Minggu, 31 Januari 2010

How to Install Drilled & Slotted Rotors

Automobiles that are manufactured with disk brakes use a rotor and caliper system that stops the car with friction. This hydraulically-actuated friction can cause a large amount of heat to build up on the rotors and pads, which can lead to failure of the braking system. Installing rotors with drilled holes and long slots can lower the temperature, but the larger size usually requires the replacement of the caliper. The average backyard mechanic can install a set of slotted rotors in about an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the end of the vehicle with the floor jack, and place it on the jack stands. Position the stand heads onto the frame rails, not the suspension. Lift the vehicle so that the wheels are off the ground at the axle where the brakes are to be changed.

    2

    Remove the wheels by turning the lug nuts in a counter-clockwise direction, then pulling the wheels from the hubs. Set the wheels aside from the work area.

    3

    Remove the line bolts that connect the brake lines to the calipers by turning the line nuts counter-clockwise with the line wrench. Allow the brake fluid to drain into the drain pan, or cap the line to prevent dust and debris from entering. Remove the calipers by turning their twin rear mount bolts counter-clockwise, then slide the calipers off of the rotors.

    4

    Remove the old rotor by pulling it free of the hub, or turn the hub nut counter-clockwise. Set the old rotor aside.

    5

    Press the new slotted rotor onto the hub, and lock down the hub nut if applicable.

    6

    Replace the caliper (and pads) by turning the line nuts clockwise, then slide the caliper onto the rotor. Tighten the rear mount bolts in a clockwise direction.

    7

    Purge the braking system with fresh fluid by turning the bleeder nipple counter-clockwise while continuously pouring more fluid into the master cylinder with the brake pedal depressed. This could take more than one person. Collect spent fluid in the drain pan. When the fluid coming out is golden and without air bubbles, close the nipple by turning it clockwise. Repeat on the opposite side.

    8

    Replace the wheels by turning the lug nuts clockwise in an alternating pattern.

    9

    Lower the vehicle from the jack stands with the floor jack.

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a Yamaha Rhino

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a Yamaha Rhino

Changing the brake pads on a Yamaha Rhino is similar to those on a car. However, the piston will need to be screwed back in instead of just pushed in with a clamp. It is a tight fit, so you will need to take off the skid pan to reach the brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the back tires. Jack up the back of the Rhino and place the jack stands under the ATV to support it. Remove the lug nuts and rear wheels.

    2

    Use a ratchet and socket set to remove the plastic skid pan from under the Rhino.

    3

    Remove the two bolts on the back of the caliper with a ratchet and socket. Pull the caliper off the differential housing.

    4

    Remove the two Allen screws at the ends of the caliper, and pull the off the brake pads. Save the shims from the old pads to use with the replacement pads. Screw in the piston clockwise as far as it will go with the small nail-puller claw. In cars, the piston is pushed in with a clamp. On the Rhino, you will have to screw it in.

    5

    Place the shims in the housing and place the pads on the shims. Tighten the Allen screws to keep the pads in place, replace the caliper on the differential housing and replace the two bolts to hold it in place.

    6

    Follow steps 3 through 5 on the other rear tire. Replace the skid pan and the tires. Hand-tighten the lug nuts on the tires and lower the ATV back to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench once the tires are on the ground.

How to Change the Rear Disc Brakes on a 1998 Taurus

How to Change the Rear Disc Brakes on a 1998 Taurus

Prior to the 1990s, rear brakes were primarily drum-style brakes, except on premium vehicles. In 1998, the Ford Taurus came with optional rear disc brakes. The rear brakes on a vehicle are only responsible for a small percentage of the stopping power, they are mostly used to provide stability when braking. The lack of stopping responsibility means that the rear pads last far longer than the front pads, sometimes twice as long. Unlike front brakes, the rear disc brakes on the Taurus are used as the parking brake, so there are a few extra steps involved and a special tool required.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts holding the rear wheels, using a ratchet and a socket.

    2

    Raise the rear of the vehicle using a floor jack and support your Taurus by placing jack stands beneath it.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts from the rear wheels and pull the wheels from the vehicle.

    4

    Trace the rubber brake hose, connecting to the rear of the caliper, to where it is held to the frame by a bolt. Loosen and remove this bolt using a ratchet and socket.

    5

    Look at the rear of the caliper, directly below where the brake hose connects to it, and locate the parking brake cable. The cable slides into a small slot on the caliper's body.

    6

    Trace the cable from the caliper and locate where it attaches to the parking brake lever.

    7

    Place the channel-lock pliers so they are contacting the parking brake level and a fixed part of the caliper body. Squeeze the channel-lock pliers, compressing the parking brake lever. Notice the parking brake cable now has slack. Grab the top of the cable and pull it upward so that the retainer -- the small, metal cylinder at the end of the cable -- clears the slot, then pull the cable through the slot in the caliper body.

    8

    Release the channel-lock pliers from the parking brake lever.

    9

    Look on the rear or the brake caliper and locate the upper and lower caliper bolts. Loosen and remove these bolts with the ratchet and socket.

    10

    Pull the caliper up and remove it from the brake assembly. Secure it to a suspension component using the bungee strap and never allow the caliper to hang by its rubber hose.

    11

    Grab the brake pads, inner and outer, and pull the from the brake assembly. Take note of how they are positioned, as the new pads must be installed in the same position.

    12

    Place the Ford rear caliper tool on the 6-inch extension. Notice the tool has two small pins protruding from it. Line these two pins up with the notches in the brake caliper piston, the metal, cylindrical object on the inside of the brake caliper. Turn the tool counterclockwise with the ratchet and apply light pressure. Notice the piston begins pressing into the caliper. Continue turning the tool until the piston is fully pressed into the caliper.

    13

    Place the new brake pads on the brake assembly and position them in the exact manner as the old ones were installed.

    14

    Place the caliper over the rear brake assembly and tighten the caliper bolts to 23 to 25 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and a socket.

    15

    Attach the brake hose to the frame and torque the bolt to 8 to 11 foot-pounds, using the torque wrench and a socket.

    16

    Grab the parking brake cable with the needle-nose pliers and pull it upwards until the retainer at the of the cable clears the slot in the caliper, then slide the cable through the slot. Lower the cable downward until the retainer sits in the grove in the caliper.

    17

    Place the rear wheels back on the Taurus and hand-tighten the lug nuts.

    18

    Remove the jack stands from under the Taurus and gently lower it to the ground.

    19

    Tighten the lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds, using the torque wrench and a socket.

    20

    Create brake pressure by pressing and releasing the brake pedal until it feels firm.

What Is the Grinding Noise Coming From My Rear Brakes?

What Is the Grinding Noise Coming From My Rear Brakes?

When it comes to the safety of your vehicle, properly maintaining the brake system is one of the most important measures you can take. A grinding noise coming from the car's rear wheels when you slow down is a sign that your brakes are dangerously worn down and must be serviced immediately.

Cause

    When you press the brake pedal in your car, the front and rear brakes are engaged to slow down the wheels. A grinding or scraping noise occurs when the brake linings have been worn down to the point where metal is exposed and is rubbing against the brake disc or drum.

Solution

    Take your vehicle to a reputable repair shop as soon as possible to have the brake linings replaced. If you've been living with the grinding sound for some time, you may have severely damaged the brake rotor. If this is the case, the rotor also will have to be replaced and the cost of the job will go up quickly.

Cost

    The price of brake repair varies depending on car make and model, but the average cost of a brake inspection and lining replacement is between $90 and $250 per axle. If your rotors need replacement as well, the cost can rise to between $300 and $650. If you are a AAA member, going to a shop that offers a AAA discount can help you save some money.

Instructions for Replacing the Rotors in the 1999 Mercury Mystique

Mercury discontinued the Topaz after the 1994 model year and its replacement was the Mystique. Much like the Mercury Topaz had the Ford Tempo, the Mystique also had a Ford cousin, the Contour. The 1996 Mystique came standard with a 130-horsepower, 2.0-liter, four-cylinder engine. It also came standard with front disc brakes. Mercury recommends replacing the rotors when their disc measures less than 0.874 inches thick. Replacing the front rotors on the 1999 Mystique is a relatively easy task and most automotive experts recommend replacing the brake pads with the rotors.

Instructions

    1

    Remove half of the fluid from the master cylinder using a turkey baster. Transfer this fluid to a small container.

    2

    Loosen, but do not remove, the front lug nuts.

    3

    Raise the front of the Mystique and put jack stands beneath the frame rails. Lower the vehicle until the stands support all of its weight. Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheels off of the vehicle.

    4

    Remove the outer brake pad spring -- the thin, metal wire on the rear of the outer brake pad -- by prying it from the holes in the caliper with a flat-head screwdriver.

    5

    Loosen the two torx-head bolts on the rear of the caliper with a ratchet and a T40 torx-bit socket. Pull the torx-head bolts from the rear of the caliper. Pull the caliper off the caliper bracket and hang it from a nearby suspension component using a bungee strap.

    6

    Pull the inner and outer brake pads from the caliper bracket and remove the two bolts on the rear of the bracket with a ratchet and socket.

    7

    Pull the rotor off of the mystique. Lightly tap the rear of the rotor to free it if it does not pull off easily. Place the new rotor on the vehicle.

    8

    Clean the brake pad shims on the caliper bracket with a wire brush and lubricate them with disc brake grease. Reinstall the caliper bracket, torquing the two bolts to 88 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    9

    Insert the new inner and outer brake pads on the caliper bracket.

    10

    Set the old inner brake pad in the caliper so it touches the caliper piston. Place an 8-inch C-clamp on the caliper, position the clamp so the screw part contacts the brake pad and the fixed side contacts the rear of the caliper. Tighten the C-clamp until the piston fully retracts into the caliper.

    11

    Place the caliper on the caliper bracket. Apply a generous coat of disc brake grease to the smooth part of the caliper bolts and tighten them to 20 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and T40 torx-head socket.

    12

    Reinstall the brake pad spring on the rear of the outer brake pad using a flat-head screwdriver.

    13

    Repeat Steps 4 through 12 for the rotor on the other side of the Mystique.

    14

    Reinstall the front wheels and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Raise the Mercury from the jack stands, with a floor jack, and remove the jack stands. Lower the Mercury to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts to 62 foot-pounds in a crisscross patter with a torque wrench and a socket.

    15

    Press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm. Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder and add fluid until it reaches the "Max" level on the master cylinder.

    16

    Take the old brake fluid in the small container to a used automotive fluid recycling center. Many auto parts stores perform this task free of charge.

How to Install Rear Brakes on 2004 Ford Freestar

The 2004 Ford Freestar has self-adjusting disc brakes on the rear to help bring the minivan to a safe halt. While the brake calipers are designed to last the life of the Freestar, the brake pads are not and will require replacement several times over the life of the minivan. Ford Motor Company recommends inspecting the rear brakes at every other oil change service and replacing them when the measurement is under 3 mm. Anyone with solid auto-repair abilities can install rear brakes on a 2004 Ford Freestar in a few hours.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the Freestar's rear lug nuts with the lug wrench. Place the wheel chocks against the left-front tire to keep the Freestar from moving.

    2

    Lift the rear end with the jack, and support it on two jack stands. Manually remove the Freestar's rear lug nuts and wheels, and set them aside.

    3

    Slide the drop pan under the Freestar's driver's side rear brake assembly. Wash off the caliper and rotor using brake cleaner to remove leftover brake dust.

    4

    Extract the bolts from the brake caliper with the socket set. Manually remove the caliper from the caliper bracket. Extract the old brake pads from the caliper by hand, and throw them away.

    5

    Clean the inside of the Freestar's caliper with brake cleaner. Lubricate the caliper slides thoroughly with white lithium grease.

    6

    Force the caliper pistons to retract with the caliper piston tool. Insert the new brake pads by hand. Set the caliper back into the caliper bracket by hand before bolting it in with the socket set.

    7

    Move to the back passenger's side of the Freestar. Repeat steps 3 through 6. Manually reinstall the Freestar's rear wheel and lug nuts.

    8

    Lower the minivan off the jack stands using the jack. Tighten all of the back lug nuts to 85 foot-pounds with the torque wrench.

Sabtu, 30 Januari 2010

How to Change Front Pads

How to Change Front Pads

In time, every vehicle needs new front brake pads. They typically wear out twice as quickly as rear brake pads. How often they need changing depends mostly on the degree of wear and tear the vehicle sustains. The more the brakes are used, the sooner they will need to be replaced. Taking your vehicle to a mechanic can be expensive. With the right tools, you can replace the brake pads yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Prepare the tools so they are handy and within your reach. Jack up the front of the car. Remove the two front tires.

    2

    Remove both of the brake hose brackets with the 10-inch extension and 12 mm socket. Remove both of the caliper bolts with the 14 mm socket and torque wrench. Turn the steering wheel to either the right or left to provide more room to work. Lift the brake caliper off of the rotor and use a piece of wire to tie it through one of the caliber bolt holes. This will take the weight off of the brake hose. If the caliper is rusted, it may take a little force to remove it.

    3

    Remove the front brake pads and shims. Some vehicles do not have shims. The pads should come off by hand. If they do not, pry them off with a flat screwdriver.

    4

    Pull out both of the caliper pins and clean them with liquid parts cleaner. Replace them and install the new pads. Also install the shims if the vehicle requires them.

    5

    Untie the wire and reattach the caliper body that covers the pads. Take the two caliper bolts and start them by hand. Tighten them the rest of the way with the 14 mm socket. Reinstall both of the bolts that hold the brake hose bracket.

    6

    Pump the brake pedal until the pedal is firm. Replace the tires, tighten the lug nuts and lower the car. Check the brake fluid level and add more fluid if necessary.

Brake Fluid Problems

Brake Fluid Problems

Brake fluid is the liquid used to transmit power from the automobile brake pedal to the brakes on each wheel. Problems sometimes compromise the ability of the brake fluid to do its job.

Water in the Brake Fluid

    Over time brake fluid will absorb water from the atmosphere and this process can be accelerated if the fluid reservoir cap is not tightly sealed. Excessive water in the brake fluid will cause corrosion of brake components. It will also lower the brake fluid boiling point, possibly causing the fluid to boil in the brake cylinders during braking.

Grit and Metal Shavings in Brake Fluid

    Over time small metal particles will wear off of the brake internal parts and these will accumulate in the fluid. This problem is accelerated if the brake fluid water content is excessive. Any such solid contamination will accelerate the wear of brake system components and could possibly form blockages in brake lines.

Use of Improper Brake Fluid

    There are many different kinds of brake fluid. These are generally designated as DOT 3, DOT 4, and DOT 5. It is important to use the precise type of fluid specified by the vehicle manufacturer. In some cases, manufacturers will specify a fluid with special properties that exceed any of the normal Department of Transportation (DOT) designations. Use of improper fluid can cause deterioration of brake system seals and may result in fluid boiling during braking.

How to Replace Expedition Brakes

Replacing the four-wheel disc brakes on the Ford Expedition is not a difficult task when you understand the basics. The Ford Expedition comes equipped with single piston rear disc brakes and drum-in-hat style parking brakes. The procedure for replacing these rear disc brake pads is much the same as replacing the front disc brakes. The only difference is in the rotors. The drum-in-hat style parking brakes use a set of brake shoes that grip the inside hat area of the rotor, much like a drum brake system. If damage happens to the machined area of the rotor, replace the whole rotor because the surface is not machinable.

Instructions

    1

    Raise and support the vehicle with the floor jack and jack stands. Position the jack stands so that they support the weight of the vehicle without intruding on the work area. Remove the wheel, and place the lug nuts and wheel aside.

    2

    Remove the caliper by removing the caliper slide pin bolts, and pry the caliper up and off the rotor with a large screwdriver.

    3

    Remove the brake pads by prying them out of the caliper bracket. Remove any shims or anti-rattle clips attached to the old pads for use on the new pads.

    4

    Compress the caliper piston with the C-clamp by placing an old pad between the caliper piston and the clamp, and tightening the C-clamp to push the piston.

    5

    Lube the slide pins and contact areas of the pads with silicone brake lube. Be careful not to get the lube onto the friction surface of the pads as this will ruin the pads.

    6

    Re-install the shims and anti-rattle clips onto the new pads and snap them into place on the caliper bracket. Slip the caliper over the new pads and bolt it into place with the slide pin bolts. Repeat Steps 1 through 5 on each wheel needing pad replacement.

    7

    Replace the wheel and lower the vehicle to the ground. Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder and top off as needed. Pump the brake pedal a few times to expand the calipers then test-drive.

Jumat, 29 Januari 2010

How to Change Brake Rotors at the Same Time As Brake Pads

How to Change Brake Rotors at the Same Time As Brake Pads

Brake pads and brake rotors are the two most important components of an anti-lock braking system. The function of the brake pads is completely reliant upon the condition of the braking rotors and vice-versa. When changing brake pads, it is wise to also inspect the braking rotors. Rotors that are scored beyond repair or warped require replacement. Brake pads need to be replaced when the wear indicators connected to the pads begin to make contact with the rotors. It is not only possible to change the brake rotors at the same time as the brake pads, it is recommended.

Instructions

Replacing the Brake Pads

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels with the tire iron. Lift the vehicle with a lifting jack, place jack stands beneath the frame of the vehicle, remove the lug nuts then pull the wheels from the wheel bolts.

    2

    Remove the caliper bolts with a 13 mm wrench. The caliper is the metal apparatus that surrounds a portion of the braking rotor. It contains the brake pads and the caliper pistons that force the pads into contact with the rotor during braking. The two caliper bolts are on the inside wall of the caliper, the side closest to the frame of the vehicle.

    3

    Pull the caliper away from the rotor. Remove the brake pads from the inside walls of the caliper. Depending on the vehicle, you may need to use a flat head screwdriver to disengage the thin metal clips that hold the brake pads to the caliper. Other vehicles will simply require you to slide the brake pads from the sides of the caliper by hand.

    4

    Open the hood of the vehicle and locate the master cylinder; it is usually near the windshield on either the driver's or passenger's side. Remove the cap from the master cylinder.

    5

    Place the C-clamp around the caliper piston and the outside wall of the caliper. Twist the C-clamp, forcing the caliper piston against the side of the caliper.

    6

    Place the new brake pads onto the walls of the caliper.

Replacing the Rotor

    7

    Pull the rotor from the wheel bolts on the vehicle. If the rotor is stuck to the wheel bolts, spray the wheel bolts and the rotor surface with chain lubricant. Spray one rotor and attempt to remove the other rotor while the chain lubricant works to relieve the bond. If the rotor is still stuck to the steering knuckle, use a hammer to tap on the back side of the rotor until it is free from the wheel bolts.

    8

    Remove the new rotor from its packaging. Spray the entire rotor with brake cleaner. Remove the brake cleaner and packing oil from the surface of the rotor with a clean towel.

    9

    Place the new rotor onto the wheel bolts. Make sure that the top hat section is facing outward (the top hat section is the side of the rotor with a protruding ring in the center).

    10

    Place the caliper with the new pads around the new rotor. Replace the caliper bolts with the 13 mm wrench.

    11

    Replace the wheel onto the wheel bolts and screw on the lug nuts by hand. Lift the vehicle with a lifting jack, remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts with the tire iron.

How to Replace Fixed Caliper Brake Pads

You can replace the brake pads on a fixed caliper braking system in a relatively short amount of time in the comfort of your own garage if you have the know-how. This'll save you time, money and the hassle of taking your car in to a professional mechanic or dealer service department.

Instructions

    1

    Secure the vehicle on a set of jack stands and unhook the battery terminals. Remove the wheels of the hubs of the calipers and set everything you removed aside where it will not be damaged or get lost.

    2

    Remove the caps on the brake fluids. Inspect the brake assembly and housing to make sure there is no damage or excessive corrosion. Push the piston back to provide room for the new pads. Depending on your vehicle you may need to use a C-clamp to depress the piston back into the bore.

    3

    Use a screwdriver to pry the caliper forward. When this is done the fluid will rise in the master cylinder. Wash off the brake dust and remove the caliper by removing the mounting bolts. When removing the caliper, check for fluid leakage and rectify any situations there may be.

    4

    Snap the brake pad off by depressing the retaining clips and removing it. Discard the old pad and snap the new brake pad into place. Make sure the caliper mounting bolts are up to specifications before re-installing. Re-install the caliper and move to the new wheel.

Kamis, 28 Januari 2010

Troubleshooting a Pulsating Brake Pedal When Applying Brakes

Troubleshooting a Pulsating Brake Pedal When Applying Brakes

Pulsing brakes are a direct result of the rapid shifting of the brake assembly against the braking surface. The rotor or drum brake surface must be flat to enable smooth braking. Braking surfaces that have significant variation due to warping, damage, uneven wear or misalignment cause the brakes to unevenly be applied. As the brake pads contact the high spots, the brakes grab slightly. When the brake pads leave the high spots, the braking strength is reduced. As the wheel turns rapidly, the brake pads have uneven pressure between the high and low spots, causing pulsation.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle and place wheel chocks around the wheels not being inspected. Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels with the pulsing brakes. Jack the vehicle to raise the wheel above the pavement and place jack stands under the vehicle. Remove the lug nuts and wheel from the lug posts.

    2

    Inspect the brake pads in the calipers, if the brakes are disk brake design. If less pad exists than metal backing, the pads should be replaced. If the leading edge of one pad is significantly worn while the trailing edge of the pad on the opposite side is worn, the rotor or calipers are out of alignment. Typical causes are poor connection of the wheel to the hub, debris caught between the wheel and hub or rotor and hub, or misaligned calipers. In all cases, the rotor should be resurfaced, if possible, or replaced. Replace brake pads with significant or uneven wear.

    3

    Spray a penetrating lubricant around the lug posts and hub to loosen any corrosion holding the drum in place, if you are inspecting drum brakes. Remove any retaining screws securing the drum to the hub. Slide the drum off the hub and inspect the brake shoes for uneven wear or obvious signs of damage. If the drum brakes are throbbing, as with disk brakes, resurface or replacement of the drums and shoes are necessary.

    4

    Rotate the rotor or axle. Watch and listen for contact from the rotor against the brake pads. The brakes should rotate freely. Have an assistant lightly press the brakes to close the distance between the pad and rotor. Properly functioning braking systems should have full contact or no contact. Intermittent contact indicates the rotor surface is either warped from excessive heat or has high and low spots due to uneven wear. Rotors or drums with warping or uneven wear should be resurfaced or replaced.

    5

    Clean the inside wheel well and mounting surface with a wire brush to free any trapped debris that may cause misalignment when the wheel is installed.

    6

    When replacing the wheel, use a torque wrench to ensure all lug nuts are evenly tightened according to manufacturer specification. A single loose lug nut can cause uneven pressure on the braking system, causing the brakes to wear unevenly and pulsate.

    7

    Perform, or have a professional perform, a four-wheel alignment. Misalignment may cause pulsing if the surfaces have been worn down unevenly.

Rabu, 27 Januari 2010

How to Remove Calipers From a Dodge Avenger

If the caliper on your Dodge Avenger is damaged or malfunctioning, you can save time and money by replacing it yourself. As with most hydraulic components, most repair stations would recommend replacing the calipers on both front wheels. While this is only a recommendation, it can save you additional time, since bleeding the brake system is going to be necessary whether you replace one or both of the calipers.

Instructions

    1

    Remove half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using the syringe or turkey baster and discard the fluid. Replace the cover.

    2

    Remove the front hubcaps and loosen the lug nuts on the Avenger using the lug wrench.

    3

    Lift and support the front of the Avenger using the floor jack and jack stands.

    4

    Remove the nuts and wheel.

    5

    Place a large C-clamp over the caliper housing. Position the top of the clamp over the inboard caliper housing and the bottom of the clamp onto the outboard pad. Tighten the C-clamp slowly to compress the caliper piston into the bore of the caliper.

    6

    Crimp the brake hose to the caliper with the brake hose crimper.

    7

    Place a drain bucket beneath the caliper and remove the banjo bolt from the caliper using a hand wrench. The hose will leak slightly, so reposition the drain bucket to catch the drips if necessary.

    8

    Remove the two caliper bolts using a hand wrench. Remove the caliper.

    9

    Replace the caliper by reversing the procedure. Bleed the caliper once you've finished by having someone pump the brake pedal four to five times, and hold the pedal while you loosen the bleeder screw on the caliper until the brake fluid is clear and no air is being purged from the caliper.

    10

    Refill the master cylinder; do not allow it to run dry during the bleeding sequence. Replace the cap to the master cylinder before pumping the brake pedal. Torque the front lug nuts to 100 foot pounds when the Avenger is back on the ground.

Senin, 25 Januari 2010

How do I Troubleshoot the Brakes on My 2002 Ford F-350 Fourwheel Drive Powerstoke Crewcab?

How do I Troubleshoot the Brakes on My 2002 Ford F-350 Fourwheel Drive Powerstoke Crewcab?

The Ford F-350 Powerstroke Crewcab is a tough, sturdy, four-wheel-drive monster, capable of handling most any task thrown its way. Its anti-lock brake system is especially important to keep maintained if you are using your F-350 in a construction site or other rugged terrain. You can troubleshoot the ABS system on your 2002 Ford F-350 Powerstroke Crewcab in your own driveway, saving time and money instead of taking it to a mechanic. You will not need any special training or tools to complete this procedure, although you may need a professional to replace select ABS parts.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect the fuse box panel located beneath the dashboard; locate the fuse that connects to your Ford's ABS system.

    2

    Disconnect the fuse and inspect it. If the fuse is popped, replace it with an identical fuse.

    3

    Twist the steering wheel fully to the right.

    4

    Inspect the ABS sensor located behind the driver's side wheel. This sensor is attached to the hub assembly and wheel bearing and has wires running off of it. It is the only sensor connected to the wheel hub itself. Inspect the wires for signs of damage. Do this for all four of your Ford's wheels.

    5

    Start your F-350 and turn the key to "II". If you see the ABS sensor light turn on and stay lit, there is a problem with the anti-lock braking system and you should consult a mechanic.

How to Bleed 1995 Monte Carlo Brakes

How to Bleed 1995 Monte Carlo Brakes

Bleeding the brakes on a 1995 Chevrolet Monte Carlo consists of removing the air from the lines. The brakes need to be bled after changing out the master cylinder or the calipers. When these components are removed, this can cause air to be sucked into the system and cause the car not to brake correctly. Bleeding the brakes starts with the rear wheels. Once the rear wheels are bled, you'll need to bleed the front wheels to finish the job.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood to access the master cylinder. Ensure the brake fluid level is at the full mark on the side of the reservoir. Do not let the master cylinder run empty.

    2

    Chock the front wheels and make sure the car is in park.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts on the back wheels with a tire tool. Do not remove the lug nuts. Loosening the lug nuts will make removing the wheel easier.

    4

    Raise the back end of the car by placing a jack under the differential. Raise the car high enough to place jack stands under the rear axle. Lower the car onto the jack stands.

    5

    Remove the two back wheels and set them aside.

    6

    Bleed the back brakes on the passenger wheel first as they are the most distant from the master cylinder.

    7

    Place a hose at the end of the bleeder screw. Insert the other end of the hose into a disposable bottle.

    8

    Instruct an assistant to hold down the brake pedal and not to release the brakes until instructed. The car needs to be idling during this process.

    9

    Open the bleeder screw with an open-end box wrench for a second to release fluid into the waste line. Close the valve once the fluid has drained into the line. Instruct your assistant at this point to release the brake pedal.

    10

    Instruct your assistant to press the brake pedal while the valve is closed. Inspect the brake fluid for air bubbles. If there are any bubbles present, repeat the bleeding process until there are no air bubbles.

    11

    Check the master cylinder and fill the reservoir to the full line. The master cylinder cannot go dry, or the process will need to be repeated.

    12

    Repeat the above steps on the driver's side rear wheel. Once complete, tighten the wheels back onto the rear and raise the car up to remove the jack stands. Lower the car once the jack stands are clear. The same process needs to be completed on the front wheels.

How to Change Brake Shoes on a Ford Focus

How to Change Brake Shoes on a Ford Focus

The rear brakes on a Ford Focus are called "drum brakes," which differ from the front wheels (called "disc brakes"). The brake pad, called a "shoe," sits inside of a "drum." When you press on the brake pedal, hydraulic pressure pushes the shoe against the inside of the drum, helping you to slow down. Eventually, the shoe will get worn down through constant friction caused by braking. When the brake shoe material is less than 1/8 inch thick, you will need to replace the shoes.

Instructions

    1

    Break the lug nuts loose on the rear wheels. You are simply trying to make it easier to loosen the nuts when the car is off the ground (and the wheels can spin freely), so you do not want to actually loosen the lug nuts to the point where the vehicle may become unstable or the wheels are in danger of coming off under the weight of the car.

    2

    Put the car in 1st gear, if your Focus is a 5-speed (it should be in park if it is an automatic). Put the car's emergency brake on.

    3

    Jack up the car using the rear jack point on the Focus. it should be in the middle of the car under the trunk area.

    4

    Place two jack stands, one on each side, under the pinch welds in the rear of the vehicle. They should be located on the side of the car in the rear of the vehicle. Alternatively, you can place the jack stands underneath the frame of the car. Lower the car onto the jack stands and check the car to make sure it is stable.

    5

    Continue to loosen the lug nuts and remove the wheels/tires from the car.

    6

    Remove the four 13 mm bolts that hold the spindle on. You can then take the drum off. Depending on how old the car is, you may need to hit the drum in order for it to come off. To do this properly, take a standard metal hammer, and hit the side of the drum all the way around. You are trying to knock the rust/corrosion off of the drum (which is keeping the drum in place) so that it is free to come off.

    7

    Using the brake spring tool, carefully remove the return spring for each of the brake shoes (highlighted in yellow).

    8

    Hold the back of the retainer pin and place the brake shoe removal tool over the retainer clip (highlighted in red). Press "in" and turn the tool counterclockwise. This will remove the spring and the retainer. The brake shoes (highlighted in green) should come right off at this point.

    9

    Place the new shoes on the brake drum and reverse the process you used to remove them in step 8 and re-attach the return springs.

    10

    Put the outer part of the drum back on and replace the four bolts and spindle you removed in step 6.

    11

    Put the wheel/tire back on, and hand tighten the lug nuts. Using the lug nut wrench begin tightening the lug nuts so that the wheel/tire sit firm against the brake drum assembly, but do not tighten them all the way. Be sure that you are tightening the lug nuts in a criss-cross pattern. For example, tighten one nut, then tighten the nut opposite of it.

    12

    Lower the car back to the ground. Torque the lug nuts to 100 ft lb using the same criss cross pattern you used when tightening the nuts initially. Before you drive away, check the brakes by pumping them a few times to ensure that normal brake pressure is being applied by the system.

Sabtu, 23 Januari 2010

How to Change Brake Pads on a 2005 Honda Pilot

How to Change Brake Pads on a 2005 Honda Pilot

With the sheer size of the 2005 Honda Pilot, it is essential to ensure that the vehicle's brakes are in great working shape. There are three common side effects that can alert you to bad brakes. The first is a faint squealing sound that occurs as you drive. The second is that the brakes stop abruptly when used. The third is if there is a grinding sound as the brakes are applied. If any of these three occur, then it is time to change the brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen all of the lug nuts with the tire iron with two full counterclockwise turns. Set the wood blocks behind the tires you will not be removing. Replace the front set first and then the back set. You may want to leave one tire on to help with reference.

    2

    Place the floor jack under the axle of the vehicle and raise it until the tires are at least 2 inches off of the ground. Set the jack stands under the same axle for support and stability. Remove the first tire.

    3

    Unbolt the brake caliper mounting bracket from the rotor with the socket wrench. The brake caliper mounting bracket is the crescent shaped metal bracket attached to the rotor that was directly behind the tire. Hang the caliper mounting bracket in the wheel well of the SUV with the twine to remove any strain on the brake line.

    4

    Pull the brake pads out of the brake caliper mounting bracket.

    5

    Attach the c-clamp to the mounting bracket by placing the stationary end of the clamp against the rear of the mounting bracket. Set the movable end against the brake caliper cylinder (the cylinder in the center of the bracket) and compress until the cylinder is flat.

    6

    Slide the new brake pads into the slots where the old brake pads were.

    7

    Untie the caliper mounting bracket and bolt it back onto the rotor with the socket wrench. Reattach the tire with the lug nuts and proceed to the next brake pads. When finished, lower the vehicle and tighten all of the lug nuts with the tire iron.

How to Replace Parking Brake Shoes

How to Replace Parking Brake Shoes

The parking brake is an essential safety feature of any automobile. Many vehicles, especially older models, use drum brakes on the rear wheels, in which case the parking brake function is performed by the drum brake. On vehicles with rear disk brakes, a separate drum style parking brake is normally incorporated into the rear brake assembly. From time to time this shoe on this type of parking brake will wear out and require replacement. When this happens the amateur mechanic can save time and money by doing the job himself.

Instructions

    1

    Block the vehicle wheels securely to prevent it from rolling. With the parking brake disengaged, loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels. Jack the car up and make sure it is securely supported. Remove the rear wheels. Work on one wheel at a time and use the other wheel as a reference in case you forget how to get all the parts back together again.

    2

    Remove the brake caliper by removing the guide rod bolts and then sliding the caliper assembly off of the disk. Hang the caliper out of the way using a wire or bungee cord. Take care not to stretch or tear the flexible brake hose.

    3

    Remove the disk by unfastening the bolts that hold the disk to the hub assembly and pulling the disk straight off. If the disk is seized on to the hub assembly it can be loosened by tapping the shoulder of the center drum area of the disk with a mallet. Never tap the outer part of the disk or the braking surface area. Some disks have two threaded holes incorporated into their design to allow jacking bolts to be used to remove a seized-on disk. The parking brake mechanism is now visible.

    4

    Remove the return springs by firmly grasping the end of the springs with pliers and unhooking them from the retaining eyes. There are normally two return springs in an upper and lower position. The upper spring is usually paired with a solid strut. If a strut is present, remove it with the upper return spring.

    5

    Remove the hold-down pin and spring on each shoe by depressing the spring and turning the pin (usually clockwise) until it can be removed. Some pins will require a hex key while others can be turned with a large screw driver. On some vehicles spring clips are used to hold the shoes rather than a pin and spring arrangement. If clips are present then depress them and pull them out with pliers.

    6

    Remove the tension spring located right beside the star wheel. Use pliers to firmly hold the end of the spring and unhook it from the retaining eye. Remove the star wheel by sliding it out from between the shoes.

    7

    Remove the front (primary) and rear (secondary) brake shoe by pulling them straight out. Remove the parking brake cable retaining ring from the cable, and then remove the cable from the parking brake shoe lever.

    8

    Clean the brake and all removed components by spraying with brake cleaning fluid. Catch excess fluid in a metal drip pan and dispose of used fluid in accordance with local regulations.

    9

    Apply brake grease (high temperature grease) to the backing plate at the points where the brake shoes contact the plate. Apply brake grease to the star wheel threads.

    10

    Reverse the steps to reinstall the components. Refer to the other wheel to remind yourself where everything goes. When reinstalling the disk be sure the adjustment port is directly over the star wheel. Once the brake disk is back on, remove the plug (if any) in the adjustment port and rotate the star wheel with a screw driver until the shoes contact the disk housing. Back the star wheel off about eight notches to set the brake clearance.

    11

    Test the parking brake. Repeat the procedure on the other wheel.

Jumat, 22 Januari 2010

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a Cadillac Catera

If your Catera is becoming more difficult to stop, the brake pads are likely worn out and should be replaced. Most Cateras have an indicator light to tell you when to replace the brakes, which often occurs within 2 years. You don't need to completely remove a brake caliper on the Catera to change the pads; however, this is a good time to inspect the calipers, as a damaged one must be replaced, too.

Instructions

    1

    Unplug the negative battery cable, raise the vehicle's rear side on jack stands and remove the wheels. Attach a hose to the brake caliper's bleeder screw and open the screw.

    2

    Siphon the brake fluid out of the master cylinder and discard it properly.

    3

    Compress the caliper's pistons with a clamp into the caliper housing to give you clearance. Push the caliper's retaining pins from the caliper from the inside out. Remove the spring retainer from the caliper and remove the brake pads.

    4

    Remove the brake caliper by removing its mounting bolts. Inspect the caliper's condition and replace, if needed. Reinstall the caliper, torquing the bolts to 59 foot-pounds and the caliper's pipe fitting to 12 foot-pounds.

    5

    Install the new brake pads onto the caliper. Attach one retaining pin to the caliper, then the spring retainer, then the other retaining pin.

    6

    Fill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid and bleed the brake system of air. Place the hose connected to the bleeder valve in a bottle, and have an assistant apply the brake pedal with the valve open. Close the valve when fluid stops trickling out, and have the assistant step off the pedal, then reopen the valve and repeat. Continue until all air is purged and clear fluid flows from the hose.

    7

    Reconnect the wheels to the vehicle, lower it off the jack and connect the battery cable. Test-drive the new brakes.

Kamis, 21 Januari 2010

How to Install Brake Shoes & Pads

How to Install Brake Shoes & Pads

Brake shoes and pads are vital components in vehicle brake systems. About half of all car manufacturers still use drum-style brakes for the rear wheels. Constant friction causes shoes and pads to wear out, so they need to be inspected and changed whenever they show signs of excessive wear. While servicing front disc brakes is fairly easy, rear brake drums can be difficult without specialized tools made specifically for them.

Instructions

Brake Shoes

    1

    Loosen rear wheel lug nuts, jack the car up and take off the tire. Work on only one wheel at a time. The brake drum should slide off fairly easily after hitting the outside edge of the drum with a hammer to loosen it. Once the drum is off, you'll see the right and left brake shoes that need to be removed on either side of the brake assembly, held together at the top by the return spring. Using the spring removal tool, take off the return spring located just below the cylinder at the top of the wheel. This is the first of three springs that need to be taken off the brake shoes.

    2

    Take off the second spring from the brake shoes, one that joins them together at the bottom, using the spring removal tool. Then, using the retainer clip tool, remove the retainer clips holding the shoes on the wheel assembly. Twist the clip tool counterclockwise to loosen and remove the clips, located on each brake shoe, midway between the top and bottom of the shoe. Keep the retainer clips and springs aside for now to use on the new brake shoes.

    3

    Pull the brake shoes outward from the axle and remove them from the wheel. The third and final spring, the brake adjuster, can now be taken off the shoes and put aside with the others. Disconnect the emergency brake from the right brake shoe by prying up on the ring holding the shoe to the emergency brake arm using a screwdriver. Check the brake drum against specifications in the owner's manual and have it resurfaced if necessary. A brake drum can be resurfaced several times before being replaced. Check with a certified brake mechanic for more details.

    4

    Spray brake cleaner on all visible surfaces to eliminate caked-on brake dust. Apply nondrying silicone brake lube to the six points of contact made where the three sets of springs touch the wheel assembly; the wear marks are plainly visible.

    5

    Insert the pin from the emergency brake arm into the new right brake shoe. Attach the adjuster spring to both new shoes and pull them apart to fit around the axle. Screw in the retainer clips for both shoes, then use the spring removal tool to replace the spring at the bottom of the shoes and the return spring at the top.

Brake Pads

    6

    Loosen the front lug nuts, jack up the car and finish taking off the front wheel. The disc and caliper assembly are visible once the tire has been removed. Use the hex wrench to unscrew the caliper mounting bolts. Caliper mounting bolts are usually located on the back of the caliper assembly, one at the top of the caliper mechanism and one on the bottom. Remove bolts counterclockwise. Consult your owner's manual for the proper size hex bolt.

    7

    Lift the brake piston caliper off the rest of the caliper assembly and inspect it for leaks. Set the brake piston caliper aside for now, being careful not to damage the pressure hose attached to it. The disc, or rotor, is visible through the caliper mechanism that remains on the wheel assembly. The brake pads are also visible, on either side of the rotor.

    8

    Remove the old brake pads, retaining the anti-rattle device for the new set of pads. The anti-rattle device is simply a backing frame that clips onto the pads. Check the rotor for unusual wear patterns and have it turned if necessary. This is a grinding process, similar to drum resurfacing, that restores the rotor to a serviceable condition, and can be performed several times before the rotor needs to be replaced. Consult a certified brake mechanic for more details.

    9

    Press the piston open on the brake piston caliper using the C-clamp, again being careful not to damage the pressure hose. Place one side of the C-clamp on the piston, using an old pad to protect it, and put the other side of the C-clamp outside the piston caliper, twisting the clamp until the piston is fully depressed.

    10

    Clip the anti-rattle hardware onto the new pads and install the pads in the caliper assembly, then replace the piston caliper over the pads. Apply a small amount of brake lube to each caliper mounting bolt to ensure that the caliper unit slides freely. Bolt the brake piston caliper onto the caliper assembly. Be sure the caliper assembly slides back and forth as it should.

Rabu, 20 Januari 2010

How to Fix the Brakes on a Deuce & a Half

How to Fix the Brakes on a Deuce & a Half

Timely brake replacement is vital for safe operation of any motor vehicle. If you begin to hear a squealing sound as you apply the brakes on your F-250, you have already waited too long, and you need to change the brake pads as soon as possible. This is because the friction of your braking has already worn through your brake pads themselves, and what you are hearing now is metal-on-metal.

Instructions

Remove the Brake Pads

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels with your lug nut wrench. Do not completely remove the lug nuts.

    2

    Raise the vehicle in a safe manner. If you don't have ramps to drive it up on, use your floor jack to jack up the front section of the vehicle and place sturdy blocks under the frame. Do not leave the vehicle on the jack during maintenance; rest its full weight on the blocks. Place wedges behind the back wheels to keep them from rolling. (Only remove two wheels at a time.)

    3

    Finish removing the lug nuts with your lug nut wrench and fingers. Pull off the wheels and put them aside.

    4

    Remove the nut and copper washers from the brake hose with a wrench. Plug the brake hose, which is now open, with an ear plug.

    5

    Remove the caliper pin bolts with a wrench. Remove the caliper from the anchor plate.

Install New Brake Pads

    6

    Place the brake caliper on the caliper anchor plate, and tighten the two pin bolts with your torque wrench. For the front brake pads, tighten to 56 foot-pounds. For the back brake pads, tighten to 26 foot-pounds.

    7

    Place the new copper washers that come with the new brake pads on the brake hose where the old copper washers were. Connect the fluid line to the caliper, and tighten it with a wrench.

    8

    Install the retaining bolt or banjo bolt and tighten them down with your torque wrench. Tighten the retaining bolt on the front brakes to 35 foot-pounds. Tighten the banjo bolt on the back brakes to 26 foot-pounds.

    9

    Place the wheels back on the vehicle. Remove the blocks or ramps and tighten the lug nuts fully.

Bleed the Brakes

    10

    Tell your helper to sit in the driver's seat. Tell him or her to fully press the brake pedal and hold it.

    11

    Loosen the bleeder bolt with a wrench and let the brake fluid flow out. When it stops flowing, tighten it again.

    12

    Add brake fluid to the brake reservoir under the hood. As you repeat these steps for all four wheels, you will need to keep adding fluid to the reservoir to keep it full. The amount you add each time will vary.

    13

    Repeat steps 1 through 3 of this section until new, clean brake fluid starts to flow out. Tighten the bleeder bolt with your wrench and repeat the process on each individual wheel.

    14

    Confirm that your brakes are working properly before you take your truck on the open road.

Selasa, 19 Januari 2010

Anti-Lock Brake Troubleshooting

The anti-lock brake system on your car or light truck allows you to maintain directional control during panic stops on slippery roads. Without this system, wheel lock-up will occur. and you'll lose directional control and the ability to steer around an obstacle. Accurate troubleshooting strategies are needed to diagnose problems in this system, and a scan tool is required.

Wheel Speed Sensors

    The quickest, most accurate way to diagnose wheel speed sensor problems is with a scan tool. Select a scan tool that has ABS capabilities, and data-stream functions. A good example of this type of tool is found at http://www.diy-auto-repair.com/computerdiagnostic.html and is reasonably priced. With the tool installed as directed by the manufacturer, test-drive the vehicle while observing the wheel speed sensor readings in the data stream. They should all read very close to the same. A sensor that drops the signal, or shows a large difference between the sensors, is suspect. Check for worn bearings and contaminated sensors before replacing the sensor, as these are common causes of inaccurate readings.

Valve Assemblies

    Bi-directional control of the solenoid valves in the ABS system is the most accurate way to test the modulator valve assemble, and the control module. Unfortunately, the equipment needed to do this is expensive, and usually beyond the price range of the home mechanic. To run the test, select "Special Functions Tests" and then "Rehome". This cycles all the valves and runs a self test using the onboard computer. If this equipment is not available, the local auto shop will be happy to run it for you for a small fee.

Repair Information Systems

    A tool that has recently become available to the home mechanic is professional level information systems. These are the same systems of repair information used by the professional mechanic, except that they are now available in single-car versions for a subscription available to the do-it-yourselfer. A good example of this type of online repair manual is found at http://www.diy-auto-repair.com/alldata.html

How to Replace a Hyundai Rotor

How to Replace a Hyundai Rotor

When you depress the brake pedal on your Hyundai, several things happen at once to slow and stop your car. First, the master cylinder sends brake fluid through the brake lines to the calipers. The caliper contains a piston that causes the brake pads to squeeze the brake rotor between them so that the car stops. You need to change the brake pads periodically because they wear out. Most people do not realize that the rotor wears out as well. This is particularly true if you allow the brake pads to wear beyond the recommended thickness. At that point, the rivets have a chance to destroy the rotor by cutting into the steel. When it reaches this point, you need to change the rotors and your brake job gets more expensive.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Hyundai on a level surface and raise it up with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the car near the jacking point and raise it to the frame.

    2

    Use the lug wrench to remove the lug nuts and pull the wheel off the car. Loosen the caliper bolts with a socket and ratchet and pull it off the wheel assembly. Use a wire tie to secure the caliper to the strut. Never allow the caliper to hang loose or you will damage the brake line.

    3

    Use the pliers to pull the cotter pin out of the wheel shaft, then use a wrench to remove the spindle nut and washer. Pull the rotor off the wheel assembly.

    4

    Put a new rotor on the wheel assembly. Put the washer and the spindle nut on the shaft and tighten it with the wrench. Insert the cotter pin and spread it open with the pliers.

    5

    Put the brake caliper on the mounting bracket and tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet. Install the wheel and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Hyundai. Lower the car to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 1999 Chevy S10

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 1999 Chevy S10

When a 1999 Chevy S10 squeals while applying the brakes, it could be a sign that the brake pads need replaced. The pads have a wear indicator that is a metal tab that hangs just below the pad. The wear indicator will start to rub against the rotor when enough pad has been worn away. The squealing sound is by design and can indicate pads soon should be replaced before serious damage occurs.

Instructions

Brake Pad Removal

    1

    Block the rear wheels of the truck. Loosen the lug nuts, raise the vehicle and support it with jack stands.

    2

    Remove the wheels by removing the loosened lug nuts. Set the lug nuts side and carefully roll the wheels aside.

    3

    Remove the brake reservoir cap and inspect the fluid level. If full, remove some of the fluid. Put on gloves and use a standard kitchen turkey baster or similar tool to remove about 4 ounces of brake fluid. Store the fluid in a suitable container for later disposal.

    4
    Using a C-clamp makes compressing the caliper piston easy.
    Using a C-clamp makes compressing the caliper piston easy.

    Compress the caliper piston by using a large C-clamp. Place the clamp so the stationary side of the clamp is on the back of the caliper and the rotating part is located on the outboard pad. Tighten the clamp until the piston bottoms out. This will provide the necessary room to install the new and thicker pads.

    5
    Brake caliper with pads installed and loaded.
    Brake caliper with pads installed and loaded.

    Remove the caliper by removing the two caliper bolts with a hex wrench. Grasp the caliper and pull it upward while tilting it front to back to remove it from the rotor. Tie it up and out of the way using a coat hanger or piece of wire.

    6

    Remove pads from the caliper and set them aside.

Brake Pad Installation

    7

    Clean the calipers using brake cleaner. Place a suitable container under rotor. Put on safety glasses and spray the caliper with brake cleaner. Pay special attention to the bolt sleeves and bushings. These need to be clean to allow movement as the pads wear.

    8

    Lubricate the sleeves and bushings using a silicone based grease. Do not get the grease on the rotors. Remove any excess grease.

    9

    Install the new brake pads. The inboard pads are side specific and have a wear indicator at one side of the pad. It should face the rear lower side of the caliper when installed correctly. If the wrong pad is installed, the wear indicator will be close to the top of the rotor. Switch pads to correct. Install the outboard pad.

    10

    Install the calipers with pads on the mounting bracket. Line up the the holes on the caliper to the holes on bracket. You may have to slide the sleeve back to accomplish this. Insert the bolts and tighten. You may have to shift the caliper to align holes.

    11

    Reinstall the wheel and tighten the lug nuts. Tighten each lug nut in a crisscross pattern until snug. Lower the vehicle and finish tightening lug nuts with a torque wrench. Over tightening or mismatched lug nut torque may warp the rotor resulting in a pulsation while stopping vehicle.

    12

    Check the brake reservoir fluid level and top it off if necessary with clean brake fluid. Reinstall the cover. Press the brake pedal firmly to seat the pads then recheck the brake fluid level.

    13

    Road test vehicle but before before driving ensure that the brake pedal feels firm and does not float to the floorboard. The brakes should feel firm without excessive pedal play. The vehicle should stop without excessive pedal force.

Senin, 18 Januari 2010

How to Change the Front Brakes in a 1999 Infiniti QX4

Replacing a set of brake pads in the 1999 Infiniti QX4 should only take about 15 minutes. The pads should be inspected every 7,500 miles and replaced at least every 15,000. Replacement pads can be purchased or ordered from most auto-supply stores.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on both wheels and jack up the front end of the vehicle. Remove the wheels. The jack point is on the frame, slightly ahead of the center point between the wheels.

    2

    Unplug the speed sensor connector located behind the rotor.

    3

    Remove the lower bolt from the caliper. The bolt is on the back side of the caliper.

    4

    Pivot the caliper around the upper bolt to move it away from the rotor. Suspend it with a length of wire.

    5

    Pry off the clips that hold the brake pads in place and remove the pads. Press the caliper piston into the cylinder with a C-clamp.

    6

    Install the replacement pads. Installation is the reverse of removal.

Minggu, 17 Januari 2010

How to Put Brakes on a 1999 Jetta

The 1999 Volkswagen Jetta comes equipped with disc brakes on all four wheels. The braking components on the Jetta consist of the master cylinder, fluid, calipers, pads and rotors. Once the brake pedal is depressed, the brake fluid pressurizes the cylinder inside the caliper. The caliper then pushes the outboard brake pad to the side of the rotor. The outboard brake pad pulls the inboard brake pad to the side of the rotor as it is compressing. The compressing of the pads to the sides of the rotor stops the Jetta.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the 1999 Volkswagen Jetta to a safe area that has a level surface and set the parking brake.

    2

    Loosen every lug nut from each front wheel with a lug nut tool such as a tire tool or a lug wrench.

    3

    Position the jack carefully underneath the car, referring to your owner's manual to locate the proper jacking locations. The jack should be placed so that the jacking pad is not placing pressure on sheetmetal parts. Raise the front of the Jetta and put a safety stand beneath both side rails. Position the safety stands under the side rails close to the front wheels so that the stands can evenly hold the weight of the front end of the Jetta. Then, slowly lower the Jetta to the safety stands. As soon as the Jetta is sitting securely on the safety stands, stop the jack and leave it in the upright position.

    4

    Unscrew and remove each of the lug nuts from the front wheels. Carefully pull the front wheels off and lay the wheels in a flat position.

    5

    Starting with the driver's side wheel, locate the two caliper mounting slide bolts on the back of the brake caliper. There is one lower slide bolt and one upper slide bolt. Loosen and remove the lower slide bolt with the ratchet and a metric socket. Then, only loosen the upper slide bolt with the ratchet and socket.

    6

    Raise the bottom of the brake caliper all the way up so that the worn brake pads inside the caliper can be accessed and removed. Then, wrap the bungee strap around the raised brake caliper and hang the other end of the bungee strap to one of the closest steering components or the frame rail. The strap will hold the caliper up while replacing the brake pads.

    7

    Remove the inner brake pad from the retaining clip inside the caliper. Then, position the c-clamp inside of the brake caliper facing the outer brake pad. Slowly screw the caliper cylinder inward until it is flush with the outside of the cylinder housing. Turn the c-clamp clockwise to compress the cylinder.

    8

    Unscrew the c-clamp and remove it from the caliper. Then, install the new brake pads into the retaining clips inside the brake caliper. Look over the new pads to ensure that they are secure inside of the caliper. Also inspect the condition of the brake rotors by gently running your hand over the inner and outer surfaces. If there is excessive wear or grooving present, have the rotors turned (resurfaced) by a machine shop or an auto repair shop. Replace the rotors if there is excessive grooving on the face of the brake rotor.

    9

    Remove the bungee strap from the brake caliper, and lower the brake caliper with the new pads back over the brake rotor. Secure the caliper to the brake rotor with the bottom slide bolt. Then, tighten both lower and upper slide bolts firmly with the ratchet and metric socket. Slide the wheel back on and secure it to the rim with the lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug nut tool.

    10

    Move to the other three wheels and repeat the same steps to replace the brake pads. Then, jack up the vehicle, remove the safety stands and lower the Jetta back to the surface. Slide the jack out from the Jetta.

    11

    Start the car and pump the brake pedal firmly to seat the new brake pads to the inner and outer sides of the brake rotor. After four or five pumps of the brake pedal, the brake pedal should start to have resistance about halfway to the floor.

    12

    Turn the engine off and open the hood. Check the brake fluid level inside the brake fluid reservoir. If the fluid level is low, add enough brake fluid to fill the fluid level up to the fill line on the side of the reservoir. Then, close the hood. This completes the brake replacement on the 1999 Volkswagen Jetta.

Sabtu, 16 Januari 2010

How to Test a 2000 Ford E-150 Abs Wheel Sensor

How to Test a 2000 Ford E-150 Abs Wheel Sensor

Ford introduced the Econoline or E-series van in 1961. The 2000 Ford E-150 was produced with the option of three engine choices: a 4.2-liter V-6, a 4.6-liter V-8, and a 5.4-liter V-8. The ABS control module on the 2000 Ford E-150 is connected through the OBDII or on board diagnostics computer. Testing and ABS sensor can be done through the OBDII port, as each wheel sensor is connected to the OBDII computer through the ABS control module.

Instructions

    1

    Open the driver's door of the E-150. Visually inspect the underside of the dashboard to locate the OBDII port. The port for the OBDII computer is the exact shape of the connector on the OBDII scanner. Install the scanner onto the OBDII port.

    2

    Sit in the driver's seat of the E-150, and turn the ignition key to the "II" or accessories position. This is the key position where the dashboard lights all light up, but the engine does not turn over. Do not start the engine. Push the power button on the scanner to start the scanner.

    3

    Select the type of scan you wish to do from the main screen of the OBDII scanner. Use the up and down arrow keys to select your answer, and press the "Read" button to accept your answers. Select ABS Diagnostics on the main screen of the scanner and press the "Read" button.

    4

    Enter the year make and model information for your truck, using the arrow keys on the scanner to select the information and the "Read" button to accept your entries.

    5

    Select "Read ABS Codes" from the scanner screen and press "Read" Allow the computer to read the on board diagnostics computer. Do not press any more buttons during the test, unless prompted to do so. Read the OBDII scanner display when the test is completed. The results should state the amount of codes found. Use the up and down arrow keys to sort through the codes that were found. If the wheel sensor is bad, the scanner will say something to the effect of "ABS Sensor-Low Circuit RF). This indicates that the passenger from wheel sensor is bad.

Kamis, 14 Januari 2010

How to Remove a Front Brake Rotor From a 2002 F150 4X4

How to Remove a Front Brake Rotor From a 2002 F150 4X4

The Ford F-150 was introduced in 1975 and eventually replaced the F-100. The 2002 Ford F-150 was equipped with a 4.2-liter V-6 as the base engine. Two versions of the 4.6-liter V-8 and two versions of the 5.4-liter V-8 were also available in the 2002 F-150. The rotors on the 2002 F-150 can wear out over a period of time, depending upon the driver's driving style. When removing the rotors for replacement it is recommended that you replace the brake pads as well to ensure congruity in the brake system.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the front lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the front of the F-150 with a jack. Place jack stands beneath both ends of the axle housing, as far apart as possible. Lower the truck onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and then remove the front wheels completely.

    2

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts with a 3/8-inch drive ratchet, along with a socket or a hex head adapter (Allen head). Pull the caliper free from the brake assembly and hang it from the front coil spring with a metal clothes hanger. Remove the brake pads from the vehicle completely.

    3

    Remove the caliper bracket bolts with a 1/2-inch drive ratchet and socket. Remove the caliper bracket. Remove the old rotor from the F-150. Set one of the old brake pads across both caliper pistons in the inboard side of the caliper. Wrap a C-clamp around the old brake pad and the rear of the caliper. Tighten the C-clamp slowly to completely compress both caliper pistons.

    4

    Install the new brake rotor on the F-150 hub. Turn one lug nut onto the stud and against the face of the rotor. Clean the front and rear side of the rotor thoroughly with aerosol brake cleaner to remove the rust prevention oil from the rotor.

    5

    Install the caliper bracket and tighten the bolts to 148 foot-pounds, with a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket. Install the brake pads onto the caliper bracket. Make sure the brake pad with the metal wear indicator tab is on the inboard side of the rotor. Place a light coat of caliper grease on the rear shim plates of both brake pads.

    6

    Install the front caliper and tighten the mounting bolts between 21 and 26 foot-pounds, using the torque wrench and a socket.

    7

    Repeat steps 2 through 6 to complete the rotor and pad replacement on the second side of the F-150. Install the wheels and tighten the lugs snug with a tire iron. Raise the truck off of the jack stands and remove the jack stands from beneath the truck. Lower the truck to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts to 105 foot-pounds of torque with the torque wrench and socket.

    8

    Proceed to the driver's side of the truck and pump the brake pedal no less than 10 to 15 times. If the brake pedal does not stiffen or create more resistance after you pump it five times, stop pumping the brakes and bleed the brake system.

How to Change the Brakes on an Infiniti G20

How to Change the Brakes on an Infiniti G20

The Infiniti is a fairly new brand of car, officially arriving on the market in the U.S. in 1989. Infiniti is the luxury branch of the popular Japanese parent company Nissan. Because Infiniti's name is not used in Japan, they are typically sold under the Nissan brand. Though these cars are considered luxury vehicles, their maintenance is very easy, and just about anyone can perform routine maintenance, such as refilling the oil or changing the brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Use a tire iron to turn the lug nuts on the wheels counterclockwise one full turn.

    2

    Use a jack to raise the Infiniti. Place the jack under the support strut on the side you are working on located near the edge of the frame.

    3

    Lower the car onto the jack stands. Once the car is lowered from the jack, remove the lug nuts completely as well as the tire. Set these both aside.

    4

    Remove the caliper mounting bracket by removing the two bolts that secure it with a socket wrench. Using twine, hang the bracket from the undercarriage of the car to prevent stress on the brake line.

    5

    Remove the brakes by wiggling then pulling them free from the caliper assembly.

    6

    Use the caliper compression tool to compress the caliper.

    7

    Place the new brakes into the assembly and reattach the caliper mounting bracket.

    8

    Reattach the wheel to the rotor. Tighten the lugs then lower the car to the ground. Finish by turning all the lugs until secure.

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 2001 Honda Accord

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 2001 Honda Accord

The brakes on your 2001 Honda Accord can wear out after thousands of miles of continuous use, requiring replacement as soon as possible. Replacing worn brake pads when required will help your Accord maintain its peak braking performance as well as protect your own safety and that of fellow motorists. The 2001 Accord is fitted with front disc brakes as standard equipment on base models and four-wheel disc brakes on premium models. Replacing the brake pads should take no more than an hour for all wheels in ideal conditions.

Instructions

Preparations

    1

    Open the hood and disconnect the negative terminal cable from the battery. This will reduce the possibility of shock and serious injury.

    2

    Open the brake master cylinder reservoir and remove half of the fluid inside with a turkey baster. Transfer the fluid to a sealable container and dispose of the used fluid.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel with a lug wrench without completely removing the nuts. Use a floor jack or garage lift to raise the vehicle. If using a floor jack, use jack stands to stabilize the vehicle. Finish removing the nuts and pull the wheel off the axle to reveal the brakes.

Changing the Brake Pads

    4

    Remove the two retaining bolts holding the brake caliper to its mounting bracket with a ratchet and socket. Pull the bolts out and lift the caliper off the rotor. Use mechanic's wire to suspend the caliper in mid-air. Do not allow the caliper to hang downward by the brake hose.

    5

    Remove the used brake pads from the caliper. Detach the retaining clips on the back of the pads if so equipped. Place one of the old pads against the brake caliper piston and place a C-clamp against the pad and the back of the caliper. Use the C-clamp to push the piston back inside of the caliper.

    6

    Attach the retaining clips to the back of the new pads and place them in the caliper. Place the caliper back over the brake rotor and reinsert the two retaining bolts. Tighten the bolts with a ratchet and socket. Repeat the procedure on the other wheels.

    7

    Mount the wheel back on the axle and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    8

    Open the brake master cylinder reservoir and add fresh brake fluid to the top fill line. Close the reservoir. Reconnect the negative terminal cable to the battery. Enter the Accord and apply the brakes four to five times to reset the brake pads.

Rabu, 13 Januari 2010

Jeep Cherokee Brake Problems

Jeep Cherokee Brake Problems

A Jeep Cherokee comes with anti-lock disc brakes on the more recent models. These disc brakes are a wearable component; expect to have brake problems periodically because of general operation of the Jeep. Check the brakes on your Jeep Cherokee regularly to identify common brake problems that inevitably need attention and repair.

Brake Pads

    The Jeep Cherokee has brake pads that are located on either side of the brake rotor. When the operator presses on the brake pedal inside the cab, the calipers press the brake pads together, stopping the rotation of the rotors, which stops the Jeep Cherokee. This continuous braking wears the brake pads down during normal operation and requires the brake pads to be replaced because of wear. The brake pads have a wear clip located on the side of the pads that notifies the operator that the brake pads need to be replaced. It does this by squealing when the operator presses on the brake or during normal operation of the vehicle. It is best to replace all four sets of brake pads at the same time to ensure that no other problems occur because some brakes pads are newer than others.

Brake Rotors

    The brake rotors are the component parts of the brake that rotate when the wheels are turning and stop when the operator presses down on the brake pedal. These rotors have a groove created by the brake pads over the course of operation of the Jeep Cherokee. The groove created by the brake pads on the rotors needs to be checked to ensure that the rotors are still thick enough to stop the vehicle safely. A brake-measuring device called a caliper can check this thickness. The rotor wear can be repaired by removing the rotors and shaving them down to remove the groove, thereby making them flat or smooth again. This is commonly referred to as turning the rotors. The rotors can also warp if the brake pads are not centered correctly on the rotors or when the rotors overheat, causing them to crack or glaze.

Brake Line or Fluid

    The Cherokee must have enough bake fluid to operate the brakes during normal operation of the vehicle. The operator can check the brake fluid level by looking under the hood of the Jeep on the driver's side of the engine and pulling the cap off of the master cylinder reservoir. The Jeep Cherokee can also have air enter into the brake lines of the vehicle, causing the brake pedal to loose tension or pressure. An operator can push on the brake pedal and the pedal will go down easily, lacking pressure. This is caused by air in the lines or a brake line leak. The tires can be pulled off and the brake lines bled to remove the air in the lines. The operator removes the brake line cap screw located behind the brake pads and calipers. Brake fluid can then be put into the master cylinder reservoir under the hood of the Cherokee while someone pushes on the brake pedal. This pushes the brake fluid through the brake lines, removing the air and causing a continuous flow of brake fluid.

DIY Mazda Miata Rotor & Brake Installation

The two-seater Mazda MX-5 Miata is a fun, sporty car. It has endured three generational redesigns since its introduction in 1989. Like with any vehicle on the road, however, the brakes will eventually have to be replaced. Replacing the brakes yourself on the Mazda Miata will help you understand how the brakes work, save you time and money, and reward you with the experience of building a relationship with your car. Some specialty tools will be required, as well as a degree of craftsmanship. Be sure to allow yourself ample time to replace the pads and rotors.

Front Rotor and Brake Installation

    Safely lift the car and support it on jack stands. Crack the lug nuts loose with the Miata on the ground before lifting, unless you have the luxury of an air compressor and pneumatic tools. Another good idea before beginning is to remove a third of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using a siphon. This way, the master cylinder does not overflow when you retract the caliper pistons and force fluid backwards through the hydraulic system.
    After removing the wheels, remove the bottom caliper bolt and then pivot the caliper upwards and remove it from the upper caliper slide bolt by pushing it away from you. Support the caliper using a bungee cord or mechanic's wire. The pads can be pried out of the caliper bracket, and it is recommended to remove the pad clips and either clean them or replace them with new ones. Next, remove the caliper bracket bolts and remove the bracket.
    The front rotors may have retaining bolts that will need to be removed using a hammer and an impact screwdriver. After they are removed, you will be able to remove the rotor.
    Compress the caliper piston with a pair of channel locks, a large C-clamp or a caliper retracting tool.
    To reinstall, be sure to clean the coating on the new rotors using a parts cleaner or brake cleaner spray. Also, be sure to apply a high-temp brake lubricant to the caliper bolt slides and to the pad clips. Wipe any of the excess lubricant that may get onto the new rotors.

Rear Rotor and Brake Installation

    The rear rotor and brake installation is very similar to the front, though the top caliper bolt is removed and the caliper is pivoted downwards. The parking brake cable is also integrated with the rear caliper and will need to be removed and replaced. Make sure to properly reinstall and align the adjusting screw. Later model Miatas also use a screw-in type caliper piston in the rear, so the tools to compress the front calipers won't work. Special tools are required to screw in the caliper pistons, but they're both available and affordable at most parts stores.

After the Brakes are Replaced

    Once the brakes are replaced, the wheel nuts tightened and torqued to specs, be sure to pump the foot brake pedal in order to seat the pads to the rotors. This will also move the hydraulic pressure back from the master cylinder towards the compressed calipers. Failing to do this will result in no braking response from the Miata because the pistons have not had time to extend out from the bores. This can cause a serious accident. Be sure to check the level of the fluid in the master cylinder once you've pumped the foot brake pedal enough times to make it feel firm.

How to Change the Front Brakes in a Town & Country Van

Periodic brake replacement on the Chrysler Town & Country is part of the vehicle's regular maintenance work. The frequency of the van's brake replacement depends on the amount of wear and tear on the brakes. If you drive the car occasionally, your brakes will last longer than brakes that are used frequently. You should inspect the pads and rotors as part of your regular maintenance routine.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on level ground and turn off its ignition. Open and secure the the engine compartment hood. Remove one-half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder with the turkey baster. Place the fluid in the drain pan for recycling after the project is complete.

    2

    Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Loosen the wheel's lug nuts with the lug wrench. Raise the Town and Country using the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the vehicle and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts from the wheel using the lug wrench and pull the tire off the car.

    3

    Loosen the bolts on the brake caliper using a socket and ratchet. Place the back of the brake caliper and the back brake pad between the jaws of the C-clamp. Close the clamp until the caliper piston is seated inside the caliper housing. Remove the brake pads from the caliper and discard them.

    4

    Place the new brake pads in the caliper. Put the caliper in place on the wheel assembly and tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet. Repeat Steps 2 through 4 on the other wheel.

    5

    Place the wheel back on the Town and Country. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the vehicle. Lower the van to the ground with the automobile jack and fully tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    6

    Open and secure the van's hood. Add fresh brake fluid to the master cylinder, as needed. Close the vehicle's hood.

    7

    Sit in the driver's seat and pump the brake pedal several times until it is firm.

How to Find Out If a Car Has ABS

Many auto manufacturers have added anti-lock braking systems (ABS) to the host of safety features available in today's newer model vehicles. ABS incorporates a computer controller to analyze the rotation and traction of each wheel. In the event of slippage, the computer takes over the pumping action and fluid system of the brakes to improve stopping ability and vehicle control. The National Institute for Highway Safety reports that about 72 percent of all new cars and 94 percent of new light trucks have ABS. Determining whether a car has ABS will help increase your ability to drive safely in your own vehicle, a rental or a borrowed car. In addition, this knowledge is important when performing repairs or requesting service through dealerships or independent repair shops.

Instructions

    1

    Check your vehicle owner's manual to determine whether your car or truck has ABS. Some owner's manuals are quite generic and may include information that doesn't apply directly to your vehicle.

    2

    Turn the ignition on your car without starting the vehicle. Look at the lights displayed on your dashboard. ABS often shows up as an amber colored symbol on the instrument panel.

    3

    Take your vehicle to a respected mechanic for an inspection. ABS features a separate controller and pump under the vehicle that will be readily visible to a skilled professional. Your mechanic will be following your brake lines to the engine compartment. If your vehicle has ABS, the brake lines will enter a control box located near the engine.

    4

    Write down your full vehicle identification number. The VIN can be found on a plate affixed to the dashboard near the lower corner of the windshield or on the sticker attached to the driver side door panel. The VIN contains every bit of information about the features available on the vehicle when it was originally produced. Call the appropriate dealership and provide the VIN number to determine if the vehicle has ABS.

    5

    Consider your own driving experience. If you've felt a pumping or vibrating motion in the brake pedal when driving on slippery surfaces, your ABS may have been engaging to regain traction. Some anti-lock braking systems make a buzzing or grinding noise when engaged.

    6

    Consult any car rental agents for full information about the safety equipment available on any rented vehicles. Brake application during loss of traction with an ABS vehicle is very different than with non-ABS vehicles. ABS requires firm pressure on the brake pedal to allow the system to work. Brake systems without ABS require the more traditional pumping of the brake pedal to resume control and vehicle traction.

Selasa, 12 Januari 2010

How to Replace Brake Pads on a 1999 Jeep Wrangler

How to Replace Brake Pads on a 1999 Jeep Wrangler

A 1999 Jeep Wrangler uses a set of disc brake pads to provide roughly 70 percent of the stopping power for your Jeep. This is due, in part, to the design of the brake caliper and rotor system and the way weight is transferred as you apply the brakes. In any case, the front pads will wear at a higher rate than the shoes on the rear of the Wrangler, requiring more frequent maintenance.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front of your Jeep Wrangler with a lug wrench. Do not fully remove the lug nuts yet. Slide a jack under the front of the Jeep and raise the tires off the ground. Support the front end on a set of jack stands positioned under the front axle tube or frame.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts completely and pull the wheels and tires off the Jeep. Locate the brake caliper on the rotor directly behind the wheel. Locate the two mounting bolts on the caliper that secure it to the caliper mounting bracket. They thread into the bracket from the backside of the caliper.

    3

    Remove the two mounting bolts with a socket and ratchet, turning them clockwise as you look at them from the front. Remember they are standard thread bolts, but you are looking at them backward. Pull both bolts out of the caliper and set them aside.

    4

    Lift the caliper off the mounting bracket and clear of the rotor. Turn the caliper on its back so the pads are facing up. Slide the outer or front pad toward the center of the caliper then lift it out of the caliper. Push the inner pad toward the center of the caliper as well but this one has a large spring clip holding it in the caliper pistons that you must snap out. Lift the pad out of the caliper.

    5

    Position a large C-clamp over the body of the caliper with the threaded part of the clamp in the inside. Place a small scrape of wood over the piston then tighten the clamp, pushing the piston back into the caliper. If you skip this step, you will not be able to get the caliper with the new full thickness pads back onto the rotor. Remove the C-clamp and wood.

    6

    Drop the new inner bad into the caliper and snap the spring clip on the back of the pad into the piston. Position the new outer pad as well. Turn the caliper over and position it over the rotor. Slide it into place and align the holes in the caliper with the holes in the mounting bracket.

    7

    Install the two mounting bolts into the rear of the caliper and mounting bracket. Tighten the bolts with a socket and ratchet. Repeat the process on the opposite side of the Jeep.

    8

    Slide the wheels onto the wheel studs. Install the lug nuts and tighten them until they are snug with a lug wrench. Slide the jack back under the Jeep, raise the front end off the jack stands and remove them from under the Jeep. Lower the Jeep to the ground.

    9

    Tighten the lug nuts on both wheels with the lug wrench. Get into the driver's seat and slowly pump the brake pedal a few times to bring the pads in to meet the rotors. Test drive the Jeep to ensure the brakes are functioning properly.

How to Replace Brake Pads in a Geo Tracker

Geo Trackers come equipped with basic disc brake pads. The disc brake pads are designed to stop the wheels on the Geo Tracker from turning. The disc brake pads are pushed against the inner and outer sides of the brake rotor as the wheel is turning to stop the vehicle. These types of disc brake pads have a built-in wear indicator. Replace the brake pads before they wear down to the wear indicators. Most brake pad manufacturers recommend replacing the pads when the width of the pad exceeds 1/8 inch.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the Geo Tracker to a safe and level work location. Pull the parking brake up.

    2

    Walk around the Tracker to make sure the ground or surface is level underneath the car. Then, loosen each lug nut from the front wheels with a lug nut tool such as a tire tool or a lug wrench. Do not remove the lug nuts.

    3

    Slide the floor jack under the front end of the Tracker and position the jack under a safe jacking point. Jack the front just high enough to position the safety stands under the side rails on each side of the car. Make sure the safety stands are positioned close to the back side of the front wheels so that the stands can hold the weight of the front end safely. Lower the jack until the Tracker is sitting securely on the safety stands. Do not remove the jack from the up right position. The jack will act as an additional safety measure.

    4

    Unscrew each lug nut from both front wheels. Pull the wheels off the wheel hubs with your hands and place on ground in a flat position.

    5

    Go back to the driver's side wheel and look on the side of the brake caliper for the access hole. Use the small pry bar to pry the outboard brake pad toward the caliper cylinder until the cylinder is flush with the cylinder housing. Use the C-clamp if necessary to finish pressing the cylinder into the cylinder housing.

    6

    Look on the back of the brake caliper and locate the lower and upper caliper slide bolts. These slide bolts are what connect the caliper to the caliper bracket. Loosen and remove the two slide bolts with the ratchet and a metric socket.

    7

    Pull the caliper off the rotor. If the caliper is stuck, pry the bottom of the caliper off. Then pry the top of the caliper off. Wrap a piece of mechanics wire around the caliper and hang it to one of the steering components located behind the wheel hub.

    8

    Slide the brake pads out of the retaining clips that are holding the pads to the inside of the caliper. Then install the replacement pads into the retaining clips in the same direction the old pads were in. Look over the pads to make sure they are secure inside of the retaining clips.

    9

    Remove the caliper from the steering component and remove the mechanics wire from the caliper. Then mount the brake caliper with the new brake pads back onto the side of the brake rotor with the two slide bolts. Tighten the slide bolts with the ratchet and metric socket until the slide bolts are very tight.

    10

    Position the wheel back on the wheel studs and screw on the lug nuts. Tighten each lug nut until the wheel begins to turn. Move over to the passenger side and repeat the steps above to replace the front passenger side brake pads. After replacing the brake pads, jack up the front end of the Geo Tracker and remove the safety stands from under the side rails. Lower the Tracker to the ground.

    11

    Finish tightening each lug nut on each front wheel. Go over the lug nuts twice to ensure that each nut is tightly secured to each wheel.

    12

    Crank the Geo Tracker and depress the brake pedal all the way to the floor and then back up again three times. This will position the new brake pads the proper distance from the brake rotor. Test drive the tracker to check out the new brake pads.

Senin, 11 Januari 2010

How to Change Brakes on a Class C Motorhome

Class C motorhomes are manufactured with hydraulically operated braking systems. The calipers, rotors, drums and shoes of these systems require routine maintenance to perform well. An average backyard mechanic can change the brakes on a motorhome in about two hours.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the motorhome at the brake to be replaced by jacking it up with the floor jack and settling the frame rail onto a jack stand.

    2

    Remove the wheel by turning the lug nuts in a counterclockwise direction. Some models may have covers on the lug nuts that look like the actual nut, so remove them if applicable. If working on a rear brake, the wheels could be stacked in a "dual" style, which requires that the outside wheel be removed first. Set the wheel(s) aside.

    3

    Remove the caliper by turning the rear mount bolts in a counterclockwise direction, then sliding the caliper off the rotor. If the brake is a drum style, remove the off-center keeper bolt by turning it counterclockwise and slide the drum from the brake assembly. Disk pads can be popped out of the caliper pistons without much effort, although some models will have clips holding the pads in that can be removed with a screwdriver. Set the drum aside, or secure the caliper to the control arm with a zip tie or string.

    4

    Remove the rotor by pulling it from the hub or turning the hub nut counterclockwise. The shoes on a drum brake can be removed by levering the long springs from the shoe hooks, then turning the primary spring bolt counterclockwise. The shoes will slide away from the brake assembly.

    5

    Replace the rotor with a resurfaced or new unit by sliding it over the hub and turning the hub nut clockwise, if applicable. The shoes on a drum brake will slide into the assembly and then be secured by turning the primary spring bolt clockwise. Reattach the long springs to the shoe hooks and check the bottom adjustment bolt for play between the shoes.

    6

    Replace the pads in the caliper with fresh pads, then slide the caliper back onto the rotor. Tighten the rear caliper mount bolts in a clockwise direction. If the brakes are drum style, slide the drum over the shoes until it meets the back of the brake assembly. Tighten the keeper bolt on the front of the drum in a clockwise direction.

    7

    Replace the wheel by turning the lug nuts in a clockwise direction, in an alternating pattern.

    8

    Lower the motorhome from the jack stand with the floor jack.

    9

    Bleed the brake by turning the purge nipple on the rear in a counterclockwise direction, then continually pouring fresh brake fluid into the master cylinder while pressing on the brake pedal. This could take more than one person to accomplish. When the fluid coming out is clean and bubble-free, turn the purge nipple clockwise to close it.

    10

    Repeat the entire procedure on the remaining brakes.