out both bolts from the caliper and pull it from the vehicle. Simply take off the lower bolt and loosen the upper bolt, then pivot the caliper upward to expose the brake pads.

New Hardware

    The brake pads are held in place by thin metal shims inside the caliper bracket. Replacing these shims helps keep the brake pads in the proper position and eliminate noises after replacing the pads. The shims simply pull out and push into the caliper bracket.

Making Space

    You may notice that the brake pads are too thick to fit between the caliper and the rotor. This is due to the caliper piston being extended outward to contact the old, worn brake pads. Use an 8-inch C-clamp to press the piston back into the front caliper, making room for the new pads. The rear caliper requires a special tool to rotate the piston while pressing it; this tool is available to rent at most parts stores.

Rotor Thickness

    The rotor -- the metal disc that the pads contact -- has a set of specifications that must be within tolerance for the system to operate properly. The front rotor must be at least 0.787 inches thick and the rear must be at least 0.315 inches thick. If the rotors fall below this specification, they require replacement as well.

Machine or Not

    Machining or cutting the rotors takes thin amounts of material off the rotor to eliminate imperfections. The rotors only need machined if they have gouges, a mirror-like shine or greater than 0.003 inches of run-out variance in thickness from the thickest point to the thinnest point of the rotor. Keep in mind to machine the rotors only if they are greater than the minimum thicknesses listed above.

Torque

    Proper torque on all bolts loosened or removed when performing the brakes is imperative to your safety. The caliper bolts require 16 to 23 foot-pounds of torque and the lug nuts require 90 foot-pounds of torque. Always tighten the lug nuts in a crisscross pattern so all of the lug nuts receive an equal amount of torque.

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Chevy Camaro

The Chevy Camaro, because it is a high-powered vehicle, has disc brakes in the front and rear of the vehicle. This provides more efficient stopping power than a disc and drum brake combination. Read further to learn how easy it is to replace rear disc brakes in your Camaro.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect the negative battery cable. Keep it away from the battery to make sure it doesn't reconnect accidentally. If the brake fluid level is more than halfway between the minimum and maximum level, use a suction gun to remove it.

    2

    Lift the rear of the Camaro from the ground with a car jack. Support the vehicle on all sides with jack stands to prevent tipping. Loosen the lug nuts with a torque wrench and remove the rear wheels and tires.

    3

    Secure the rotor to the hub with a lug nut. Compress the caliper piston slightly with a C-clamp, making sure to press the ends of it against the outboard brake pad and the rear of the caliper body. Remove the C-clamp after compressing the caliper piston just enough to remove the brake pads.

    4

    Take out the brake pin guide bolts and remove the caliper. Secure it to the frame of the Camaro with mechanical wire. Slide out the brake pads and brake pad retainers.

    5

    Verify that the caliper slide boots are free from any damage. Compress the piston completely into the bore, again using a C-clamp. Remove the C-clamp.

    6

    Attach the brake pad retainers to the caliper bracket. Install the brake pads, making sure that the wear sensors on the inboard brake pads are in the trailing position when the rotor moves forward. Install the caliper and torque the bolts to 23 ft. lb.

    7

    Replace the tires and wheels, and then lower the vehicle to the ground. Pump the brakes, waiting 15 seconds between compressions. Refill any necessary brake fluid to bring it up to the proper level. Replace the battery cable.

Jumat, 08 Oktober 2010

How to Replace the Rear Brake Shoes on a 1996 Nissan Truck

How to Replace the Rear Brake Shoes on a 1996 Nissan Truck

The 1996 Nissan Truck comes in either a 2-wheel drive or 4-wheel drive model, both fully customizable with a variety of packages and options. All models come with all around disc brakes. Disc brakes make at home brake changes quite simple, in comparison with drum brakes. Brakes should be changed every 3 to 6 months, depending on the brand and quality of brake that you purchase. Brakes are ready to be replaced when you hear a squealing or grinding sound or when the brakes are "grabbing," or stopping jerkily.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lugs. Rotate the lugs turn counterclockwise with the tire iron. Place the wood blocks in front of the front tires.

    2

    Raise the truck. Place the floor jack underneath the support strut on the driver's side of the rear of the truck. Raise the truck enough to allow the wheels ample room to come off. Place the jack stands underneath the same support strut as the jack. Repeat on the opposite side of the truck.

    3

    Remove the tires. Remove the lug nuts completely and the tire. Set the lugs and the tire aside.

    4

    Remove the brake caliper mount. Remove the two bolts that hold the mount to the rotor with the socket wrench. Tie the mount to the undercarriage of the truck with the twine to prevent stress on the brake line.

    5

    Remove the brake pads. The brake pads slip out of the caliper mount.

    6

    Compress the caliper. Place the c-clamp on the caliper mounting bracket and align the main disc on the caliper in the bracket. If the clamp slips, place one of the of brake pads over the caliper to provide a larger area.

    7

    Install the new brakes. Place the new brake pads in the caliper mount. Make sure that the brake material on each brake is facing inward, toward the rotor.

    8

    Reattach the caliper mount. Bolt the mount back on with the socket wrench. Reattach the tire and the lug nuts. Lower the vehicle. Tighten the lugs.

Kamis, 07 Oktober 2010

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Chevy Avalanche

Adjust the parking brake in your Chevy Avalanche with a screwdriver. All you need is a little time to save you a whole lot of money by avoiding the mechanic. Make parking brake adjustments when your Chevy Avalanche brake does not hold the vehicle in park when on a slope.

Instructions

    1

    Put your Chevy Avalanche on the jack stands by raising the truck in the air. Support each rear wheel with a jack stand.

    2

    Get under the vehicle. Locate the wired cables coming from each rear wheel. They come together with a connecting nut.

    3

    Use your screwdriver to move the adjuster nut. Test the adjustment by spinning the rear wheels around. If there is no tension, then the adjustment was successful. If there is tension in the rear wheels, then turn the adjuster nut around the opposite way from the first adjustment.

    4

    Remove the jack stands from your vehicle. Raise your vehicle up using the jack, then remove the jack stands. Continue to use the jack to lower your truck to the ground.

How to Replace the Calipers on a 2001 Grand Marquis

How to Replace the Calipers on a 2001 Grand Marquis

Replacing the brake calipers on a 2001 Mercury Grand Marquis depends on which end of the car you are changing them. The 2001 model has larger dual-piston calipers on the front brakes that have the pads installed in their mounting brackets. This makes changing them different from the smaller rear calipers with the pads directly inside them. In either case, you are letting in air when you change a caliper, and you have to bleed the air out of the system.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Raise the end of the car that has the calipers that need replacing. Lower the car onto jack stands for support. Remove the wheels.

    2

    Unscrew the banjo bolt for the brake hose with a wrench and disconnect the banjo fitting from the caliper.

    3

    Remove the caliper's mounting bolt and remove it from the front mounting bracket or rear torque plate.

    4

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper. You will only need to do this for a rear caliper. Dispose of the pads if they are worn down.

Installation

    5

    Install the brake pads into a rear calipers. Use new pads if you disposed of the old ones.

    6

    Connect the new brake caliper onto the mounting bracket and fasten it in place with its mounting bolts. Connect the brake hose with its banjo bolt.

    7

    Connect a hose to the caliper's bleed screw and submerge the hose's other end in a bottle partially filled with brake fluid.

    8

    Loosen the bleed screw with a wrench while someone else presses on the brake pedal, forcing fluid and air out of the caliper. Close the screw and repeat until you see no air bubbles in the bottle.

    9

    Remount the wheel. Lower the car and refill the engine's brake master cylinder reservoir with brake fluid as needed.

How to Remove Front Brake Pads on a 2005 GMC Yukon

In 1992, GMC released its new full-sized SUV, the Yukon, which the maker based off its line of full-sized pickups. In 1995, Chevrolet added the Tahoe, the fraternal twin of the Yukon, to its lineup. In 2000, GMC redesigned its pickups, which brought about a redesign of the Yukon. The 2005 model year --- one year away from another redesign --- came in two sizes, standard and a slightly larger XL model. Replacing the front brake pads on the 2005 Yukon and Yukon XL is the same process, only a few torque values differ.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the master cylinder's lid, and siphon out about half of the fluid from the master cylinder, using a clean turkey baster. Transfer the brake fluid to a small container.

    2

    Loosen the Yukon's front lug nuts, using a ratchet and socket, and raise the front of the SUV with a floor jack. Position jack stands under the Yukon's frame rails and lower the vehicle onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheels from the Yukon.

    3

    Position an 8-inch C-clamp over the brake caliper, so the screw part touches the outer brake pad and the fixed part touches the inner part of the caliper. Tighten the C-clamp until it stops moving; this compresses the caliper's internal piston.

    4

    Remove the two caliper-to-bracket bolts, using a ratchet and socket. Pull the caliper off the bracket, and suspend it from a nearby suspension component, using a bungee strap.

    5

    Pull the brake pads from the caliper bracket and discard them. Pull the caliper clips --- the thin metal clips on above and below the pads --- from the caliper bracket.

    6

    Remove the two caliper bracket bolts, using a ratchet and socket, and pull the caliper from the SUV's steering knuckle. Pull the rotor from the Yukon's front hub. If the rotor does not pull off easily, lightly tap the rear of the rotor with a rubber mallet to free it.

    7

    Inspect the rotor for any defects, including excessive wear, glazing, hot spotting or grinding. If any defects exist, replace the rotor with a new one.

    8

    Set the rotor on the Yukon's front hub and set the caliper bracket on the steering knuckle. Tighten the two caliper bracket bolts to 121 foot-pounds on a standard Yukon and 221 foot-pounds on a Yukon XL, using a torque wrench and socket.

    9

    Press new brake pad clips --- included with the brake pads --- on the caliper bracket; the pad clips are asymmetrical, so they only fit one way. Set the new brake pads in the caliper bracket --- the inner pad has one wear indicator and the outer pad has two wear indicators.

    10

    Set the brake caliper in place on the caliper bracket, and tighten the caliper bolts to 80 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and socket.

    11

    Repeat Steps 3 through 10 for the brake pads on the other side of the Yukon.

    12

    Reinstall the front wheels on the Yukon, and hand-tighten the front lug nuts. Raise the vehicle off the jack stands, using a floor jack. Remove the jack stands from under the vehicle and lower it to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts to 140 foot-pounds, in a crisscross pattern, using a torque wrench and socket.

    13

    Press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm. Refill the brake master cylinder with DOT 3 brake fluid until the level reaches the "Max" line on the master cylinder. Press the lid onto the master cylinder.

    14

    Take the old brake fluid to a used automotive fluid recycling center. Many auto parts stores take old fluids free of charge.

DIY Brake Pads on a 2001 Honda Civic Lx

The year 2001 marked the beginning of the seventh generation for the Civic. Honda completely redesigned its compact vehicle, giving it elongated headlights and taillights. The 2001 Civic came in four main trim levels: DX, HX, LX and EX. The 2001 Civic LX came with a 115-horsepower, 1.7-liter four-cylinder engine. Honda fitted the 2001 Civic LX with a braking system that utilized front disc brakes and rear drum brakes. Replacing the brake pads on the front of the Civic is a money-saving procedure that any do-it-yourself mechanic should learn.

Instructions

    1

    Remove about half of the fluid in the brake master cylinder, using a clean turkey baster. Transfer this fluid to a small container.

    2

    Loosen, but don't remove, the front lug nuts, using a ratchet and socket. Raise the Civic's front wheel off the ground with a floor jack. Position jack stands under the Honda's subframe and lower the vehicle onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and front wheels.

    3

    Remove the two brake caliper-to-anchor plate bolts, using a ratchet and socket, and pull the caliper off the anchor plate. Hang the caliper from a nearby suspension component, using a bungee strap.

    4

    Pull the old brake pads from the anchor plate. Remove the two anchor plate-to-steering knuckle bolts, using a ratchet and socket, and pull the anchor plate from the Civic.

    5

    Loosen the two screws on the center of the rotor, using a Phillips screwdriver. If the screws do not remove easily, lightly tap their heads with a hammer to free them. Grab the rotor and pull it from the Civic's hub; tap the rotor with a rubber mallet if it does not remove easily.

    6

    Inspect the rotor for any visual wear or damage, such as: deep grooves, mirror-like shine, grinding or hot spotting. If any defects exist, replace the rotor with a new one.

    7

    Set the new or original rotor on the Civic's hub and tighten the two screws with a Phillips screwdriver. Position the anchor plate back over the rotor and tighten the two anchor plate-to-steering knuckle bolts to 82 foot-pounds, utilizing a torque wrench and socket.

    8

    Set the new brake pads in the anchor plate, positioning the squeal indicator facing downward, and coat the rear of each pad with disc brake grease.

    9

    Set the old inner brake pad inside the caliper, so that it contacts the caliper piston. Set the screw side of an 8-inch C-clamp over the caliper, so that the screw part touches the inner brake pad and the fixed part touches the rear of the caliper body. Tighten the C-clamp until the piston presses all the way into the caliper. Remove the C-clamp and brake pad.

    10

    Remove the caliper from the grip of the bungee strap and set it over the brake pads. Tighten the caliper-to-anchor plate bolts to 24 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and socket.

    11

    Repeat steps 3 through 10 to replace the brake pads on the other side of the Civic.

    12

    Reinstall the Civic's wheels and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Raise the Honda off the jack stands, using the floor jack, and slide the jack stands from under the vehicle. Slowly lower the Civic to the ground.

    13

    Tighten the lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds in a crisscross pattern, using a torque wrench and socket.

    14

    Press and release the pedal, repeatedly, until it feels firm under your foot. Check the fluid level in the brake master cylinder and add DOT 3 brake fluid until the level reaches the "Max" line on the master cylinder.

Rabu, 06 Oktober 2010

How to Change Brakes & Rotors on a 2000 Pontiac Sunfire

How to Change Brakes & Rotors on a 2000 Pontiac Sunfire

The 2000 Pontiac Sunfire has four-wheel anti-lock disc brakes. The brake system is comprised of the rotors, the calipers, and the brake pads. After years of use the brake rotors become scored by the brake pad wear indicators. The rotors can also become warped, which will significantly affect the performance of the brakes. The caliper, which houses the brake pads and the caliper piston, is a component that rarely (barring a collision) requires replacement. When changing the brake pads, inspect the caliper for cracking or other signs of serious wear.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Lift the Sunfire with the jack and place jack stands beneath the frame.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheels from the wheel bolts.

    3

    Remove the two caliper bolts with the 5/8 inch Hex socket and ratchet. Remove the caliper and place it on top of the steering arm. Disconnect the brake line from the caliper by unscrewing the fastener that holds the line to the caliper.

    4

    Spray the rotor with chain lubricant to break up the bond of brake fluid and rust that holds the rotor to the wheel bolts. Pull the rotor from the wheel bolts.

    5

    Spray the new rotor with brake cleaner and wipe it clean. Place the rotor onto the wheel bolts with the raised center section (called the "top hat" section) facing outward.

    6

    Connect the new brake pads to the new caliper. The brake pads snap onto the sides of the caliper with thin metal clips on the back side of the brake pad.

    7

    Connect the brake line to the new caliper and screw the fastener (by hand) that holds the line in place.

    8

    Place the caliper onto the rotor and replace the caliper bolts with the 5/8-inch Hex socket and ratchet.

    9

    Replace the wheels on the wheel bolts and screw on the lug nuts by hand.

    10

    Remove the jack stands and lower the Pontiac to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    11

    Remove the cap to the master cylinder, located under the hood of the Pontiac Sunfire, and fill the container with brake fluid. Press the brake pedal three times slowly to force brake fluid into the new caliper.

Selasa, 05 Oktober 2010

How to Remove the Rear Drums on a 2000 Dodge Caravan

Although the rear drum brakes on your 2000 Dodge Caravan do not wear down as quickly as the front disc brakes, they sometimes do need to be replaced. It is recommended they be changed approximately once every 10,000 to 15,000 miles. If you hear squeaking or grinding noises coming from your back tires when you brake, it means it may be time to change the rear drum brakes. In order to do this, however, you will first have to remove the rear drums from your rear wheels.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on both rear tires.

    2

    Place emergency brake on and jack up the rear end of your Caravan. Slip the jack stands underneath your rear frame and set the Caravan down on them so that they rest firmly and securely.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts on both rear tires and pull both tires off.

    4

    Remove the cotter pin holding the brake drums in place with a pair of pliers. The pin will be located on the inside of each wheel.

    5

    Slide both rear brake drums off.

How to Replace a Caliper in a Chrysler Sebring

A luxury car like the Chrysler Sebring isn't worth much if important parts like the brakes don't work. When something like a brake caliper must be replaced on a Sebring or any vehicle, it's best to let a trained expert handle it. Consult with one before choosing to replace such a part yourself.

Instructions

Remove the Old Caliper

    1

    Press down on the brake pedal and hold it with a rod or other holding tool. This will isolate the master cylinder from the hydraulic system so the fluid won't completely drain out of the brake fluid reservoir.

    2

    Raise the vehicle on the jack and remove the tire and wheel for the caliper that needs replacing.

    3

    Remove the anti-rattle spring, which is located on the outboard side of the caliper and adapter.

    4

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper by removing the banjo bolt. Discard the two washers that are on the bolt.

    5

    Take off the two caps over the caliper guide pin bolts and remove the bolts. Remove the caliper from the adapter and brake rotor. The outboard shoe should stay with the adapter while the inboard shoe comes off with the caliper.

Install the New Caliper

    6

    Make sure the caliper piston is completely in the piston bore. A C-clamp should compress it in there.

    7

    Lubricate the caliper adapter abutments where the shoes slide together. Silicone grease should work.

    8

    Position the new caliper with its inboard shoe carefully over the brake rotor, outboard shoe and adapter and install it onto the adapter. Install the guide pin bolts, tighten them to 26 foot pounds and place the caps.

    9

    Attach the anti-rattle spring on the caliper's outboard side. Start the clip in the holes on the caliper and stretch the clip legs past the abutments on the adapter.

    10

    Reconnect the brake hose, using new fitting washers with the banjo bolt. Place one washer on each side of the hose fitting, slide the bolt through the fitting and thread the bolt into the port on the caliper's rear. Tighten the bolt to 26 foot pounds.

    11

    Install the tire and wheel, and torque the lug nuts to 100 foot pounds. Lower the vehicle and remove the tool holding the pedal.

    12

    Bleed the brake system. Open the bleeder valve, attach a transparent hose to the valve and have another person depress the pedal to remove air from the system.