Jumat, 30 April 2010

Squeaking Brake Remedies

Brake squeaks and squeals most commonly occur from heat and vibration. The caliper, pad and rotor assembly are secured to the vehicle, but the weight of the vehicle and the demand of the braking power create stress on the moving parts in the braking system. The friction material of the pad or shoe contacts the smooth surface of the rotor or drum which creates heat. There are many other variables that can cause front or rear brake noise.

Disc Brake Squeaks

    Disc brakes operate by calipers that hug two pads on both sides of the vertically positioned disc. The disc rotates with the velocity of the wheel when driving. To slow the vehicle down, hydraulic pressure expands a piston inside the caliper upon demand, which squeezes the pads against the rotor. Friction material of the pad is usually constructed of metal and brass flakes. This composition can often be the culprit of front brake noise.

    Front brakes accommodate 75 to 80 percent of the braking capacity for vehicles. They work harder than rear brakes, and that creates a more hostile environment for the braking system.

    Lubricants intended for allowing free movement to the components in the front braking systems can erode away from exposure or regular wear and tear.

    Common disc brake squeaks are most usually caused by cracked or worn pads, compromised rotor/disc surface, dry or corroded slides, brake pad drag or slipped shims. Wear sensors applied to the backing plate of the pads will also pronounce a squeal or squeak. These sensors inform the driver that the pads are low and in need of attention. Although a simple metal tab on most applications, these sensors can vary in scenarios when they sing. On some vehicles, the tabs will scrape along the surface of the rotor, making noise until the brakes are applied, and then go away until the brakes are released. Other applications make noise when the brakes are applied only.

    Lubricating all moving components, replacing rattle clips, making sure Teflon coated shims are in place and the pads are seated in their mounts properly will usually eliminate noisy disc brakes.

Drum Brake Squeaks

    Drum brakes work inside a closed environment, unlike disc brakes. In most cases, the drums entrap brake dust formed when the friction material slowly wears away from the shoes. The dust accumulates and then gets trapped between the surface of the shoes and the drums. Removing the drums and cleaning out the brake dust helps--until the dust builds up again.

    Applying lubricant under the shoe tabs that contact the backing plate of the drum brakes will also prevent squeaks. The backing plate is made of thin metal and the tabs of the shoes are made of hardened steel. These two surfaces rub together when the shoes reposition under demand.

    Worn springs or other hardware can comprise the rear drum brake systems and contribute to rear brake noise.

    Seeping or leaking rear wheel cylinders or blown axle seals can contaminate the rear drum brakes. Although a full shoe and hardware replacement is needed in addition to replacing the cylinder and/or seal, this scenario is more rare. The lubrication from the brake fluid or axle fluid helps prevent noise. However, this makes the other wheels work harder when braking, and can cause premature wear and duress.

How to Replace a Caliper in a Toyota Camry

The brake calipers on your Camry, like any other car, apply the brake pads to the rotor to stop the car. This makes them among the most important parts. If your Camry's calipers need replacing, it must be done with extreme care.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the appropriate wheel from the car. Loosen the lug nuts halfway before raising the car on the jack stand, the complete the removal after raising it.

    2

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper. Make sure dirt can't get into the hose and throw away the two washers attached with the fitting bolt.

    3

    Loosen and remove the bolts attaching the caliper to its torque plate. You may need to hold the sliding pin flats with a wrench while loosening. You can now lift the caliper upward and remove it.

    4

    Install the replacement caliper onto the rotor. Install the bolts loosely, and then tighten them to 25 foot pounds while holding sliding pin flats with the wrench.

    5

    Attach the brake hose to the caliper. Use two new washers with the banjo bolt.

    6

    Fill the brake system with fresh fluid. Open the bleeder valve and have another person push the brake pedal to bled air from the system. Connect the valve to a fluid-filled container with a tube to aid this procedure.

    7

    Lower the vehicle off the jack, check the fluid level and test the brakes. Don't test them on the road until they feel firm.

Kamis, 29 April 2010

How to Fix Drum Brakes on a Saturn

How to Fix Drum Brakes on a Saturn

Saturn vehicles may have disc or drum brakes on the rear wheels, depending on the year and model. If the vehicle has drum brakes, the parking brake shoes are installed within the drum itself. If you need to fix the drum brakes by replacing the shoes, you are dealing with numerous springs that connect the shoes and will require precision to disassemble and reassemble. The exact method may vary depending on the model, also, so talk with your mechanic beforehand. Professional help may be needed.

Instructions

Accessing the Brake Shoes

    1

    Raise the vehicle's rear end and support it with jack stands, then remove the rear wheels. Block the front wheels with wheel chocks and release the parking brake.

    2

    Pull the brake drum off of the wheel studs.

    3

    Clean the brake assembly with an aerosol brake cleaner. At the same time, observe the assembly and take note of where all the components are installed and positioned.

Removing the Brake Shoes

    4

    Unhook the upper return spring from its retaining bracket with needle-nose pliers, then remove the bracket, the self-adjuster lever connected to the bracket and the adjuster spring hooked onto the lever.

    5

    Pull the brake shoes apart at their upper ends and remove the adjuster from in between them. Push and twist the hold-down springs with pliers to remove the springs and retaining pins.

    6

    Disconnect the lower return spring from the front shoe and remove that shoe. Remove the rear shoe and detach its parking brake lever from the cable.

    7

    Unscrew the brake adjuster and clean it with the brake cleaner. Lubricate the threads and ends with high-temperature grease and re-assemble the brake adjuster.

    8

    Transfer the parking brake lever from the old rear shoe to the new one. You may need to pry out the pin with pliers and install the pin with a new clip or drill out the rivet and fasten the lever to the shoe with a rivet gun.

    9

    Clean the brake assembly's backing plate with the brake cleaner and a rag. Apply the high-temperature grease to the brake shoe contact areas on the backing plate.

Installing New Brake Shoes

    10

    Connect the parking brake cable to the parking brake lever on the rear brake shoe. Place the shoe on the backing plate and attach its hold-down spring with vice-grip pliers.

    11

    Hook the lower return spring to the rear shoe and then on to the new front shoe. Install the front shoe on the backing plate and secure it with its hold-down spring.

    12

    Place the brake adjuster in between the shoes with its screw turned as far back as it will go. Position the adjuster's forked end so the longer fork is behind the rear shoe.

    13

    Connect the adjuster lever spring to the front shoe and the adjuster lever. Place the lever on its pivot pin and install the retaining bracket in its holes.

    14

    Connect the upper return spring to the brake shoes using needle-nose pliers. Make sure the brake shoes connect to the pistons on the upper wheel cylinder.

    15

    Connect the brake drum back onto the hub flange and re-connect the wheel without tightening the lug nuts.

    16

    Lower the vehicle off the jack stands after changing the brake shoes for both wheels, then tighten the lug nuts.

Rabu, 28 April 2010

How to Test a Brake Line for Leaks

How to Test a Brake Line for Leaks

Leaking brake fluid is an unacceptable problem on any car. You will need to isolate each component area of the braking system to test it for leaks. The hydraulic pressure within the system should be sufficient to produce a discoverable leak when you push the brake pedal.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the hood and look for evidence of leaks around the master cylinder. It will be attached to the fire wall of the car above the engine to the far left or far right. Make sure the cap is in place and secure. Examine the lines running from the master cylinder for brake fluid leaks. Rusty or damaged areas are a place to pay special attention. If it appears that brake fluid has been leaking, have your helper push hard on the brakes and watch for brake fluid to ooze or spray out.

    2

    Inspect the back and front of each of the four wheels on the car for signs that brake fluid has been leaking. It will leave an oily residue and will probably be dirty from accumulated dust on the fluid. If a possible leak is noted on the rear of the wheel, examine the area where the brake lines enter the wheel cylinder assembly to see if the bleeder has been weeping. This is a fitting that will stick out from the area where the line connects. Have your helper depress the brakes and verify the leak.

    3

    Raise the car to access the brake lines underneath the vehicle. Isolate the area of the leak by clamping off the rubber tubes on the brake lines with vice grips or other type of clamping devices. Press on the brakes. If the brake pedal holds its position, you have eliminated the brake lines running to the four wheels. If the brake does not hold, make sure the master cylinder is full and push the brakes again while someone is under the car watching the brake lines until the leak is found. If the brakes hold on the previous test, release the clamp on one wheel at a time until the leak is discovered on one or more wheels. Use the lug wrench and remove the tire on the offending wheel to verify the precise location of the leak.

How to Do a Front Brake Job on a 2003 Dodge Ram

The 2003 Dodge Ram began the third generation of the truck which was available in 1/2-ton, 3/4-ton or 1-ton models. It was also available in two- or four-wheel drive. Replacing the front brakes on the 2003 Dodge Ram employed the same procedure no matter what model or drive train the truck came with. The only difference was on the 1-ton model--if replacing the rotors in that model, the hub extension and mounting nuts must be carefully removed from the rotor.

Instructions

    1

    Break the lug nuts loose on one front wheel using the lug nut wrench or breaker bar. Lift the Ram with the hydraulic jack and then support the front wheel onto a jack stand placed under the lower control arm. If desired, lift and support the other front wheel after cracking the lug nuts loose. Remove the lug nuts and then remove the wheel(s).

    2

    Insert a pry bar into the front port of the caliper and then pry the outboard pad against the rotor to compress the caliper piston. If necessary use a large C-clamp to compress the piston further into the caliper bore.

    3

    Use a 3/8-inch hex-head key to remove the upper and lower caliper guide bolts. Set them aside.

    4

    Rotate the caliper rearward off of the rotor and caliper mount. Rest the caliper onto milk crate or box. Do not allow the caliper to hang from the brake hose or damage can occur to it. Remove the outboard pad from the caliper assembly first by prying the clips off of the caliper housing. Pull the inboard pad retaining clip out of the caliper piston. Proceed to step 6 if not replacing the rotors.

    5

    Remove the two caliper anchor bolts using the breaker bar and a socket. Set the anchor aside. Remove the rotor. On 1-ton models, remove the hub extension bolts first and then remove the hub extension to remove the rotor. On all models, clean the hub extension with emery cloth. Spray the new rotor with brake clean to remove the protective coating and then replace the new rotor onto the hub. Replace the caliper anchor and tighten the bolts with a torque wrench (130 foot-pounds for light-duty 1500 or 210 foot-pounds for heavy-duty models).

    6

    Install the inboard pad into the caliper piston first and then replace the outboard pad onto the caliper housing. Apply a liberal coating of anti-seize compound to the surface of the rattle clips. Use an artisan paint brush to prevent getting any of the compound on the rotor. Wipe off any excess compound from the rotor if necessary. Place the caliper and pad assembly over the rotor and caliper anchor. Apply a light coat of anti-seize to the smooth surface of the guide bolts before reinstalling them into the caliper. Tighten the bolts to 24 foot-pounds using the torque wrench if possible with the hex-head key. An adapter may be necessary to achieve this.

    7

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts flush to the hub and then lower the Ram. Torque the lug nuts to 140 foot-pounds. Repeat the procedure for the other side.

    8

    Pump the brake pedal until it feels firm in order to seat the pads to the rotors.

Selasa, 27 April 2010

How Often Should I Check the Brakes on My Car?

How Often Should I Check the Brakes on My Car?

    Brakes are one of the most important parts of your vehicle.
    Brakes are one of the most important parts of your vehicle.

Every 35,000 Miles

    You should check your brakes every 35,000 miles. You can see your brake pads by looking through the rim assembly of your car. If the pads are less than 1/4 inch thick, you need to replace them.

Special Circumstances

    You should check your brakes if you hear or feel anything unusual, whether or not you are at 35,000 miles. Listen for squealing or grinding sounds when you brake. Check the brakes if you notice they feel squishy, or aren't responding as readily as usual.

Bottom Line

    Most cars are fine with a brake check every 35,000 miles. However, pay attention to your car's braking performance to notice if anything is out of the ordinary in the feel or sound of the brakes. If you notice anything, check the brakes immediately or take the car to your mechanic.

Senin, 26 April 2010

How to Replace a Caliper in a Dodge Intrepid

The Dodge Intrepid is a discontinued model, so finding replacement parts and service may grow difficult. Before replacing an important part, like a brake caliper, on an Intrepid, consult with your mechanic to get the exact parts needed.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Disconnect the wheel and tire from the car once it's securely raised. Remember to disconnect the lug nuts in a five-star pattern, removing each one opposite from the one previously removed.

    2

    Remove the two caliper guide pin bolts and the caliper assembly. Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper by removing the retaining bolt. Plug the hole to avoid contamination.

    3

    Pivot the caliper upwards from the rotor. Slide it off of the pin boot.

Preparing the New Caliper

    4

    Connect the brake hose to the new caliper. Use new washers when attaching the bolt.

    5

    Push the caliper pistons into their bore. This is needed if you installed new linings to accommodate their thickness. A large C-clamp should do the job.

    6

    Install the brake pads into the caliper. Lubricate the machined areas that support the caliper, using a high-temperature grease.

Installation

    7

    Attach the caliper to the steering knuckle in its proper position. Install the guide pin bolts, making sure you don't cross their threads.

    8

    Torque the guide pin bolts to 15 foot pounds. Torque the brake hose fittings to 35 foot pounds.

    9

    Bleed the brake system to remove air from it. The best way would be to attach a transparent hose to the opened bleeder valve and hold down on the brake pedal. (This will require two people.)

    10

    Reattach the wheel and tire, and then lower the car.

    11

    Seat the brake pads against the rotors by pumping the pedal. Check the fluid level and add as much as needed. Road test the car and brakes.

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Lincoln Navigator

Lincoln Navigators are available with two types of rear brakes; disc and drum. Disc brakes are gaining popularity due to their efficient stopping power. If your Lincoln Navigator has rear disc brakes, read further to learn how to replace them when needed.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the car off the ground using a car jack. Make sure to evenly support the vehicle on all sides. Keep children and animals away from the vehicle to prevent harm should it collapse.

    2

    Remove the wheels from the Navigator. Use a torque wrench to loosen the lug nuts. Set the wheel on the ground face up to prevent scratching.

    3

    Take the brake caliper off the rear hub by loosening the caliper mounting bolts, but don't disconnect the brake hose.

    4

    Wipe down all areas of the caliper and its support assembly. Use a lint free cloth and brake cleaner, making sure to get in between the areas that touch each other when the caliper slides.

    5

    Replace the brake shoes and anti-rattle clips with the new ones and make sure to line them up with the disc brake caliper support bracket. Hook up the rear disc brake calipers with the rear support bracket. Pump the air out of the brakes.

    6

    Scrub the wheel hub mounting area with the lint free cloth and brake cleaner. Put the Navigator's wheels back on.

    7

    Lower the Navigator until the weight rests slightly on the front tires. Tighten the lug nuts to 83 to 112 ft. lb. using a torque wrench. Lower the vehicle all the way and check the brakes for efficient operation.

How Do I Change 997 Brake Pads?

How Do I Change 997 Brake Pads?

Modern sports and high performance cars all come with four-wheel disc brakes, which use pads to grab a rotor attached to the wheel which, in turn, slows the car. These types of brakes offer superior stopping performance over the old drum-style brakes, but brake pads wear out rather quickly, especially if they're being used to stop a car that can achieve speeds like the Porsche 997. Luckily, replacing brake pads is an easy, at home repair that the auto enthusiast can do in an afternoon.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the car with a jack and support it on jack stands. Do not attempt to do this with the car simply resting on a hydraulic jack.

    2

    Remove the wheels with a lug nut wrench.

    3

    Loosen the bolts holding the brake calipers in place with the appropriate-sized wrench and rotate them away from the rotor. Now would be a good time to inspect the rotors for scoring and warping. If you note any damage or warping, take the rotors to a local brake shop where they can determine whether you need a new rotor or if your rotor simply needs to be resurfaced.

    4

    Remove the brake pads from either side of the calipers. You may need to use the flat head screwdriver to work them loose.

    5

    Push the brake pistons back into their open position, flush with the rotor. You should be able to do this with the heel of your hand.

    6

    Place a liberal amount of brake grease on the back of the new brake pads.

    7

    Place the pads into the rotors and ensure that they clip firmly into place. Rotate the calipers back into place over the rotor then reinstall the wheels. Lower the car off the jack stands with the jack.

Minggu, 25 April 2010

How to Put on Brake Rotors

How to Put on Brake Rotors

Brake rotors should be replaced when they become scored, excessively rusted or warped. Any of these conditions can reduce brake life or decrease the occupant's safety by increasing the distance needed to stop. Warped rotors will also cause the driver to feel a severe shake in the vehicle when applying the brakes. Replacing rotors is not difficult and requires only common tools.

Instructions

    1

    Use the screwdriver or small pry bar and remove the wheel covers.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Do not remove the lug nuts at this point.

    3

    Jack the vehicle high enough for the tires to be off the ground.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts, then remove the tires.

    5

    Select the proper socket and remove the bolts which hold the caliper in place.

    6

    Remove the caliper. Do not let it hang from the brake hose. Use a piece of wire or some other means to tie it up and support it.

    7

    Locate the two bolts which secure the caliper carrier to the spindle. These are large bolts, generally requiring an 18mm or 19mm wrench to remove. Loosen and remove these bolts and the carrier.

    8

    Remove the rotor. It should simply pull off the hub, but force is sometimes required if the rotor is rusted to the hub. If the rotor does not easily remove, insert a large screwdriver in the cooling fins to provide some leverage when prying it off.

    9

    Install the new rotor. It will simply slide on over the studs. Temporarily hold it in place with one lug nut.

    10

    Replace the caliper carrier. Put a drop of Locktite medium strength of the threads before installing the bolts.

    11

    Install a set of new brake pads. Never reuse old brake pads.

    12

    Replace the caliper and the caliper bolts.

    13

    Replace the tire and securely tighten the lug nuts.

    14

    Take the vehicle off the jack stands and jack.

    15

    Recheck the lug nuts for tightness.

    16

    Pump the brake pedal a few times before driving the vehicle.

What Are the Causes of Dragging Trailer Brakes?

What Are the Causes of Dragging Trailer Brakes?

It can be tricky to find the cause of dragging brakes on a trailer. Several problems or malfunctioning parts can make trailer brakes activate by themselves. Dragging brakes usually don't lock up completely. It's common for the wheels to still turn, but skid as they move across less solid surfaces like gravel. Brakes that drag even slightly can dramatically lower the fuel efficiency of your vehicle. Dragging brakes can overheat and damage other parts of the brake system. Locked brakes can wear a hole in the tire as it drags on the ground. It's important to fix dragging brakes immediately.

Air in Brake Lines

    When refilling a trailer's brake fluid, air gets into the brake lines. As the brakes are used, the air heats up and expands. The increased air pressure can keep brake shoes in contact with the brake drum as it passes through the lines. To remove air from the brake lines, you have to bleed the brakes. Most brakes have bleeder valves to assist with removing air. Hook a tube to the bleeder valve, place the other end in a container to hold the brake fluid that was released, have someone inside the vehicle press the brake pedal and open the bleeder valve slightly. Brake fluid and air will flow through the valve into the tube. The process should be repeated until air no longer comes through the valve.

Corrosion

    Water can get into a trailer's brake system and cause corrosion. This is especially problematic with boat trailers that are exposed to saltwater. The saltwater corrodes metal parts much faster than freshwater. Corroded metal parts are not able to move as freely as normal and can become locked in position rubbing against the brake drum. It is possible to remove rust from metal parts by sanding them, but it can be difficult to remove all the rust without slightly altering the shape of the parts. It's usually a better idea to just replace corroded parts in the brake system.

Bent Spindle

    If the brakes started dragging after you hit a bump or pothole, the likely cause is a bent spindle. The spindle holds a tire onto the trailer's axle. When the spindle is bent, the tire has an uneven rotation and often rubs against brake pads. You can check for a bent spindle by placing a level on top of the tire that is dragging. The level should indicate the tire is evenly balanced if the spindle is not bent. If the spindle is bent, the entire axle should be replaced. It's possible to weld a new spindle onto the current axle, but the heat required for welding weakens the metal axle and greatly increases the chance the axle will break in the future.

How Can I Bleed the Brakes After Changing the Master Cylinder on a 1997 Jeep?

1997 Jeeps, regardless of model, use power brakes. The power brake system allows you to press a pedal into the power booster adding to the stopping power, which compresses the piston in the master cylinder sending fluid to the brakes. Replacing the master cylinder or any part of the system in the Jeep will cause air to become trapped in the line. When replacing the master cylinder or brake booster, flush the brake system and bleed the brakes.

Instructions

Flush the Brake Lines

    1

    Siphon out any brake fluid in the master cylinder using a turkey baster or similar device. If you have just replaced the part, no fluid should be present. Fill the reservoir to the fill line with DOT-3 brake fluid.

    2

    Raise the vehicle one wheel at a time with a jack while removing the tires using a lug wrench. Place the jack under the axle and raise the vehicle up. Loosen the lug nuts and remove the tires. Set them to the side. Place a jack stand under the frame of the vehicle and remove the jack.

    3

    Loosen all four bleed screws. Disc brake bleed screws are located on the caliper facing the engine. Drum brake bleed screws are located on the back of the drum above the axle.

    4

    Have an assistant press down on the brake pedal and hold the pedal in place. Tighten the bleed screws and release the pedal. Repeat this process until the fluid coming out of the bleeders is clean. While processing, make sure to keep the brake fluid reservoir full.

Bleed the Brakes

    5

    Bleed the passenger rear brake first, as it is the furthest from the reservoir, to ensure all the air is evacuated from the line without air bubbles just shifting around in the system. After the passenger rear, bleed the driver rear, then the passenger front and finally the driver front.

    6

    Place one end of the plastic tubing onto the bleed screw and the other end submerged in the clear plastic container partially filled with brake fluid.

    7

    Have the assistant depress the brake pedal. Loosen the bleed screw and watch for air bubbles to come out of the end of the tube. Once the flow of bubbles or fluid stops, tighten the screw. Release the brake pedal. Repeat the process until you see no bubbles come out of the rubber tubing for at least three times. Fully tighten the bleed screw. Watch the fluid level to make sure it remains at least half full at all times.

    8

    Repeat Steps 2 and 3 for the other three tires as outlined in Step 1.

    9

    Replace each wheel and the lug nuts. Going one wheel at a time, raise the vehicle to remove the jack stand and lower the vehicle to the ground.

    10

    Tighten all the lug nuts to factory specifications upon lowering the vehicle.

Sabtu, 24 April 2010

How to Change the Brakes on a Honda Accord

The brake pads on your Honda Accord need to be changed at least every 50,000 miles, and possibly sooner if you drive and brake under intense conditions. If you hear any grinding noises at all when applying the brakes, you must change the pads immediately. The brake pads are contained in the brake calipers that grip the rotors. You must change both sets of pads on both wheels at the same time.

Instructions

    1

    Siphon out at least half half the brake fluid from the Accord's master cylinder using a clean siphon or turkey baster. Raise the front end of the car on jack stands and remove the wheels.

    2

    Disconnect the brake hose mounting bolt if it gets in the way of removing the brake caliper. Remove the bolt on one caliper's lower end and pivot the caliper upward to reveal the brake pads and shims.

    3

    Remove the brake pads, shims and retainers on both sides of the caliper and remove the old pads from the shims.

    4

    Clean the caliper brackets and lubricate their sliding pins with a high temperature brake grease. Lightly apply anti-seizing compound to the backing tabs for the pads and the slots those tabs go into on the bracket. Re-install the retainers and shims.

    5

    Press the caliper piston back into the brake caliper. Clean the piston's exposed area with brake cleaner, wipe it with a lint-free cloth and use a C-clamp to press it back in, pressing on the center of the piston.

    6

    Install the replacement brake pads into their retainers. Pivot the caliper back down into position and install the mounting bolt.

    7

    Repeat the process for the brake caliper on the other side.

    8

    Replace the wheels and lower the Accord once both brakes have been changed. Fill the brake master cylinder to the necessary level. Press the brake pedal in short strokes (no more than two inches at a time) until the brakes feel firm.

How do I Replace Brakes on Chevrolet Silverado Trucks?

How do I Replace Brakes on Chevrolet Silverado Trucks?

Chevrolet Silverado model trucks come with front and rear brake pads. The brake pads are responsible for stopping the Silverado by applying friction to the brake rotors. As the brake pedal is pushed in, the brake caliper compresses the pads to the brake rotor. The friction from the pads sliding against the turning rotor is what stops the truck. Replace the brake pads before they wear down to the wear indicators located inside of each brake pad.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Chevrolet Silverado in a work location with a level surface. Turn the motor off and open the hood.

    2

    Remove the cap from the brake fluid reservoir located near the brake master cylinder. Insert the brake fluid syringe into the brake fluid and suck out about half of the fluid in the reservoir. Put the lid back on and close the hood. Place the syringe full of fluid in a safe place.

    3

    Pry the center cap off of both front wheels with the flat-head screwdriver. Loosen all of the lug nuts from the front wheels with a tire tool or a lug wrench. Only turn the lug nuts about one quarter of a turn to loosen.

    4

    Slide the floor jack under the front of the Chevrolet Silverado and jack the front end up from a safe jacking location. Once the truck is high enough, place the safety stands under the side rails on both sides of the truck. Then, lower the floor jack until the truck is sitting securely on top of the stands. Leave the jack sitting jacked up under the truck.

    5

    Remove all of the lug nuts from both wheels and pull the wheels off of the wheel hubs. Place the wheels down flat on the level work surface.

    6

    Move to the driver side front brake caliper and locate the two guide pin bolts on the back of the caliper. Loosen and remove the bolts with the ratchet and a metric socket.

    7

    Locate the access opening on the side of the brake caliper. Slide the flat-head screwdriver into the opening and pry the outer brake pad against the caliper cylinder until the caliper is loose. Slide the caliper off the rotor and hang it on one of the steering components behind the wheel hub with a piece of rope.

    8

    Pry the inner brake pad out of the retaining clip inside the brake caliper. Position the 6-inch C-clamp inside the caliper so that the adjustment rod is facing the outer brake pad. Compress the outer brake pad against the caliper cylinder with the C-clamp until the cylinder has fully retracted inside the caliper. Unscrew the C-clamp and remove it from the caliper.

    9

    Pry the outer brake pad out of the retaining clip inside of the brake caliper. Position the new pads into the retaining clips inside the caliper. Make sure that the new pads are seated inside the retaining clips in the same direction as the old pads were in.

    10

    Inspect the brake rotor for damage. If the rotor has only a small amount of wear and grooves, take the rotor to a machine shop or auto shop to have the rotors turned. If the rotor has excessive cracks and grooves, replace the rotors with new rotors. Wait until all of the rotors have been inspected before having the rotors turned or replaced.

    11

    Remove the rope from the caliper and slide it back over the side of the rotor. Screw the two guide pin bolts back in place and tighten with the ratchet and socket. Put the wheel back on along with the lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts with the tire tool.

    12

    Move to the other three wheels and repeat the same exact steps to remove and replace the brake pads. After the brake pads have been replaced, jack the Chevrolet Silverado back up and pull the safety stands out. Lower the Silverado to the surface and remove the floor jack.

    13

    Open the hood and remove the brake fluid reservoir lid. Squirt the brake fluid back into the reservoir and put the lid back on. Close the hood.

    14

    Crank the Chevrolet Silverado and pump the brake pedal a couple of times to seat the brake pads to the brake rotors. Take the Chevrolet Silverado for a test drive to make sure that the new pads are working properly.

Jumat, 23 April 2010

How to Remove Rear Drum Brakes on a Toyota Tundra

The Tundra is Toyota's most popular pickup truck. Known for its durability and reliability, the Tundra can often be used for several years without any brake work. Although the Tundra has front disk brakes, the rear brakes utilize the drum design, where the brake pads expand against the drum when the brake pedal is depressed to slow the truck down. Due to the weight of the Tundra, the rear brake pads generally need attention before the front disk brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Place the Tundra's transmission into "Park" and release the emergency brake.

    2

    Raise the rear of the Tundra under the differential with a jack.

    3

    Support the back of the Tundra with jack stands. One jack stand should be placed underneath each rear axle.

    4

    Remove the wheel and tire assembly with a lug nut wrench.

    5

    Pull the brake drum off of the axle shaft to reveal the brake pads.

    6

    Locate the brake adjusting screw, which is a horizontal metal bar at the bottom of the brake assembly. Turn the adjusting screw with a screwdriver in a clockwise direction to release the pressure on the brake pads.

    7

    Pull each of the large springs in the brake assembly up and over the anchor pins that the springs attach to.

    8

    Remove the shoe hold-down springs with a pair of pliers. The two circular shoe hold-down springs are located on each side of the brake assembly. Grasp each spring with the pliers, then push into the spring while turning the spring in a counterclockwise direction to release each spring.

    9

    Pull the brake pads away from the brake assembly to complete the removal.

How to Diagnose Dragging Brakes

Pinpointing brake problems stump many car owners. Questions arise about whether or not the trouble plagues the front or back wheels. Diagnose dragging brakes by checking the drums after first isolating the problem to the back wheels. In addition, think "safety-first" with any car repair or diagnosis. Use caution, wear the proper safety gear and work with a friend when possible.

Instructions

    1

    Determine if the dragging occurs in the front or back wheels. Lift up the front and back ends of the car separately to see if the wheels turn freely. If the wheels stick on the back end, then the brake drums may be causing the problem. Jammed wheels on the front end of the car could result from brake disc issues. Use a car jack to hoist up the vehicle.

    2

    Find out what part of the drum brakes is causing the dragging. Pinpoint the problem by looking at the parking brake cable, the brake adjusters and the wheel cylinders.

    3

    Check the parking brake cable. Inspect the area for rust, which can jam the cable in its holding area. Releasing a parking break lever will not free a rusted cable from its housing, and that results in dragging. Wheels turn slower than usual because the cable pulls one of the shoes against the drum.

    4

    Examine the brake adjusters. Use a plastic faced hammer to separate the drums from the shoes. Brake adjusters automatically place the shoes near the drum as the shoes' friction material wears out. If the adjuster pushes the shoes out too far, they will drag against the drum.

    5

    Inspect the wheel cylinders. If these are stuck, they produce symptoms similar to jammed brake adjusters. Corrosion forms inside the system due to lack of brake fluid that causes the wheel cylinders to stick in the open position. This results in brake shoes pressing on the drum even after releasing the brakes.

Kamis, 22 April 2010

Removal of a Power Brake Booster

The power brake booster on a car or truck uses vacuum power from the engine to apply added pressure to the brake master cylinder. This makes braking easier and allows you to apply more pressure to the brakes. If the power brake booster goes out, then it becomes difficult to stop your vehicle, and you could potentially get into an accident. Before you can replace the power brake booster, you first have to remove the old one from the vehicle.

Instructions

    1

    Pop the hood of your vehicle Locate the rubber vacuum line running to the brake booster on the driver's side of the firewall. Pull the vacuum line off of the brake booster or, if necessary, use a flat head screwdriver to remove the hose clamp holding the line in place.

    2

    Unbolt the brake master cylinder from the power brake booster with an open-end wrench.

    3

    Look underneath the dashboard and locate the rod that connects the brake booster to the brake pedal. Remove this connection with a 3/8-inch ratchet and socket or a flat head screwdriver to take off the clip.

    4

    Unbolt the power brake booster from the firewall with the 3/8-inch ratchet, extension and sockets and a 3/8-inch universal joint. Go underneath the hood and pull the brake booster forward and off of the firewall until the rod clears the firewall. Then pull the brake master cylinder off of the booster and remove the booster from the vehicle.

How to Remove a Front Rotor on a Toyota

How to Remove a Front Rotor on a Toyota

If the front rotors on your Toyota are bad, they will not be effective when you put your foot on the brake and try to stop the car. Brake rotors should be smooth on the surface, and free of any cracking. Additionally, they have to meet minimum thickness requirements, which means that you need to discard them when they reach 0.787 inch thick. It does not take very long to remove a brake rotor. An average person can complete the project in about 30 minutes for each wheel.

Instructions

    1

    Place a set of wheel chocks behind the rear wheels of the Toyota. Raise the car on the side that you need to work on using the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the Toyota near the jacking point and raise it to the frame of the car. Loosen the lug nuts with the lug wrench and take the wheel off the automobile.

    2

    Drain the brake fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster. Place the fluid in the drain pan for later recycling. Remove the union bolt and gasket from the wheel cylinder using a socket and ratchet. Disconnect the flexible hose from the assembly using a wrench. Remove the brake cylinder sub-assembly using a wrench.

    3

    Remove the brake pad support plates from the wheel cylinder mount. Remove the slide pins from the cylinder mounting using a pair of pliers. Remove the two bolts from the disc using a socket and ratchet. Remove the cylinder mounting from the wheel assembly and position it so that it does not hang loose. Remove the brake rotor disc from the wheel assembly.

How to Stop Ceramic Brakes From Squeaking

How to Stop Ceramic Brakes From Squeaking

Squeaking ceramic brake pads are rare. Part of their popularity among consumers stems from the fact that ceramic pads are some of the quietest brake pads available on the market. Because they are made from ceramic materials instead of metal, they do not create the same amount of friction with the rotor as traditional metallic pads and, therefore, do not cause as much noise. When sold, however, most ceramic pads do come with a noise reduction grease that may be applied for an even quieter riding experience.

Instructions

    1

    Jack your car up off the ground. Place jack stands under the car's side rails. Carefully lower your car onto the jack stands. Use your tire wrench to turn your lug nuts counterclockwise. Turn them 1/4 inch to loosen them. Pull off the lug nuts. Secure them in an easy-to-remember, accessible place for later reassembly. Take off the tire.

    2

    Locate your brake caliper's two pin bolts. They secure the brake caliper to the piston. One is at the bottom rear of the caliper while the other is at the top rear. Use your socket wrench to screw the pin bolts out. Turn them to the left. Some car calipers have two different-sized pin bolts. Make note of which bolt fits in which hole for later reassembly.

    3

    Slide a screwdriver in a free space in your caliper to loosen it. Pull the caliper up and off. The caliper is attached to rubber brake lines which are fragile. Secure the caliper so the brake lines are not stretched. Do not pull on the caliper too much. Your brake pads are inside of the caliper.

    4

    Slide the inner ceramic brake pad out from the piston. Put some ceramic brake pad noise reduction grease on your index finger and apply it to the sides of the pad that come in contact with the rotor. Push your outer pad inward to release it. You may have to use pliers to release the outer pad from a flexible holding pin. Apply the noise reduction grease only to the sides of the outer pad that come in contact with the rotor.

    5

    Slide the caliper back onto the rotor. You may have to wiggle it a bit to get a secure fit. Locate and insert the two pin bolts that were removed in Step 2. Turn the bolts to the right to tighten them.

    6

    Put your tire back on. Insert your lug nuts and tighten them. Remove the jack stands, and lower your car back to the ground.

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a Nissan Quest

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a Nissan Quest

The rear brakes on your Nissan Quest come equipped with a set of brake shoes that you should inspect at your car manufacturer's suggested intervals and replace when worn or damaged. However, installing new brake shoes requires attention to detail to reassemble the several components properly. This will ensure you install them right the first time and your brakes keep working as they should.

Instructions

Removing the Brake Shoes

    1

    Park your Nissan on a level surface and release the emergency brake.

    2

    Loosen the wheel lugs on both rear wheel assemblies using a lug wrench.

    3

    Lift both rear wheels using a floor jack and place two jack stands on the rear frame for support.

    4

    Chock the front wheels and finish removing the rear wheel/tire assemblies.

    5

    Pull the brake drums off the hubs by hand. If the drums seem stuck, you may need to retract the brake shoes by rotating the adjusting screw. You can access the screw through the hole in the backing plate. Remove the rubber plug on the hole and use a screwdriver to push the locking lever away from the star wheel on the adjusting screw and rotate the star wheel with a brake-adjusting tool. If the drum is still stuck, hammer around the outer edge of the drum with a rubber mallet to break the rust adhesion at the hub and lug studs.

    6

    Remove the brake shoe-to-backing plate hold-down springs on each shoe using a hold-down spring tool.

    7

    Detach the upper and lower brake shoe connecting springs using a brake spring tool.

    8

    Lift the brake shoes off the backing plate and take off the adjusting screw by hand.

    9

    Unhook the parking brake cable from the toggle lever attached to one of the brake shoes using a pair of needle nose pliers.

    10

    Detach the toggle lever from the brake shoe by removing the retainer ring using a screwdriver and the needle nose pliers. Then remove the shoes from the brake assembly.

Installing the New Brake Shoes

    11

    Spray the backing plate and hub assembly with brake parts cleaner and wipe the assembly with a lint-free cloth.

    12

    Attach the toggle lever to the new brake shoe with the retainer ring using the needle nose pliers.

    13

    Hook the parking brake cable to the toggle lever on the brake shoe.

    14

    Wash your hands with water and soap and apply a dab of brake grease to the brake shoe-to-backing plate contact points.

    15

    Place the shoe with the toggle lever in position on the backing plate and install the corresponding shoe hold-down spring using the hold-down spring tool.

    16

    Place the other shoe and adjusting screw in position and install the shoe hold-down spring using the hold-down spring tool.

    17

    Attach the upper and lower brake shoe connecting springs using the brake spring tool.

    18

    Spray the inside of the brake drum with brake parts cleaner and wipe the drum clean with a lint-free cloth.

    19

    Install the brake drum and rotate the wheel assembly by hand. You should hear the new brake shoes slightly dragging against the drum. If not, rotate the star wheel on the adjusting screw to adjust the shoes.

    20

    Replace the brake shoes on the brake assembly of the opposite wheel starting with Step 7 of the previous section through Step 9 of this section.

    21

    Install the wheel/tire assemblies and screw the lug nuts in place using the lug wrench.

    22

    Lower the vehicle and finish tightening the lug nuts.

    23

    Test-drive your vehicle to make sure the brakes work properly.

Rabu, 21 April 2010

How to Install Rear Brake Rotors on a 2002 Chevrolet Trailblazer

How to Install Rear Brake Rotors on a 2002 Chevrolet Trailblazer

Installing rear brake rotors on your Trailblazer is an easy do-it-yourself repair. The brake rotors should be serviced regularly if you use the truck to tow, or do a lot of traveling during the year. Damage to rear brake rotors often occurs because of worn out front brake pads, which forces the rear breaks and rotors to work harder to stop the truck. Changing the rear rotors yourself can be done safely in the driveway. The repair from start to finish will take up to two hours to complete.

Instructions

Removing the Rear Brake Rotor

    1

    Pop the center cap off of the tire's rim with the flat head screwdriver. Set it to the side of the work area out of the way. Grab your lug wrench and crack each one of the tire's lug nuts. Don't take them off--loosen them only slightly.

    2

    Slowly raise the truck with the car jack. The tire should be at least 8 inches off of the ground. Slide the jack stand into position slightly to the left of the car jack. Raise the jack stand so it is at the same height as the car jack and slide the locking pin back in to secure it. Don't remove the car jack--leave it in place for extra support.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts from the tire's rim one at a time. When you get to the last lug nut, hold the tire into position so that it doesn't stress the hub bolts. Slowly remove the tire, while checking to make sure your car jack and the jack stand are sturdy.

    4

    Remove the two inner bolts on the brake caliper bracket using your socket wrench. Do not remove the brake calipers bolts. Set the bolts to the side on a clean surface. Place the 5-gallon bucket right near you. Using both hands, carefully slide the caliper unit off of the rotor and set it down on the bucket.

    5

    Slide the rotor off of the hub slowly. If the rotor is stuck, use the rubber hammer to give it a few taps on the back side. Using both hands to twist the rotor forward and backward also works.

Reinstalling the Rotor

    6

    Compare the new rotor with the old rotor to assure they are the same. Also check to make sure the bolt patterns are the same on both of the rotors. Check the new brake rotor for any damage that you can readily see like scratches or cracks as well.

    7

    Slide the new rotor back onto the hub, the exact way you removed the old brake rotor.

    8

    Carefully lift the brake caliper unit and slide it back onto the brake rotor. Start each of the two bolts by hand to assure the caliper unit won't misalign. Tighten each bolt one quarter turn past hand tight.

    9

    Slide the tire and rim back on the hub carefully. Return each of the tire's lug nuts by hand. Tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern with the lug wrench. Once they're all hand tight, give them all one more half turn.

    10

    Remove the jack stand and lower the truck so that the tire is just barely touching the ground. Tighten each lug nut again, one half turn. Safely lower the truck, remove the car jack and place the center cap back on. Start the car and pump the brakes a few times to firm them up. When you feel the brake pedal stiffen stop pumping the brakes immediately. This method can be use for both rear brake rotors on your Trailblazer.

Selasa, 20 April 2010

How to Change the Rear Disks on a BMW Cooper S

How to Change the Rear Disks on a BMW Cooper S

Save yourself some money by changing the rear brake disks on your Mini Cooper S yourself. Brake disks, or rotors as they are also commonly called, may need changing if they have worn out or been damaged by worn, loose or missing brake pads. If your Mini Cooper's brakes are squeaking or grinding then it's worth taking a look at the rotors to make sure they're still in good shape, and then changing them if they're not.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the bolts on both rear wheels.

    2

    Jack the car up and place on the jack stands.

    3

    Remove the lug bolts and then remove both rear wheels.

    4

    Remove the two bolts holding the brake caliper in place and swing it back. Secure it to a piece of the chassis using the coat hanger.

    5

    Unscrew the hex bolt at the center of the brake rotor. Remove the bolt and pull off the rotor.

    6

    Replace the old rotor with the new one. Secure the new rotor in place with the hex screw.

    7

    Remove the coat hanger and drop the caliper back into place. Secure it in place with the two bolts.

    8

    Put the wheel back on and secure it with the lug bolts.

    9

    Take the Mini down from the jack stands and then tighten the lug bolts to the correct specification.

How to Use a Disc Brake Piston Tool

Brake calipers all work under the same premise. A hydraulic piston extends from the caliper bore when demand is placed on the brakes. The movement of the piston squeezes the friction material of the brake pads against the metal surface of the rotor. When replacing brakes, the pistons must be retracted to make room for the thicker pads and/or rotors. Not all caliper pistons employ the same procedure to retract the pistons, however. Rear calipers can sometimes require the piston to be turned clockwise (or counterclockwise in some cases) to retract the piston. Knowing which type of caliper you intend to use the disc brake piston tool on will help prevent damage to the caliper or tool.

Instructions

    1

    Support the removed caliper to the suspension or frame of the vehicle with a bungee cord so it does not hang from the rubber brake hose. This will prevent damage to the brake hose. If applicable, remove the pads from the caliper. Some vehicles use pads that remain in the caliper mount and removing them from the caliper is not required.

    2

    Read the repair manual for your specific vehicle to determine which type of caliper you are trying to compress the piston to. Some pistons simply retract by slowly squeezing the piston into the bore. This can be done with the disc brake caliper piston tool set or even a large C-clamp. Place the wedge plate from the set onto the drive arbor of the tool. Insert the bottom of the drive arbor into the caliper piston. You can also use the backing plate of the old pad or a block of wood against the caliper piston. Because some pistons are phenolic, they can crack or break under duress. Place the wedge plate up against the outer caliper housing and tighten the tool until the drive arbor and wedge plate are working together to compress the piston. Continue to slowly tighten the tool by hand until the caliper piston is fully retracted into the bore. Loosen the tool and then remove it.

    3

    Match up the correct adapter of the disc brake piston tool or the disc brake piston tool set to the screw-in type caliper. These pistons have visible grooves on the face of the piston. Many makes and models of cars employ different-size grooves that require different adapters. The tool has six sides or the kit features up to nine applications. Insert the adapter onto the face of the caliper piston until the notches mate the grooves. If using the set to retract the piston, employ the same procedure as in step two with the wedge plate and drive arbor up against the adapter on the face of the piston. If using just the tool, a ratchet and extension with suitable matching drives will be required. Turn the ratchet or drive arbor clockwise to slowly compress the piston into the bore until it is fully seated. Make sure that the piston does not employ a left-handed thread. Although rare, some cars may use a right-hand thread piston on the left side and a left-handed piston on the right side. On some import cars, bottoming the piston fully into the bore can cause damage to the piston or parking brake mechanism. The manual will alert you of this if applicable. Using a ratchet may also require someone to hold the caliper steady for you while you start to turn the tool.

    4

    Inspect the caliper boots once the pistons are retracted and the tools are removed. Sometimes air can become trapped inside the boots when retracting caliper pistons. This will cause them to bubble up above the surface of the compressed piston and can get trapped between the piston and pad when the caliper piston returns. This will damage the protective boot. Lift up on the bubbled areas of the boot to release the air or use a plastic pick (not a metal one) to help you maneuver the boot to restore it to its collapsed position.

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Mitsubishi 3000GT

Make parking brake adjustments in your Mitsubishi 3000GT at home to avoid going to the mechanic. Adjust your Mitsubishi 3000GT parking brakes when your car starts to slip down the hill you park it on. You can use this technique on your 1999 Mitsubishi 3000GT.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the center console covering the parking brake lever. Locate the parking brake lever between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat. Put the parking brake lever in the lowest position.

    2

    Turn the cable adjuster locknut to make the nut loose. Find the nut at the base of the parking brake lever.

    3

    Raise your Mitsubishi 3000GT rear wheels using a jack and support the rear wheels using jack stands. Remove both rear wheels using a tire iron to loosen and take off the lug nuts. Take off the tire from the rods by hand.

    4

    Get underneath the car and remove the rubber hole plugs from the brake rotors. Locate the rotors on the underneath inside of the wheel wells.

    5

    Take off the brake calipers with a screwdriver, but do not disconnect the brake fluid lines.

    6

    Use a pry bar to push up on the parking brake self adjuster wheel. Locate this next to the brake caliper and it looks like a star wheel. Rotate this wheel until the rotors will not turn.

    7

    Turn the adjuster wheel five notches in the opposite direction. Reinstall the calipers and wheels. Lower your Mitsubishi 3000GT using the jack and remove the jack stands from the rear wheels.

Senin, 19 April 2010

How to Remove Rust on C5 Corvette Rotors

How to Remove Rust on C5 Corvette Rotors

Created from metal alloys, the brake rotors on your C5 Corvette are prone to developing surface rust, especially if they are left exposed to the elements. Moisture that develops on the surface of the rotor can cause surface rust to develop as well. In most cases, removing rust is only a matter of driving your vehicle in a normal manner, since application of the brake pads can remove a large amount of surface rust. However, you will need to remove the rotors in order to remove rust formed along the edges of the rotor.

Instructions

    1

    Apply the C5 Corvette's brakes during normal driving. Two to three brake applications at normal speeds should help remove surface rust from the face of the rotor. However, this will not remove surface rust near the rotor hub or along the outer edges of the rotor. In order to remove rust from other areas, you will have to remove the rotor.

    2

    Park the C5 Corvette on a flat surface and loosen the lug nuts with a lug wrench. Raise the vehicle off the ground with a floor jack and support the vehicle with jack stands. Finish removing the lug nuts and pull the wheel off of the hub

    3

    Use a ratchet and socket to remove the four bolts holding both the caliper and caliper mount in place. Pull the rotor off of the hub and place it on a flat work surface.

    4

    Use a Dremel tool with a wire brush or sanding disc attachment to remove surface rust from the outer edges and inner surfaces of the rotor. Remove any remaining debris from the rotor with brake cleaner and a shop rag. If the rotor appears pitted with rust, consider having it replaced with a new rotor. Repeat this step for the other rotors on the C5 Corvette.

    5

    Slide the rotor back onto the hub. Reattach the caliper and caliper bracket onto the hub and remount the wheel. Place the lug nuts on the wheel and hand-tighten them. Remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground, and then tighten the lugs with the lug wrench.

Is Brake Line Failure a Maintenance Issue?

Among the most dangerous mechanical problems facing a vehicle owner is sudden brake failure due to ruptured brake lines. Brake hoses rely on hydraulic pressure to operate. The driver risks an accident -- and potentially serious injuries -- when his brakes fail.

Background

    Brake lines are composed of steel, and are located on the underside of the vehicle. Pressing down on the brake pedal delivers brake fluid through the lines. Hydraulic pressure is applied to the brakes at each wheel.

Corrosion

    Brake lines are exposed to road salt and other corrosive materials. This exposure causes leaks and a loss of pressure, typically leading to an inability to brake. Brake lines are difficult to inspect on a regular basis, due to their location. Replacing brake lines as part of a preventative maintenance program -- common with other car parts -- is not cost efficient or practical. New brake lines can cost $1,000, as of 2011.

Considerations

    In April 2010, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration began an investigation into brake failure problems involving about 6 million Chevrolet and GMC pickup trucks. This followed complaints from drivers about sudden brake-line failure as a result of corrosion.

Minggu, 18 April 2010

How to Change Cavalier Brake Shoes

The Chevy Cavalier uses rear brake shoes instead of a caliper and brake pad design for the rear wheels. Brake drums are easier to maintain than caliper assemblies, but they do not have the clamping force that brake calipers have. This is because brake drum and shoes use a design where the shoe pushes against the brake drum assembly to slow the vehicle down. Over time, the shoes wear down and need to be replaced. When this happens, you need to change the brake shoes.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts by turning the tire wrench an eighth of a turn counterclockwise.

    2

    Jack up the rear of the Cavalier using the rear jack point behind the trunk.

    3

    Finish removing the lug nuts from the wheel and remove the wheel from the wheel hub assembly by pulling it straight off.

    4

    Hit the outer drum with a hammer to knock the rust and corrosion loose and then pull the drum off.

    5

    Remove the return spring for each of the brake shoe using a brake spring removal tool.

    6

    Hold the retainer pin from behind the wheel hub assembly, and place the brake shoe removal tool over the retainer clip. Press the tool in and then turn the tool counterclockwise to remove the spring and retainer.

    7

    Remove the brake shoes (they should come right off).

    8

    Spray all of the brake parts down with brake parts cleaner.

    9

    Install the new pads. Installation is the reverse of removal.

How to Repair the Brakes on a 1970 Chevy C10

The 1970 Chevy C10 trucks come equipped with disc brake pads on the front wheel hubs and brake shoes on the rear wheel hubs. Chevrolet did not install the four-wheel brake pad system on C-10 trucks until 1972. The brake pads are designed to stop the truck by applying friction to the sides of the brake rotors. The brake shoes stop the truck by applying friction to the inside of the brake drums. Change the brake pads or the brake shoes before the brake pad thickness is less than 1/8-inch.

Instructions

Replace the Front Brake Pads

    1

    Park your 1970 Chevy C10 on a level surface and engage the parking brake.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on all four wheels about one-quarter of a turn with a tire iron or lug wrench.

    3

    Jack the front end of the Chevy C10 up and place jack stands under the front jacking points. Lower the truck onto the jack stands. Move the jack to the rear of the truck and jack the rear end up. Place the other jack stands under the rear jacking points. Lower the truck onto the jack stands and leave the jack in place.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts from all four wheels. Place the wheels aside for later reassembly. Begin the brake pad replacement process on the front wheel on the driver's side.

    5

    Loosen and remove the two slide bolts from the back of the brake caliper with a ratchet and a metric socket. Slide a flat-head screwdriver between the brake rotor and the outboard brake pad. The outboard brake pad is on the back of the brake rotor. Pry the brake pad back and forth until there is enough slack in the caliper to remove it from the rotor. Pull the caliper off of the rotor and hang it on one of the suspension components behind the wheel hub assembly with a bungee cord.

    6

    Pull the inboard brake pad out of the inside of the caliper. The inboard brake pad is the pad that is opposite the caliper piston. Slide the C-clamp around the back of the caliper and around the front of the outboard brake pad. Slowly compress the brake pad against the caliper piston with the C-clamp until the piston is fully retracted inside of the caliper. Remove the C-clamp and the outer brake pad from the caliper. Insert the two new brake pads into the caliper.

    7

    Inspect the brake rotor for damage. The brake rotor is the round component that the brake caliper is mounted on. Inspect the rotor for excessive grooving and cracking. Replace the rotor if the damage is excessive; if the damage is minimal, have the rotor machine-turned. If the rotor is undamaged, no action is necessary.

    Remove the bungee cord from the caliper and slide the caliper over the rotor. Screw the two slide bolts back into the rear of the caliper. Tighten the bolts down securely with the ratchet and socket. Torque the slide bolts with a torque wrench and a metric socket to 25 foot-pounds.

    8

    Slide the wheel onto the hub and screw the lug nuts on tight. Move to the front wheel on the passenger side and repeat the steps outlined above to replace the brake pads.

Replace the Rear Brake Shoes

    9

    Move to the rear wheel hub on the driver's side and pull the brake drum off the brake shoes with your hands. If the drum is stuck, use a hand-held sledgehammer to tap the back of the drum until it is loose enough to remove from the brake shoes. Pull the drum off and put it aside.

    10

    Remove all of the springs from the inner and outer brake shoes with a brake-spring removal tool. There are two brake shoe return springs on the top of the brake shoes and one brake shoe hold-down spring near the bottom of the brake shoes. Slide the removal tool over the springs and twist counterclockwise to remove the springs. Pull the brake shoes apart and pull the shoes free from the wheel hub. Place the old shoes aside. Tap the spring retainer clips out of each brake shoe with the hand-held sledgehammer.

    11

    Install all of the new brake shoe accessories provided in the new brake shoe kit to the new brake shoes. Position the brake shoes back onto the wheel hub. Re-clip all of the springs with the brake-spring removal tool. Make sure that the top of each brake shoe is against the top edges of the wheel cylinder. Inspect the brake drum for any damage such as cracks or breaks. Slide the brake drum over the new brake shoes. If the drum will not go over the new brake shoes, adjust the brake shoes to retract by using the brake shoe adjuster. Use a flat-head screwdriver to turn the gears on the brake adjuster counterclockwise until the brake shoes are retracted enough for the drum to fit over the new brake shoes. Slide the drum in place over the brake shoes.

    12

    Slide the wheel over the drum and screw the lug nuts on tightly. Move to the rear wheel hub on the passenger side and repeat the same process as outlined in this section to replace the brake shoes.

    13

    Jack the rear of the truck up and remove the jack stands. Lower the truck to the surface and remove the jack. Push the jack under the front end of the truck and lift the truck to facilitate removal of the jack stands. Lower the truck to the ground. Start the engine. Crank the engine and push the brake pedal in and out repeatedly to position the front brake pads to the proper spacing on each brake rotor. Test drive the C-10 in a safe area to check the operation of the new brake pads and new brake shoes.

Sabtu, 17 April 2010

How to Install Trailer Brakes

Many trailers rely on the inertia of the car for stopping power. While this is acceptable on trailers that only travel short distances or trailers that are infrequently used, trailers that transport boats or travel trailers require slightly more sophisticated methods, such as installing a braking system.

Instructions

    1

    Determine what kind of brake system you should install on your trailer. While simple systems such as electric brakes exist, more complex hydraulic systems are available. Examine such factors as what distance your trailer will be traveling, as well as the environment, such as a crowded city highway or an open country road.

    2

    Use a tire iron to loosen the lug nuts on the trailer tires.

    3

    Lift the trailer frame using a stable jack or a car lift. Since the brake installation requires being beneath the trailer, take extra care to make sure the trailer is stable before attempting to perform any work.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts and set them in a secure place. Then remove the tires from the trailer frame.

    5

    Remove the lug nuts and set in a secure place. Then remove the tires from the trailer frame.

    6

    Remove the spindle washer and spindle nut that are located underneath the trailer hub. Do not discard them, as they will need to be replaced after the trailer brake is installed.

    7

    Locate the plate mount on the axle, a square-shaped piece of metal with four holes at the corners. This is where the brakes will be attached.

    8

    Mount the brakes onto the plate mount. Identify which brake is the left and right before you begin and stand behind the trailer to properly determine the trailer's left and right sides.

    9

    "Pre-pack" the brake bearings. Coat all the bearing rollers in grease, making sure that all the roller surfaces are thoroughly covered.

    10

    Insert grease into the hollow of the trailer hub, and then insert the rear bearing into the hub rotor.

    11

    Attach the outer bearing, thrust washer and spindle nut onto the hub rotor. Then use a wrench to tighten the spindle nut. Once the nut is tight, loosen it a quarter of a turn. Loosen and tighten the nut with your fingers until you cannot tighten it without using tools, and then fasten it in place with a cotter pin.

    12

    Install the brake tubing system if you are installing a hydraulic brake system. This will connect your trailer brakes with the brake coupler, located behind the trailer ball connector.

    13

    Bleed the trailer brakes. Locate the bleeder valve on each brake and then fill the brake coupler with brake fluid. Attach a clear tube to the bleeder valve, place a glass jar underneath the tube, then manually pump the brake coupler and check for air bubbles, repeating the test as necessary until no air bubbles appear.

    14

    Replace the tires, and then test the new braking system. Get a friend to turn the trailer tires as you manually engage the brake coupler. If the brakes have been properly installed, the tire will suddenly stop moving.

Jumat, 16 April 2010

Brake Master Cylinder Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting a bad master cylinder requires a visual inspection and a pressure test. During the visual inspection, external leaks can be found and clogged ports can be identified. During the pressure test, internal parts can be checked for wear and damage. Both sets of checks must be done to insure accuracy in diagnosis.

System Operation

    A typical master cylinder is made up of two pistons, located inside a bore in the housing, and a fluid reservoir. Each piston has primary cup seal and a secondary cup seal, and a return spring. When at rest in the bore, the primary cup seal sits between the vent and replenish ports, connecting the bore and fluid reservoir. As the piston is pushed forward in the bore, the primary seal moves past the vent and replenish ports to close the hydraulic system. Fluid is allowed to fill in the space behind the pistons through the replenish ports, and when the pedal is released, fluid moves back into the master cylinder through the replenish ports.
    A clogged vent or replenish port can cause a master cylinder failure.

Clogged Ports and Leaks

    The visual inspection begins with a look at the master cylinder. Any wetness near the rear of the master cylinder at the booster needs a closer look. Remove the master cylinder retaining nuts, and check for fluid between the cylinder and the booster. Any fluid here indicates a leaking master cylinder, and a replacement will be needed.
    If no external leaks are found, clean and remove the reservoir cap. Check the fluid level and condition. Then have a partner push the brake pedal as you observe the fluid. When the pedal is released, a spurt of fluid should be observed in the reservoir. No spurt of fluid indicates a clogged replenish port, and the only repair is a new cylinder. Unless the fluid can release into the master cylinder reservoir when the pedal is released, the pressure cannot be relieved and will hold the brakes on only partially. Another check for this is to apply the brake, released it and open the bleeder screw. A clogged vent or replenish port will cause fluid to spurt out of the bleeder.

Pedal Pressure Testing

    Testing for pressure bypass begins with the engine in the off position. Apply the pedal several times to eliminate residual power brake booster assist. Apply hard pressure to the pedal and hold. The pedal should hold and not drop. If the pedal drops in this position, there is a leak somewhere else in the system.
    Without releasing the pedal completely, release the pressure until light pedal pressure is applied. The pressure should be about the same as what you would apply when holding at a stop light. If the pedal drops now, the master cylinder is bypassing pressure internally and should be replaced.

Kamis, 15 April 2010

Brake Cleaner Ingredients

Brake Cleaner Ingredients

Brake cleaner is an aerosol-delivered solvent designed to clean grease, oil, brake dust and dirt from brake pads. Brake cleaner is available in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated versions. The ingredients in brake cleaners are toxic. Take care not to inhale the brake cleaner, and keep it away from automotive paint and plastic parts, as the solvent can be damaging to both of these. The ingredients in brake cleaners are a solvent combined with an aerosol propellant.

Acetone

    Acetone is a solvent also used as fingernail polish remover.

Butane

    Butane is a petroleum derivative, most familiar to people as a fuel, that acts as a solvent.

Carbon Dioxide

    Carbon dioxide is used as a propellant in aerosols.

Isopropanol

    Isopropanol is another name for isopropyl alcohol. Diluted for household use, this is a common disinfectant and cleaner. In stronger concentrations it acts as a solvent in brake cleaner.

Methanol

    Methanol is another name for methyl alcohol or wood alcohol. It's used as a fuel and as a solvent.

Methyl Ethyl Ketone

    Also known as butanone or MEK, methyl ethyl ketone is another solvent, similar to acetone.

Propylene Glycol

    Propylene Glycol is the chief ingredient in automobile antifreeze. In brake fluid it acts as both a solvent and as a stabilizer for other ingredients, helping them to combine more readily and lowering the freezing point.

Stoddard Solvent

    Stoddard Solvent is a flammable liquid derived from paraffin.

Tetrachloroethylene

    Also used in dry cleaning, tetrachloroethylene cuts grease.

Taluene

    Also known as methyl benzene, toluene is used as a paint thinner. It is a solvent.

Rabu, 14 April 2010

How to Reset the ABS Sensor on a Camry

How to Reset the ABS Sensor on a Camry

The anti-lock braking system (ABS) on your Toyota Camry is responsible for electronically pumping the brakes during hard-braking situations where, otherwise, the wheels would lock up and cause the car to skid. The ABS system can pump the brakes for you much faster than you could pump them yourself which will allow you to brake effectively but still retain control over your vehicle. The ABS system rarely malfunctions, but when it does you need to have it serviced right away. Sometimes, the fix to a malfunctioning ABS sensor is simply to reset the sensor.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of your Toyota and loosen the retaining nut on the cable clamp running to the negative battery terminal using a socket wrench.

    2

    Slide the cable clamp off the terminal.

    3

    Wait three full seconds before sliding the clamp back over the negative battery terminal.

    4

    Tighten the retaining nut using a socket wrench.

Selasa, 13 April 2010

How Do Electric Brakes on Pop-Up Campers Work?

    Electric brakes use electromagnets in place of wheel cylinders to actuate the brakes. A form of braking power, be it surge or electric, must be used on any towed vehicle that weighs over 1,000 pounds (such as a larger pop-up campers). On vehicles with dual axles that weigh over 5,000 pounds, brakes are needed on both axles. Electric brake pressure is controllable in both forward and reverse where surge brakes need something to release the brake fluid pressure when in reverse or the brakes would stay on.

    Electric trailer brakes get pressure by varying the amount of voltage to the electromagnets. This is accomplished by a controller that is mounted on the bottom left of the dash. The controller is hooked up to the brake pedal arm--usually with a rod. There is a handle control and an adjustment for voltage on the front of the controller. When the brake pedal is depressed, a voltage from 1 to 13 volts, depending on the amount of brake pressure being applied, is sent to the electromagnets in the brake drum. The electromagnets pull on a rod actuating the brakes. The more voltage sent, the harder the brakes are applied.

    All towed vehicles must have some way of stopping the vehicle should it break away from the hitch. Small, lightweight vehicles rely on the safety chain. A pop-up camper must use an auxiliary battery mounted on the tongue of the trailer behind the point of breakaway. Usually a cable is used to activate a solenoid that immediately applies full voltage to the brakes. The auxiliary battery and the brakes should always be tested before towing. To test the trailer brakes alone start the vehicle moving and without touching the towing vehicle's brakes use the hand controller and apply just the trailer brakes and see if it slows the tow vehicle down.

How to Install a Master Brake Cylinder

A vehicle's master cylinder converts the motion of the brake pedal into hydraulic power, which is then transmitted to the brakes. As a safety feature, the cylinder is actually two cylinders; one acting on the front right and rear left brakes, and the other acting on the other two brakes. In this way, a failure of one part of the master cylinder will not result in a complete brake failure. Problems can develop in the master cylinder, however, that will require the unit to be replaced. A low brake pedal is usually a sign that drivers need to replace the master cylinder.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on level ground. Open the hood and locate the master cylinder, which will be near the rear wall of the engine compartment on the driver's side, roughly in line with the top of the brake pedal. The master cylinder will be attached to the front of the brake vacuum booster. The brake fluid reservoir is located just above the master cylinder, and the four brake lines connect to the lower part of the master cylinder.

    2

    Remove the cap of the brake fluid reservoir. Use the turkey baster to remove as much of the brake fluid from the reservoir as possible.

    3

    Disconnect the brake-fluid-reservoir-level sensor, if present, by pulling the wiring connector off of the sensor terminal. Place a plastic container under the master cylinder to catch any spills and drips. Disconnect the brake lines by removing the flare-nuts and pulling the lines clear of the cylinder. Be careful not to strip the flare-nuts or damage the brake lines.

    4

    Remove the two nuts that secure the master cylinder assembly to the brake vacuum booster. Pull the master cylinder and brake fluid reservoir assembly off the studs that extend from the booster.

    5

    Slip the new master cylinder and brake-fluid-reservoir assembly onto the booster studs and secure with the nuts. Reattach the brake lines to the master cylinder and the wiring for the reservoir-level sensor.

    6

    Fill the reservoir with brake fluid. The proper type of brake fluid is usually written on fluid reservoir cap, or in the vehicle owner's manual. Locate the brake bleeder connections on each of the four brakes. Attach one end of a length of clear tubing to each bleeder connection, and put the other end in a plastic container set securely on the ground. Open the bleeder connections on all four wheels until brake fluid begins to drip out of the bleeder connection. On some vehicles. you will have to jack the vehicle up and remove the wheels to access the brake-bleeder connections.

    7

    Have and assistant start the engine and gently press the brake pedal down. Examine the brake fluid as it comes out of the four brake-bleeder connections, looking for air bubbles trapped in the fluid. Close the bleeder connections. Have the assistant release the brake pedal. Refill the brake fluid reservoir with new fluid, and repeat the procedure until no air bubbles are visible at the bleeder connections.

    8

    Close the brake bleeder connections and remove the plastic tubing. Fill the brake fluid reservoir to the full mark, and replace the cap. Test the brake operation before driving normally. Dispose of all used brake fluid in accordance with local regulations.

Senin, 12 April 2010

How to Diagnose a Hard Brake Pedal

Sometimes you may find that the brake pedal is acting a little strange and feels "hard." This is something that should be examined as it would not be safe to drive in a vehicle with faulty brakes. Here we will detail two possible causes for a hard brake pedal and the possible solution. If this is not the answer, then consult with a trained mechanic.

Instructions

Brake Power Booster

    1

    Check the brake power booster by pumping on the brake pedal while the car isn't running. Continue pumping until you've "bled off" the vacuum from the booster.

    2

    Hold the pedal down while you start the car. The pedal should go down a bit more beneath your foot. If it doesn't, then you should examine the connection between the vacuum hose of the brake power and the engine's vacuum.

    3

    Replace the brake power booster if the connection's fine, which would fix the hard brake pedal problem.

Calipers

    4

    Check the components of the caliper for any wear.

    5

    Look at the metal spring where the brake pads sit.

    6

    Apply tension to the pad and see whether you hear a pop. If you do, the brake pad is moving too much on the bracket. Replace the caliper. This could help the hard brake pedal.

Minggu, 11 April 2010

How to Fix Rear Brakes on a 1994 Ford Ranger

How to Fix Rear Brakes on a 1994 Ford Ranger

If you hear a high-pitched squealing coming from the rear wheels when you apply the brakes on your Ford Ranger, this is an indication that it is time to change the brakes. However, you should not wait to hear this signal before you inspect the brakes. Although there is no specific period of time during which you need to replace your brakes, you should inspect them regularly as you perform maintenance on your truck.

Instructions

    1

    Insert wheel chocks behind the front wheels of the Ranger. Jack up the rear of the truck on the side you wish to start with. Place a jack stand underneath the Ford near the jack. Raise it up to the frame. Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench and take the wheel off.

    2

    Use a wrench to remove the three nuts that attach the drum to the wheel assembly. Pull the drum away from the wheel assembly. Inspect the brake drum thoroughly for cracks, grooves and other damage. If there is damage present, you will have to have the drums machined smooth or replace them.

    3

    Place a small C-clamp on the ends of the brake cylinder and tighten it enough to hold the ends so they do not pop out. Remove the adjuster from between the brake pads. Turn one end of the adjuster so that it is all the way into the housing. Pull the adjusting lever toward the back and unhook it from the brake shoes. Remove the adjusting spring and the lever in the same manner that you removed the adjuster.

    4

    Use the brake tool to remove the top springs from the brake shoes. Remove the retaining springs from the brake shoes by gripping them with a pair of pliers and pushing them in while turning approximately turn until they release from the retaining pins. Pull the brake shoes away from the backing plate.

    5

    Clean the entire area using a clean rag and brake cleaning fluid. Connect the parking brake link to the secondary brake shoe by hooking it into the slot. Place the new brake shoes on the backing plate and secure them with the retaining springs by pushing the springs in with pliers and turning them turn until they lock into place. Using the brake tool, connect the top springs to the brake shoes. Install the adjusting spring and lever to the secondary brake shoe. Remove the C-clamp from the wheel cylinder. Insert the self-adjuster between the shoes.

    6

    Open the brake adjuster by spinning it just enough that it is snug between the brake shoes. Place the brake drum on the wheel assembly and tighten the three retaining nuts with a wrench. Install the wheel on the Ranger and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from beneath the truck and lower the vehicle to the ground.

    7

    Bleed the air out of the brake lines when the project is complete. Have someone help you do this by pumping the brakes and holding the pedal in as you open the bleeder valve on the wheel with a wrench. Do this on both wheels until the air is out of the lines.

Sabtu, 10 April 2010

How to Rebuild a Hydraulic Master Cylinder

Hydraulic master cylinders (m/c) are a crucial part of a hydraulic brake system. They mount the reservoir that holds a surplus of fluid and house the piston, which, when actuated by hand (or foot) pressure either directly or augmented by a vacuum booter, supplies hydraulic pressure to the brake calipers and wheel cylinders. Hydraulic brake fluid that is contaminated with dirt or other hard particulates can destroy the piston seals and score the cylinder, leading to brake fade and failure. The rubber piston seals also may be damaged by using the wrong fluid and even old age.

Instructions

Rebuilding a Master Cylinder

    1

    Wipe the m/c down with a clean shop rag to remove any dirt and debris from the outside. Remove the m/c cap and discard the old fluid. Remove the brake lines from the m/c with a flare-nut wrench and capture any escaping fluid with a clean rag. Remove the bolts or nuts holding the m/c in place and pull it from the vehicle.

    2

    Look into the open end of the m/c and locate the retaining (snap) ring. Carefully remove the snap ring and discard it. Snap rings are intended for one-time usage and should never be reused. Spring pressure will cause the piston to protrude from the m/c. Pull the piston from the cylinder and inspect the cylinder walls for pitting or scoring. Damaged cylinders should be discarded and replaced. Wash the cylinder in fresh fluid to remove any debris or dirt. Inspect the bleed-back hole in the reservoir and insure that it is clear of obstructions.

    3

    Lubricate the new piston with fresh fluid and insert it into the m/c. Push it in and hold it against the spring pressure and install the new snap ring. Reinstall the m/c onto the vehicle and install the m/c bleeders. Lead the bleeder tubes into the reservoir and add fresh fluid. Actuate the brake system until all the air is purged from the m/c. Remove the bleeders and reinstall the brake lines. Torque them snugly with the flare wrench.

    4

    Top off the reservoir with fresh fluid and actuate the brakes. Observe the bleed-back hole and insure that there is a small geyser of fluid issuing from it just as the cylinder begins to move. This will indicate a properly working system and prevent a hydro-lock from not allowing the brakes to retract and disengage at the calipers. Bleed the brakes as per the manufacturer's recommendations and top the reservoir off at the indicated "full cold" mark on the reservoir.

How to Change the Front Brakes on a Dodge Dakota

The Dodge Dakota pickup truck is manufactured with a front disk braking system that requires routine maintenance to perform adequately. The rotors and pads are the hydraulically operated friction surfaces that can run out of material and fail to stop the truck. These can be replaced or resurfaced by the average backyard mechanic in about an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the truck at a front wheel and place the jack stand underneath the frame rail. Do not place the jack stand or lift with the floor jack at the suspension or body.

    2

    Remove the wheel by turning the lug nuts in a counterclockwise direction. Place the wheel aside.

    3

    Disconnect the anti-lock braking sensor from the wiring harness by pulling the adapter plug from the caliper socket.

    4

    Remove the caliper and pads by turning the twin rear mount bolts in a counterclockwise direction, then sliding the caliper off the rotor. Set the caliper onto a control arm, or secure it to the arm with zip-ties. Do not let the caliper dangle from the brake lines.

    5

    Remove the front rotor by pulling it from the hub, or turning the hub nut counterclockwise on four-wheel-drive models.

    6

    Replace the rotor with a new unit by pressing it over the hub, then securing the hub nut in a clockwise direction, if applicable.

    7

    Slide the caliper back over the rotor and secure the rear mount bolts in a clockwise direction. Press the ABS wiring harness adapter plug back into the caliper socket.

    8

    Replace the wheel by turning the lug nuts in a clockwise direction, with an alternating pattern.

    9

    Lower the truck from the jack stand with the floor jack by turning the pressure screw counterclockwise slowly.

    10

    Repeat the entire process for the opposite front wheel.

Jumat, 09 April 2010

How to Bleed the Rear Brakes on a Chevy 1997 C2500

How to Bleed the Rear Brakes on a Chevy 1997 C2500

The 1997 Chevrolet 2500 Series trucks were available in two different versions, the K2500 and the C2500. The C2500 was only available in two-wheel drive, while the K2500 was available in four-wheel drive. Bleeding the rear brakes on either model of the 1997 2500 is the same process, regardless of vehicle type. Bleeding the rear brakes should take about a half hour to complete. This process can be completed with the rear wheels still on the vehicle, but will require raising the rear end of the truck.

Instructions

    1

    Park the truck on a level surface. Raise and support the hood of the truck for the duration of this project. View the brake fluid reservoir to check that it is at the "Full" mark. Add brake fluid to the reservoir to obtain a full level to begin this project. Always replace the reservoir cap after each filling.

    2

    Raise the rear of the 2500 using a 2-ton jack, or a jack with greater capacity. Place jack stands beneath the rear axle housing, on either end. The farther apart you place the jack stands, the lower the truck's center of gravity and greater its stability will be.

    3

    Lie beneath the rear bumper of the 2500 and slide yourself into position to access one of the bleeder screws, on the back of either rear brake housing. The bleeder screw is a small nipple with a hole through the middle. When released, the bleeder opens and allows air and brake fluid to escape the brake system. Place a drain or catch pan directly beneath the bleeder screw, so that the pan will catch fluid and brake spray.

    4

    Instruct your assistant to enter the truck. Ask him to pump the brake pedal until the pedal provides solid resistance. If after three pumps the pedal is still going to the floor, instruct your assistant to remove his foot completely from the brake pedal.

    5

    Open the bleeder screw on the rear of the brake housing 1 1/2 to 2 turns. Instruct your assistant to depress the brake pedal slowly to the floor of the truck. Ask your assistant to say "down" when the pedal is to the floor. Close the bleeder screw firmly, but do not torque the bleeder. Instruct your assistant to pump the brake pedal back up and hold his foot on the pedal. Ask him to say "holding" when the pedal is up. Repeat this step three times or until you have only fluid coming out of the line, rather than air.

    6

    Check the brake fluid reservoir at the front of the truck after bleeding one side of the truck. Ensure the fluid level is at the "Full" mark. The fluid will be at a slight angle as the rear of the truck is raised. Add the fluid until the middle of the angle aligns with the "Full" mark. Replace the reservoir cap when finished.

    7

    Repeat Steps 3, 4, and 5 to bleed the second side of the 2500. Use verbal commands like "down" and "holding" to ensure proper communication between you and your assistant. Ensure you complete the bleeding cycle at least three times, or until you hear no air escaping the brake line. The brake pedal should pump up to its full upward position when you have completely bled the system of air.

    8

    Instruct your assistant to exit the truck. Raise the rear of the 2500 from the jack stands, using your jack. Remove the jack stands from beneath the truck and then lower the truck to the ground.

    9

    Check the brake fluid reservoir to ensure that it is filled to the "Full" mark. Add fluid as necessary and then replace the reservoir cap.

Rabu, 07 April 2010

How to Change the Rotors & Brake Pads on a Chevy HHR

How to Change the Rotors & Brake Pads on a Chevy HHR

Replacing brakes and rotors on the Chevrolet HHR is something that you should do yourself if you want to avoid the high labor rates that repair garages charge these days. You can expect each wheel to take you about 30 minutes and you can do it in your garage or driveway. Inspect the brakes and rotors periodically so that they do not end up wearing beyond recommended thickness. If the rotors have any damage such as grooves, or if they are too thin, you need to replace them.

Instructions

    1

    Open the engine compartment and drain one-half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder with the turkey baster. Put the fluid in the drain pan for recycling later. Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels of the Chevy. Raise the vehicle with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the automobile near the jacking point. Raise it to the frame.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench and pull the wheel from the vehicle. Remove the brake caliper from the mounting cradle using a socket and ratchet to loosen the bolts.

    3

    Remove the front pad from the brake caliper. Insert the jaws of the C-clamp over the back brake pad and the caliper. Twist it closed until the caliper piston seats itself into the caliper housing.

    4

    Set the caliper aside but do not let it hang by the brake hose or you will damage the line. Pull the brake rotor from the wheel assembly. Install the new brake rotor onto the wheel assembly. Place the new brake pads into the caliper.

    5

    Place the brake caliper on the mounting cradle and tighten the retaining bolts with the socket and ratchet. Place the wheel back on the Chevy and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the vehicle.

    6

    Lower the Chevy to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel. Pump the brakes several times until the brake pads are settled onto the surface of the brake rotors when the project is complete.