Minggu, 28 Februari 2010

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Toyota Tundra

Use a screwdriver to adjust your Toyota Tundra trucks parking brakes and save time and money. Avoid the mechanic and adjust the parking brakes at home. Tundra models that are 1999 year or older adjust underneath the truck with braking cables or by adjusting the star wheel adjuster. Models 2000 to 2006 require you to drive a bit with the parking brake on to set it properly.

Instructions

Adjust the Parking Brake Cables on Models 1999 or Older

    1

    Jack up the rear side of your Toyota Tundra using your jack. Place a jack stand underneath each rear wheel to support the Tundra while you make the adjustment.

    2

    Locate the wire covered cables that come from each of the rear wheels. Follow along each cable until they meet together. Adjust the connector that holds the two cables, using your screwdriver. Remove the slack or loosen the cables.

    3

    Lower your Tundra with the jack and remove your jack stands from underneath.

Adjust the Star Wheel Adjuster on Models 1999 or Older

    4

    Raise your Toyota Tundra rear wheels using the jack and support each rear wheel with a jack stand.

    5

    Place your truck in park. Leave the parking brake off.

    6

    Get underneath the truck and locate the adjustment hole in the inside of the wheel well. Use your screwdriver to insert into the hole and turn the star wheel adjuster.

    7

    Turn the star wheel adjuster until you can feel tension in the wheel when it turns around.

    8

    Lower the Tundra and remove the jack stands.

Adjust the Parking Brake on Models 2000 to 2006

    9

    Raise your Toyota Tundra using the jack and support each rear wheel using your jack stands.

    10

    Get underneath the truck and locate the adjustment hole in the inside of the wheel well. Use your screwdriver to insert into the hole and turn the star wheel adjuster until you can no longer turn the wheel wells.

    11

    Turn the adjuster nut back eight notches. Lower your car with the jack and remove the jack stands.

    12

    Press in on the parking brake pedal with 33 ft-lb of torque or pressure. Drive your car at 31 mph for about a quarter of a mile.

    13

    Repeat Step 4 two or three times. Release your parking brake. Press in fully on the parking brake and your car should not move.

How to Replace the Rotor in a Ford Mustang

Rotors only need to be changed if they become worn down by the brake pads or warped from heat and hard braking. If your prized Ford Mustang is shuddering when you hit the brakes, it's probably time to swap out the old rotors. The process is the same for all model years and it's fairly simple to do it yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Buy rotors for your Ford Mustang at your local auto parts store or order them online. Plan on replacing all of the rotors at once, or at least the front or rear pair of rotors at the same time for safe braking performance.

    2

    Raise your Mustang with jacks and jack stands and then block the wheels to keep your car from moving while you work. Remove the tire and wheel assembly and set aside.

    3

    Drain half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir and discard. Remove the mounting bolts on the caliper and then slide the caliper off the rotor.

    4

    Keep the brake hose connected to the caliper. Use mechanic's wire or a bungee cord to suspend the caliper and brake hose out of the way. If the hose becomes disconnected, you must then bleed then brakes after the installation.

    5

    Use needle nose pliers to remove the retaining clips from the old rotor. Pull the old rotor off the spindles and set aside. Clean the area with a damp cloth to remove any dust or corrosion.

    6

    Install the new rotor into the hub. Fasten the retaining clips if they are provided with the new rotor. Attach the caliper and brake hose to their original position and tighten the caliper mounting bolts with a torque wrench. Replace the wheel assembly and tire. Repeat this process for each additional rotor.

    7

    Lower your Ford Mustang and tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern to 95 ft. lbs. (129 Nm). Pump the brakes and then refill the master cylinder with new brake fluid. Road test your Mustang to make sure that everything is working properly.

How to Replace the Disc Brakes on a 2002 Dodge Ram

It is not difficult to replace the disc brake pads on a 2002 Dodge Ram. You can take care of the project in your driveway or garage and avoid having to take it into a repair shop. It will take about 30 minutes to finish each wheel. When you change the brake pads, inspect the brake rotors as well. If there is any damage to them, such as grooves in the surface, it will wear your brake pads prematurely, so they need to be replaced as well.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Ram on a level, paved surface and turn off the engine. Open the engine compartment and locate the master cylinder on the driver's side back firewall. Lift the lid of the reservoir and siphon enough brake fluid from it with the turkey baster to bring it to the minimum level. Put the fluid in a drain pan for later recycling.

    2

    Place wheel chocks behind the rear wheels of the truck. Raise the Ram on the side you will be working on first with a jack. Place a jack stand under the truck and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts with a lug wrench then take the wheel off the truck.

    3

    Place a C-clamp on the brake caliper, front to back, while it is still on the mounting bracket. Tighten the clamp until the piston seats itself inside of the caliper housing. Remove the C-clamp from the brake caliper. Loosen the caliper retaining bolts with a 3/8-inch hex socket and ratchet. Pull the caliper away from the mounting bracket. Remove the old brake pads and discard them.

    4

    Insert the new brake pads into the caliper and place it on the mounting bracket. Tighten the bolts with the hex socket and the ratchet. Remount the wheel onto the truck and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Dodge. Lower the truck to the ground with the jack. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

    5

    Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir and add to it if necessary. Pump the brakes several times to seat the brake pads onto the rotors.

Sabtu, 27 Februari 2010

How to Replace the Rotors on a 1997 Chevy 2500

Bad brake rotors on your Chevy 2500 are dangerous so you need to inspect them on a regular basis. When there is any sign of damage, they need to be replaced as soon as possible. If you use the brakes often, you should consider checking them every two or three months. Replacing the rotors is not difficult to do, and you can make the repairs in your driveway in about 45 minutes per wheel. When you replace rotors, you need to replace them on both sides.

Instructions

    1

    Place a set of wheel chocks behind the rear wheels of your Chevy. Lift the truck on the side you are starting with with a jack. Place a jack stand under the Chevy near its jacking point and raise it to the frame. Loosen the lug nuts with the lug wrench then pull the tire off the truck.

    2

    Remove the locking hub from the wheel assembly. Remove the castellated nut with a socket and ratchet. Remove the ring and flat washer from the axle. Loosen the retaining bolts on the caliper with the socket and ratchet. Secure the caliper to the strut with a wire tie.

    3

    Pull the rotor away from the wheel spindle along with the outer bearings. Be careful not to drop the bearing or you may damage it. Place the new rotor on the spindle. Install the wheel bearing and pack it with wheel grease.

    4

    Place the flat washer onto the wheel spindle. Place the retaining ring on the spindle until it is against the flat washer. Install the lock nut and tighten it with the socket and ratchet. Install the locking hub on the wheel assembly. Cut the wire tie securing the caliper to the strut with a pair of pliers. Place the brake caliper in the mounting cradle and tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet.

    5

    Remount the wheel on the Chevy and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the truck then lower the Chevy to the ground with the jack. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

How to Change the Brakes in a 1995 Maxima

How to Change the Brakes in a 1995 Maxima

The Nissan Maxima is Nissan's largest passenger car. According to Consumerguideauto.com, in 1995 it was redesigned to incorporate front wheel drive, a V6 engine, and a longer wheel base. All of this extra power requires an excellent braking system to ensure maximum safety for the passengers. The braking system is regarded as the most important system in a vehicle due to the central role it plays in safety.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts. The first step is to loosen, not remove, the lug nuts. This can be done by rotating each lug two full rotations with the tire iron. Place the wood blocks in front of the tires you will not be removing.

    2

    Jack the car up. Place the floor jack underneath a stable section of the car and jack up the car. Make sure that it is high enough to allow the jack stands to be placed beneath the same stable spot and to allow the wheels to clear the ground when removed.

    3

    Remove the tires. Finish removing the lug nuts and then take the tire off completely. Repeat this for both sides of the vehicle. Do not jack up both the front and rear of a vehicle at the same time.

    4

    Remove the brake caliper mounting bracket. The mounting bracket is held on by two bolts, both of which should be fully removed using the socket wrench set.

    5

    Remove the brake pads. The brake pads slide in and out of the mounting bracket and should easily come out.

    6

    Compress the caliper. The caliper is the cylinder in the center of the mounting bracket and can be compressed using the c-clamp.

    7

    Install the new pads. The new pads will slip right in where the old ones were. Brake pads are universal, so which side of the bracket they go on is unimportant. Make sure that only one box of pads is used per wheel and that the black brake material faces inward toward each other when installed.

    8

    Replace the mounting bracket. Reattach the mounting bracket and the tire. Lower the vehicle.

Jumat, 26 Februari 2010

How to Replace Brakes and Rotors on a 2001 Ford F-350

How to Replace Brakes and Rotors on a 2001 Ford F-350

It is a good idea to replace the brake rotors when changing the brake pads on a Ford F-350. However, you do not need to change the rotors every time you change the brakes. Examine the surface of the rotor disc. If there is visible damage, and you have never resurfaced the rotors, change them, along with the brake pads. If you have resurfaced them before, then you will probably need new rotors for the F-350. Replacing the rotors is only one additional step, unless your Ford F-350 is the two-wheel drive model.

Instructions

    1

    Open the engine compartment, and remove 2/3 of the brake fluid from the brake master cylinder, using a turkey baster as a syringe. Put the brake fluid in the drain pan for later disposal. Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels.

    2

    Jack the F-350 up, using the automobile jack, and place a jack stand near the jacking point. Raise the jack stand up to the frame of the truck.

    3

    Remove the wheel of the truck with the lug wrench. Remove the brake caliper, using the ratchet and socket to remove the retaining bolts. You can access the bolts on the back of the caliper. Secure the caliper to the strut, using the wire tie. If the caliper hangs, it will damage the brake line.

    4

    If your truck is a four-wheel drive model, pull the rotor off the wheel assembly. If your Ford F-350 is the two-wheel drive model, remove the grease cap from the wheel hub, using the regular screwdriver as a pry tool to pop the cap off. Remove the cotter pin, using the pliers to pull it out of the wheel shaft. Remove the retaining nut and spindle nut with a wrench. Remove the bearing retainer ring, using the screwdriver, and pull the wheel bearing off. Pull the wheel rotor assembly off by hand.

    5

    Put the new rotor on the wheel assembly. Place the wheel bearing on the shaft, followed by the bearing retainer. Replace the spindle nut, and tighten it with the wrench. Thread the retaining nut on the shaft, and tighten it against the spindle nut with the wrench. Put a new cotter pin through the shaft hole, and spread it apart with the pliers. Tap the grease cap onto the wheel with the rubber mallet.

    6

    Cut the wire tie away from the brake caliper with the pliers. Remove the old brake pads from the caliper, along with the anti-rattle clips. Put new anti-rattle clips in the caliper; they are provided with the new brake pads. Install the brake pads on the caliper by putting them in place.

    7

    Place the caliper back into the mounting bracket on the wheel assembly. Tighten the retaining bolts with the socket and ratchet. Replace the wheel on the truck, and tighten it with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Ford, and lower the truck back to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

Kamis, 25 Februari 2010

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Chrysler Sebring

Adjust your Chrysler Sebring parking brake adjustment if your car has a drum brake or disc in drum brake system. Save yourself time and money by skipping the mechanic and doing it yourself. Use these instructions on Chrysler Sebring models, Convertible or Sedan, from 1995 to 1998 and 2001 through 2005. Adjustment of the parking brake on the 1999-2000 Sebring Convertible isn't necessary.

Instructions

Drum Brake

    1

    Remove the center console that surrounds the hand parking brake. Locate this inside the car between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat.

    2

    Use your pliers to unscrew the nut to loosest point, to release the cable.

    3

    Start the engine using your key and then press down on the foot brake with your foot.

    4

    Pull up on the hand parking brake and release. Count how many clicks it takes and stop pulling up on the hand parking brake lever when you are at three to five clicks.

    5

    Screw the adjuster nut close to the metal plate, leaving no space.

    6

    Replace the center console.

Drum to Disc Brake

    7

    Repeat Steps 1 and 2 of Section One.

    8

    Use your screwdriver in the adjustment hold to turn the adjuster the direction of the arrow. Then turn the adjuster five notches in the opposite direction to set the parking brake.

    9

    Pull up on the hand parking brake and release. Count how many clicks it takes and stop pulling up on the hand parking brake lever when you are at five to seven clicks.

    10

    Screw the adjuster nut close to the metal plate, leaving no space. Replace the center console.

How to Use Actron

How to Use Actron

Ohio-based Actron manufactures and sells vehicle scanning equipment. Actron's auto code scanner allows you to connect it to your home computer to diagnose a variety of problems with your vehicle. The scanner displays a series of fault codes identifying problems. As of November 2010, the scanners cost between $150 and $300, depending on whether you buy a basic model or upgraded Pro Scanner.

Instructions

    1

    Connect the scanner to your vehicle. Locate the OBD II connector under the steering column, remove the cover, and turn the ignition to the "ON" position, but do not start the engine. Plug the OBD II connector into the vehicle connector.

    2

    Scan the required component. The tool automatically reads codes, and monitors and displays your vehicle's data. When this is complete, press the "BACK" key to return to the main screen.

    3

    Retrieve the list of diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) and code definitions from the vehicle's computer. To read the data, press and hold the "READ" key for two seconds, then release it or select the "READ CODES" option from the main menu. If a DTC is reported, there is a potential malfunction in that part of the vehicle. Pending DTCs do not always indicate failure of the component. They show up when a non-persistent problem has been detected.

    4

    Erase codes from the vehicle computer by selecting the "ERASE" option. Confirm your choice by selecting "YES," or decline by selecting "NO." If a problem persists after erasing its code from the vehicle, the problem has not been fixed.

    5

    Freeze-frame live timing to pinpoint your vehicle's problem. Selecting this option from the menu allows you to display a snapshot of the operating conditions at the time the diagnosis was created.

    6

    Play back the timing to scrutinize the data and create a clear diagnosis. You can also find out about the emissions data by selecting "VIEW DATA." This gives details about switches, sensors, solenoids and relays.

    7

    Connect the device to the Internet or your home computer to record the results of scans and to download new scanning suites from the manufacturer.

How to Fit Brake Pads

Fitting brake pads is crucial to the proper functioning of your vehicle's brakes. When it's time to change the brake pads, fitting the new ones into the caliper assembly can be confusing without proper instruction. Thankfully, fitting new pads can be done with a few simple tools for most vehicles. Once you have removed the wheel and have the vehicle onto jack stands, fitting new brake pads should take you no more than 20 minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Slide the screw end of the C-clamp over the outboard brake pad (the pad that is facing you as you look straight at the caliper assembly). Slide the other end of the clamp over the back of the caliper assembly. Turn the handle on the C-clamp to tighten the clamp against the pad. This will compress the caliper piston. You won't be able to see it at this point, but you will see a gap developing between the outboard pad and the brake caliper bracket. This will tell you that the caliper piston is being compressed back into the caliper.

    2

    Remove the C-clamp and then remove the caliper pin bolt on the bottom of the caliper. The pin bolt is the bottom-most bolt on the caliper.

    3

    Remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts.

    4

    Slide the caliper off the brake rotor.

    5

    Remove the brake pads by swinging the bottom of the caliper up and sliding the old pads out.

    6

    Slide the new pads into the caliper so that the curved end of the brake pad is facing the caliper assembly.

    7

    Sling the caliper bracket closed and slide the caliper back over the brake rotor. Thread and tighten the caliper mounting bolts and pin bolt. Tighten the bolts to the torque specs listed in your vehicle's service manual.

Rabu, 24 Februari 2010

How to Replace the Rear Drum Brakes on a 2000 Town & Country

How to Replace the Rear Drum Brakes on a 2000 Town & Country

The 2000 Chrysler Town & Country has rear drum brakes. Drum brakes are more complicated to replace than disc brakes, but the process can still be completed in about half an hour. The brakes should be inspected every 15,000 miles or whenever a problem is suspected, such as excessive squeal or delayed braking. If the pads on the shoes are thinner than .281 inches, they should be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts with a lug wrench. Raise the rear wheel with a jack and remove the wheel and brake drum.

    2

    Pull the parking brake cable down and towards the back of the van to add slack to the line. Clamp the cable behind the mounting bracket with a pair of locking pliers.

    3

    Remove the spring from the automatic adjustment lever with a pair of needle-nose pliers. This lever is attached to the front brake shoe. Remove the lever.

    4

    Remove the lower spring that connects the two brake shoes.

    5

    Remove the clip that connects the upper spring to the adjuster assembly. Remove the upper spring.

    6

    Twist the pin that connects the hold-down spring to the rear shoe to remove the pin and spring.

    7

    Remove the rear brake shoe and the attached parking brake components.

    8

    Pull the automatic adjuster off the front brake shoe to remove it.

    9

    Twist the front pin to remove the pin, hold-down spring and front shoe.

    10

    Separate the parking brake strut from the front shoe.

    11

    Install the brake pads. The process is the reverse of removal. Clean the brakes with brake cleaner according to the instructions on the can before replacing the drum.

    12

    Unclamp the parking brake line, reattach the wheel then lower the van. Tighten the lug nuts to 95 ft.-lbs. of torque.

    13

    Replace the brake shoes on the other side of the vehicle by following the same procedure.

    14

    Stop the van at a low speed, while traveling in forward and reverse several times, to allow the brakes to readjust. Once the brakes seem to react normally, it is safe to take the van out on the road.

Selasa, 23 Februari 2010

How to Fix Chevy Brakes

How to Fix Chevy Brakes

The most common problem with Chevy brake systems is worn brake shoes and pads. The brake pads are designed to be wearable parts which must be replaced periodically to ensure proper brake function. When replacing brake shoes or pads always try to purchase the highest quality pads you can afford. Buying low quality parts can increase wear on the brake drums and rotors, which can cost more money in the long run.

Instructions

Removing Front Brake Discs and Pads

    1

    Lift the front of the vehicle and support with jack stands underneath the frame.

    2

    Remove the front wheels and tires.

    3

    Loosen but do not remove the two bolts that secure the brake caliper to the brake caliper bracket.

    4

    Lift the caliper off the brake disc. Do not allow the caliper to hang from the hydraulic line. Secure it to the frame with wire or plastic ties.

    5

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper by pulling them loose.

    6

    Remove the brake disc from the lug studs by pulling it away from the hub.

Installing Front Brake Discs and Pads

    7

    Slide the new brake disc over the lug studs and press it against the hub.

    8

    Use a C-clamp to drive the piston back into the brake caliper.

    9

    Load the brake pads into the caliper. The inboard pad will have a steel clip that fits into the piston in the caliper. The outboard pad will have a steel clip that fits over the outside of the brake caliper.

    10

    Set the brake caliper into position over the new brake disc. Tighten the two screws that secure it to the brake caliper bracket.

    11

    Reinstall the wheels and tires.

    12

    Lower the vehicle.

Removing the Rear Brake Drums and Shoes

    13

    Raise the rear of the vehicle and support it with jack stands placed underneath the rear frame or axle.

    14

    Remove the rear wheels and tires.

    15

    Remove the rear brake drum by pulling it off the lug studs.

    16

    Remove the two springs that connect the brake shoes to the anchor point at the top of the brake backing plate.

    17

    Remove the wire link that connects the secondary shoe to the anchor pin.

    18

    Remove the spring and adjusting star wheel that connect the two shoes at the bottom of the brake backing plate.

    19

    Remove the brake shoes by compressing the retaining spring and turning it a quarter turn to disengage it from the retaining pin.

    20

    Remove the parking brake strut from above the axle.

Installing Rear Brake Shoes and Drums

    21

    Inspect all the brake hardware; replace as necessary.

    22

    Place the shoes into position; attach using the retaining springs and pins. Push the retaining pin through the backing plate and brake shoe. Compress the retaining spring and rotate the retainer a quarter turn to secure.

    23

    Place the parking brake strut above the axle between the two shoes.

    24

    Attach the two springs that connect the two brake shoes to the anchor pin at the top of the brake backing plate.

    25

    Place the star wheel adjuster between the two brake shoes at the bottom of the backing plate.

    26

    Reinstall the spring at the star adjuster wheel that connects the two brake shoes at the bottom of the brake backing plate.

    27

    Slide the brake drum over the lug studs.

    28

    Reinstall the rear wheels and tires.

    29

    Lower the vehicle.

Minggu, 21 Februari 2010

How to Convert to a Dual Piston Master Cylinder on a 1955 Ford

How to Convert to a Dual Piston Master Cylinder on a 1955 Ford

The brake system on a 1955 Ford was a single circuit hydraulic brake system. In a single line system, if a leak occurred the brakes on all four wheels would fail. Stopping ability in such a case depended on how bad the leak was and how much brake fluid remained. Once the fluid is gone so are the brakes. The dual master cylinder arrived in the late sixties and divided the brake system into two separate hydraulic circuits, the front and rear. If a leak occurs in one circuit the other circuit stops the car.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the old single master cylinder from the cowl of the '55 Ford. By loosening and removing the single brake line into the master cylinder and loosen and remove the two bolts that secure the master cylinder to the cowl.

    2

    Inspect the cowl area of the 1955 Ford. Be sure the cowl is solid, with no fatigue cracks or rust damage.

    3

    Determine that the brake pedal linkage rod is of sufficient length to work with the new masters cylinder. Hold the linkage rod at the cowl while a helper in the car holds the brake pedal even with the clutch pedal or around five inches from the floor. Measure the length of linkage rod that protrudes through the cowl. Be sure the linkage is long enough to push the master cylinder plunger and stop the car.

    4

    Bench bleed the dual master cylinder. This is done by clamping the master cylinder into a vice. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid. Thread the two small lines included with the new master cylinder, one line in each reservoir. The short lines route the brake fluid back into the reservoir, the ends of the those lines must remain under the fluid level.

    5

    Bolt the dual master cylinder to the cowl. Be sure there is a dust boot installed on the master cylinder to keep the linkage rod, dirt and moisture free.

    6

    Trace the brake lines from the rear axle to the junction block or T-block where the front and rear brake lines joined into a single line that ran to the old master cylinder. Remove the rear brake line from the junction block and thread a double flare union on to this rear line.

    7

    Measure the distance from the rear master cylinder reservoir to the newly installed union. Select a new brake line the length of the measurement. Join one end of the new line to the union on the rear brake line. Do not tighten this end of the line. Thread the other end of the new line to the rear reservoir of the new master cylinder and tighten this line tight.

    8

    Trace the brake lines from the front wheel to the junction block or T-block where the front and rear brake lines joined into a single line that ran to the old master cylinder. Remove the front brake line from the junction block and thread a double flare union on to this front line.

    9

    Measure the distance from the front master cylinder reservoir to the newly installed union on the front line. Select a new brake line the length of the measurement. Join one end of the new line to the union on the front brake line. Do not tighten this end of the line. Thread the other end of the new line to the front reservoir of the new master cylinder and tighten this line tight.

    10

    Push the brake pedal to the floor and hold it there. Now tighten both the front and rear brake lines. Then release the pedal. This will release some air that was in the new line. With the pedal released loosen both of the new lines at the double flare unions. Again push the pedal to the floor and hold it there until both lines are re-tightened then release the pedal.

    11

    Check and add brake fluid to the dual master cylinder as needed. Bleed the front and rear brakes separately. Once the air is bled from the brakes inspect all the lines to be sure they are tight. Visually look under the dash, pull the brake pedal all the way up to be sure the linkage rod can not come out of the master cylinder. The brakes should now be suitable for highway use.

DIY: Honda Element Brake Pads

DIY: Honda Element Brake Pads

Replacing the brake pads on a Honda Element is a way to learn how the braking system works on the SUV. You'll also save money on labor charges. Use that extra money to buy higher-quality replacement pads. While the Element features front disc brakes that employ pads, yours may also feature either rear drum brakes or rear disc brakes. There is little difference whether you're replacing front or rear pads.

Supporting the Element Safely

    Before lifting the Element, remove half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder. This will allow room for the brake fluid to be purged back into the cylinder when the caliper pistons are compressed. Use a turkey baster for this task. Use the Elements tire iron to loosen the lug nuts 1/8 of a turn before lifting the axle. If you're replacing the front pads, apply the parking brake prior to lifting, but if you're replacing the rear pads, place a wheel chock in front of one of the front tires and don't apply the parking brake.

    Lift one side at a time on a hard, flat surface and then place the jack stand in a suitable location. Place a piece of flat wood under the jack stand if youre replacing the pads on asphalt during a particularly hot day. This way, the stand legs wont cut into the tar. Lift both sides of the same axle. Never use the jack to support the vehicle.

Removing the Calipers and Pads

    Finish removing the lug nuts and then remove the wheels.

    Locate the caliper pin retaining bolts on the inside edge of the caliper. Use a 12-mm box-end hand wrench to turn the bolts counterclockwise to remove them from the caliper slide pins. With the bolts off the caliper, pull it off the pad and rotor assembly. There are two wire pad rattle clips (front only) that will pop off once you pull off the caliper. Save these if the replacement pad set did not come with new clips. Hang the caliper from the suspension spring so you dont damage the brake hose.

    Remove the pads from the caliper anchor.

Replacing the Pads

    Prep the new replacement pads by placing the shims provided in the box on them. Some pads may already have them staked on. If the pad set also has the pad retaining plates, pry the old ones off the caliper anchor and use the new ones. Apply a coat of lubricant to the tops of these plates (new or old). Apply some of the lubricant to the shims before replacing the pads in the anchor.

Finishing the Job

    Pull the caliper pins out of the anchor, wipe off the old grease and re-lubricate with new lubricant.

    Use a 4-inch C-clamp to compress the caliper piston slowly until it's fully seated in the bore. Place the bottom of the caliper onto the pads, but keep it pivoted away from the top of the pads. Insert the rattle clip (old or new) into the holes on the outer edges of the pads. Pivot the caliper up over the top of the pads and clip and then re-pivot it upward to replace the lower rattle clip. Replace both the caliper mounting bolts.

    Do both sides. Obtain the proper torque specifications for re-tightening all the nuts and bolts. These are available from the parts store where you bought the pads.

    Torque the lug nuts when the Element is lowered to the ground, but tighten them snugly before lowering it. Be sure the master cylinder cover is on and then pump the brake pedal several times until firm. This will push the compressed pistons of the calipers out and allow them to seat against the rotors. Top off the master cylinder with new brake fluid. Dont forget to remove the wheel chock and release the parking brake before test driving.

How to Change the Brake Wheel Cylinder on a 1991 Grand Am

The wheel cylinders on the 1991 Pontiac Grand Am control the movement of the brake shoes on the rear wheels. As you depress the brake pedal, the master cylinder distributes brake fluid throughout the brake lines. On the rear wheels, the fluid pushes the pistons out on each side of the wheel cylinder, forcing the brake shoes against the drum in order to stop the car. Like other parts of the braking system, the wheel cylinders will wear and need replacing. The average do-it-yourself mechanic can replace the wheel cylinders in the garage or driveway, avoiding the need to take the car to a repair shop.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car on a level surface and turn off the key. Place a set of wheel chocks in front of the front wheels.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel you are starting with using the lug wrench, but do not remove them. Raise the Grand Am using the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the rear axle of the car and raise it as high as possible by hand. Lower the automobile jack just enough that the car is resting on the jack stand.

    3

    Make a mark on the wheel to match it up with the axle using a marking crayon. This will help to keep the tires balanced when you put everything back together. Remove the lug nuts from the wheel assembly and pull the tire away from the car. Make a mark on the drum to line it up properly with the axle for balancing purposes using the marking crayon.

    4

    Remove the brake drum from the wheel assembly. Clean any dirt and debris from around the wheel cylinder using a shop towel. The wheel cylinder is at the top of the wheel assembly.

    5

    Loosen the nut on the inlet tube behind the brake backing plate using a wrench. Do not pull the brake line away from the backing plate or you may damage it. It will separate from the cylinder when you pull the cylinder off. Plug the brake line with a brake line plug to prevent fluid loss.

    6

    Remove the bolts securing the wheel cylinder to the backing plate using a ratchet and a 6 Torx socket. Pull the wheel cylinder away from the backing plate.

    7

    Place the new wheel cylinder on the brake backing plate. Torque the retaining bolts on the cylinder to 15 foot-pounds using a 6 Torx socket and torque wrench.

    8

    Remove the brake line plug from the brake line and connect the line to the wheel cylinder. Torque the tube nut to 12 foot-pounds with a crowfoot attachment and torque wrench.

    9

    Remove the cover from the master brake cylinder in the engine compartment and add brake fluid as necessary to bring it to the full mark. Install the brake drum, making sure to line up the marks you made when removing it.

    10

    Install the wheel and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Lower the car to the ground and retighten the lug nuts using a star pattern. Repeat the process as necessary on the other wheel.

    11

    Attach a clear plastic hose to the bleeder valve on the wheel cylinder. Slowly open the bleeder valve using a wrench while a helper depresses the brake pedal. Allow the fluid to flow into the drain pan until there are no bubbles coming out with the fluid. Close the valve with a wrench and torque to 65 inch-pounds with an inch-pound torque wrench. When bleeding the brakes, start with the right rear wheel, then move to the left rear and repeat the process.

    12

    Move to the front of the car starting with the right front wheel and repeat the procedure followed in step 11, and then move to the left side of the Grand Am. Be sure to continuously add brake fluid to the master cylinder as necessary to prevent the brake lines from pulling air into the system.

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Chevy Corvette

Brake pads are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc when you step on the brake pedal. They are an important part of your Chevy Corvette's braking system. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a 1/4 inch, or risk damaging your Impala's brake discs.

Instructions

Remove the Rear Brake Pads

    1

    Park your car on a level surface. Set the parking brake. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

    2

    Open the hood of your car and disconnect the negative battery cable.

    3

    Raise the rear end of your Corvette with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

    4

    Place a large C-clamp on the body of the caliper. Place the clamp ends against the rear of the caliper body and the outboard pad. Slowly tighten the clamp evenly to compress the pistons.

    5

    Remove the upper caliper bolt and pivot the caliper downwards until you have enough clearance to remove the brake pads. Support the caliper with wire or a small bungee cord.

    6

    Take the brake pads and lining assemblies out of the caliper.

Install the Rear Brake Pads

    7

    Use a brake parts cleaner to remove all residue from the pad and lining assembly guiding surfaces on the caliper housing and the mounting bracket. Make sure the caliper pistons are fully compressed.

    8

    Place the outboard pad and insulator in the caliper housing. Place the inboard pad with the wear sensor into the caliper pistons. Firmly press the pads until they are they are fully seated.

    9

    Pivot the caliper upwards until it stops. Insert and tighten the upper bolt to 23 foot pounds. (31 Nm).

    10

    Replace the wheel assembly (tire). Lower the car to the ground.

    11

    Reconnect the negative battery cable.

Sabtu, 20 Februari 2010

How to Remove Brake Drums on a 1967 to 1969 VW

Volkswagens produced in the late 1960s were equipped with a drum-brake system as standard equipment. When the brake pedal is depressed, two brake shoes mounted behind each wheel expand and press against a round drum. The resulting friction is what slows the vehicle. However, this friction also gradually wears down the drum. If the damage to the drum is not extensive, it can often be repaired by a process called "turning." In extreme cases, the drum must be replaced. The first step in either task is to remove the drums.

Instructions

    1

    Bend the two ends of the cotter pin at the center of the drum together with pliers.

    2

    Pull the cotter pin out of the castle nut with the pliers.

    3

    Loosen the castle nut by turning the nut in a counterclockwise direction with a breaker bar and a socket.

    4

    Remove the wheel's lug nuts with a lug-nut wrench.

    5

    Lift the back of the vehicle with a jack.

    6

    Lower the vehicle onto safety stands.

    7

    Remove the lug nuts with the lug-nut wrench.

    8

    Lift the wheel off of the brake drum.

    9

    Remove the loosened castle nut with a socket wrench.

    10

    Disengage the parking brake.

    11

    Pull the brake drum off of the vehicle.

Rabu, 17 Februari 2010

How to Check the Electrical Brakes on a Trailer

Most trailers come equipped with electric brake shoes, which are designed to stop the trailer wheels by applying pressure to the surface of the brake drums. When the brake pedal inside of the tow vehicle is depressed, the brake controller relays the corresponding compression information to the brake shoes. The brake shoes then push against the brake drum according to the distance the brake pedal is depressed. Replace the brake shoes when they wear down to a thickness of 1/8-inch.

Instructions

    1

    Park the trailer on a flat surface and disconnect the tow vehicle from the trailer.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on both rear wheels one-quarter turn counterclockwise with a tire tool.

    3

    Jack up the driver side rear of the trailer and place a jack stand under the rear axle about 12 to 14 inches away from the driver side wheel backing plate. Lower the driver side axle onto the stand. Move the jack to the passenger side rear of the trailer. Jack the trailer up and place a jack stand under the rear axle about 12 to 14 inches away from the passenger side rear wheel backing plate. Lower the passenger side axle onto the stand and leave the jack in place.

    4

    Finish removing the lug nuts from both wheels. Pull the wheels off and place them flat down on the surface. Move to the driver side rear brake drum and tap the dust cap off of the front of the drum with a rubber mallet. Remove the cotter pin from the castle nut and the spindle with the pliers. Loosen and remove the castle nut with a ratchet and a socket.

    5

    Grab the brake drum with your hands and shake it back and forth until the wheel bearing inside of the drum loosens up from the spindle. Pull the bearing and the washer off of the spindle. Pull the drum off of the brake shoes and place it on the ground. If the drum is stuck, tap it with a rubber mallet until it loosens.

    6

    Inspect the brake shoes for the proper thickness, which should be no less than 1/8-inch. Make sure that the magnet is still attached between the two brake shoes. Also make sure that the return springs, retainer springs, retainers and the retainer clips are all attached. Inspect the brake drum for damage, such as wear or grooving. Replace the drum if the damage is excessive. Slide the brake drum back over the brake shoes and reverse the steps above to reinstall the wheel hub. Torque the castle nut to 35 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and a socket.

    7

    Slide behind the brake assembly backing plate and locate the rubber plug on the back of the backing plate. Remove the rubber plug from the access hole with a flat head screwdriver. Adjust the brake shoes to the proper distance from the surface of the brake drums. Start by shining the flashlight through the access hole to locate the star gears on the brake shoe adjuster wheel. Slide the end of the brake shoe adjuster tool onto one of the star gears and turn the gears clockwise until they stop turning. Grab the wheel and attempt to turn it. If the it will not turn, this means the brake shoes are fully compressed to the surface of the brake drums.

    8

    Turn the star gears counterclockwise to position the brake shoes away from the brake drum. Turn the wheel at the same time. Once the wheel begins to turn with no restrictions, stop turning the star gears and reinsert the rubber plug. Slide the wheels back on and screw the lug nuts on tightly. Jack up the trailer and remove the jack stands. Lower the trailer to the surface and remove the jack.

    9

    Move to the passenger side brake drum and repeat the same process described above. After both rear electric brake shoes have been inspected, slide the wheels back on and screw the lug nuts on tightly.

    10

    Jack up the trailer back and remove the jack stands. Lower the trailer to the surface and remove the jack. Finish tightening the lug nuts firmly.

How to Install Brake Rotors on a Honda Integra

How to Install Brake Rotors on a Honda Integra

Acura, the luxury car division of the Honda Motor Company, manufactures the Integra. According to Edmunds, the Integra's quality is the reason it has such a large following in the U.S. Quality, however, does not mean the Integra is immune to breakdown since, at some point in time, all automobile parts will wear or sustain damage and require repairs. If the brake rotors have grooves or other damage to them, they will need to be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Place wheel chocks behind the rear wheels and raise the car with an automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the frame of the car and lower it onto the stand with the jack.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts on the wheel with a lug wrench then remove the wheel.

    3

    Unscrew the retaining bolts from the brake caliper with a socket and ratchet. Secure the caliper to the strut with a wire tie to avoid damaging the brake line.

    4

    Remove the rotor retaining screws with the appropriate-sized screwdriver. Some model-years of Acuras do not have them installed. Pull the rotor away from the wheel assembly. If it does not come off freely and there are no retaining screws, hit the rotor with a rubber mallet until it breaks free.

    5

    Install the new rotor onto the wheel assembly then reinstall the retaining screw if so equipped. Replace the caliper onto the wheel and tighten the retaining bolts with the socket and ratchet. Remount the wheel onto the vehicle and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the vehicle and lower the car to the ground.

    6

    Repeat the process on the other wheel. You should always replace rotors in sets.

Senin, 15 Februari 2010

Do Chlorine & Brake Cleaner Work As Accelerants?

Do Chlorine & Brake Cleaner Work As Accelerants?

Chlorine in liquid form can keep your pool clear of bacteria. In gaseous form, however, it is extremely toxic and can kill you. Brake cleaners are made in two different forms, with and without chlorine.

Chlorine

    Chlorine is an element that in its natural state is a gas. Using manufacturing processes, this gas can be pressurized and cooled to its liquid form so it can be shipped and stored safely. It is not flammable either as a gas or liquid but it can have a violent reaction to other chemicals, including fire and explosions. These other chemicals include ammonia, turpentine and brake fluid.

Brake Cleaner

    Brake cleaner is sold in two forms: the chlorinated nonflammable and the extremely flammable brake cleaners. Environmental regulations led to the creation of nonflammable brake cleaner. The problem is that when this spray comes into contact with hot metal or flame it releases chlorine gas in the form of toxic vapors. These vapors include carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethane and chlorobenzene. At a rate of four parts per million, it can kill a human being.

As Accelerants

    These toxic gases were created beginning in World War II by the Nazis as a poison gas to kill Allied troops. While neither chlorine nor the chlorinated brake cleaner is flammable, and neither by itself could be used as accelerant, the presence of an ammonia- or petroleum-based cleaner could generate fumes that could ignite an explosion. The safest brake cleaner is the eco-unfriendly, extremely flammable brake cleaner.

How to Change the Brake Line on a 1997 Mercury Marquis

You need to replace any of the brake lines on your Mercury Grand Marquis corroded, leaking or otherwise damaged. It is a good idea to inspect the condition of these lines every six months to check for such damage. Replacing a line on the 1997 Grand Marquis is much like any other vehicle, making sure the replacement lines are bent in the same shape as the old ones were. Always use steel brake lines, never copper.

Instructions

Changing the Line

    1

    Raise the car at the front or rear end--whichever one corresponds to the brake line you are changing--and support it on jack stands. Remove the wheel for the correct brake line.

    2

    Unscrew and disconnect the metal brake line from the fitting for the rubber hose by gripping the hose's fitting with an open-ended wrench as you turn the metal line's fitting with another wrench.

    3

    Disconnect the brake line at the line's other end with your wrenches and remove the line from its brackets.

    4

    Install the replacement brake line to the fitting near the main line to the master cylinder; many auto parts stores carry brake lines that are already flared at the ends and bent in the shape needed for your model. TIghten the fitting with your wrenches.

    5

    Check and make sure the new line is secure in the brackets while still having enough clearance from all hot or moving parts on the car, and then connect the brake hose fitting to the line. Make sure the there are no kinks in the rubber hose as you tighten the fitting.

    6

    Bleed the brake system at the wheel you changed the line for as described below.

Bleeding

    7

    Fill the master cylinder reservoir to the max with fresh brake fluid and close the cap on the reservoir.

    8

    Loosen the bleeder valve on the brake caliper and connect a length of 3/16-inch tubing to the valve. Submerge the tube's other end in a bottle partially filled with brake fluid.

    9

    Open the bleeder valve while an assistant presses down on the brake pedal from inside the car. Look for air and fluid to come out of the hose into the bottle and then close the valve and have the assistant release the pedal.

    10

    Repeat until there is no more air coming out the tube--as in no more air bubbles in the fluid--and then close up the valve and remove the tube.

    11

    Reconnect the wheel to the car and lower it off the jack stands.

How to Replace the Rear Breaks on a Ford Ranger

How to Replace the Rear Breaks on a Ford Ranger

Replacing the rear brake shoes on a Ford Ranger can be challenging, but not impossible. Anyone with the right set of tools can replace brake shoes in a single afternoon, or less with experience. Prior to starting the process, purchase the brake shoes from your local automotive repair store. Then, it is just a matter of rolling up your sleeves and getting to work.

Instructions

    1

    Place blocks in front of the front tires, which will remain on the ground, to prevent the truck from rolling.

    2

    Jack up the rear end of the truck and support each side with jack stands.

    3

    Remove the tires. At this point, you should be able to see the brake drum.

    4

    Remove the brake drum and you will see the rear brake shoes and the wheel cylinder.

    5

    Remove the rear brake shoes by removing the springs that hold them on. Use a brake spring removal tool for this step, if necessary. Lay the brake shoes and springs out the way they came off to make installation much easier.

    6

    Remove the caliper bracket, but only if it is required for removal of the rotor. The caliper bracket is usually held on by two bolts. Remove the bolts and then the caliper bracket. Install rear brake shoes, checking the springs and retainers as you go. Replace any worn or damaged springs.

    7

    Install rear brake drum and adjust rear brakes untill you feel them drag on the drum a little.

    8

    Place the caliper over the pads and rotor and replace the bolts. Tighten the bolts to the manufacturer's specifications.

    9

    Torque the lug nuts to manufacturer's specifications.

    10

    Pump the brakes before driving. If the brake pedal does not feel right after three or four pumps, remove the tires and recheck the brakes.

    11

    Test-drive the truck. The brakes may feel a little soft for the first few trips until the brake shoes seat properly.

How to Change Drum Brakes on a 2000 Mercury Cougar

The rear brakes on the Mercury Cougar consist of a laminated brake shoe and drum assembly. The drums will wear over time or sometimes crack from heat and use. Replacing the drums with new OEM or aftermarket drums will restore your braking performance and safety. Drums are available at most auto parts stores and through the dealership. While you have the drums off, inspect the rear brakes to be sure none of the other components needs replacing.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the rear of your Cougar with a lug wrench. Do not take them, off the wheel studs yet. Using a jack, raise the rear of the car off the ground then place a set of jack stands under the rear axle.

    2

    Lower the jack, setting the car securely on the jack stands then remove the lug nuts from the wheel studs. Pull the wheels off the car and set them out of the way.

    3

    Grasp the rear brake drum with both hands and pull it straight out, removing it from the axle assembly. It may not come right off the first time; work it back and forth until you can free it from the axle, backing plate and the brake shoes. Discard the old drum.

    4

    Position the new drum squarely on the brake shoes and slide it in, aligning the holes in the drum with the wheel studs. Push the drum in to ensure it seats properly. Position the wheel and tire on the studs and install the lug nuts.

    5

    Move to the opposite side of the car and repeat the steps. Raise the car off the jack stands, remove the stands from under the car and lower the car to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts with a lug wrench.

Minggu, 14 Februari 2010

How to Remove the Brakes From a 1986 Chevy

How to Remove the Brakes From a 1986 Chevy

Taking care of your brakes is an important part of vehicle upkeep. The brakes on your 1986 Chevy will need to be removed from the vehicle for both inspection and replacement. Inspecting these components and replacing any worn or failing parts will help your Chevy retain its optimum braking performance. Most 1986 Chevys are equipped with drum brakes at the rear and disc brakes up front although some models, such as the Chevy Camaro, may have disc brakes on all four wheels.

Instructions

Preparation

    1

    Open the hood and locate the vehicle's brake master cylinder reservoir and remove half of the brake fluid from the reservoir with a turkey baster. Dispose of the fluid in a safe and environmentally responsible manner.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel with a lug wrench. Use a floor jack to lift the vehicle off of the ground and support it on jack stands.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts from the wheel with the lug wrench. Slide the wheel off of the axle to access the brake disc or drum.

Disc Brake Removal

    4

    Remove the two mounting bolts holding the caliper to its mounting hardware with a ratchet and socket. Lift the caliper off of the brake rotor and suspend it in mid-air with mechanic's wire.

    5

    Unscrew the two mounting bolts holding the brake pad bracket in place. Pull the bracket off of the brake rotor and set it aside.

    6

    Pry the dust cap off of the rotor with a flat head screwdriver. Use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the cotter pin from the spindle nut. Use a ratchet and socket to loosen and remove the spindle nut.

    7

    Grasp the rotor firmly with both hands and pull it away from the axle. Apply a liberal amount of penetrating lubricant around the spindle area and allow it to set at for least 15 minutes if the rotor does not come off immediately.

Drum Brake Removal

    8

    Remove the round clips from the wheel studs if your 1986 Chevy has rear-wheel drive. Pry away the dust cap with a flat-head screwdriver to expose the spindle nut. Remove the cotter pin from the nut with a pair of needle-nose pliers and remove the nut with a ratchet and socket.

    9

    Grasp the brake drum firmly and pull it away from the axle. If the axle fails to move, remove the rubber plug on the backing plate to reveal the access hole for the adjuster. Insert a brake adjuster tool and rotate the adjuster wheel until the brake drum starts to spin freely then pull the brake drum away from the axle.

    10

    Unhook the upper and lower brake return springs with the needle-nose pliers and remove the two hold-down springs on the brake shoes. Detach the parking brake cable from the brake assembly. Remove the anchor pin holding the brake shoes together and pull the shoes out of the assembly.

Sabtu, 13 Februari 2010

Removing Rear Drum Brakes on a 92 GMC Truck

Removing Rear Drum Brakes on a 92 GMC Truck

The tools required for replacing the rear brakes on your 1992 GMC truck can be found in most toolboxes. Labor rates are high , and you should do any of the maintenance that you can yourself to save money on repairs. You can complete this project in your garage or driveway, and a person with no experience working on trucks can expect each wheel to take about an hour to complete.

Instructions

    1

    Park the GMC truck on a level surface and place the wheel chocks behind the rear tires. Raise the truck with the automobile jack. Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench and take the wheel off the truck.

    2

    Loosen the parking brake equalizer with the brake tool enough that you can easily pull the brake drum off the wheel. Remove the springs from the return shoe (the rear shoe) using the brake tool. Push the retaining spring in using the pliers while turning it -turn clockwise. Pull the shoe off the wheel assembly. Remove the retaining spring on the forward shoe the same way.

    3

    Remove the adjuster actuator and the adjuster lever from the forward shoe by pulling it out of the slot. Unclip the parking brake spring and strut using the pliers. Clean the backing plate and the springs thoroughly using the wire brush. Disconnect the parking brake lever from the rear shoe using the pliers to release the clip. Properly discard the old brake shoes.

    4

    Connect the parking brake lever to the new rear brake shoe. Install the shoe to the backing plate and secure it with the retaining spring and washer by turning it turn with the pliers. Place the forward shoe on the backing plate and secure it with the retaining spring and washer, using the pliers to push it in and turn it turn.

    5

    Lubricate the parking brake lever and springs with brake lubricant. Lubricate the self-adjuster and then turn it all the way in. Insert it into the slot between the brake pads. Connect the return spring to each of the brake shoes using the brake tool. Connect the parking brake cable to the rear brake shoe. Connect the spring to the top of the brake shoes using the brake tool.

    6

    Thoroughly inspect the brake drum and check for grooves and other damage. If there is damage present you will have to replace the drum or have it machined smooth at an automotive machine shop. In any case, make sure to clean the drum thoroughly with brake part cleaning solvent. Place the drum onto the wheel assembly. Replace the wheel on the truck and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    7

    Remove the jack stand from under the GMC and lower the truck to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel. Before driving the truck, be sure to bleed the air from the brake lines by having someone pump the pedal several times and holding it, while you open the valve at the wheel cylinder to let out any air.

How to Assemble a Rear Brake Drum System for a 2006 Jeep Wrangler 6-Cylinder

How to Assemble a Rear Brake Drum System for a 2006 Jeep Wrangler 6-Cylinder

The 2006 Jeep Wrangler was available in six trim packages; SE, Rubicon, Unlimited Rubicon, X and Limited. The 2006 Wrangler 4.0-liter V-6 engine produced 190-horsepower and 235 foot-pounds of torque. The 2006 Wrangler drum brakes are somewhat difficult to remove and install because of the amount of hardware springs that have to be placed to set the shoes, self-adjuster and parking brake equipment. Proper adjusting of the new rear drum brakes is essential for optimal performance of the entire braking system.

Instructions

Drum Brake Removal

    1

    Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts on the Wrangler, using a tire iron. Raise the rear of the car, using a jack. Place jack stands beneath the rear axle housing, about one-foot inward from the rear wheels. Lower the Jeep onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts from the wheels completely, then remove the rear wheels.

    2

    Remove the nut springs from the face of the brake drum if equipped, using side cutters. If the drums do not come off the vehicle easily, remove the rubber stopper from the rear of the brake backing plate. Insert a flat-head screwdriver through the hole in the backing plate. Adjust the self-adjusting wheel with the screwdriver to release the brake shoes from the brake drum. Strike the drum on the forward and rearward facing sides, using a rubber mallet. Remove the brake drums from the Wrangler.

    3

    Remove the U-clip from the parking brake adjuster and parking brake pin. Use a brake drum hook tool, or flat-head screwdriver to remove the clip. Remove the two brake return springs from the shoes, using a drum brake hook tool. Remove the hold- down springs and caps from the retainer pin, using a cylindrical drum brake tool while holding the pin still with your finger on the rear of the backing plate.

    4

    Remove the brake adjuster screw, lever and spring, using the brake hook tool. Remove the spring from between the two brake shoes, using the hook tool. Remove the brake adjuster cable from the guide by hand, using the adjuster guide. Remove the brake shoes and strut bar from the brake backing plate.

    5

    Install the parking brake lever and pin to the new rearward or trailing brake shoe. Install a new U-clip onto the pin, and set it with your screwdriver. Install the parking brake over the lever. Install both forward and trailing brake shoes onto the backing plate. Secure each brake shoe to the backing plate in position, with a large C-clamp. Install the pin through the rear of the backing plate and hold it with your finger. Install the spring and cap, and rotate the cap into a plus shape with the pin, using your cylindrical brake tool.

    6

    Install the strut bar and spring between the two shoes. Install the middle return spring between the two shoes, using your hook tool to set the spring. Install the guide plate and self-adjuster cable onto the anchor pin above the wheel cylinder. Install the two return springs onto the shoes, using your hook tool. Install the adjuster cable onto the trailing brake shoe. Install the adjuster screw assembly between the two lower portions of the brake shoes. Push the shoes inward to lock the screw in place.

    7

    Install the adjuster screw spring and lever onto the bottom of the brake shoe and connect the adjuster to the cable. Push both brake shoes inward simultaneously to compress the wheel cylinder pistons completely and allow room for the new drums.

    8

    Spray the new drums thoroughly with aerosol brake parts cleaner to remove the factory protective oil film from the drums. Slide the new drums onto the brake assembly. Spin one lug nut against the outer face of the drum to hold it temporarily. Spin the drum while adjusting the self-adjuster screw through the backing plate until you can no longer turn the drum with your bare hands.

    9

    Repeat steps 2 through 8 to complete the drum brakes on the second side of the car. Remove the lug nuts from both brake drum faces once you have primarily set the drag on the rear drum brakes on both sides. Install the rear wheels onto the Jeep and tighten the lug nuts snug with a tire iron.

    10

    Spin both rear wheels while they are still in the air. If the wheel spins one complete rotation by hand, the rear brakes are set. If the wheel spins more than one rotation, the brakes are underadjusted. If the wheel spins less than one full rotation, the brakes are overadjusted. Adjust the self-adjuster through both rear backing plates until each wheel spins only one rotation by hand.

    11

    Raise the Wrangler off the jack stands and remove the stands from beneath the Jeep. Lower the Wrangler to the ground and tighten the rear wheel lug nuts to 110 foot-pounds of torque, using a 1/2-inch-drive torque wrench and wheel nut socket.

How to Change the Brake Rotors for a 1990 Acura Legend

How to Change the Brake Rotors for a 1990 Acura Legend

Just as you have to take care of your brakes on the Acura Legend, you have to keep an eye on your rotors as well. Your rotors are just as important to the overall safety of your vehicle as the brake pads are. If they wear too thin, or sustain damage because the brake pads wore a little longer than they should have, it creates havoc on the rotors. The rotors will tend to get hot and become ineffective. You would usually change the rotors at the same time that you would the brake pads, but there may come a time you may only have to replace the rotors for some reason. It doesn't take very long, and someone with no experience can do each wheel in about 40 minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Place the wheel chocks behind the rear tires of the car and jack it up with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the car for additional safety and raise it up to the automobile frame.

    2

    Remove the wheel that you are starting with using the lug wrench to remove the lug nuts. Remove the retaining bolts from the brake caliper using a ratchet and socket. Secure the caliper to the strut using a wire tire. Do not simply allow it to hang or you will damage the brake line.

    3

    Remove the retaining screws holding the rotor to the wheel hub using a hex socket and ratchet. If there is corrosion around the screws, use penetrating oil and allow it to soak into the threads. Pull the rotor off of the wheel hub. If the rotor does not come off easily, use the rubber mallet to strike it until it comes free.

    4

    Place the new rotor on the hub and install the retaining screws using the hex socket and ratchet. Place the caliper back on the wheel assembly and tighten the retaining bolts with the socket and ratchet. Replace the wheel on the car and remove the jack stand from under the automobile. Lower the car to the ground and repeat the process on the next wheel.

Jumat, 12 Februari 2010

How to Repair the Rear Brakes on a 2001 Honda Odyssey

How to Repair the Rear Brakes on a 2001 Honda Odyssey

The brake pads are of the utmost importance to a vehicle's performance and safe driving capability. Worn or damaged brakes create a serious risk of accident or injury if the driver cannot stop the vehicle on time. For those who don't want to have a mechanic service their 2001 Odyssey, you can fix the rear brakes in their own driveway. The process involves raising the vehicle, removing the rear wheels, taking out the caliper and pads, and installing replacements.

Instructions

    1

    Use a suction pump to remove some fluid from the reservoir. Then raise and support the vehicle.

    2

    Remove the rear wheels. Take out the banjo bolt and separate the brake hose from the caliper. Prevent fluid loss and contamination by plugging the hose.

    3

    Take off the two caliper mounting bolts, and remove the caliper from its mounting bracket. Also remove the pads, shims, and pad retainers. You are now ready to install the new brakes.

    4

    Clean the caliper thoroughly, being sure to get off any dirt or dust. Examine the brake rotor for grooves, cracks, and other signs of damage. Install the pad retainers and apply a bit of molybdenum brake grease to both surfaces of the shims and the back of the disc brake pads.

    5

    Install the pads and shims. Make sure to the wear retainer on the inboard pad faces down when you install it. Push caliper piston into its bore and fit the caliper over the pads. Apply some silicon grease to the piston boot with silicon grease. Do not twist the boot.

    6

    Secure the brake caliper and tighten down the mounting bolts. Reattach the rear wheels, and lower the vehicle to the ground. Add fluid and press the brakes several times to seat the pads.

Kamis, 11 Februari 2010

How to Remove the Rear Caliper Support Bracket Pins for the 2000 Mustang GT

The brake caliper guide pins in your Mustang GT keep the brake pads properly aligned within the support bracket. Although you can remove the brake caliper from the support bracket, you must remove each of the guide pins to replace the rear brake pads. With a socket wrench and a pair of needle-nose pliers you can remove the guide pins on your 2000 Mustang GT's rear brake caliper yourself. Removing the pins will take you less than five minutes to do once you have removed the tire.

Instructions

    1

    Place a wheel block in front of the driver and passenger's side front tires of your 2000 Mustang. Loosen the lug nuts a quarter turn counterclockwise on the rear passenger's side tire with a lug wrench.

    2

    Raise your Mustang, using the frame rail as a support, with a hydraulic jack. Place a jack stand on the immediate right of the hydraulic jack to aid in supporting the Mustang's weight.

    3

    Remove all of the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Pull the wheel off the hub assembly on your Mustang then roll it to the side of the work area.

    4

    Remove the inner, upper and lower caliper mounting bolts with a socket wrench. If you look behind your Mustang's brake caliper, you will see the two bolts securing it to the support bracket. Unless you're removing the brake rotor, do not remove the support bracket's two bolts.

    5

    Stack two empty milk crates on top of each other. Turn the crates upside down so that the bottom of them faces up. Position the crates on the side of your Mustang's brake caliper within the wheelwell.

    6

    Lift your Mustang's brake caliper vertically off the support bracket and brake rotor. Set the brake caliper down on top of the milk crates so that you're able to clearly see the outer brake pad and both guide pins. At the front of each guide pin, on both sides of the outer brake pad, you should see a small metal cotter pin.

    7

    Straighten out the legs on the cotter pin on the right first with a pair of needle-nose pliers. Grab the small metal loop at the top of the cotter pin with the pliers and pull it out of the service hole on the guide pin. Repeat this step to remove the cotter pin from the guide pin on the left of your Mustang's brake caliper.

    8

    Grasp the guide pin on the right, at its rear where it pushes through the inner brake pad, with the pliers. Twist the guide pin back and forth while simultaneously pulling it away from both brake pads. Repeat this step to remove the guide pin on the left side of your 2000 Mustang GT's brake caliper.

Electric Brake Troubleshooting

Electric Brake Troubleshooting

Electric brakes are used in trailers. As with any other piece of equipment, they can malfunction and require repair. Brake problems for trailers may stem from a number of issues.

Types of Problems

    One problem you may experience is insufficient braking power. This may include the absence of any braking at all. There might also be strange noises emanating from the brakes. You may also experience a sense of drag.

Causes

    For braking issues, you must determine if the electrical circuit is short or closed, if all the wiring is sound and if the magnets and resistors are functioning. There may also be a problem with the controller. You must check the flanges, springs and brake linings if the brakes are locking up. For instances of noisy brakes, examine the adjustment of the brakes, the linings and the bearings as well.

Considerations

    A trailer's brakes may be affected by the load you place on the trailer. Attention is required to ensure that you are not exceeding the load-bearing capacity of your trailer. If you experience problems with brakes, you should avoid using the trailer until all issues are resolved.

Rabu, 10 Februari 2010

Signs of Bad Brake Rotors

Brake rotors are integral parts of the braking system on your car. Brake pads grab the rotors, squeezing the rotating disc to slow down the vehicle. Over time, imperfections in the brake pads or the accumulation of dirt particles can wear down brake rotors by the constant heat and friction generated every time you press the brake pedal. As the rotor surface thins, the effectiveness of braking ability decreases to dangerous levels.

Significance

    Bad brake rotors cause a wide range of problems that affect your car's entire braking system. Worn rotors can cause overheating, which translates to ineffective braking and can cause brake system failure.

Identification

    Brake rotors warp from overheating and from the constant grinding of worn brake pads against the once-smooth rotor surface. Bad brake rotors may make the car shake or vibrate when you apply the brake.

Features

    If you can feel vibrations in the steering wheel or brake pedal when applying the brakes, bad brake rotors may be the cause.

Functon

    Brake rotors work in conjunction with bake pads as the final step in the braking process of a car. When the brake pedal is pressed, this forces brake fluid through a master cylinder to the brake lines. The fluid heats under pressure, triggering heat transfer that cause compression of the brake pads against the rotor.

Warning

    Brake rotors should be measured to gauge the appropriate level of thickness. Worn brake pads can warp and score the rotor, causing the surface to thin to dangerous levels that cannot adequately absorb and transfer heat.

Selasa, 09 Februari 2010

How to Replace a Vacuum Booster on a 1997 Ford F350

A 1997 Ford F-350 is designed to tow large loads, and as a result, needs as much stopping power as it can get. One way it accomplishes that is with a vacuum operated brake booster mounted between the brake pedal and the firewall. These boosters need a complete seal to function properly, because otherwise the booster can't keep the vacuum contained. If your booster fails, then you should replace it with a new one as soon as possible.

Instructions

    1

    Open up the hood. Remove the master cylinder's mounting nuts from the booster with an open-end wrench. Remove the vacuum line on the booster with your hands. Pull the master cylinder carefully off of the brake booster and let it suspend by the brake lines.

    2

    Look under the dash to find the linkage on the brake booster which is mounted to the brake pedal. Take off the stoplight switch retaining pin, then remove the stoplight switch and the booster linkage off of the pin on the brake pedal with your hands. Pull off the sound deadening material on the firewall with your hands, then unbolt the booster from the firewall with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket.

    3

    Grab the brake booster with both hands and maneuver it carefully away from the firewall. Insert the replacement booster into the firewall, then bolt it down with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Reinstall the sound deadening material over the brake booster linkage, then install the linkage and stoplight switch to the brake pedal pin. Reinstall the stoplight switch retaining pin.

    4

    Bolt the master cylinder onto the booster with an open-end wrench and plug the vacuum line onto the booster. Shut the hood.

How to Remove the Rear Brake Rotor on a W126

If the brakes on your Mercedes W126 are no longer responsive or are making a horrible squealing sound, it may be time to remove and replace the brake rotors. Brake rotor removal is a simple, straightforward process that requires the use of a few common tools and can be done by almost any amateur mechanic. With the right instructions you'll be able to remove the rear brake rotor on your W126 in a couple of hours.

Instructions

    1

    Park your W126 on a flat, paved surface. Raise the rear of the car with a jack and lower it onto jack stands. Unfasten the wheel lugs holding the wheel in place with a lug wrench or tire iron. Grip the wheel with both hands and pull it away from the car.

    2

    Put on a pair of safety glasses. Inspect the rotor for any noticeable wear, scarring, warping or severe rust. If the rotor shows any of these signs, it's likely time to replace it.

    3

    Remove the two caliper mounting bolts, located on the top and bottom of the caliper, with a 12 mm socket attached to a socket wrench. Lift the caliper off of the caliper mount, being careful not to damage the brake fluid line. Suspend the caliper out of the way with a bungee cord; do not let it hang freely by the brake fluid line.

    4

    Unscrew the two bolts holding the caliper mount in position with the 12 mm socket and socket wrench. Lift the caliper mount off of the rotor and set it aside.

    5

    Remove the rotor retaining screw holding the rotor in position with a large Phillips head screwdriver. If it's stubborn, apply anti-seize spray onto the bolt to help it along.

    6

    Grip the rotor with both hands and pull it away from the axle plate. If it's difficult to pull off, strike the back of the rotor with a rubber mallet to loosen it.

Senin, 08 Februari 2010

How to Install Rear Rotors on a 2006 Ford F-150 4x4

How to Install Rear Rotors on a 2006 Ford F-150 4x4

The rear brake rotors on the 2006 Ford F-150 4x4 are one of the most important components in the truck's braking system. The braking system on this truck is designed for the brake pads to compress to the facing of the brake rotors each time that the brake pedal is pushed inward. The brake pads are compressed to the facing of the brake rotors by the brake caliper cylinder. Once the brake pads have worn down to the wear indicators, the pads will need to be replaced and the rotors will need to be turned or replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 2006 Ford F-150 4x4 on a level surface. Pull the hood open and lock the hood in place with the hood locking rod. Place the wheel chocks in front of the front wheels.

    2

    Locate the off-white-colored brake fluid reservoir that is located near the bottom of the brake master cylinder on the rear driver side of the engine compartment. Remove the plastic lid with your hand and stick the basting syringe inside the brake fluid reservoir and suction at least one full syringe of brake fluid. Set the syringe in a safe place.

    3

    Move to the rear driver-side wheel and loosen the lug nuts with the tire tool. Then, move to the rear passenger-side wheel and loosen the lug nuts with the tire tool.

    4

    Slide the hydraulic jack under the rear axle and jack the Ford F-150 up. Place the safety jack stands under the rear jacking points that are located in front of the rear tires on both sides of the truck. Lower the hydraulic jack slowly so that the truck comes to a secure stop on the top of the stands. Leave the jack under the rear axle as extra support.

    5

    Move back to the rear driver-side wheel and finish removing the lug nuts. Then, pull the wheel off and set it near the rear of the truck.

    6

    Look on top of the brake rotor and locate the brake caliper. Insert the flat end of the pry bar into the opening on the top of the caliper. Wiggle the caliper back and forth until it loosens up enough to remove it from the rotor.

    7

    Remove the two rear bolts that are located on the top and bottom of the caliper using the 3/8-inch drive ratchet and a socket. Remove the bolts and reach down and pull one end of the caliper off the rotor. Then, pull the other end of the caliper off the rotor. Hang the caliper to the nearest component with the small rope.

    8

    Remove the inner brake pad from the caliper. Then, put the C-clamp inside of the caliper and compress the caliper cylinder until it is completely inside of the caliper housing. Then, remove the C-clamp and the outer brake pad. This will make room for the brake caliper and brake pads to fit over the new brake rotor.

    9

    Pull the brake rotor straight off the wheel hub with your hands. The brake rotor will slide straight off. Set the old brake rotor to the side and then slide the new brake rotor in place.

    10

    Untie the small rope from the brake caliper and slide the caliper over the top of the new brake rotor. Line up the two rear caliper bolt holes and screw the bolts into the caliper. Tighten down the caliper bolts with the ratchet and socket. Then, torque the caliper bolts down to 30 ft-lbs. with the torque wrench and a socket.

    11

    Position the wheel back onto the hub and screw the lug nuts onto the lugs. Tighten the lugs until the tire starts to turn. Then, follow these same instructions for replacing the brake rotor on the rear passenger side of the truck.

    12

    Jack the F-150 back up and remove the stands out from under the jacking points. Slowly lower the truck back to the ground. Finish tightening the lug nuts down tight with the tire tool.

    13

    Crank the 2006 Ford F-150 4x4 and slowly pump the brakes in and out four or five times. This will match the brake pads up to the new brake rotors. Turn the engine off.

    14

    Squirt the brake fluid back into the brake fluid reservoir with the basting syringe. Check the brake fluid level. If the fluid is low, add DOT-3 brake fluid until full. Put the plastic lid back on the reservoir and shut the hood. Remove the wheel chocks from the front wheels.

How to Remove Caliper Pins on a 1993 Ford Explorer

The brake calipers on a 1993 Ford Explorer use pins to hold the brake pads in place and help keep the pads properly aligned. These pins need proper lubrication because the caliper body slides on the pins each time the brakes are applied. If you need to lubricate your brake caliper pins, remove them from the caliper, which can be done in about an hour with basic tools.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Explorer on a level surface, and apply the parking brake. Lift the front with the jack, and put the Explorer on a pair of jack stands. Use the tire iron to remove the front wheels.

    2

    Locate the caliper pins, which are just outside the brake pads on the caliper. Unbolt the brake caliper pin bolt using a 3/8-inch ratchet and socket.

    3

    Tap the end of the caliper bolt using the pointed chisel and hammer until you can fit pliers on the opposite end of the pin. Pull the pin through the caliper with the pliers.

How to Replace 1999 VW Passat Rear Brakes

How to Replace 1999 VW Passat Rear Brakes

The rear brake pads on your 1999 Passat may need replacing about 15,000 miles from when they were last replaced. Replacing the rear brake pads will require the additional knowledge of how to adjust the parking brake cable to your Passat brake system. A special brake caliper piston retracting tool is required to perform this repair procedure at home.

Instructions

Replacing the Rear Brake Pads

    1

    Raise the Passat rear end, and support it with jack stands. Remove the lug nuts, using a tire iron and wheels.

    2

    Disengage the parking brake, and adjust the parking brake cable, so that optimum free play in the cables is allowed.

    3

    Apply brake system cleaner over the brake components. Wipe off the sprayed areas with a rag. Start with the brakes on one wheel, while using the other as a reference.

    4

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts with a box wrench, while securing the guide pins with an open-end wrench from rotating.

    5

    Remove the caliper from the brake pads, and hang it from the shock absorber with a length of wire.

    6

    Pull out the brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket.

    7

    Remove the guide pins out of the boots, and inspect them for damage. If the pins are fine, lubricate them with brake grease, and reinsert them.

    8

    Install a brake bleeding kit to the bleed screw. Open the bleed screw with a wrench.

    9

    Push the caliper piston into the caliper bore, using a retraction tool, turning the piston clockwise. Unnecessary brake fluid should eject into the kit bottle as the piston retracts. When the piston has fully retracted, remove the kit, and tighten the bleed screw.

    10

    Install the new brake pads into the mounting bracket. Make sure the protective film on each pad, has been removed, before installing them.

    11

    Position the caliper back over the brake pads. Ensure that the anti-rattle springs are pressed against the inner surface of the caliper body.

    12

    Install the new mounting bolts, and torque them to 22 ft-lbs. with your torque wrench, while keeping the guide pins from rotating with an open-end wrench.

    13

    Repeat Step 3 through Step 12 to replace the other brake pads.

    14

    Force the brake pads against rotors, by applying the brake pedal several times, until the pedal feels firm when depressed.

    15

    Readjust the brake parking brake cables.

    16

    Install the wheels, and screw on the lug nuts with your fingers. Remove the jack stands, and lower the Passat. Torque the lug nuts with your torque wrench to 89 ft-lbs.

    17

    Top off the brake fluid in the brake fluid reservoir, if necessary.

    18

    Test the new brakes, driving in an isolated area.

How to Install the Back Brakes on a 1994 Jeep Cherokee

How to Install the Back Brakes on a 1994 Jeep Cherokee

The brakes on your Jeep Cherokee should be replaced often to ensure they are in good working order. Your Cherokee is equipped with disc brakes. You can replace the brake pads yourself. They mount to calipers and press against the discs, known as rotors, when the brakes are applied, slowing the vehicle. They are equipped with a small metal plate that is designed to make the brakes squeak when they need replacement so you don't continue driving and damage the rotors.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on a rear tire using a lug nut wrench.

    2

    Set the jack directly under the axle of your Jeep Cherokee. Lift the vehicle high enough so that you can remove the tire. Remove the lug nuts and pull the tire from the hub.

    3

    Remove the two bolts that secure the caliper to the rotor using a ratchet and a 13 mm socket. Remove the caliper from the rotor.

    4

    Remove the brake pads from the rotor. There are two brake pads on each side of the rotor. They can be removed easily by pressing the release pins with your hands.

    5

    Press the piston on the caliper toward the rear of the caliper using a C-clamp. The C-clamp can be placed on the piston and the outside edge of the caliper. Tighten the clamp.

    6

    Slide the replacement brake pads into the caliper and mount the caliper back onto the rotor. Tighten the two bolts using a ratchet and a 13 mm socket.

    7

    Replace the tire and tighten the lug nuts using a lug nut wrench. Lower the vehicle to the ground and replace the wheel.

    8

    Replace the brakes on the opposite side of the vehicle.

    9

    Refill the brake fluid reservoir located inside the engine compartment with DOT4 brake fluid.

    10

    Press the brake pedal 15 to 20 times to engage the pistons in the calipers.

How to Replace the Rotors on a 2004 Ford Explorer

How to Replace the Rotors on a 2004 Ford Explorer

The brake rotors on the 2004 Ford Explorer are the main components that the brake pads compress against to stop the Explorer. The caliper cylinder pushes the brake pad to the facing of the brake rotor to bring the Explorer to a stop. The brake rotors must be turned or replaced each time that the brake pads are changed. When new brake pads are compressed to worn or grooved brake rotors, it can cause uneven braking.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 2004 Ford Explorer on level ground. Open up the hood and secure it in place with the hood locking rod. Remove the plastic lid from the brake fluid reservoir.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front, driver-side wheel with the tire tool. Then, move to the front passenger side and loosen the lug nuts with the tire tool.

    3

    Slide the floor jack up under the front of the 2004 Ford Explorer and position the jack under the cross frame. Jack the Explorer up and put the jack stands under the side rail on both sides of the explorer. Position the jack stands close to the back side of the front wheels to evenly hold the weight of the front of the Explorer.

    4

    Lower the Explorer onto the top of the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts from the front driver side. Then, move to the front passenger side and remove the lug nuts from the wheel. Pull the wheels off and set them to the side of the Explorer.

    5

    Remove the brake caliper from the front driver side of the Explorer. This can be done by removing the two top and bottom caliper mounting bolts from the rear of the caliper with the 3/8-inch drive breaker bar and a socket.

    6

    Insert the flat end of the flat-head screwdriver into the top of the brake caliper. Push the brake caliper back and forth with the screwdriver until the caliper loosens up. Then, pull the caliper off the top of the brake rotor.

    7

    Hang the brake caliper to the frame rail or to the front spring with the bungee cord.

    8

    Tap the back side of the brake rotor with the rubber mallet until the brake rotor loosens up from the wheel hub. Then, pull the brake rotor off the wheel hub with your hands. Set the old brake rotor to the side and slide the new brake rotor onto the wheel hub. Tap the new brake rotor in place with the rubber mallet.

    9

    Slide the brake caliper back onto the top of the new brake rotor. Line up the bolt holes and screw the bolts back into the rear of the brake caliper. Tighten the bolts down tight with the 3/8-inch drive breaker bar and a socket.

    10

    Slide the front, driver-side wheel back onto the hub and screw the lug nuts onto the lugs. Tighten the lug nuts down with the tire tool. Follow these same exact instructions for replacing the brake rotor on the front passenger side.

    11

    Jack the front of the Explorer back up and remove the stands. Lower the Explorer to the ground.

    12

    Crank the 2004 Ford Explorer and pump the brakes in and out five or six times to fit the brake pads to the proper distance from the new brake rotors. Turn the engine off and check the level of the brake fluid inside of the reservoir. If low, add brake fluid to the reservoir until the level reaches the full mark. Close the hood.

Minggu, 07 Februari 2010

How to Troubleshoot the ABS on a Ford F150

The anti-lock breaking system (ABS) on a Ford F150 pulses the brakes for you in the event of hard braking. Rather than manually pumping the brakes, the ABS system pulses the brakes many times faster than any human being could ever do. This prevents the wheels from locking up and keeps the F150 from skidding across the pavement. This, in turn, helps you to better control the vehicle. If you are having problems with your ABS, however, you'll want to troubleshoot the problem prior to fixing it.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the ignition to the "II" position.

    2

    Check the dash lights. The ABS sensor light should come on for a few seconds, and then go off. If it stays on, then you'll need to check the ABS system with a visual inspection.

    3

    Turn the steering wheel on the F150 all the way to the right. Look at the brake system on the front driver's side of the vehicle. With the wheels turned all the way to the right, you should be able to easily see the ABS sensor mounted to the wheel bearing assembly. There are two wires coming out of the sensor. The sensor is a small black box secured to the wheel bearing and hub assembly. It monitors the rotation of the rotor and wheel, checking to see if there is ever a stop or break in rotation while the vehicle is moving and the brakes are being applied. If the wires are broken or damaged in any way, your ABS is failing and needs to be serviced by a brake shop. If the wires look fine, repeat this step for each wheel. To check the passenger side wheel, you may need to turn the steering wheel all the way to the left. To check the rear wheels, you'll need to climb under the rear cab.

    4

    Turn the ignition off if all of the ABS wires appear to be normal and in-tact at the wheel hub. Wait 30 seconds and turn the ignition back on to the "II" position. If the ABS light remains on, the ABS is malfunctioning. You may have a bad sensor at one of the wheels. You'll need to have this component serviced by a professional brake shop.

How to Install Brakes on a Scion Xb

The brakes on a Scion xB use a caliper and rotor design. The brake system works by pushing hydraulic fluid through metal tubing, called "brake tubing" or "brake line," and actuating a piston inside the caliper mechanism. The caliper piston forces a brake lining, called a "brake pad," against the surface of a rotor, which is a disc that rotates with the drive wheels. When the brake lining wears down to about 1/8 inch thick, the brakes need to be replaced. Once you have the brake system apart, you'll need to know how to install brakes on the Scion---the installation requires a special process.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the old brake rotor by sliding it off the hub if you have left it on the hub. It's a good idea to change the brake rotor with the pads so that the pads can bed into the new rotor without creating excessive wear on the pads.

    2

    Slide the new rotor on the hub.

    3

    Place the face of one of the old brake linings on the front of the brake caliper piston.

    4

    Place the c-clamp over the caliper and the brake lining.

    5

    Tighten the handle on the c-clamp to compress the brake lining against the piston. This, in turn, will force the piston back into the brake caliper. You need to perform this step carefully to ensure the piston boot does not tear or twist. It and the piston should fold straight back into the caliper housing.

    6

    Remove the c-clamp and old brake lining.

    7

    Orient the new brake lining so that the curved edge of the lining sits on the inside of the caliper.

    8

    Slide the new brake lining into the caliper. The lining will fit rather snug into the caliper. This is normal. There are two retaining clips on the top and bottom of the caliper that correspond to the tabs on the top and bottom of the new brake lining. The tabs on the lining fit into the retaining tabs and locks on the caliper.

    9

    Slide the caliper assembly over the brake rotor.

    10

    Place a small bead of thread locker on the caliper mounting bolts and thread the bolts onto the caliper mounting bracket.

    11

    Tighten the bolts until they are tight, then, turn the bolts an additional 1/4 turn.

Rabu, 03 Februari 2010

How to Install Front Brake Pads on a 1999 Chevy Tracker

Though it looks like an SUV, the Chevy Tracker is actually certified as a light truck because of its off-road capabilities. As the first year of the second generation, the 1999 Tracker came in only one trim level, with a 1.6-liter engine, a five-speed manual transmission and rear-wheel drive as standard equipment. Anti-lock brakes, four-wheel drive, a four-speed automatic transmission and a 2.0-liter engine were options.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Park your Tracker on firm, level ground. Raise the hood and locate the brake master cylinder fluid reservoir on the driver-side firewall. Wipe the cap and reservoir with a clean shop rag to remove dirt or debris that may fall into the reservoir when you remove cap.

    2

    Set the parking brake and chock the rear wheels. Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels a few turns, using a lug nut tool, but do not remove them. Locate the jacking points on the frame rail just behind the front tire wells. Jack the front of the vehicle up and support it on jack stands. Finish removing the lug nuts and remove the wheels.

    3

    Remove the two caliper retaining bolts from the caliper, using a ratchet and socket. Install a length of clear tubing on the caliper bleeder valve, and lead the loose end into a catch pan. Open the bleeder valve using an open-ended wrench. Cock the caliper on the rotor to compress the caliper piston slightly and force brake fluid from the bleeder valve, then close the bleeder valve. Lift the caliper from the mounting bracket and support it with a bungee cord or piece of wire.

    4

    Remove the old brake pads and shims from the caliper mounting bracket. Inspect the bracket under the shim locations, and remove any rust or corrosion from the bracket at these points, using a wire brush. Remove the rotor retaining screws, if applicable -- stock rotors have retaining screws, aftermarket rotors may not. Slide the rotors from the lugs and inspect them for wear. Scratch a fingernail across the surface and if any of the grooves are deep enough to catch your nail, then have the rotors measured for minimal thickness, and resurface or replace as necessary.

Installation

    5

    Install the new shims and brake pads in the bracket. Place an old brake pad on the piston-side of the caliper and install a large C-clamp bearing on the caliper body and the old pad. Open the bleeder valve, then compress the caliper piston back into the caliper body while capturing the brake fluid for disposal. Do not over-compress the piston and damage the rubber piston boot. Close the bleeder valve once the caliper is fully compressed, and remove the clear tubing.

    6

    Release the C-clamp and remove the old brake pad. Quickly install the caliper in the caliper bracket. Install and torque the caliper retaining bolts to 20 foot-pounds.

    7

    Install the front wheels and install the lug nuts finger tight. Lower the vehicle to the ground. Using a cross-pattern, torque the lug nuts to 69 foot-pounds, starting with the lug at the 12 o'clock position.

    8

    Add DOT 3 brake fluid until the fluid level is up to the "Max" mark on the reservoir. Start the engine and slowly pump the brake pedal until the pedal becomes firm. Check the brake fluid level and add fluid as necessary to bring it up to the "Max" level mark on the reservoir. Install the reservoir cap and close the hood. Pump the pedal until it feels normally firm.