Sabtu, 31 Juli 2010

How to Assemble Brake Lines & Fittings

How to Assemble Brake Lines & Fittings

Brake lines and fittings are usually something we look for a professional to handle, but now do-it-yourself mechanics can successfully assemble their own brake lines and all the fittings needed with brake line assembly kits. These kits include a long section of brake line, both male and female fittings and the manifold fitting, commonly called the banjo because of its shape. No special tools are needed besides a tabletop or bench vise to help secure the fittings correctly. They even include a vise wrench to help hold the brake line in the vise.

Instructions

    1

    Slip the female brake line fitting over the end of the -3 brake line hose. Cut the end of the hose between the black dashes with a pair of side cutters.

    2

    Insert the -3 hose into the end of the male brake line fitting opposite the end with the nut on it. Push it into the fitting until the first dash it comes to completely disappears under the sleeve of the male fitting.

    3

    Hold the hose and the male brake line fitting and insert the shaft of the banjo fitting into the end of the male fitting and into the hose. The banjo is the fitting that has a long shaft and a round end on it that has a hole in it. There is a line where the shaft of the banjo flairs out. This is called the witness line and it is instrumental in the proper assembly of the brake line and fittings.

    4

    Twist the end of the banjo until the threads on the banjo shaft clear the inside threads on the male fitting. This allows the banjo to turn freely inside the connection until it is time to secure it to the manifold.

    5

    Check the black dash on the hose to be certain the hose did not move during the installation of the banjo. You can also check the witness line on the banjo as well. It should be inside the male fitting.

    6

    Place the supplied vise wrench on the hex end of the male fitting and then place the assembly in a bench or tabletop vise. Push the female brake line fitting that you put on the hose at the beginning of this process up to the male fitting. Secure it to the male fitting with a 7/16-inch wrench until the hex end of the female fitting seats on the hex end of the male fitting.

    7

    Fit this end of the brake line in place, route the hose to the other end and cut it off between the dashes as before. Then repeat the process for this end of the brake line.

Symptoms of a Faulty Brake Hose

Symptoms of a Faulty Brake Hose

The website Brake Equip compares brake hoses to human arteries. Just as physicians perform a stress test on humans to help assess their condition, mechanics will test brake hoses with pressure applied---stressing them, in a sense. This test usually requires two people: one to check the hoses and another to apply pressure to the hoses by depressing the brake pedal from the driver's seat. If you check your own brake hoses, keep a new one handy for comparison.

Feeling For Problems

    Mechanics will recommend feeling brake hoses to find out whether they feel either excessively hard and stiff or soft and weak. In either case, the brake hoses will likely need replacing. Have an assistant depress the brake pedal while sitting in the driver's seat. If the hoses expand noticeably, they are likely faulty as well.

Look for Problems

    Common visible signs of faulty brake hoses include cracks, particularly near the ends, or twisting along the hoses. Areas that expand, forming a bubble when you depress the brake pedal, also indicate problems. You may also be able to see the brake hoses expand too greatly under pressure. Look for signs of wear, such as a worn spot at a point along the hose---sometimes referred to as "chafing." Inspect the ends of the hoses as well, checking for leaks.

Deterioration

    All of your brake hoses will usually wear down at about the same rate because brake pressure occurs fairly evenly with use. Signs of wear on the outside of the hoses will often indicate deterioration on the insides as well. As a general rule of thumb, replace all of your hoses at the same time when you find one faulty hose. This way, they will again wear away at the same rate from the same point.

Subaru Brake Problems

Subaru Brake Problems

The widespread nature of brake problems in Subaru vehicles of all models and years has prompted considerable concern on the part of owners, dealers and government agencies. While braking issues on vehicles are not all necessarily dangerous, the potential for serious consequences is elevated in Subaru cars. Symptoms of any nature should be investigated thoroughly.

Recalls

    In 1999, Subaru issued a recall on brake parts specific to its Legacy line. The deficiencies increased the likelihood of a crash by slowing brake reaction. The problem primarily surfaced in cold weather and affected anti-lock brakes on these sport utility vehicles. A similar recall occurred in 2002, also affecting cold weather brake performance. In both instances, dealers replaced cylinders in all affected models, resolving the issue.

Rotors

    Bad brake rotors are a frequent problem in all Subaru models from many years. While rotor maintenance is a routine procedure in all vehicles, Subaru cars tend to require this much more often, sometimes every 15,000 miles. The rotor deterioration causes failed vehicle inspections, and they sometimes need full replacement. In some cases, the rotors are too damaged to easily remove. Further complications to the emergency brake may result directly from brake rotor maintenance.

Noises

    While brake noises are not unusual in any vehicle, Subaru owners often find them a particularly elusive nuisance. Common methods for reducing brake squeak, such as replacing the pads, might not work. Instead, annoying sounds develop into serious conditions, including a grinding noise when braking that does not respond smoothly to pedals. Owners report that multiple visits to dealers don't always fix the noise, but a dealer can make sure it is not a dangerous condition.

Hydraulics

    Some Subaru brake systems develop a "spongy" reaction to the pedals, which results from hydraulic malfunction. This is a serious symptom, known as hydraulic bleeding, that can lead to total brake failure. Any experience resembling this should be investigated by a qualified mechanic as soon as possible. The issue might not be accompanied by noise, so always monitor changes in brake-pedal reaction to prevent consequences.

Litigation

    The long history of problems surrounding the braking systems on Subaru vehicles has resulted in numerous collisions and law suits over the years. A 1995 purchase of a Subaru Legacy eventually led to the U.S. District Court case Kruger v. Subaru, which formally documented the extensive symptoms of these malfunctions. The National Transportation Safety Board also has made safety recommendations based on Subaru brake problems as far back as 1985. Owners of any Subaru model should remain aware of any changes in brake performance.

Jumat, 30 Juli 2010

How to Replace the Rear Disc Brake Pads on a 1995 Ford Taurus

How to Replace the Rear Disc Brake Pads on a 1995 Ford Taurus

The 1995 Ford Taurus features either rear drum brakes and brake shoes, or rear disc brakes and brake pads. Unlike the front disc brakes and brake pads, the rear brakes account for only about 30 percent (or less for drum brakes) of the braking power for the family sedan. This means replacing rear disc brakes is not as common as having to replace the front. But because they're smaller and thinner than the front brake pads, eventually you must replace them.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Taurus on a flat surface suitable for lifting and supporting the car, but do not apply the parking brake.

    2

    Release the hood latch, open the hood and then remove the cover from the master cylinder. Use a brake fluid suction baster to suck out 1/2 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder, and then discard this fluid.

    3

    Place a tire chock in front of one of the front tires, then loosen the wheel nuts to the rear tires using a lug wrench 1/4-turn counterclockwise.

    4

    Lift the rear of the Taurus with a car jack (one side at a time), then support it onto jack stands placed under the rear lateral frame rails. Finish removing the wheel nuts and remove the tires.

    5

    Remove the brake hose retaining screw holding the hose bracket to the rear shock absorber, using a small hand wrench.

    6

    Disconnect the retaining clip of the parking brake cable from the caliper housing, and then use a pair of needle-nose pliers to disengage the end of the cable from the caliper housing.

    7

    Place an open end side of a combination hand wrench onto the upper slider pin of the caliper and use a closed-end side of another combination wrench to disengage the pinch bolt in a counterclockwise motion.

    8

    Pry the caliper downward from the rotor and pads assembly, using a standard screwdriver if necessary.

    9

    Use a T87P-2588-A tool (or compatible rear caliper reset tool) to wind the rear caliper piston into the caliper piston bore in a clockwise motion until it is fully seated and the notches on the piston align with the nibs of the replacement pads.

    10

    Pry the old pads from the caliper mount, using a standard screwdriver if necessary.

    11

    Install the new pads into the caliper mount, then swing the caliper upward over the pads and rotor assembly.

    12

    Clean the bottom threads of the pinch bolt on a wire brush wheel of a bench grinder. Apply a light coat of thread-lock compound to the threads of the bolt, and align it into the slider pin. Tighten the bolt (while holding the slide pin with an open-end side of the combination hand wrench) to 25 foot-lbs. with a torque wrench and socket.

    13

    Reattach the parking brake end to the caliper housing, secure the retaining clip and then reattach the retaining screw to the rear brake hose assembly to the bracket on the rear shock.

    14

    Repeat the pad replacement procedure on the other side of the rear brakes before replacing the tires and wheel nuts on the Taurus. Tighten the nuts flush to the hub.

    15

    Raise the Taurus with the car jack again just high enough to extract the jack stands (one side at a time), then slowly lower the vehicle to the ground. Torque the rear wheel nuts in a offset star-like pattern to 100 foot-lbs. with the torque wrench and a socket.

    16

    Pump the foot brake pedal several times to seat the rear pistons and pads until the pedal has a firm feel to it (make sure the master cylinder cover is tight on the reservoir first).

    17

    Check the level of the brake fluid in the master cylinder, and top it off with new brake fluid only before test-driving the Taurus.

How to Check Electric Brakes on a Horse Trailer

How to Check Electric Brakes on a Horse Trailer

Electric trailer brakes are designed to slow a trailer and usually cannot lock up the trailer's wheels when it's loaded. That's why It is important to tow with a heavy duty vehicle. The tow vehicle supplies the power to operate electric trailer brakes. When voltage is sent to the trailer brakes, an electromagnet mechanism in the drum applies the brake. Most trailer brake failure is caused by little or no voltage to the brake magnets. Broken and corroded wires or wire connections are the common cause and can be found on either the tow vehicle or the trailer.

Instructions

Preliminary Testing

    1

    Hook the trailer to the tow vehicle and connect the trailer plug.

    2

    Apply the emergency brake in the tow vehicle and block the trailer wheels.

    3

    Spread a ground mat or a large piece of cardboard under the trailer.

    4

    Go under the trailer with at 12 volt DC test light and a continuity tester. Use the 12 volt test light and test the two wires going into each of the brake backing plates for power while someone applies the the trailer brakes.There must be power in one wire going into each baking plate for the electromagnet to apply the brakes.

    5

    Mark the wires that light the test light on each backing plate as the positive and the other wire as the ground.

    6

    Test the ground wire going into each backing plate using a continuity test light by grounding the continuity light and probing the ground wire. If the ground wire is properly grounded the light will light.The continuity tester gets its power from an internal battery.

Dymanic Brake Check.

    7

    Adjust the trim wheel on the trailer brake unit to the maximum setting. The brake unit is normally mounted under the dash board of the tow vehicle.

    8

    Drive the trailer to an area that has loose gravel.

    9

    Apply the trailer brake lever, but not the tow vehicle brakes while driving slow. If the brakes are working properly the wheels should slide, or a drag should be felt. The trailer should be empty when performing this task.

Kamis, 29 Juli 2010

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 2003 Alero

The brake pads on the 2003 Oldsmobile Alero need to be checked every six months for wear. The brake pads contain a friction material that wears away over time. Eventually, the pad material will shrink to 1/8-inch thick. At this point, you will need to change the pads. This job should take no more than 20 minutes for an amateur, but if you've never done this before, it may take you an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels you will be working on. Turn the lug nuts counterclockwise 1/4 turn with a tire wrench.

    2

    Jack up the side of the Alero you are working on. In most cases, it's best to simply jack up the front of the vehicle or the rear of the vehicle using the designated jack points behind the radiator and the trunk, respectively.

    3

    Place jack stands underneath the pinch welds on the side of the car and lower the Alero onto the stands.

    4

    Finish removing the lug nuts and slide the wheel off the hub assembly.

    5

    Place a c-clamp over the caliper so that the screw-end of the clamp is flat against the exposed brake pad and the other end of the clamp sits flush with the back of the caliper.

    6

    Tighten the clamp to force the brake caliper piston back into the caliper. A space should develop between the brake pads and the caliper. Tighten the clamp until the piston bottoms out.

    7

    Remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts and slide the caliper off the Alero.

    8

    Slide the pads out of the caliper and install new pads.

    9

    Put the caliper back onto the hub assembly and tighten the mounting bolts. Make sure you use a small amount of thread locker on the threads of the bolts. Torque the mounting bolts to 55 pounds-foot with a torque wrench.

    10

    Spray the brake assembly down with brake parts cleaner.

    11

    Put the wheel back on and lower the car to the ground.

How to Bench Bleed a Master Cylinder in a Chevy Camaro

The speedy Chevy Camaro was first introduced in 1967 and is still a very popular muscle car today. If you need to replace the brake master cylinder in your Camaro, bench bleed the new one before installing it to get the trapped air out of the system and avoid forcing it into your brake lines. The process only takes about 10 minutes and these instructions apply to any model year.

Instructions

Prepare the Master Cylinder

    1

    Uninstall the old master cylinder before you bench bleed the new one. The location of the cylinder varies slightly between different model years, but generally, it sits prominently near the driver's side firewall on the Chevy Camaro.

    2

    Clean and reuse the old brake fluid reservoir. Your new master cylinder may already come with one, so do whatever is most cost-effective.

    3

    Place the new Chevy Camaro master cylinder in a vise on your work bench or table. Clamp it down firmly, making sure it's level, so it doesn't form air pockets inside it during the process. Have your bleeder kit handy.

    4

    Fit the reservoir onto the replacement cylinder, if you're reusing your old one or if you've bought a new one. If your cylinder came with a reservoir, then it's most likely already installed.

    5

    Find the two fittings that came with your kit and screw them into the outlets on the side of the cylinder. Insert the two lengths of plastic tubing from the kit into the fittings.

    6

    Bend the hoses, so they aim into the brake fluid reservoir, then trim them so they'll stick about halfway down into it. Clip the two tubes to the reservoir to keep them in place to ensure you don't allow air back into the system.

Bench Bleed the Master Cylinder

    7

    Pour fresh DOT 3 brake fluid into the Chevy Camaro's reservoir; stop when you get just short of the maximum fill line. The hoses you attached should extend down into the fluid to make a miniature hydraulic system.

    8

    Put the screwdriver into the master cylinder and firmly push it against the piston to start the process. Pump the piston to push the fluid through the cylinder and into the hoses. The fluid will cycle back into the reservoir, but since you used fresh fluid, it's okay.

    9

    Look for air bubbles coming out of the hoses and depositing into the brake fluid in the reservoir. Keep pumping until all the air is out of the cylinder and bubbles no longer appear.

    10

    Leave the hoses in the reservoir and carefully remove the cylinder from the vise. Now you're ready to install the master cylinder into your Chevy Camaro.

Rabu, 28 Juli 2010

How to Remove the Calipers from a 2002 Chevy Suburban

The Suburban is far-and-away the longest-running SUV in the GMC and Chevrolet lineups. It arrived back in 1936 as a modified panel truck. The next closest to the Suburban's age is the full-size Blazer, which lasted 25 years before Chevy changed its name to Tahoe. The 2002 Suburban came in two versions: 1500 and 2500. Changing the brake calipers is the same straightforward process on both trucks. After replacing the calipers, you must bleed the brake system.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Unscrew the cap from the master cylinder reservoir and siphon out about half of the brake fluid with a clean turkey baster. Transfer this fluid to a small container.

    2

    Loosen the front or rear lug nuts, depending on if you are replacing the front or rear calipers, with a ratchet and socket. Raise the front or rear of the SUV, depending on what calipers you are replacing, with a floor jack and slide jack stands under the vehicles frame rails. Lower the Suburban onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheels off the Suburban.

    3

    Position an 8-inch C-clamp over the brake caliper, so the fixed part touches the rear of the caliper and the screw part touches the outer brake pad. Tighten the C-clamp until it stops moving, this compresses the internal caliper piston. Loosen the C-clamp and pull it off the caliper.

    4

    Wrap a clean, lint-free cloth around the center of the rubber brake hose to insulate it. Seal off the hose by closing a set of locking pliers over the clean, lint-free cloth. This prevents excess fluid loss and air introduction.

    5

    Slide a drain pan under the caliper. Remove the caliper hose banjo bolt with a ratchet and socket. Pull the brake hose from the caliper and discard the two brass washers.

    6

    Remove the two caliper guide pin bolts with a ratchet and socket, and pull the caliper off its bracket.

    7

    Repeat Steps 3 through 6 to remove the caliper on the other side of the Suburban.

Installation

    8

    Clean the old grease off the caliper guide pin bolts with a clean, lint-free cloth, if reinstalling the old caliper. Apply a generous coat of disc brake grease to the smooth parts of the guide pins do not get grease on the threaded part of the pins. On a new caliper, apply grease to the new caliper guide pin bolts that came with the caliper.

    9

    Set the caliper on the caliper bracket. Slide the caliper pins into the caliper and the caliper bracket, and hand-tighten the caliper guide pin bolts. Tighten the front caliper guide pin bolts to 80 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. On the rear caliper, tighten the caliper guide pins to 31 foot-pounds on Suburban 1500 or 80 foot-pounds on a Suburban 2500.

    10

    Set a new brass washer included with the caliper onto the brake hose banjo bolt. Insert the banjo bolt through the brake hoses bolt hole and set the other brass washer on the banjo bolt. Remove the plastic cap on the new calipers inlet hole and hand-tighten the banjo bolt into the inlet hole.

    11

    Tighten the banjo bolt to 30 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. Disengage the locking pliers from the brake hose.

    12

    Repeat Steps 1 through 4 to install the caliper on the other side of the Suburban.

Bleeding the Brakes

    13

    Fill the brake master cylinder to its Max line with fresh DOT 3 brake fluid. Keep the master cylinder reservoir from running out of fluid throughout the bleeding process.

    14

    Raise the side of the pickup not raised in the section titled Removal with a floor jack, and position jack stands under the frame rails. Lower the Suburban onto the jack stands.

    15

    Find the bleeder valve the -inch metal nipple on the rear of the right-rear brake caliper. Press a -inch-diameter rubber hose onto the end of the bleeder valve. Set the other end of the hose in a clean, clear container. Pour DOT 3 brake fluid into the container until fluid submerges the end of the hose.

    16

    Instruct an assistant to press and release the brake pedal repeatedly until it feels firm, then to hold pressure on the pedal. Open the bleeder valve by turning it about a half-turn counterclockwise with a combination wrench. Look at the end of the hose in the brake fluid and watch for bubbles to come from the hose. Tighten the bleeder valve to close it. Tell your assistant to release the brake pedal. Repeat this step until no bubbles come from the hose.

    17

    Refill the brake master cylinder to its Full line with fresh DOT 3 brake fluid.

    18

    Repeat Steps 3 through 5 on the remaining three calipers, in the following order: left rear, right front and left rear. Top off the master cylinder between each caliper. Do not let the master cylinder run dry, or you will have to start over.

    19

    Reinstall the wheels on the Suburbans hubs and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Lower the vehicle to the ground.

    20

    Tighten the lug nuts, in a crisscross pattern, to 140 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    21

    Pump the brake pedal until it feels firm before driving the vehicle.

    22

    Take the old brake fluid to a used-automotive-fluid-recycling center for disposal. Some auto parts stores perform this task for free.

Selasa, 27 Juli 2010

How to Put Rear Brake Pads on a 2005 Ford Freestar

How to Put Rear Brake Pads on a 2005 Ford Freestar

The rear brakes on a Ford Freestar are rotor-style brakes. When you step on the brake pedal, hydraulic fluid is pumped through the vehicle's brake lines to the Freestar's caliper assembly. The pressure in the lines make the caliper piston press against the brake pad. The pad is then forced against the rotor, which decreases the speed of the vehicle. The inner pad assembly on the Freestar tends to wear more quickly than the outer pad. After the pad material is worn to 1/8 inch, the pads need to be replaced. Also, if vibration is detected in the steering wheel when braking, the Ford Freestar rear brakes should be checked and changed.

Instructions

Safety First

    1

    Secure the front of the vehicle by placing a stone or wedge on the front side of each front wheel. When jacking up the rear of the minivan, you will want the front wheels to stay in place.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels by rotating them a quarter using the tire wrench.

    3

    Position the jack at the rear jack point near the trunk and raise the vehicle. Place a jack stand under each of the rear pinch welds and lower the Ford onto the stands.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts and wheels.

    5

    Unbolt the top and bottom caliper mounting bolts and remove the caliper from the rotor.

    6

    Temporarily attach the caliper to the coil springs above the brake assembly.

    7

    Remove the brake pads. If the pads resist removal, tap the back of them with a rubber mallet.

    8

    Compress the caliper piston into the caliper assembly with c-clamp by placing the face of one of the pads over the caliper piston and placing the c-clamp over the pad and caliper. Tighten the c-clamp to force the piston against the caliper.

    9

    Insert the new brake pads into the caliper assembly.

    10

    Reassemble the brakes.

    11

    Place the wheels back onto the vehicle, tighten the lug nuts, lower the van to the ground.

    12

    Tighten the lug nuts and torque them to 100 pounds of pressure.

How to Replace the Brakes on a Saturn

The brakes on your Saturn perform an important function for your vehicle. When hydraulic pressure is forced through the metal brake lines, it pushes against a piston in the caliper which in turn pushes the brake pads against the brake rotor to slow down your vehicle. When the brakes on your Saturn are 1/8-inch thick, you need to check and replace them.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the driver's side wheel using the torque wrench. Turn the wrench counterclockwise 1/4 degree. If you are going to change the passenger side brakes, you will want to repeat this process for the passenger side wheel.

    2

    Jack the Saturn up, using the front jack points on the vehicle. The front jack point will be located behind the radiator in the center of the vehicle. Place the jack stands under the frame of the Saturn and lower it onto the stands.

    3

    Continue to loosen the lug nuts you started to loosen on the driver's side, remove the lug nuts and the wheels. Unbolt the bottom caliper-mounting bolt and remove it. Loosen the top caliper mounting bolt but do not remove it. Swing the caliper up off the rotor. Secure the bottom of the caliper to the coil springs of the suspension with zip ties. Pull the pads out of the calipers.

    4

    Place the face of the old brake pad over the caliper piston and put the C-clamp over the pad and caliper assembly. Tighten the C-clamp and force the piston back into the caliper. Make sure the rubber piston boot folds accordion style into the caliper and does not twist or rip.

    5

    Install new brake pads into the caliper. The pads on your Saturn will only fit in 1 orientation. Reassemble the caliper and put the wheel back on, tightening the lug nuts down in a crisscross pattern. For example, tighten 1 lug nut and then tighten the nut opposite of that 1. Installation is the reverse of removal.

    6

    Lower the vehicle to the ground and torque the lug nuts to 100-foot lbs. Pump the brake pedal to restore the brake pressure. You may need to pump the pedal a few times to restore pressure.

How to Adjust the Parking Brake on a 2002 Tahoe

How to Adjust the Parking Brake on a 2002 Tahoe

Most General Motors light trucks and SUVs from the 2000 to 2006 model years use a four-wheel disc brake system for increased stopping power. The parking brake for these trucks is a completely independent system of brake shoes located inside of the rear disc brake rotor. Adjusting the parking brake on a 2002 Tahoe, or any similar GMC vehicle, requires special care.

Instructions

    1

    Jack up the rear of the vehicle and support it using the jack stands. Remove both rear wheel and tire assemblies. Make a mark across the brake rotor and the hub, so that you can install it again in the same position. Place a C-clamp over the caliper, between the rear of the caliper body and the outboard brake pad. Tighten the clamp gradually to compress the disc-brake piston.

    2

    Remove the C-clamp from the caliper. Remove the nut and bolt from the quarter shaft shield on the caliper, and remove the shield. Remove the two caliper bolts and pull the brake caliper off the rotor. Hang the caliper by a bungee cord. Remove the rotor by turning it slowly while pulling it away from the hub. You may need to hit the end of the hub or the rotor with a hammer to separate the rotor and allow it to come off.

    3

    Clean all rust from the hub-mounting surface, as well as on the brake rotor flange, where it meets the hub. This will keep the rotors true and avoid pulsation. Clean with a wire brush. Use a clean cloth to remove any dirt and debris on the parking brake shoes.

    4

    Use the J21177A tool to measure the outside surface of the brake rotor "hat," or the area that the shoes push against. Lock the gauge in place and put the other side of the gauge over the parking brake shoes at their widest point. Turn the adjusting nut until the parking brake shoes contact the gauge. This gives the correct shoe-to-drum clearance. Repeat for the other side.

    5

    Install the brake drums on the hubs, lining up the marks so that you install them in the same position. Install the brake calipers and quarter shaft seal. Install the wheel and tire assemblies. Verify that the equalizer nut on the parking brake cable is tight. Apply and release the parking brake pedal three times.

Minggu, 25 Juli 2010

How to Replace Chevy Calipers

The brake calipers on the Chevy use hydraulics to squeeze the rotor between the brake pads to stop the automobile. If they are not functioning properly, the vehicle will not stop. Signs of a bad brake caliper include leaking around the caliper piston, the car seeming to pull to one side when braking, or the brake pads seeming to wear quickly and unevenly because the calipers are not operating properly. An average person can change a brake caliper in about 30 minutes. If you find yourself replacing the brake calipers on your Chevy, be sure to replace the pads as well if they are worn.

Instructions

    1

    Locate the master cylinder on the driver's side of the firewall in the engine compartment. Remove the cover and drain the brake fluid from it using the turkey baster. Place the fluid in the drain pan for later recycling. Place a set of wheel chocks behind the rear wheels of the Chevy. Raise the Chevy on the side you are starting with, using the automobile jack.

    2

    Place a jack under the Chevy near the jacking point and raise it to the frame of the vehicle. Loosen the lug nuts with a lug wrench and remove the wheel from the vehicle. Remove the brake hose from the main brake line using a wrench. Remove the brake hose from the caliper using a wrench to remove the bolt.

    3

    Loosen the brake caliper bolts using a hex socket and ratchet. Lift the caliper away from the wheel assembly. Remove the brake pads from the caliper and discard them if they are worn. Connect the new brake hose to the caliper. Tighten the bolt using a wrench. Insert the brake pads and place the brake caliper on the mounting cradle on the wheel assembly.

    4

    Connect the brake hose to the main brake line and tighten the fitting with a wrench. Tighten the caliper bolts using a hex socket and ratchet. Place the tire on the Chevy and tighten the lug nuts with a lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the vehicle. Lower the Chevy to the ground. Repeat the procedure on the other wheel.

    5

    Fill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid when the project is complete. Bleed the air out of the brake lines by having an assistant pump the brake several times and hold them while you open the bleeder valve on the wheel with a wrench to expel the air in the lines. Repeat the process until all air is out of the brake lines.

Jumat, 23 Juli 2010

How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a 2002 VW Passat

The 2002 Volkswagen Passat was equipped with a 2.8-liter V-6, a 1.8-liter turbocharged four-cylinder, or a 4.0-liter W-8 engine, depending on the sub-model. The 2002 Passat was available in front-wheel drive or all-wheel drive. The 2002 Passat had rear drum brakes on the base model, but had the option of a four-wheel disc-brake system. The rear calipers on the 2002 Passat have rotating pistons that require a special tool, available at most auto parts stores.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the hood on the Passat. Inspect the brake fluid level in the reservoir. Remove brake fluid with a turkey baster or bottle siphon, until the fluid is about 1/2 inch below the "Full" mark. Install the reservoir lid and tighten it.

    2

    Loosen the rear wheel lug bolts with a tire iron, but do not remove them. Raise the rear of the Passat with a jack. Place jack stands beneath the rear axle beam, about 6-inches inward from the rear wheels. Remove the rear lug bolts, then remove the rear wheels from the car.

    3

    Sit in the vehicle and make sure the parking brake handle inside the car is in the resting or off position. Step out of the vehicle and position yourself under the rear of the Passat. Insert a screwdriver between the two arms on the parking brake assembly, on the rear of the caliper. Hold the assembly still while removing the hex bolt from the rear of the parking brake assembly with a ratchet and socket. Pull the parking brake lever attached to the cable free from the parking brake assembly with the screwdriver.

    4

    Remove the caliper bolts from the rear of the caliper with a ratchet and socket, while holding the caliper slide pins still with an open-end wrench. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly with a small pry bar if needed. Hang the caliper from the rear coil spring with a metal clothes hanger or hook. Do not let the caliper hang freely by the rubber hose it is attached to.

    5

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper bracket by hand. Inspect the anti-rattle clips at the top and bottom of the caliper bracket, and replace them if they are bent or damaged. Inspect the rear brake rotor for cracks, pitting or rust. Measure the rotor thickness with a tape measure. if the rotor is damaged or is less than 3/8 inches thick, replace the brake rotor at this time.

    6

    Retract the caliper piston into the caliper body, using a 3/8-inch drive ratchet, extension and caliper-rotating tool. Turn the piston clockwise while applying inward pressure on the piston. Continue turning until the piston is completely retracted into the caliper. Remove the caliper guide pins from the rear of the caliper. Thoroughly grease the pins with caliper grease, then insert them back into the caliper. Replace the small rubber boots on the rear of the caliper at this time, if they are dry rotted or torn.

    7

    Install new brake pads onto the caliper bracket. Install the rear brake caliper onto the brake assembly. Install and tighten the caliper bolts to 26 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. Install the brake cable assembly back onto the rear parking brake assembly. Install and tighten the brake cable nut with a ratchet and socket, while holding the parking brake assembly still with a screwdriver. You may have to loosen the nut on the adjuster arm below the cable arm, to fit the cable arm back into place. Tighten both fixtures with a ratchet and socket.

    8

    Repeat steps 3 through 7 to complete the rear brake pad replacement on the second side of the Passat. Fill the brake fluid reservoir if necessary, until the fluid level is near the "Full" mark. The fluid level may be on an angle due to the incline of the car. Use the middle of the reservoir fluid level as your guide for how full the reservoir is. Install and tighten the reservoir cap.

    9

    Gently seat yourself in the driver's seat of the Passat. Pump the brake pedal slowly about 40 times. This will seat the caliper pistons against the new brake pads. If the pedal does not stiffen after five or six pumps, stop pumping and bleed the rear brakes. Exit the Passat when you have completed pumping the brakes and have a solid brake pedal.

    10

    Install the rear wheels onto the Passat. Insert a guide pin or punch awl through one of the lug bolt holes to align the holes on the hub with those on the wheel. Insert all of the lug bolts and begin threading them by hand, to ensure proper threading. Tighten the lug bolts snug with your tire iron. Raise the Passat off of the jack stands, then remove the stands and lower the car to the ground. Apply 90 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. Double check the brake fluid reservoir with the car lowered onto level ground.

Kamis, 22 Juli 2010

How to Change Brake Pads on a 97 VW Jetta

The brakes on your 1997 Volkswagen Jetta play a crucial role in the driving experience. When the brakes start to wear down, so does your stopping distance, until eventually you run the risk of losing your brakes entirely. It's recommended to turn or replace your rotors with every brake pad change, but that's not always possible to do. If you just need to change your pads, it can be done quickly--about 15 minutes per corner.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the front of the car with the jack and put it down onto the jack stands. Take off the wheel lugs using the tire iron and remove the front wheels.

    2

    Unbolt the bottom bolt on the brake caliper using two open-end wrenches. Flip the bottom of the brake caliper up until it's sticking just past vertical. Pull the brake pads out of the caliper housing.

    3

    Compress the piston in the middle of the brake caliper using the large C-clamp or the caliper clamp. Then insert the replacement pads into the caliper. Swing the top of the caliper down onto the brake rotor. Reinstall the lower brake caliper bolt using two wrenches.

    4

    Repeat steps 2 to 3 for the other side of the car. Reinstall the wheels with the tire iron and then set the car on the ground using the jack.

How to Stop Brake Rotor Rust

How to Stop Brake Rotor Rust

Rust is common on a car's brake rotors. Because these parts are out of the sunlight, moisture can easily build up within the brakes and lead to rust. The good news is that rust on the brake rotors is not a big problem. There's little you can do to completely stop rust from forming, but it's very easy to keep that rust from building up.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the car frequently to give the brakes plenty of use, especially if you live in humid or rainy conditions. The rust will always begin to build up, but applying the brakes will remove the rust from the rotors.

    2

    Clean the rotors regularly. You will need to raise the car and remove the wheel to reach the rotors, and you might want to remove the caliper to clean the entire rotor. Use an aerosol brake cleaner with a pan underneath to catch the dripping residue; never use compressed air on brake parts because of the asbestos in them.

    3

    Use an oil-based lubricant on any parts of the rotor that don't touch the pads when driving. Apply this only if you notice rust beginning to build up. Use a aerosol-based lubricant like WD-40, wipe it and the rust away with a cloth. Make sure all the lubricant is gone from the rotors before driving.

    4

    Replace your brake rotors with ones that have special plating or coating like zinc or cadmium. Zinc may be the better option as cadmium contains poisons that can wear down onto the roads and can possibly cause environmental problems.

Selasa, 20 Juli 2010

How to Remove a Rear Wheel Cylinder on a 91 Grand Am

The 1991 Pontiac Grand Am base model came with a 2.5-liter in-line four-cylinder engine and a five speed manual transmission. The rear brakes on your Grand Am are drum brakes which require a double piston wheel cylinder to apply equal pressure to both brake shoes when the brake pedal is pressed. Over time the wheel cylinder for each drain can wear out and begin to leak or become seized preventing the proper pressure from being applied to the brake shoes. Replacing either rear wheel cylinder is a straightforward task, but will require a helper when it comes time to bleed the new wheel cylinder.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Park the vehicle on a level surface and set the parking brake. Loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheel with the faulty wheel cylinder with a lug wrench. Lift the rear of the vehicle into the air with a floor jack and place jack stands under the rear suspension. Lower the rear of the vehicle until it rests securely on the jack stands.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts for the rear wheel. Remove the rear wheel from the vehicle and set it aside. Spray the brake line fitting going to the wheel cylinder and the two torx bolts that secure it to the brake backing plate. Remove the drum from the brake backing place and wheel hub. Tap the drum with a rubber mallet, if it is stuck to the wheel hub. Wait at least 5 minutes to allow the penetrating oil to work into the bolt threads and brake line fitting.

    3

    Place a drain pan under the rear brake assembly. Tap the back of the brake line fitting with the flat end of a line wrench to help break the taper seal. Loosen and remove the brake line fitting from the rear of the wheel cylinder, but do not bend the brake line back of damage may occur. Install a 3/8-inch line plug to the brake line.

    4

    Loosen and remove the wheel cylinder mounting bolts with a 3/8-inch drive torx socket and a ratchet. Push outward on the brake shoes and remove the wheel cylinder from the brake backing plate. Drain any remaining fluid from the wheel cylinder into the drain pan and set the cylinder aside.

    5

    Spray brake cleaner over the brake backing plate, brake return springs, and brake shoe hold down pins. Inspect the brake shoe lining for brake fluid contamination, if the shoes have been contaminated with brake fluid you will need to replace them before continuing.

Installation

    6

    Push outward on the brake shoes and position the wheel cylinder against the brake backing plate. Loosely install the wheel cylinder bolts. Remove the line plug previously installed in the brake line and thread the brake line fitting into the new wheel cylinder.

    7

    Tighten the wheel cylinder mounting bolts to 15 foot-pounds with a 3/8-inch drive T6 Torx socket and a breaker bar. Tighten the brake line fitting to 12 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and crowfoot attachment.

    8

    Lift and support the vehicle hood with the hood prop rod. Remove the brake master cylinder cap and top of the brake fluid reservoir. Loosen the bleeder valve on the new wheel cylinder and wait for two minutes. Close the bleeder valve. Install one end of 3/8-inch clear tubing to the wheel cylinder bleeder valve and direct the opposite into the drain pan.

    9

    Instruct a helper enter the vehicle and pump the brakes until the achieve a firm brake pedal. Instruct the helper to maintain constant pressure on the pedal and to hold to the floor when applicable.

    10

    Loosen the bleeder valve and allow the fluid to enter the clear tubing. Close the bleeder valve when the pedal hits the floor. Instruct the helper to pump the brake pedal until a firm pedal is achieved. Loosen the bleeder valve. Tighten the bleeder valve when fluid stops flowing. Repeat this step until there are no air bubbles in the fluid traveling from the bleeder valve.

    11

    Install the brake drum over the wheel hub and brake backing plate. Install the wheel to the vehicle and install the lug nuts hand tight. Lift the rear of the vehicle off the jack stands and remove the jack stands from under the vehicle. Lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds in a criss-cross pattern with a torque wrench.

    12

    Top off the brake fluid reservoir with fresh Dot 3 brake fluid and install the reservoir cap. Shut the vehicle hood.

How to Change the Brakes on a Lexus ES 300

How to Change the Brakes on a Lexus ES 300

The brakes on your Lexus ES 300 use a caliper-and-pad design. This caliper system provides improved braking over a brake-drum system. The caliper is a device that sits over the brake rotor, a disc that is mounted on the wheel hub and turns with the wheels. When you press on the brake pedal, the caliper forces the brake pads against the brake rotor, which slows the vehicle down. When the brake pad material is less than one-eighth of an inch thick, it's time to replace the brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Jack up on your Lexus' front jack point using a floor jack under the front jack point behind the radiator. Place jack stands under the front jack-support positions under the front doors and then lower the vehicle onto the stands.

    2

    Remove the wheel lug nuts with an impact wrench and pull the wheel off.

    3

    Slide the C-clamp over the brake caliper and tighten the clamp so that the outboard brake pad is pushed in towards the wheel hub. The screw end of the clamp should rest against the back of the outboard pad. When you tighten the clamp, a piston inside the caliper retracts into the caliper. When the piston bottoms out, you won't be able to tighten the clamp any further.

    4

    Remove the clamp from the caliper and loosen the caliper-pin bolt on the bottom of the back side of the caliper.

    5

    Swing the bottom of the caliper up and remove the brake pads. Then, insert the new pads and close the caliper.

    6

    Tighten the pin bolt. The rest of the installation is the reverse of removal.

Senin, 19 Juli 2010

How to Remove the Brake Disc From a 2001 Lexus ES 3000 Model

How to Remove the Brake Disc From a 2001 Lexus ES 3000 Model

The Lexus ES300 was introduced in 1992 as a redesigned version of the ES250. The 2001 Lexus ES300 was produced with a 3-liter V-6, capable of producing 210 horsepower. The 2001 ES300 came standard with anti-lock brakes, and electronic traction control. Removing a brake disc, or rotor, from the 2001 ES300 should take no longer than 45 minutes, even if you have never attempted this work before. All of the tools needed for this project are available at an auto parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the front of the vehicle on the side that you intend to work on. Set a jack stand beneath the lower control arm to hold the vehicle in the air more securely while you complete the rotor removal.

    2

    Remove all five wheel lug nuts with a lug wrench. Remove the wheel and tire assembly completely from the vehicle. You can position the wheel so that it is laying on its back near the vehicle, so that you have something other than the ground to sit on for this project.

    3

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts from the rear of the disc brake assembly. The caliper mounting bolts hold the caliper in place over the rotor. Use a 3/8-inch ratchet and socket set to turn the bolts counterclockwise for removal.

    4

    Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using a small pry bar or flat-head screwdriver between the top of the rotor and the caliper. Set the caliper on the lower control arm so that it does not move during this operation. A loosely hanging caliper can rip or tear the brake line leading from the vehicle to the caliper.

    5

    Remove the caliper mounting bracket bolts from the rear of the rotor, using a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket to turn the bolts counterclockwise. The only brake parts that should be on the vehicle now are the caliper mounting bracket and rotor; all other brake parts should be out of the way. Remove the caliper mounting bracket from the vehicle and set it aside.

    6

    Remove the rotor by hand if possible. The rotor should slide off the hub with no problem because all of the other brake parts are out of the way. Corrosion and rust may be a factor, which could seize the rotor to the hub. If the rotor is seized and not removable by hand, use a hammer to tap the raised front of the rotor. Tap the rotor in between all five lug stems to create a vibrating force which will loosen the rotor from the hub. Repeat this step until the rotor comes free of the car.

Minggu, 18 Juli 2010

How to Remove the Front Brakes on a 2005 Ford Five Hundred

The front brakes on a 2005 Ford 500 are made up of a brake caliper, pads, and rotor, all of which work in harmony to stop the car. The more miles that are on the car, the more wear and tear that the brakes receive until eventually the calipers and rotors will need to be replaced entirely. Doing so involves completely removing the front brakes, which can be done in a few hours.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Ford 500 on a level surface and apply the parking brake. Put the transmission into the Neutral position. Pick up the Ford 500 with the jack so the front wheels are off the ground, then support the chassis with the jack stands. Take off the wheels using a tire iron.

    2

    Clamp the rubber brake line leading to the brake caliper using the brake line clamp. Unbolt the brake line connection to the caliper with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, then unbolt the caliper and caliper anchor plate from the front suspension with the ratchet as well. Take the caliper and caliper anchor plate away from the car.

    3

    Remove the screws holding the face of the rotor to the knuckle using the Phillips-head screwdriver. Spray the rotor's surface and the mating surface between the rotor and the hub with the penetrating spray. Allow the rotor to sit for 5 minutes before you proceed.

    4

    Slide the rotor away from the hub using both hands to support the weight of the heavy rotor.

Kamis, 15 Juli 2010

Typical Mileage for Brake Pad Replacement

Typical Mileage for Brake Pad Replacement

Brakes are often a last defense in preventing accidents that call for a person to stop abruptly. Because of their important role in automobile safety, information on the typical mileage that should be traveled before brake pad replacement is needed can be beneficial for vehicle owners.

Mileage

    There is no exact mileage that can predict the life of a vehicle's brake pads. It is often recommended that brake pad replacement should be done once you have crossed the 35,000 mile mark. This is not the standard for all vehicles, though.

Factors

    Determining mileage for brake pad replacement can be tricky because so many factors affect brake wear. Driving habits, as well as the conditions of the road are examples of this. Also, drivers who routinely carry heavy loads are prone to shorter brake pad life.

Considerations

    Because mileage is not an exact science when it comes to determining if you truly need a brake pad replacement, drivers might want to consider an alternative method. Inspecting your brake pads is a safe option, as any pads under 1/8 of an inch in thickness should be replaced.

How to Replace Rear Brakes on the 2005 Ford F-150 4X4

How to Replace Rear Brakes on the 2005 Ford F-150 4X4

The 2005 Ford F150 4x4 pickup is equipped with self-adjusting rear disc brakes. The brake pads clamp down on the rotor, which stops the truck when you put your foot on the brake pedal. While this system works marvelously, the downside is the designed wear of the brake pads and rotors. Every time you put your foot on the brakes, the pads wear down until you eventually must replace them. While the rotors wear down as well, they last two to three times longer than the pads. If you're mechanically inclined and have a few hours to spare, you can replace the rear brake pads on the 2005 Ford F150 4x4 yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Block off the front wheels with the wheel chocks to prevent the truck from rolling. Loosen the lug nuts on both rear wheels using the lug wrench. Make sure the lug nuts are loose enough to remove by hand later on, but don't take them off yet.

    2

    Place the floor jack under the rear differential and lift the F150 with the jack. Positions the jack stands under the rear axle, out by the leaf springs and then lower the truck onto the jack stands.

    3

    Remove the rear lug nuts from both wheels and then pull the wheels off by hand.

    4

    Set the drip pan under the left-rear brake rotor and spray the brake rotor and caliper off with brake cleaner to remove any visible signs of brake dust.

    5

    Unbolt the caliper with the socket set. Pick the caliper up and off the rotor and pull the brake pads out of the caliper by hand. Never let the caliper hang on the rubber brake hose.

    6

    Clean the inside of the caliper with the brake cleaner in a similar manner to how you cleaned the rotor and outside of the caliper earlier. Make sure to get all the old grease, brake dust and road dirt off the caliper slide pins.

    7

    Lubricate the caliper slide pins with the white lithium grease so the caliper can contract and expand smoothly in response to the brake pedal.

    8

    Retract the caliper pistons with the caliper tool, pull the tool out and then put the new brake pads in by hand. Make sure the pad material faces inward and the pads sit in the same manner as the old ones you removed earlier.

    9

    Slide the caliper over the rotor, thread the caliper bolts back into the caliper and bracket by hand and then tighten the bolts with the socket set.

    10

    Repeat steps four through nine on the right-rear.

    11

    Reinstall the rear wheels and lug nuts by hand. Lower the F150 off the jack stands. Tighten the lug nuts to 140ft-lbs. with the torque wrench and then remove the wheel chocks.

Rabu, 14 Juli 2010

How to Reset the Check Engine Light on a 2008 Toyota Tundra

How to Reset the Check Engine Light on a 2008 Toyota Tundra

You can reset the check engine light on your 2008 Toyota Tundra just using an OBD II scan tool. This tool can be purchased from your local auto parts retailer. The Tundra comes equipped with an On-Board Diagnostic Second Edition computer that monitors all of the electrical and mechanical functions of the vehicle. Diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) are sent from sensors positioned throughout the Tundra to the OBD II computer whenever they detect a problem in one of the vehicle's systems.

Instructions

    1

    Find the diagnostic link connector (DLC) on the driver's dashboard above the steering column. You will know you have located the correct port by examining the size and shape of it and comparing it to the size and shape of the OBD II scan tool's connective cable. It should be trapezoidal in shape.

    2

    Plug the OBD II scan tool into the diagnostic link connector (DLC) of the Tundra. Don't force the tool into the port because doing so could bend the pins inside.

    3

    Put the key into the ignition and turn it to the "on" position. Don't let the engine start, however. The "on" position turns on the electrical systems of the vehicle and powers on the OBD scan tool.

    4

    Look at the OBD II scan tool's screen. Use the arrow keys to scroll to the "erase code" or "reset" command. Press "select" or "enter" to select the erase option. Wait for the main menu of the scan tool to appear.

    5

    Turn off the vehicle and unplug the scan tool from the port. Wait one minute and then turn on the engine. Look at the instrument panel to verify that the check engine light has shut off.

Senin, 12 Juli 2010

Master Brake Cylinder Problems

Your car's master cylinder is the main component that operates the hydraulic brake functions, which allows you to stop when driving. Identifying and solving the problems that the master cylinder may have is essential for safety reasons.

Bypassing

    Bypassing is a leak that occurs internally within the master cylinder. This is when brake fluid is being pumped into the front chamber out from the rear chamber and the rear reservoir would appear low on fluid. Bypassing can cause a low or sinking brake pedal feel. A defective sealing cup within the master cylinder would be responsible for this condition.

Seepage

    Problems with your car's master cylinder would typically involve leaks or seepage. Because the master cylinder is mounted onto the brake booster, seepage may likely occur around the mounting area. A little seepage is normal. But should a lot of seepage occur, the master cylinder's secondary end seal may be defective.

Blocked Vent Port

    You may have to overhaul the master cylinder with a kit if it has a blocked vent port. If the brake fluid is not allowed to escape when the brakes are released, it can heat up and cause the brakes to self-apply while you are driving.

Sabtu, 10 Juli 2010

How to Install Rear Disc Brakes on a 1970 Mustang

How to Install Rear Disc Brakes on a 1970 Mustang

The 1970 Ford Mustang came equipped with disc brakes, which provided stopping safety, as well as replacement ease for the at-home mechanic. Disc brakes are the favored brakes for the do-it-yourself car guy because of their ease of removal and installation. Rear brakes on a Mustang can be removed and replaced in around an hour if not less time.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen all of the rear lug nuts with the tire iron. Do not remove the lug nuts yet.

    2

    Place a jack underneath the rear axle and raise the car until the tires leave the ground. Set jack stands underneath the rear axle for support and safety. Lower the car onto the stands. Remove the lug nuts and remove the wheel and tire.

    3

    Undo the lower bolt on the brake caliper mounting bracket with the socket wrench. The bracket is the half-moon-shaped piece of metal attached to the rotor. Hang the bottom half of the bracket with the rope to prevent strain on the brake line.

    4

    Pull the brake pads free from the mounting bracket.

    5

    Compress the brake caliper cylinder. Place the C-clamp on the mounting bracket, with one part of the clamp against the back of the bracket and the other against the brake caliper cylinder. If the clamp slips, place one of the old brake pads between it and the cylinder for a broader grip surface. Compress the cylinder until it is flush with the bracket.

    6

    Install the new brake pads. Make sure that the black brake material is facing the rotor. Each wheel uses one boxed set of brakes, but the brakes themselves are universal as far as which side of the rotor to place them on (as long as the brake material faces the rotor).

    7

    Remove the rope from the bracket and re-bolt it to the rotor. Place the tire back on the rotor and finger tighten all of the lug nuts. Lower the car and tighten all of the lugs with the tire iron.

How to Troubleshoot a 1999 Ford Mustang ABS with the Light on

An ABS warning light on your 1999 Ford Mustang can indicate a number of problems. Before taking the car in for service, an owner can do some troubleshooting of his own, by checking fluid levels and inspecting the system wiring. However, it is highly recommended that after troubleshooting the system with these steps the vehicle be taken to an authorized dealer to correctly diagnose the problem. Because the braking system is a primary safety component of the vehicle, needed repairs should be done by a qualified mechanic.

Instructions

    1

    Check the brake control module electrical connection and ensure it is tightly connected. The module is located in the right front corner of the engine bay.

    2

    Inspect the brake fluid reservoir and add brake fluid if the level is low.

    3

    Pull all of the brake fuses and make sure they are operational.

    4

    Locate the hydraulic control unit for the brake system and ensure the electrical connections are fastened securely. The unit is located in the lower right front corner of the engine compartment.

    5

    Check the ABS wheel sensors at each wheel and make sure the wiring to each sensor is functional.

    6

    Examine the wiring running from each sensor on the wheel to the engine bay and make sure there are no cuts in the wiring.

Jumat, 09 Juli 2010

What Are the Dangers of Nonflammable Brake & Contact Cleaner?

What Are the Dangers of Nonflammable Brake & Contact Cleaner?

Nonflammable brake and contact cleaners present their own kinds of hazards and thus require careful handling. Dangers can include everything from skin and eye contact to inhalation. While brake cleaners offer flame-resistant traits, they can still wreck havoc on exposed skin and human nervous systems if inappropriately contacted or ingested. Consult a doctor immediately with any health concerns or problems.

Skin Irritation and Absorbtion Dangers

    Brake cleaners contain a variety of noxious chemical elements that can harm the human nervous system, according to Service Pro. These cleaners are dangerous to people who handle these products---especially those on a continual basis. Repeated contact to the skin can result in severe irritation, rashes and even dermatitis. Immediate consequences of brake cleaner contacting unprotected eyes include irritation and burning. Those working with brake cleaner fluid should wear protective gloves to cover hands and wrists, along with safety glasses to keep fluid from splashing into the eyes. Flush your eyes with fresh water right away if your skin, open wounds or eyes do come into contact with brake fluid.

Inhalation and Ingestion Dangers

    Inhaling brake fluid fumes can cause damage to lungs and the brain. Ingesting brake fluid can even become deadly. Dangerous and immediate repercussions of inhalation and ingestion include light-headedness, stomach cramping, vomiting and uncontrollable bowel movements, warns Service Pro. Brake fluid fumes also have a potentially carcinogenic chemical makeup. Other digestive organs are also at risk if you ingest brake fluid. Use and store this product in a safe and responsible manner.

Contamination Dangers

    Spills can occur commonly when you work with auto parts. Nonflammable brake cleaners can cause contamination concerns if leaked or spilled. According to Service Pro, minor spills require immediate soaking and mopping with rags, while larger spills may require site evacuation. Take care to prevent brake fluid from draining into sewers or coming into contact with freshwater bodies such as streams, lakes or rivers. Keep brake fluids away from pools and ponds, and always work with these chemical compounds in ventilated areas with quick access to sanitation tools.

Tools for Bleeding Brakes

Tools for Bleeding Brakes

To bleed a brake system, certain tools are required to complete the job safely and efficiently. Bleeding brakes requires taking old brake fluid, known as flushing, out of the brake lines, wheel cylinders, master cylinder and calipers, then refilling the system with clean, fresh brake fluid. Bleeding brakes may be necessary after repairing or replacing parts, or to remove air bubbles or moisture out the system.

Box-end Wrench

    A box-end wrench can fit in narrow, tight spaces.
    A box-end wrench can fit in narrow, tight spaces.

    A box-end wrench is used to remove the vehicle's bleeder screws. The wrench works by enclosing the bleeder screws to properly remove them without stripping the screws. The ends of a box-end wrench are narrow, allowing it to fit into small areas. Bleeder screws can be located on the right of the rear calipers.

Turkey Baster or Syringe

    A household turkey baster is an effective tool for removing brake fluid or sediment.
    A household turkey baster is an effective tool for removing brake fluid or sediment.

    A turkey baster or syringe will allow you to pull any fluid or sediment out of the master cylinder by means of suction.

Clear Plastic Tubing

    Clear plastic tubing is needed to drain the brake fluid.
    Clear plastic tubing is needed to drain the brake fluid.

    Clear plastic tubing will need to fit securely over the vehicle's bleeder screws. The clear plastic tubing should be roughly 12 inches in length to provide room for brake fluid to drain into a disposable container set up to collect the brake fluid.

Floor Jack and Jack Stands

    A floor jack will be required to lift the vehicle while safely setting the vehicle down on jack stands. This will prevent the car from moving while bleeding the brakes. It's recommended to place a wooden block in back of the rear tires to keep the car from rolling backward off the jack stands.

Brake Fluid

    Fresh brake fluid will be required to replace the old brake fluid. Approximately three containers of brake fluid will be needed for completely replacing the old brake fluid while one container will be sufficient if only bleeding the brakes.

Rubber Mallet

    Rubber mallets are used to remove any air bubbles adhering to the inside shell of the caliper. Lightly tapping the outside of the caliper will help remove air bubbles.

Anti-lock Brake Scanning Tool

    If the vehicle is equipped with an anti-locking brake system (ABS), a scan tool will be needed. The can tool will cycle the valves and pumps during the bleeding process. The ABS scan tool cycles and energizes the ABS solenoids and will instruct you when to bleed each wheel.

How to Replace the Brake Lines in a 1996 Plymouth Voyager

If any of the metal brake lines on your 1996 Plymouth Voyager are punctured or otherwise damaged, it will cause fluid to leak and you'll need to replace it. The metal brake lines are made up of multiple steel pipes connected together, and replacing a line is much like changing one on any other vehicle, save for the exact shape the pipes are bent in. Always use steel brake lines and never copper ones, and look for brake lines that are already flared at the ends for easier installation.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the van at the end closest to the brake line you are servicing and support it on jack stands. Remove the wheel.

    2

    Clean all dirt and contaminants away from the brake line fittings using compressed air.

    3

    Disconnect the metal brake line at both ends with a flare-nut wrench, making sure you don't bend the frame bracket or the line at either end, especially near the rubber brake hose.

    4

    Bend the replacement brake line to the exact same shape as the old line using a tubing bender. You may be able to find brake lines bent to the same shape needed for the 1996 Voyager.

    5

    Install the new brake lines in their fitting and the brackets on the Voyager's chassis, making sure there is enough clearance between the lines and all hot/moving components. Tighten the fittings on the lines with the flare-nut wrench.

    6

    Fill the brake master cylinder with fresh DOT 3 brake fluid. Bleed the brake system at the wheel for the line you changed. If the line you changed was connected to the master cylinder, bleed all four brakes.

Bleeding the Brakes

    7

    Connect a small piece of rubber tubing to the bleeder screw on the brake caliper and submerge the tube's other end in a container partially filled with brake fluid.

    8

    Open the bleeder valve while a second person presses on the rake pedal inside the van. Look for air bubbles to appear in the container, then close the valve and have the assistant release the pedal. Repeat until all air is purged.

    9

    Reconnect the wheel and lower the van off the jack stands.

How to Remove the Rear Drum on a Suzuki Aerio

Removal of the brake drums on the rear of your Suzuki Aerio is slightly different from the older standard drums that came on many cars and trucks. The job is not difficult, and most home mechanics can do it in the driveway in about an hour. The Aerio was sold from 2001 to 2007 but the procedure is the same for all model years. Replacement drums or brake parts are available through the Suzuki dealership.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels of the car with a lug wrench then raise the rear off the ground with a jack until the tires are off the ground. Position a set of jack stands under the rear axle to support the car, and then lower the jack until the car is resting on the jack stands.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts, pull the tires off the car and set the tires aside. Locate the rubber plug in the rear of the brake drum and pull it out with a pair of needle nose pliers. Insert a flat screwdriver into the hole and under the adjuster lock tab inside the drum.

    3

    Insert a brake spoon into the access hole where you placed the screwdriver then turn the adjuster up to loosen the brake shoes. Move to the front of the brake drum and locate the Phillips head screws on the face of the drum.

    4

    Remove the two screws with an impact driver and hammer. Set the screws aside for now.

    5

    Grasp the drum on either side with your hands and pull the drum straight back toward you. Carefully slide it off the hub and wheel studs. Repeat the process for the opposite side of the car.

Senin, 05 Juli 2010

How to Repair Auto Brakes

Auto brake repair is a do-it-yourself job if you have the right tools and a little bit of experience in car repair. You'll need an extra pair of helping hands and plan to spend about half a day putting on a new set of brakes. If all you need is shoes or pads, the job takes less time. Read on to learn how to repair auto repair brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Secure your vehicle and jack it up. The front two tires must be off the ground in order to remove them and repair the brakes.

    2

    Remove the tires. Use the jack and lug nut remover that came with your car. Set your lug nuts aside with the tire for easy replacement.

    3

    Take off the brake cylinder and pads. Use a hydraulic wrench to remove the fittings and then slide the cylinder off. If you have drum brakes you'll need to remove the brake cover and take off the brake shoes.

    4

    Plug the brake line so brake fluid doesn't leak out all over the floor.

    5

    Install new pads and replace the cylinder. Turn the new brake cylinder as far as it will go by hand and then tighten down the bolts. Purchase the right pads and cylinders at your local auto parts supply store.

    6

    Bleed the brake line if needed after replacing the tires. Have the person helping you push on the brake pedal inside the car until braking feels normal.

How to Change the Rear BrakePads on a Chevy Silverado

Brake pads are an important part of your Chevy Silverado's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a 1/4 inch, or risk damaging your Silverado's brake discs.

Instructions

Remove the Rear Brake Pads

    1

    Park your car on a level surface. Set the parking brake. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

    2

    Open the hood of your car. Locate the master cylinder and remove about 2/3 of the brake fluid. A turkey baster is a good tool for this.

    3

    Raise the rear end of your Silverado with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

    4

    Remove the caliper bolts from the back of the caliper. Slide the caliper off of the disc brake and suspend it near the disc brake with a small bungee cord or coat hanger. Suspend the caliper housing so that you do not damage the brake hose.

    5

    Take the brake pads out of the caliper. Remove the clips from inside of the caliper mounting bracket.

Install Rear Brake Pads

    6

    Connect the clips to the inside of the caliper. Place the inner and outer brake pads in the caliper. Attach the caliper mounting bracket to the backing plate assembly.

    7

    Prepare the mounting bolts for installation. Remove the any adhesive left by the adhesive patch. Clean the mounting bolt threads with brake parts cleaner and allow to dry. Apply red Loctite272 to the mounting bolt threads.

    8

    Install the caliper mounting bracket bolts to the steering knuckle. Tighten the bolts to 148 foot pounds (200 Nm) on the 15 series; 122 foot pounds (165 Nm) on the 25 series.

    9

    Put the caliper back in place and tighten the bolts to 80 foot pounds (108 Nm).

    10

    Replace the wheel assembly (tire). Lower the car to the ground. Pump the brake pedal a few times to seat the brake pads. Do this before trying to move your car.

    11

    Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder container. Add fluid to the container as needed.

How to Install Back Brake Pads on a Hyundai

Replacing rear brake pads in a Hyundai is not an overly difficult job. It will require some tools and some technical know-how. The benefit to replacing your own pads is the money you can save on expensive labor charges at dealerships or local repair shops. Many places will try to sell you the warranty on the brake pads as well as the pads themselves. However, a good quality brake pad from the parts store is going to have the exact same lifetime warranty as the repair shop is trying to promote and inflating their prices in order to do so. Dust off those tools in the garage and give it a try.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Hyundai on a flat paved or concrete surface. Release the hood latch.

    2

    Place a wheel chock in front of one of the front tires and open the hood.

    3

    Locate the master cylinder reservoir on the upper firewall on the driver's side. Remove the cap and suck out half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster. Discard the fluid properly and do not reuse it. Replace the cap on the master cylinder securely.

    4

    Break the lug nuts loose on the left rear wheel using the breaking bar and a 21 millimeter socket.

    5

    Raise the left rear quarter of the Hyundai with the floor jack and place the jack stand under the rocker panel close to the rear tire.

    6

    Remove the lug nuts and wheel.

    7

    Locate and remove the lower caliper bolt using the ratchet and socket.

    8

    Pry the caliper upward off of the rotor and pads using the screwdriver. The upper caliper bolt on most Hyundai's pivots and does not need to be removed unless you're replacing rotors as well.

    9

    Compress the piston of the caliper inward using the C-clamp. Tighten the clamp slowly and compress the piston inward until it bottoms out flush with the caliper housing. Remove the C-clamp.

    10

    Hold the caliper up and pry the pads out of the caliper anchor using the screwdriver.

    11

    Squeeze some silicone brake lubricant onto bristles of the acid brush. Apply it to the bottom and top caliper anchor spots where the tab of the pads backing plate seat into.

    12

    Apply the stick-on shims of the pads (most likely in the box of pads or already staked on with rivets) and insert into the caliper anchor.

    13

    Replace the caliper over the pads and rotor and tighten the caliper bolt tightly with the ratchet and socket. Do not over-tighten, but make sure it's snug.

    14

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Tighten snug with the ratchet and 21 millimeter socket. Then lower the Hyundai and re-tighten the lug nuts with the adjustable torque wrench set at 80 foot pounds.

    15

    Repeat the steps on the right rear wheel and brakes.

    16

    Pump the brake foot pedal of the Hyundai when you're done and it is back on the ground. This will restore the hydraulic pressure back to the compressed calipers. Check and adjust the brake fluid in the master cylinder after you've pumped the brake foot pedal and it feels normal. Only add new DOT-approved brake fluid to the master cylinder.

    17

    Remove the wheel chock and test drive.

How Long Should GS 300 Brake Rotors Last?

How Long Should GS 300 Brake Rotors Last?

    A lexus GS 300 brake rotor lifespan depends on many factors.
    A lexus GS 300 brake rotor lifespan depends on many factors.

Aggressive Driving Style

    The length of time a Lexus GS 300 brake rotor will last depends on your driving conditions. Driving your GS in the city, or with many stops, will decrease the useful life of the rotor. Driving in an aggressive style, braking hard at the last moment or driving fast into corners will wear out the rotors sooner.

Cautious Driving Style

    Driving your Lexus 300 GS on the highway with fewer stops will increase the lifespan of a brake rotor and pads. Go slowly when coming to a stop or cornering the Lexus. Downshifting when coming to a stop will cut down on brake use.

Bottom Line

    Most brake pads on a Lexus GS 300 can last 20,000 to 30,000 miles or more. Have your brakes serviced regularly; a worn pad can gouge the rotor and require a replacement. Mechanics will often replace the rotors when changing the brake pads, as the materials used in the brake pads tend to last as long as the rotors.

Minggu, 04 Juli 2010

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a 2005 Chevrolet Avalanche

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a 2005 Chevrolet Avalanche

The brake pads on a 2005 Chevrolet Avalanche are the most frequently maintained part of the braking system, and the condition of the rotors and calipers can be checked while the pads are being replaced. Brake pads shrink over time; and when they begin to get too thin, a metal section is exposed, creating a high-pitched squealing sound whenever the brake pedal is depressed. As soon as that noise begins, make plans to replace the brake pads as soon as possible.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a flat surface and set the parking brake.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front tire by turning a lug wrench 1/2 turn on each nut. Place a jack under the front of the truck in the center of the frame. Lift the Avalanche until jack stands can be placed under the front axle. Finish removing the lug nuts then remove the wheel.

    3

    Remove the two bolts holding the caliper in place. Inspect the caliper for damage then carefully hang it from the axle with a short piece of wire so the brake line doesn't get damaged. Inspect the rotor for damage.

    4

    Press in on the brake pad with a C-clamp to fully compress the piston underneath. Pull up and back on the clips that hold the brake pad in place. Remove the brake pad. If the pad is stuck, carefully pry it loose with a flat head screwdriver.

    5

    Dab a small amount of silicone grease on the back of the new brake pads and put them in place. Push the retaining clips closed until they snap into position.

    6

    Reassemble the brake assembly by reversing the steps above. Put the wheel back on the axle and tighten down the lug nuts most of the way. Repeat with the other wheel.

    7

    Remove the jack stands and lower the Avalanche to the ground. Climb in the vehicle and press the brake pedal three or four times to seat the pads.

Removal & Installation of the Rear Brake Rotors in a 2003 Acura TL

Removal & Installation of the Rear Brake Rotors in a 2003 Acura TL

Acura, a division of Honda Motor Company, introduced the TL in the United States in 1997. The 2003 Acura TL was available in four different sub-models, the 3.2 TL, the 3.2 TL with navigation system, the Type S, and the Type S with navigation system. The 3.2 TL sub-models were both equipped with a 3.2-liter, 225-horsepower V-6 known as the UA4. The Type S sub-models were both equipped with a more powerful 3.2-liter 260-horsepower V-6 known as the UA5. The rear brakes on the 2003 TL are disc brakes, which incorporate pads, rotors, and calipers.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Acura on a level surface. Raise the hood of the TL and locate the brake fluid reservoir on the driver's side of the engine compartment, near the firewall. Visually inspect the brake fluid level. If you have not added brake fluid to the vehicle then your brake fluid should be slightly lower than the "Full" mark. Use a turkey baster or small bottle siphon to remove the brake fluid, so that it is about 1/4-inch below the "Full" mark on the reservoir. Removing the brake fluid will ensure that you do not spill fluid while retracting the caliper pistons.

    2

    Loosen, but do not remove, the rear wheel lug nuts, using a tire iron. Raise the rear of the TL with the floor jack. Place jack stands beneath both rear lower suspension arms. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stands and gyrate the vehicle slightly to test the stability. The farther apart you place your jack stands, the lower your center of gravity and greater the balance of the car will be. Remove the rear lug nuts completely, then remove the rear wheels. Work on one side of the car at a time, so you will always have a complete brake assembly as a visual reference.

    3

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts from the rear of the caliper, using a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket. Pull the caliper up and off of the brake assembly, using a small pry bar. Hold the caliper in one hand, and remove one of the old brake pads from the caliper bracket. Set the old pad against the caliper piston on the rear inside of the caliper. Wrap a 7-inch C-clamp around the back of the caliper and the front of the old pad. Turn the C-clamp inward to compress the caliper piston, until it is flush with the caliper body.

    4

    Hang the caliper onto the rear strut spring, using a wire coat hanger or a metal S-shaped hook. Don't let the caliper hang by the brake hose. Remove the caliper bracket mounting bolts from behind the rotor, using a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket. Remove the caliper bracket from the remaining brake assembly and set the bracket out of your way. Remove the rotor retaining screws with a Phillips screwdriver. Remove the rotor completely. If necessary, thread two 8-by-1.25 mm bolts into the screw holes to force the rotor off the hub.

    5

    Coat the new rotor thoroughly with aerosol brake cleaner spray, to remove the factory anti-rust coating. Install the new brake rotor straight onto the rear hub assembly, being careful not to go askew and possibly damage the emergency brake components. Install the caliper bracket immediately after you get the rotor on. Install the rotor retaining screws and tighten them. Tighten the caliper bracket bolts to 28-foot-pounds, using a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket. Respray the brake rotor with more cleaner to ensure that you remove the oil from your fingers.

    6

    Install new brake pads on the front and rear of the rotor, in their slots on the caliper bracket, making sure the inner pad has its wear indicator facing downward. Lightly lubricate the shim plates on the outsides of the brake pads with caliper grease. This grease will help eliminate squealing that is common with new brake products during the break-in period. Unhook the caliper from the wire hanger or hook, and slide the caliper over the brake pads and rotor assembly.

    7

    Remove the caliper slide tubes and rubber boots from the rear of the caliper. Simply pull the slide tubes out with your hand. Thoroughly lubricate the metal slides with caliper grease, then reinstall the slide tubes and boots. Install the caliper bolts and torque the bolts to 41-foot-pounds of torque, using a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket.

    8

    Repeat steps 3 through 7 to complete the rotor replacement on the second side of the vehicle.

    9

    Reinstall the rear wheels on the TL, and snug the wheel lug nuts. Raise the vehicle off of the jack stands using your jack, then remove the jack stands. Lower the Acura to the ground and remove your jack. Immediately tighten the wheel lug nuts to 80-foot-pounds of torque, using a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket. Enter the Acura and pump the brake pedal several times, until the brake pedal becomes stiff and resistant. Perform the pedal pumping procedure directly after you torque the wheels in place.

How to Replace Trailer Drum Brakes

The drum brakes on a trailer's wheels use brake shoes that are installed much like the brake shoes on most cars and trucks. The shoes drag against the brake drum when applied to halt movement. Replacing these brakes involve disconnecting the full assembly of shoes and springs that work together. You also should replace the springs, as they can wear down from the heat. A full replacement brake shoe set should include replacement springs.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Raise the trailer with a floor jack and support it on jack stands. Remove the wheels on both sides of the trailer.

    2

    Pop the grease cap off the hub using a mallet and a large flat screwdriver as a wedge. Pull the cotter pin out of the hub with pliers, then loosen the drum's castle nut with a socket or ratchet wrench and remove the drum.

    3

    Disconnect the two upper return springs using a spring removal tool on the central pin, removing the pin and the washer beneath it.

    4

    Remove the hold-down spring for the rear brake shoe and then pull out this shoe slightly to remove the adjuster wheel at the bottom.

    5

    Unscrew and remove the front shoe's hold-down spring and remove the front shoe, then remove the rear shoe.

    6

    Twist the disconnected adjuster screw until it is completely closed.

    7

    Clean and wipe off the backing place with a rag.

Installation

    8

    Install the replacement front shoe on the backing plate, using the top retaining pin to pivot it into position and engaging it with the push rod near the middle, and fasten its own retaining pin and spring.

    9

    Connect the rear shoe to the front one using the replacement lower spanner spring and then reconnect the star adjuster screw to the plate and shoes, making sure the star wheel points toward the trailer's rear end.

    10

    Connect the rear shoe to the upper pin and then install the shoe's keeper pin and the first replacement return spring. Install the large flat washer and the second return spring with your spring installment tool.

    11

    Pull out the plug in the back of the plate and turn the star wheel with a screwdriver until the shoes barely avoid touching the outside of the drum assembly.

    12

    Place the drum back on the assembly and tighten the castle nut. Tighten it to about 35 foot-pounds while turning the drum forward to seat the bearings, then loosen the nut to finger tight and install a new cotter pin.

    13

    Reinstall the dust cap, tapping it with a hammer and wood block.

    14

    Reconnect the wheels after changing both brakes.

    15

    Adjust the star wheel with your screwdriver while turning the brake drum until the drum drags, then turn the wheel the other way until it just stops dragging.

    16

    Lower the trailer off the jack stands.

How to Repair the Front Brakes on a Dodge Ram

How to Repair the Front Brakes on a Dodge Ram

Replacing the disc brake pads and removing the rotors for resurfacing on a Dodge Ram pickup are two relatively straightforward jobs, but they do require some basic mechanical skills. Generally, brake calipers are not disassembled during this process--only moved out of the way to allow the rotor to be removed and the pads to be replaced. Resurfacing the rotors is always recommended as part of this process. Most larger auto parts stores have the equipment to complete this job.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Dodge pickup on a firm, level surface. Block the rear wheels with wheel chocks or wood blocks.to prevent accidental movement of the vehicle. Use a lug wrench to loosen, but do not remove, the front wheel lug nuts. Two-wheel drive trucks can be lifted with a jack placed under the lower control arm. Four-wheel drive models can be lifted with the jack placed under the spring at the axle. Raise one side of the truck, insert a jack stand under the lower control arm then lower the vehicle onto the jack stand. Repeat this for the opposite wheel. Once the vehicle is safely on the jack stands, use the lug wrench to completely remove the lug nuts and carefully lift the wheels off and set them aside.

    2

    Unscrew the two Allen bolts that secure the caliper then lift it off the rotor. Do not let the caliper hang by the hose; secure it to the suspension with a piece of wire. Remove the brake rotor if there is any sign of wear or if any brake shudder was noted when driving. The rotor may have clips installed over its lug bolts; these are simple to remove. Take the rotor to a qualified machine shop to have it resurfaced if necessary.

    3

    Remove the outer pad from the caliper by prying the clips free from the caliper with a flat head screwdriver. The inner pad is held in place by a spring clip and can easily be pried out with the screwdriver. Once the inner pad has been removed, use a large C-clamp to compress the piston. This will allow the caliper to be reinstalled after the pads are replaced. The new pads can be installed by simply reversing the steps for removal.

    4

    Lubricate the surface of the mounting bolts and set them aside. Gently slide the caliper assembly over the rotor and align the holes for the assembly with the mounting brackets. Insert the freshly lubricated Allen bolts used to attach the caliper assembly then tighten them.

    5

    Remount the wheels then tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Check the brake fluid level at the reservoir to verify sufficient fluid is present. The minimum and maximum levels are marked on the reservoir. If additional brake fluid is needed, use only the type specified on the reservoir cover. Start the truck and pump the brakes until the brake pedal feels firm.

    6

    Raise one side of the vehicle up and remove the jack stand. Lower the vehicle to the ground with the jack. Repeat for the other side of the vehicle. Re-tighten the lug nuts to ensure the wheels are properly secured. Remove the blocks from the rear wheels. Shift the vehicle into gear and move the vehicle slightly with the brakes applied to verify proper braking action. If there is any indication of a problem, do not drive the vehicle until the brake installation is re-inspected to ensure proper brake pad installation.

Sabtu, 03 Juli 2010

How do I Replace the Rear Brake Drums on a 2005 Dodge Caravan?

The 2005 Dodge Caravan uses drum brakes to stop the rear tires from spinning when you press on the brake pedal. Drum brakes consist of three main parts: two brake shoes held on by two springs, and the brake drum held on by the wheel. When you complete a brake job on drum brakes, you replace both shoes and the drum. You need a specialized tool called a drum puller to remove the drum from the wheel hub. You can rent one from your local auto parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts using the Caravan's tire iron.

    2

    Place a jack under the frame directly in front of the tire you want to remove. Raise the Caravan until you can place a jack stand under the frame in front of the jack. Lower the Caravan onto the jack stand.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheel off the wheel studs.

    4

    Place the fingers of the drum puller around the drum and position the threaded post in the center of the wheel hub. Place a socket and ratchet on the end of the threaded post and turn the ratchet clockwise to pull the drum brake off the hub and wheel studs.

    5

    Disconnect the springs from the brake shoes using a pair of needle-nose pliers. Lift the brake shoes off the wheel housing.

    6

    Place the new brake shoes onto the wheel housing. Secure them in place using the springs and your needle-nose pliers.

    7

    Slide the drum onto the wheel studs and center it on the wheel hub. Pound the drum onto the wheel hub using a rubber mallet until the back of the drum butts up against the brake shoes.

    8

    Remount the wheel on the wheel studs. Thread the lug nuts onto the wheel studs and tighten them lightly with the tire iron.

    9

    Raise the Caravan until you can remove the jack stand. Lower the vehicle to the ground and tighten all of the lug nuts with the tire iron.

    10

    Repeat the process on the other rear wheel of the Caravan.

How to Put the Caliper Back on Your Car

Car braking systems need to be inspected and maintained regularly to avoid accidents that could result in injury to the driver or another vehicle. A thorough inspection should be done with every oil change and replacement done as needed. Here is how to reinstall the brake caliper after inspection and maintenance.

Instructions

    1

    Inspect the caliper mounting bolts, or slide pins, for excessive corrosion. Replace them, if necessary. Measure the length of bolts and check it against your vehicle repair manual for specifications. If they have stretched, replace them.

    2

    Clean and lubricate the caliper bushings, or slide pins. This can be done with brake cleaner. Install the caliper in the same manner in which you removed it.

    3

    Tighten the mounting bolts, or slide pins, to the torque listed in your vehicle's manual. Install the brake hose and banjo bolt. Use new copper washers, then tighten to the torque listed in your vehicle's repair manual.

    4

    Bleed the brakes. Install the wheels and lower the vehicle. Tighten the wheel lug nuts to the torque listed in your vehicle specifications. Firmly depress the brake pedals a few times to bring the pads back against the rotors, or disc.

How to Change Chevy Cavalier Brakes & Rotors

The front wheels (called disc brakes) do the bulk of the stopping when you press on the brake pedal, which is why it is critical that you check and replace them whenever they are worn down. The brake pad sits in a device called a caliper, which wraps around the brake rotor. A piston inside the brake caliper pushes against the brake pad via hydraulic pressure created through the master cylinder, brake booster, proportioning valve, and the brake lines which pushes against the brake rotor which slows down and stops your vehicle. of course, this creates a lot of friction and wears the pads down, so when the brake pad material is less than 1/8 inch thick you should replace the pads.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels with the lug nut wrench. The purpose here is to make it easier to remove the wheel when the car is off the ground, so you only want to break the lug nut loose, not loosen it so much so that the wheel becomes unstable.

    2

    Put the car in first gear, or park if the car is automatic.

    3

    Jack the car off the ground using the front jack point on the Cavalier. The jack point should be in the center of the front of the car behind the radiator.

    4

    Place two jack stands, one on each side, under the pinch welds in the front of the vehicle. They will be located on the side of the car in the front of the vehicle. You can also place the jack stands underneath the frame of the car. Next, lower the car onto the jack stands and check the car to make sure it is stable.

    5

    Loosen the lug nuts all the way, and then remove the wheels from the car.

    6

    Unbolt the top and bottom bolts on the brake caliper Next, secure it to the coil spring above it with zip ties. This will keep the caliper out of the way and keep you from accidentally damaging the rubber brake line by letting it hang down on the weight of the caliper.

    7

    Slide the brake rotor off of the hub assembly. You may need to hit the back of it with a rubber mallet to loosen the corrosion/rust that has accumulated.

    8

    Install the new brake rotor over the hub assembly.

    9

    Slide the old brake pads out. Place the flat end of the old brake pad against the piston of the caliper. Using a C-clamp, gently compress the piston back into the caliper. Be sure that the piston boot does not fold unnaturally or become disoriented. It should fold straight back, accordion-style, into the caliper.

    10

    Slide the new brake pads into the caliper paying attention to the proper orientation for each pad. The pads can only fit one way in the caliper. Once the pads are in place, you can cut the zip ties and fit the caliper back over the brake rotor and re-tighten the caliper bolts.

    11

    Put the wheel/tire back on, and hand tighten the lug nuts. Using the lug nut wrench begin tightening the lug nuts so that the wheel sit firm against the brake rotor and hub assembly. However, do not tighten them all the way. Be sure that you are tightening the lug nuts in a criss-cross pattern. For example, tighten one nut, then tighten the nut opposite of it.

    12

    Lower the car, and finish tightening the lug nuts. Torque the lug nuts to 100 ft lb using a torque wrench and use the same criss-cross pattern you used when tightening the nuts initially. Before you drive away, make sure that the brakes have pressure by pumping them a few times to ensure that normal brake pressure is being applied by the system. You will need to pump the brakes a few times before normal brake pressure returns.