Minggu, 29 November 2009

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a 1993 Saturn

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a 1993 Saturn

The 1993 Saturn models include the two-door coupes (SC1 and SC2), the four-door sedans (SL, SL1 and SL2) and the five-door wagons (SW1 and SW2). All use front disc brakes with rotors and brake pads, and employ the same braking system. No matter what model you have, the procedure to replace the front brake pads is universal. As long as the front brake rotors are not rust-pitted, warped (giving off a vibration during braking) or cracked, you can replace just the brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 1993 Saturn on a level surface that is safe for lifting and supporting the vehicle, and then apply the parking brake.

    2

    Remove the hubcaps of the two front tires and then loosen the lug nuts with a lug nut wrench/tire iron, twisting in a counterclockwise direction. Only loosen them enough to break them free from the lug stud.

    3

    Use the vehicle jack to lift one side of the car at a time and then lower the jack with a jack stand placed under each front frame rail. Make sure the entire front axle is elevated and supported on the jack stands before continuing.

    4

    Turn the ignition key a half click clockwise to unlock the steering wheel. This will allow you to move the tire back and forth, and give you better access to the caliper and brake pads. Finish removing the loosened lug nuts and then remove the wheels.

    5

    Turn the steering wheel so that the caliper and pads of the side you're working on first protrudes outward from the wheel well.

    6

    Use a ratchet and socket to remove the upper and lower caliper lock pins, and then use a small pry tool to pry the caliper gently off of the knuckle assembly. Bend the wire coat hanger to create a makeshift caliper hanger and then support the caliper on the hanger to the coil spring of the front suspension.

    7

    Compress the piston inward using a large set of channel locks and then slowly squeeze the piston of the caliper fully into its bore.

    8

    Use the pry tool to remove the upper and lower pad clips on the knuckle assembly. Discard the old clips.

    9

    Remove the brake pads (using the pry tool if necessary) from the caliper anchor mount on the knuckle assembly and then inspect the inside and outside surface of the rotor for any visual defects, such as scoring, rust pits or cracks. The presence of any of these conditions requires replacement of the rotor(s).

    10

    Snap the new replacement pad clips onto the upper and lower caliper anchor mount seats and then apply a small amount of high temperature anti-seize compound to the brake pad tab seats on the clips. Be careful not to get the compound on the rotors. If you do, wipe the rotor clean with a shop rag or paper towel.

    11

    Install the new replacement pads (both inboard and outboard) into the caliper anchor mount, making sure to align the pad tabs properly into the clip seats.

    12

    Remove the caliper from the wire hanger and then place the caliper over the pad and anchor mount assembly of the knuckle.

    13

    Lubricate the smooth section of the caliper lock pins, and then align them into the caliper and hand thread them into the caliper anchor mount. Tighten the pins using the torque wrench and a socket to 37 foot-pounds.

    14

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts, and then tighten the lug nuts so they secure the wheel rim to the hub.

    15

    Repeat steps 5 through 14 for the other front brake assembly.

    16

    Raise one side of the Saturn at a time high enough to remove the jack stand and then slowly lower the vehicle to the ground. Pump the foot brake pedal until the caliper pistons extend and seat the pads to the rotor. The brake pedal will feel firm. Release the parking brake and then test drive the Saturn.

How to Replace a Brake Line on a Harley

How to Replace a Brake Line on a Harley

One of the first customizations many riders make to their Harley-Davidson motorcycle is changing the handlebars. It sounds pretty simple at first--unbolt the old ones, then transfer over the old parts to the new one. However, if the brake line is too short, it impedes your range of motion and becomes a safety hazard. If it is too long, it may scratch and damage your motorcycle. Fortunately, replacing the brake line is fairly easy and can be completed just about anywhere with some simple tools.

Instructions

    1

    Move your motorcycle to a clean, level surface. Place your motorcycle in first gear to prevent accidental movement. Place the run/off switch to "off." Consult your owner's manual and follow the instructions to disconnect your negative battery terminal.

    2

    Drain the fluid from your front brakes. First, cover your painted surfaces with shop towels to prevent damage from brake fluid or loose parts. Connect tubing to the bleeder valve located on your brake caliper. Run the tubing to a clean bucket. Using the adjustable wrench, open the bleeder valve--only one half to one turn should be enough. With the motorcycle upright, use the Phillips screwdriver to unscrew the master cylinder cover on your front brakes. Pump the brake lever and fluid should begin to flow. When the fluid stops flowing loosely, disconnect the tubing and move out of the way. Reinstall the master cylinder cover. Clean up any spilled fluid with shop towels.

    3

    Note the routing of the current brake line to ensure reinstallation follows the same pattern. Also, note the order of the mounting hardware where the brake line fits to the caliper and master cylinder. Using an Allen wrench, remove the brake line mounting clamps from the motorcycle. With the socket and socket wrench, remove the brake line from the master cylinder and caliper.

    4

    Replace the gaskets and connect the brake line fitting of the new brake line to the master cylinder. Replace the gaskets and connect the brake line fitting to the caliper. Consult your notes to ensure the line and fitting are at the proper angle and that the hardware was installed in the proper order.

    5

    Run the brake line through the mounting clamps and reinstall them on the motorcycle. Consult your notes to ensure the line is properly routed. Check the range of motion of your new brake line.

    6

    Reconnect the tubing and bucket to the caliper drain valve (it still should be open). Remove the master cylinder cover. Slowly add brake fluid until it begins to flow into the bucket. At this time, close the drain valve. Pump the front brakes several times and slowly add more fluid. Open the bleeder valve one half turn and bleed out any air in the line. Repeat until the master cylinder is full and no air bubbles are in the line. Replace the master cylinder cover. Dispose of used fluid in accordance with local laws.

Sabtu, 28 November 2009

How to Replace Ford Front Brakes

How to Replace Ford Front Brakes

Replacement of the brake pads on your Ford front disc brakes is a common money-saving project for the home mechanic. It does not require specialized tools. Most home mechanics already have the tools needed to do this job, and if not, they are available at your local auto parts store. There are some safety concerns to be aware of when you do this project. Proper lifting of the vehicle and finishing the job with a test drive eliminate these problems and make this a safe project for the beginner.

Instructions

    1

    Set the parking brake, and position wheel chocks behind the rear wheels to prevent the vehicle from rolling while the front wheels are off. Loosen the lugnuts slightly with the lug wrench, and then raise the front wheels off the ground. Position jack stands under the frame, and lower the vehicle down onto them. Remove the front wheels and store them, with the lugnuts, out of the way. Lifting and securing the vehicle in this manner will prevent serious injury.

    2

    Remove the caliper by removing the caliper slide bolts, and prying the caliper off the rotor with a large screwdriver. Open the bleeder screw located on the caliper housing and push the caliper piston back into the housing with the c-clamp. Close the bleeder screw and remove the c-clamp. This prevents debris in the caliper bore from damaging the system when pushing the piston into the caliper housing.

    3

    Remove the two bolts attaching the caliper bracket to the steering knuckle, and remove the rotor. Take the rotor to the local auto parts store or service center, and have it checked for thickness. If it meets specifications, have it machined to eliminate any warp that may be present. The shop that is machining the rotor will check it and advise you if replacement is needed.

    4

    Reinstall the rotor and caliper bracket onto the steering knuckle, and tighten the caliper bracket bolts securely. Clean the caliper slides and pad contact points, and lube them with silicone brake lube.

    5

    Install the new pads onto the caliper bracket, and slide the caliper into place. Tighten the caliper bolts securely. Repeat steps two through five on both sides of the vehicle.

    6

    Reinstall the wheels and tighten the lug nuts securely. Lower the vehicle to the ground and tighten the lug nuts, in a star pattern, one more time. Pump the brake pedal several times until the brakes are hard to push, and then test drive.

Kamis, 26 November 2009

How to Adjust Toyota Tacoma Drum Brakes

How to Adjust Toyota Tacoma Drum Brakes

You can adjust the drum brakes on your Toyota Tacoma right from your home garage, saving yourself time and money. There are adjusters on the rear brakes that keep the shoes in the proper place as the shoes wear down. But if you replace the shoes or drive off-road, the adjusters may need to be manually adjusted to ensure that the shoes stay in the correct position, allowing the brakes to function properly.

Instructions

    1

    Position wheel chocks behind and in front of each of the front wheels. Loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels using the lug wrench, but don't remove yet. Raise up the rear of the vehicle using a jack and slip jack stands under the vehicle next to each of the rear wheels for support. Lower the Tacoma onto the jack stands.

    2

    Remove the rear lug nuts and wheels and set aside.

    3

    Find the brake adjuster, which is a 4-inch spring. Use a flat-head screwdriver to turn the notched wheel attached to the brake adjuster in a downward direction until the shoes touch the brake drum.

    4

    Turn the wheel in the other direction using the screwdriver. Do this for 15 clicks.

    5

    Repeat Steps 3 and 4 for the other rear brake.

    6

    Put the wheels back on and tighten the lug nuts. Raise the vehicle, remove the jack stands, lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts all the way. Remove the wheel chocks.

    7

    Start the Tacoma and drive it slowly in reverse. Apply the brakes often as you do this to seat the shoes and activate the brake adjusters.

How to Tell What Kind of Brakes a Car Has

How to Tell What Kind of Brakes a Car Has

When ordering brake parts for your car or truck, you will be asked if it has disc or drum, power or anti-lock brakes. It is possible to make the determination of your car's brakes without jacking up your vehicle and removing any wheels.

Instructions

    1

    Look through one of the holes at the top of the front wheel. If your car has front disc brakes (most do), you will see the brake rotor, a shiny smooth surface an inch or two behind the wheel. If it does not have front disc brakes you will see a round rusted-looking brake drum.

    2

    Look through one of the holes in the top of one of the rear wheels. You will either see a brake rotor, which will be smooth, shiny and flat, or a brake drum, which will be round, rough and very likely quite rusted-looking.

    3

    Look at the back side of the wheel and tire if you cannot see clearly enough through a hole in the wheel. A disc brake will have a rubber hose from the axle or body to the brake caliper; a drum brake will have a metal tube.

    4

    Determine if your car has anti-lock brakes by one of these methods:
    1) Turn the ignition key to on and look at the warning lights on the instrument panel. If your car has anti-lock brakes there will be an "ABS" or "Anti-lock" light illuminated.
    2) Look for a wire at the back of each wheel. Check both front and back as some vehicles only have front ABS, while others may have front and rear.
    3) Call your dealer with your VIN number and ask.

    5

    Open the hood and look for a large round metal can about 10 or 12 inches in diameter on the rear of the driver's side of the engine compartment. This is the power brake booster. If you have one of these, your car has power brakes.

How to Replace a Caliper in a Nissan Altima

In a Nissan Altima, or any vehicle, replacing a brake caliper is a risky task. Such maintenance is often best recommended for a trained mechanic. Should you look to replace a caliper yourself, take it up with such an expert beforehand.

Instructions

Removing the Old

    1

    Take off the wheel for the caliper you must replace. Make sure the car is securely on the jack stand before you do this.

    2

    Disconnect the parking brake cable and lock spring if you're replacing a rear caliper. Disconnect and plug the brake hose, tossing out the washers that were attached with the flare nut.

    3

    Unscrew and remove the caliper pin bolts so you can remove the caliper. It should pivot up away from the rotor or bracket and slide inboard off the pin sleeve.

    4

    Remove the brake pads, shims and pad springs.

Installing the New

    5

    Make sure the new caliper's piston is completely in the caliper body. Turn the piston clockwise back into the caliper if it isn't. Avoid damaging the piston boot.

    6

    Coat the mounting support with a silicone based grease where the pad makes contact. Install new pads with the shims and pad springs.

    7

    Install the caliper into position. The pin bolts should be torqued between 16 foot pounds and 23 foot pounds.

    8

    Connect the brake fluid hose. Use new copper washers with the flare nut. The nut should be tightened to 12 foot pounds to 14 foot pounds.

    9

    Reattach the lock spring and parking brake cable to the rear caliper.

    10

    Bleed the brake system to remove air from it. Attach a transparent hose to the open bleeder valve and have another person depress the brake pedal. Close the valve, let the brake retract and repeat until all air is gone.

    11

    Replace the wheel and lower the vehicle. Pump the pedal several times to seat the brake pads, then test the brakes on the road.

How to Replace the Front Disc Brake Pads on a Hyundai Sonata

How to Replace the Front Disc Brake Pads on a Hyundai Sonata

The Hyundai Sonata debuted in the American market in 1989. The model was redesigned for model years 1995, 1999, 2006, and again for 2011. Originally a low-cost family sedan, the model has evolved into a competitive full-featured sedan while still remaining relatively inexpensive. All Sonatas are fitted with front disc brakes, and while the design varies slightly the same service procedures apply to all models.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a firm, level surface. Set the parking brake. Loosen the wheel lug nuts about one-half turn and then jack up the vehicle. Support the vehicle securely on an axle stand. Completely remove the lug nuts and pull the wheel off.

    2

    Remove the two caliper guide bolts. Roll the caliper back and forth a few times to force the brake pads apart slightly, then lift the caliper off the disc and hang it out of the way on a wire hook of bungee cord. Be careful to not damage the flexible brake hose.

    3

    Slide the brake pads and shims out of the caliper.

    4

    Push the caliper piston back into the cylinder with a piston retractor. Place the retractor spindle swivel on the piston face and the metal plate on the inner surface of the outer caliper frame. Tighten the spindle to force the piston back into the cylinder bore. Be careful not to damage the piston rubber seal.

    5

    Pull the disc off the hub. If difficult to remove, thread an 8 mm bolt into the hole on the disc face, and tighten the bolt to force the disc off the hub.

    6

    Measure the thickness of the brake pad linings. The shop manual specifies a minimum lining thickness of 0.08 of an inch for model year 2005 and earlier, and 0.12 of an inch for model year 2006 and later. If the lining thickness is less than the specified minimum, or if the linings are damaged or unevenly worn, then replace the pads.

    7

    Measure the thickness of the brake disc with a brake micrometer at several places around the disc. The minimum allowable disc thickness is stamped into the rim of the disc. If the measured disc thickness is below the specified minimum, or if the disc is warped, cracked, or shows other severe damage then replace the disc. Minor damage to the disc can be refurbished by machining at a brake shop or auto parts supply store.

    8

    Follow the steps in reverse order to reassemble the bake. Clean the caliper guide bolts with brake cleaning fluid and then liberally coat them with brake grease before reinserting them in the caliper mounts. Start the vehicle and test the brake operation. Replace the wheel and lower the vehicle.

Senin, 23 November 2009

How to Replace a 1995 Pontiac Grand Prix's Rear Brakes

How to Replace a 1995 Pontiac Grand Prix's Rear Brakes

A 1995 Pontiac Grand Prix has drum brakes in the rear. Whenever you replace them, you need to replace both of them at the same time or the vehicle may begin pulling to one side when you stop. In addition, you need to replace the springs that attach them as they lose tension over time. You also need to be aware the the dust created by the brake system may contain asbestos, and it's a good idea to wear a filtering mask.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen but do not remove the lug nuts on both rear tires.

    2

    Raise the rear of the Grand Prix and support it on jack stands. Block the front wheels with pieces of wood or bricks to keep the vehicle from rolling off the jack stands.

    3

    Release the parking brake. Remove the lug nuts and the wheel on the side you are going to work on first.

    4

    Remove the brake drum. That's the round disc through which the lug nuts are protruding. Hit it with a hammer until it loosens up enough so that you can remove it.

    5

    Clean the brake assembly with brake system cleaner.

    6

    Use a pair of brake spring pliers to remove the actuator spring located to the upper right.

    7

    Wedge a flat-head screwdriver under the spring next to the brake shoe. Pry up to remove the shoe, the adjusting screw and the actuator lever.

    8

    Pry the retractor spring from the trailing brake shoe. That's the one toward the rear of the car. Swing the shoe out from the hub area to gain access to the parking brake cable.

    9

    Rotate the brake shoe until the slot lines up to release the parking brake lever from the shoe.

    10

    Use a screwdriver to pry the retractor spring over until the spring releases.

    11

    Lubricate the contact surfaces of the backing plate and the adjuster screw, using high-temperature grease. Make sure the screw turns freely.

    12

    Install the new shoes by reversing the previous steps.

    13

    Set the preliminary shoe adjustment on the adjuster so that the diameter of the linings is snug as you install the drum. Make sure it can still turn.

    14

    Check the drum before reinstalling, looking for cracks, score marks, deep scratches and hard spots, which will present themselves as a blue discolored area. Remove them with an emery cloth if found. If you cannot remove imperfections, you will need to take the drums to an automotive store or brake specialty store to have them turned to remove the imperfections.

    15

    Mount the wheel and reattach the lug nuts. Lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    16

    Apply and release the brake pedal three dozen times using normal pedal force, pausing one second between pedal applications.

    17

    Ensure that both wheels turn freely.

Minggu, 22 November 2009

How to Install the Master Brake Cylinder on a 1977 Firebird

How to Install the Master Brake Cylinder on a 1977 Firebird

The master cylinder on the 1977 Pontiac Firebird creates the hydraulic pressure to stop the vehicle. This component has several rubber O-rings and valves that open and close to create the pressure. Over time, the O-rings can weaken, or the valves may simply wear out. When this happens, the brake pedal may feel soft or completely depress before engaging the brakes. No matter the symptom, this is a dangerous condition to drive in and you should replace the master cylinder as soon as possible.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Open the Firebird's hood and open the mater cylinder's cap by pushing the wire retainer to the side and removing the metal lid. Pull the rubber insert from inside the master cylinder.

    2

    Siphon out all of the old fluid from inside the master cylinder, using the turkey baster. Transfer this fluid to a 1/2-gallon or larger container to be properly disposed of later.

    3

    Place a clean shop rag on the fender well, directly below the brake lines running into the master cylinder, to protect the paint from damage. Loosen and remove the two metal brake lines on the driver's side of the master cylinder, using a brake line wrench. .

    4

    Loosen and remove the two nuts and washers holding the master cylinder to the brake booster, the large metal component directly behind the master cylinder, using a combination wrench. Pull the master cylinder, gasket and rubber boot towards the front of the vehicle and off the brake booster.

Bench Bleeding

    5

    Place the new master cylinder on in a bench vise with rubber jaw protectors. Tighten the vise until the master cylinder is secured.

    6

    Remove the plastic inserts covering the brake line holes on the new master cylinder. Hand-tighten the bench bleeder kit's hoses into the brake line holes and snug the hoses with a brake line wrench.

    7

    Fill the master cylinder with new DOT 3 brake fluid and bend the bleeder hoses so the ends are completely submerged in brake fluid.

    8

    Press and release, in 3/4- to 1-inch strokes, the plunger on the rear of the master cylinder, using the bleeding tool included with the bleeder kit. Observe as air bubbles come from the bleeder hoses. Repeat this step until no air bubbles come from the hoses.

    9

    Loosen the vise and remove the master cylinder.

Installation

    10

    Place the new rubber boot inside the brake booster in the same orientation as the old one. Place the master cylinder gasket over the mounting studs on the brake booster.

    11

    Mount the master cylinder on the studs protruding from the brake booster; be careful not to spill any brake fluid from the cylinder. Place the washers on the studs and tighten the nuts using a combination wrench.

    12

    Place a thin layer of thread tape over the threaded nuts for each brake line. This prevents future leaks, if the nuts are slightly worn out.

    13

    Loosen and remove one of the bleeder hoses, using the brake line wrench. Quickly thread in the brake line and tighten it with the brake line wrench. Repeat this step for the other brake line.

    14

    Place the rubber insert and lid on the new master cylinder and lock the lid by pulling the metal retainer over the metal lid until it snaps into place. Remove the shop rag from the fender well.

Brake Bleeding

    15

    Raise the front of the vehicle, using the floor jack, and secure it with jack stands. Position the stands beneath a frame rail for support. Slowly lower the Firebird until the weight of the vehicle is resting on the jack stands.

    16

    Place the drain pan below one wheel. Place the 1/4-inch rubber hose on the brake bleeder valve, the brass valve at the top-rear of the caliper.

    17

    Instruct your assistant to pump the brake pedal until it is firm, then hold the pedal. Turn the bleeder valve one-quarter of a turn counterclockwise and observe as fluid and air escapes from the 1/4-inch hose. Repeat this step until only fluid flows from the hose.

    18

    Remove the master cylinder lid and check the master cylinder fluid level. Add more fluid if it is below the "Min" line inside the master cylinder. Replace the master cylinder rubber insert and lid, locking it in place with the metal retainer.

    19

    Repeat steps 2 through 4 of this section for the wheel on the other side of the Firebird.

    20

    Remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground.

    21

    Raise the rear of the vehicle, using the floor jack, and secure it with jack stands. Position the stands beneath a frame rail for support. Slowly lower the Firebird until the weight of the vehicle is resting on the jack stands.

    22

    Place the drain pan below one wheel. Place the 1/4-inch rubber hose on the brake bleeder valve, the brass valve at the top-rear of the brake backing plate, the large metal plate behind the rear brakes..

    23

    Instruct your assistant to pump the brake pedal until it is firm, then hold the pedal. Turn the bleeder valve one-quarter of a turn counterclockwise and observe as fluid and air escapes from the 1/4-inch hose. Repeat this step until only fluid flows from the hose.

    24

    Remove the master cylinder lid and check the master cylinder fluid level. Add more fluid if it is below the "Min" line inside the master cylinder. Replace the master cylinder rubber insert and lid, locking it in place with the metal retainer.

    25

    Repeat steps 7 through 8 of this section for the wheel on the other side of the Firebird.

    26

    Remove the jack stands and lower the Firebird to the ground.

    27

    Open the master cylinder lid and remove the rubber insert. Check the fluid level relative to the "Max" and "Min" lines inside the caliper. Add or remove DOT3 fluid so it is between the two lines.

    28

    Pour all of the old brake fluid into the 1/2-gallon container and dispose of it properly. Most auto-parts stores will dispose of old fluids free of charge.

Causes of Warped Brake Rotors

Brake rotors are like almost any other vehicle mechanical part in that they are susceptible to damage. Although not a routine source of major mechanical problems, brake rotors can become damaged or warped from a variety of causes. What follows is a brief list of the most common causes of warped brake rotors.

Excessive Heat

    Brake rotors are very susceptible to excessive heat, especially heat related to excessive brake pad friction. If brake rotors are exposed to excessive heat levels for a prolonged period of time, they can become warped and damaged.

Physical Damage

    Many times brake rotors are damaged during tire changes, especially as the results of a faulty jack stand or hydraulic jack that fails and allows the car and the brake rotor mechanism to fall to the ground, thus severely damaging and/or warping the brake rotor.

Malfunctioning Brake Pads

    Malfunctioning brake pads can severely damage and/or warp a set of brake rotors. Brake pads that are cracked, broken or incorrectly installed can cause physical damage to brake rotors, damage that can include cracks, breaks or warping.

Malfunctioning Brake Calipers

    Brake calipers are responsible for squeezing brake pads against spinning brake rotors, a process that produces a vehicle's braking action. Malfunctioning brake calipers can apply abnormal amounts of squeezing action over time, a condition that can seriously warp a set of brake rotors.

Damaged Hub Assembly

    Brake rotors spin around a vehicle's hub assembly, which is a long, slender rod that houses the wheel bearings and provides the anchor to which a vehicle's tire affixes to. A bent or damaged hub assembly can cause a rotor to turn abnormally, a condition that can lead to warping of the brake rotor.

Sabtu, 21 November 2009

How to Take Off the Drum Brakes on My 1995 Honda Civic

The rear suspension of a 1995 Honda Civic uses drum brakes. These brakes provide a percentage of the braking power for the vehicle and function as the parking brake. Drum brakes don't wear out very often; but when they do, they need to be replaced as part of the braking system. The first part of the process is to remove them, which should take about an hour to do.

Instructions

    1

    Place wheel chocks in front of and behind the front wheels. Lift the rear of the Civic with a jack and position jack stands underneath the rear of the chassis. Remove the lug nuts from the rear wheels with a tire iron then pull off the wheels.

    2

    Pull the drum off of the rear suspension. If the drum will not come off, thread two 8 mm bolts into the threaded holes on the face of the drum and tighten them with a 3/8-inch ratchet and socket until the drum pops off of the suspension.

    3

    Spray the rear brake shoes with brake cleaner. Locate the retainer spring on the center of the brake shoe around the perimeter of the braking assembly. Push the spring toward the center of the spindle on the suspension with a flat head screwdriver until the shoes come free. Pull the shoes off of the rear suspension.

How to Replace a Caliper in a Dodge Caravan

Changing or replacing a brake caliper is no small task, especially for a vehicle as large as a Dodge Caravan. Consult with a mechanic or expert before taking on such an important task. Replacing a caliper on a Caravan or any vehicle is often best left in the hands of a professional.

Instructions

Remove the Old Caliper

    1

    Raise and support the van, making sure you use a jack for a vehicle of its size. Remove the wheel.

    2

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper by removing the attaching bolt. Discard the seal washers. Plug the hose to prevent fluid from leaking.

    3

    Remove the caliper guide pin bolts. Slide the caliper slowly away from the steering knuckle. Slide the caliper's opposite end out from under the machined abutment on the steering knuckle.

    4

    Clean the steering knuckle abutment surfaces of any grease, dirt or corrosion. Spray a fine mist of water on the surface and use a damp rag for this. Lubricate the abutment surfaces with a liberal amount of multipurpose lubricant.

Install the New Caliper

    5

    Position the new caliper over the brake pads and disc rotor. Be careful not to damage the caliper seals or guide pin bushings from the steering knuckle bosses while installing.

    6

    Reinstall the caliper guide pin bolts. Make sure you don't cross thread them. Torque the front caliper bolts to 195 inch pounds. Torque the rear caliper bolts to 192 inch pounds.

    7

    Attach the brake hose to the caliper with new washers. Tighten the bolt to 35 foot pounds.

    8

    Bleed the brake system. Open the bleeder valve on the assembly, attach a transparent hose to it and press on the brake pedal to remove air from the system.

    9

    Place the wheel back on the vehicle and torque the lug nuts to 100 foot pounds. Lower the van and pump the brake pedal several times to insure firmness. Then test drive the van.

Jumat, 20 November 2009

How to Change a Parking Brake

How to Change a Parking Brake

When it's becoming more difficult to engage the brakes on your car, you're likely in need of a brake pad replacement. This is not a task to delay. Replacing the brakes is important for your safety and the safety of others. Replacing the brake pads, whether you do it yourself or have a mechanic do it for you, is part of being a responsible driver. You can pick up a brake pad kit at your local hardware or autobody shop and complete the job in a short time, although there are a lot of tools involved.

Instructions

    1

    Insert support jacks under all four corners of the vehicle.

    2

    Use a socket wrench to remove the hub caps. Insert the head of the socket wrench onto the lug nuts and turn them counterclockwise to remove. Use a wrench to remove bolts and nuts under the hub to remove the wheel and tire.

    3

    Pull the brake drums off the wheel studs with your hands. Use a pry bar if you're struggling to pull them off.

    4

    Use the needle nose pliers to remove the parking brake lock pin and the clevis pin. Pull the parking brake cable out of the way.

    5

    Remove the brake hose bracket. Remove the two calliper bolts with the 14mm socket and torque wrench. Twist them off the rest of the way using your fingers or a ratchet. Set them aside.

    6

    Remove the calliper body by loosening it with your hands and pull out until it is maneuvered out of position. Wrap a wire around the calliper body and tie it around the vehicle frame. This will provide support for the calliper body so that it's not hanging from the brake hose.

    7

    Remove the old brake pads and shims. Shims are a thin layer of rubber or metal that fits between the brake pads and rotors. Not all vehicles have shims but most brake kits will have them. Use a large flat-blade screwdriver and pry out the shims and remove the pads.

    8

    Above the pad retainers are two calliper pins. Remove them and clean them off with a cotton cloth and grease them with a high-temperature grease. Reinstall the pins by snapping them in place. Make sure the two flat surfaces of the pin heads are horizontal. Clean the upper and lower pad retainers with an emery cloth.

    9

    Install the new brake pads. If the brake pad kit comes with two shims, install the one with the hole for a tab on the inside pad.

    10

    Use a special brake tool to screw the calliper piston clockwise. After about 20 revolutions, it should be installed. Line the cutout of the piston with the brake pad tab. Use a cordless drill, if you have one, to drill the piston to the brake pad. Use a turkey baster to collect any excess fluid.

    11

    Remove the wire holding the calliper body. Reinstall the calliper over the brake pads and onto the calliper bracket. Fit the flat sides of the calliper pins into the calliper body.

    12

    Install two calliper bolts. Screw them part way with your fingers and use a 14-wrench and torque them to 36-foot-pounds all the way.

    13

    Insert the pin through the lever in the cable to reinstall the parking brake. Use the needle-nose pliers to position the pin and install the lock pin.

    14

    Reinstall the calliper shield. Hold it in your left hand and position so that the underside screw hole is above your thumb and the upper hole is directly across from you.

    15

    Install the brake hose bracket using a 16-foot-pound torque from the wrench. Reengage the parking brake from the cockpit.

    16

    Pump the brake pedal several times to make sure it is firm. Lower the car and remove the support jacks.

Rabu, 18 November 2009

How to Remove Speed Sensors on a 1994 Buick

The 1994 Buick has an ABS system used to help stop the brakes from locking up in case of an emergency stop. This system works by using speed sensors on each wheel to help determine how fast the wheels are moving and how to properly actuate the brakes to stop the car safely. When they go out, the ABS stops functioning correctly. In this case, the project vehicle is a 1994 Buick Regal, but the process is similar for other Buick cars as well.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the car onto a set of jack stands using the jack. Make sure the Buick is solidly on the stands before you remove the jack.

    2

    Undo the wheel lugs using the tire iron and lift the tire off of the front suspension. Set them to the side.

    3

    Locate the wheel sensors on the backside of the brake disc rotor. Disconnect the electrical connection to the sensor using your hands. Unbolt the two bolts securing the speed sensor to the suspension using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Remove the sensor from the car.

Chevy Blazer Brake Problems

Chevy Blazer Brake Problems

The Chevrolet Blazer is a truck-based SUV that was manufactured from 1967 to 2005 in several model types, mostly with front disc and rear drum hydraulic brakes. Some early models had four wheel drums, and some later models had four wheel disc braking systems, all of which could develop problems due to normal wear. The average backyard mechanic can diagnose most Blazer brake problems in about 20 minutes.

History

    Determine the type of braking system on the Blazer. From 1967 to the mid-1970s, the full-sized Blazer K-5 had four wheel drum brakes with front disk systems as an option. These drum systems were prone to reduced performance in adverse conditions such as rain or dust due to inherent design, and the stopping power was increased significantly with the move to four wheel disc systems on S-models after 1996. All models use a master cylinder to pump hydraulic fluid to the brakes. Any wear or deficiency at points in this system could cause problems, readily identified by several key sounds or observations.

Sounds

    Listen for sounds while the brakes are in operation. The most common wear for most systems are the shoes or pads, which are designed to make a high-pitched squealing sound when they are reaching the end of their lifespan. Other issues can be determined by sound, such as brake "dragging" or broken parts, which can manifest as clunking or scraping sounds when the pedal is depressed.

Leaking

    Check all lines, calipers, wheel cylinders, and master cylinder for leaking fluid. A loss of fluid could cause the system to show reduced performance, or quit working entirely, and should be corrected immediately. The master cylinder, located under the hood in front of the driver, is where the mechanic can add fluid through the top cap opening. This cylinder contains several pressurized membranes to regulate fluid pressure, and the failure of any of these rubber gaskets can cause leaking or reduced stopping power. Connection fittings, where the lines connect to each other or to the braking components, can also be prone to leaking. All Blazers for all years use DOT-3 braking fluid.

Vibration

    Check the disk brake system for vibration when in operation, if applicable. Vibration, or pulling to one side during braking is a clear indicator of "warped" rotors. The rotor, a flat surface that is pinched by the pads, can become uneven due to heat. This uneven surface becomes vibration when the warped rotor runs over the pads like a bent vinyl record on a turntable. The proper repair for this problem is complete replacement of the rotor, as the defect cannot typically be fixed by turning or machining.

Calipers and Wheel Cylinders

    Check key braking system components, such as the wheel cylinders and calipers, for proper function and leaks. These parts are the primary braking mechanisms for stopping the truck, where the fluid causes the hardware to press or squeeze the parts together, making friction and stopping the vehicle. If these components fail, then the entire system is compromised.

How to Remove Brake Rotors From a 2005 Mini Cooper

How to Remove Brake Rotors From a 2005 Mini Cooper

Known for ts small size and slot-car handling, the 2005 Mini Cooper also has excellent stopping power for its size. The brakes rely on properly functioning pads and rotors to do this job properly. When the pads wear down, so do the rotors. When it comes time to change the pads, either turn the rotors or have them replaced with new ones. To complete this task, however, you first have to remove the rotors.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the front of the car using the jack, and place it on jack stands. Take off the wheels and tires with the tire iron.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper bracket from the steering knuckle with the ratchet and sockets. Support the caliper from the front strut with the bungee cord. Inspect the brake line to ensure that it has not become twisted or kinked in the process.

    3

    Using the Phillips-head screwdriver, twist the screw located on the center of the rotor counterclockwise, then hit the end of the screwdriver with the mallet to twist the screw out of the rotor.

    4

    Pull the rotor off of the steering knuckle. If it doesn't move, hit it from the backside with the mallet until it pops free.

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a 2005 Toyota Camry

How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a 2005 Toyota Camry

The Toyota Camry comes equipped with soft suspension to suppress street driving bumps, and its interior contains ergonomically designed seating and large, easy to adjust climate control knobs, according to a review of the 2005 model at automotive.com. The Camry's 4-cylinder engine contains a new and improved 5-speed automatic transmission, and all 2005 Camrys come with an anti-lock brake system.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lugs nuts two full rotations, but do not remove them. Place the blocks in front of the tires you will not be removing.

    2

    Place the floor jack beneath a support strut of the vehicle and raise the car enough to allow the tires to come off. Place the jack stand beneath the support strut.

    3

    Finish removing the lugs and slide the tire off.

    4

    Remove the brake caliper mounting bracket, which is held on by two bolts, using the socket wrench set. Tie the bracket to the undercarriage of the vehicle with the rope to prevent strain on the brake line.

    5

    Remove the brake pads. (The brake pads will easily come out of the mounting bracket.)

    6

    Compress the brake cylinder piston using the c-clamp. Place one of the old brake pads across the piston and engage the clamp. The cylinder must be flush with the bracket.

    7

    Install the new brake pads. The new brake pads will fit snugly where the old ones were removed.

    8

    Reattach the mounting bracket. Once the bracket is re-bolted, reattach the tire and the lugs. Lower the vehicle. Tighten the lug nuts with the vehicle on the ground.

Selasa, 17 November 2009

How to Change the Rear Brakes on an Oldsmobile Aurora

How to Change the Rear Brakes on an Oldsmobile Aurora

The Oldsmobile Aurora came standard with four-wheel disc brakes. The rear disc brake system uses an actuator caliper that has a mechanical parking brake function built in. Replacement of the brake pads on this system is similar to other General Motors four-wheel disc brake systems, and it's well within the abilities of the average home mechanic. The rear calipers do require a special tool to compress the piston back into the caliper, but this tool is widely available at auto parts stores.

Instructions

    1

    Place wheel chocks behind the front wheels of the Aurora, and release the parking brake. Raise the rear wheels with a floor jack, and place jack stands just in front of the wheel well. You will notice an area of the pinch weld about 6 inches in front of the wheel opening that is reinforced for jacking and jack stand placement. Remove the wheels with a lug wrench, and store them away from the work area.

    2

    Remove the caliper hold-down bolts, and pry up on the caliper to remove it. This can take a little effort to slide the caliper past the locating pin on the back of the brake pads. Compress the caliper piston by rotating and pushing the piston back into the housing with the caliper piston tool.

    3

    Remove the caliper bracket, and slip the rotor off the hub assembly. Take the rotors to an auto parts store or repair shop, and have them machined to remove warp. This will prevent brake noise and vibration.

    4

    Clean and lube the slide pins and pad contact surfaces with silicone brake lube. This prevents accelerated pad wear due to sticking caliper slides.

    5

    Install the rotors, the caliper bracket and the new pads. A small locating pin on the back of the inside pad engages a notch in the face of the caliper piston. Rotate the piston with the piston tool to line these up. Slide the caliper into place, and securely tighten the retaining bolts.

    6

    Reinstall the wheels, and pump the brake pedal. Lower the Aurora onto the ground and test-drive to verify the brakes work properly. Set the parking brake, and make sure it holds while the vehicle is in drive.

Senin, 16 November 2009

How to Install Rear Brake Shoes

Drum-braking systems use a surfaced drum and hydraulic shoes to stop an automobile, and these systems can fail after the shoes wear down their material. The shoes are held in place with retainer springs, and actuated by the brake's wheel cylinder. The average backyard mechanic can replace both shoes on one drum brake in about 20 minutes.

Instructions

Installing rear brake shoes

    1

    Jack up the vehicle and place its frame on the jack stands, suspending the rear end off the ground.

    2

    Remove the rear wheels by turning their lug nuts in a counterclockwise direction. Stow the wheels away from the vehicle.

    3

    Remove the rear drum by turning the keeper bolt in a counterclockwise direction. The keeper bolt is typically a hex-head that is off-center from the axle, holding the drum in place on the outside. Pull the drum firmly and it will disengage from the shoes, and off the vehicle. Check for leaks around the wheel cylinder, now viewable between the shoes.

    4

    Remove the shoes by using a screwdriver to pry the long springs from their hooks on the shoes, then turning the center spring bolt counterclockwise. The shoe will pull free directly away from the axle. The long springs can be left hanging, or can be replaced at this time.

    5

    Replace the shoes with fresh units, then press them into position on the brake. The natural curve will only allow them to fit in one direction, and on most vehicles they are identical to each other. Tighten the spring bolt, keeping the shoe in place. With the screwdriver, fasten the springs back onto their respective hooks on each shoe.

    6

    Replace the drum by pressing it around the shoes, then tightening its keeper bolt in a clockwise direction.

    7

    Release the bleeder nipple by turning it counterclockwise, then press the brake pedal to force fluid out while refilling it at the master cylinder. This will reduce the amount of air in the lines, which may have entered through leaks or depressurization of the wheel cylinder during this process. When solid fluid comes out of the nipple, turn it clockwise to seal it.

    8

    Repeat the steps 3 through 7 on the opposite brake, then replace both wheels by turning their lug nut clockwise. Lower the vehicle from the jack stands.

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Nissan Sentra

The need for an adjustment usually means that the parking brake cables underneath have stretched and need to become tighter. Adjust the nut on the inside of your vehicle if the vehicle starts to slip down a slope when in "Park."

Instructions

    1

    Raise your Nissan Sentra rear wheels in the air using your jack and support the rear wheels with the jack stands. Put the parking brake lever in the released position and rotate the rear wheels freely.

    2

    Remove the center console cover around the parking brake lever. Locate the center console between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat.

    3

    Pull up on the parking brake lever six to seven notches for Nissan Sentra years 1982 to 1986. For years 1987 to 1996, use seven to eight notches for drum brakes and eight to nine notches for disc brakes.

    4

    Turn the adjuster nut with your 10mm wrench until the rear wheels do not turn. Release the parking brake and the wheels should turn freely.

    5

    Bend the thin piece of metal to touch when the parking brake lever pulls up one notch. Locate this at the end of the parking brake adjuster rod. This is the parking brake warning lamp. Make sure the warning light turns off when the parking brake lever releases to the floor position.

    6

    Lower your Nissan Sentra using the jack and removing the jack stands from the rear wheels.

Minggu, 15 November 2009

How to Replace Brake Seals on Drum Brakes

Drum braking systems use a hydraulic wheel cylinder to press twin shoes into the interior of a drum, stopping the vehicle. The rubber seals on both sides of the wheel cylinder can become worn and eventually fail, requiring replacement. The average backyard mechanic can replace the seals on drum brakes in about an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the vehicle at the brake to be repaired using the floor jack, then remove the wheel by turning the lug nuts counterclockwise. Set the wheel aside, and away from the vehicle.

    2

    Remove the drum by turning the keeper bolt in a counterclockwise direction, if applicable. Pull the drum free from the brake assembly and set it aside, away from the work area. Place the drain pan underneath the brake at this time.

    3

    Locate and inspect the wheel cylinder, usually at the top of the brake assembly. The cylinder is a small, round steel or plastic device capped with black rubber gaskets. These gaskets should not be visually leaking, or appear kinked or damaged.

    4

    Remove the wheel cylinder by turning the rear wheel cylinder retainer bolts counterclockwise, then pulling the cylinder away from the assembly. Some automobiles may require the removal of the brake springs to access the wheel cylinder; lever a screwdriver into the spring hook and disengage it from the shoe. The rear of the wheel cylinder will have a gasket sealing it to the brake assembly. Collect any brake fluid in the drain pan.

    5

    Replace the wheel cylinder gaskets by prying them off with a screwdriver, then positioning new gaskets in their place. Some models will have more than three gaskets, but typically there are two rubber cones on the outside with a central gasket protecting the small piston within.

    6

    Reassemble the wheel cylinder by pressing it back into place and securing the rear retainer bolts in the back in a clockwise direction.

    7

    Replace the springs (if applicable) and drum, then secure the keeper bolt by turning it clockwise until snug.

    8

    Replace the wheel by turning the lug nuts clockwise until tight, in an alternating pattern.

    9

    Lower the vehicle from the jack, and repeat the entire procedure on the remaining drum brakes.

    10

    Once all brake seals are replaced, bleed the brake system by turning one bleeder nipple on the back of the brake plate counterclockwise, then continually pouring fresh brake fluid into the master cylinder while the brake pedal is depressed. This could require two people. Close the bleeder nipple and move to the next brake's nipple and repeat the process until all lines have been purged.

Sabtu, 14 November 2009

How to Change the Brakes on a 1993 Plymouth Grand Voyager

The 1993 Plymouth Grand Voyager comes equipped with front and rear disc brake pads. The brake pads are responsible for stopping the Plymouth Grand Voyager by applying pressure against the brake rotors. When the brake pedal is pushed inward, the caliper cylinder pushes against the brake pads. The brake pads then compress the brake rotor. The friction from the pads being pushed against a turning rotor is the main process that stops the Plymouth Grand Voyager. Change the brake pads before the pads wear down to the wear indicators.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 1993 Plymouth Grand Voyager on a level area and set the emergency brake to prevent the van from rolling.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts from the front wheels with a tire tool or a lug wrench. Do not remove the lug nuts; just loosen them.

    3

    Slide the jack under the Grand Voyager and jack it up high enough for the safety stands. Slide the safety stands under the frame rail on both sides of the van. Position the safety stands close to the front wheels so that the stands can safely hold the weight of the van. Lower the Plymouth Grand Voyager to the safety stands and leave the jack up.

    4

    Finish unscrewing each lug nut from the front wheels with the tire tool and then your fingers. Pull the front wheels off and place the wheels down flat to prevent them from rolling away.

    5

    Locate the access opening on the side of the brake caliper. Slide the small pry bar into the access opening and pry the outer disc brake pad toward the back of the brake caliper. This will cause the caliper cylinder to retract inward and loosen the caliper enough to remove it from the rotor.

    6

    Locate the slide pin bolts on the back of the caliper. There are two upper and lower slide pin bolts that connect the caliper to the caliper housing. Remove the slide pin bolts by turning the bolts counterclockwise with the ratchet and a socket.

    7

    Pull the bottom of the brake caliper away from the brake rotor until the top part of the brake caliper also comes off the rotor. Hang the brake caliper to the front strut or to the frame rail with a piece of rope.

    8

    Pull the inner brake pad out of the metal retaining clip and out of the brake caliper. Then, lower the C-clamp into the caliper so that the adjustment rod is facing the caliper cylinder. Turn the C-clamp so that the adjustment rod compresses the caliper cylinder inward. Keep compressing the cylinder until it is completely inside the caliper.

    9

    Unscrew the C-clamp and remove it from the caliper. Pull the outer brake pad out of the metal retaining clip. Position the two new brake pads into the metal retaining clips inside of the brake caliper. Untie the rope from the caliper and hang the caliper back on the side of the rotor. Screw the slide pin bolts back into the caliper and tighten with the ratchet and socket until tight.

    10

    Slide the wheel onto the wheel studs and screw the lug nuts in place. Tighten the lug nuts down tight with the tire tool. Move to the other three wheels and follow the preceding instructions for replacing the brake pads. When you have finished replacing the brake pads on all four wheels, jack the vehicle back up and remove the stands. Lower the van to the ground and remove the jack.

    11

    Crank the Grand Voyager and pump the brake pedal five or six times to seat the brake pads to the proper working distance from the rotors. Then, turn the engine off.

    12

    Finish tightening the lug nuts with the tire tool. Then, use the torque wrench to torque the lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds on each wheel.

Selasa, 10 November 2009

How to Install Rear Brake Pads in a Chevy S10

How to Install Rear Brake Pads in a Chevy S10

The S10 is Chevrolets small pickup truck designed as an economical alternative to the full-size Silverado pickups. The S10 has four-wheel disc brakes, complete with single-piston calipers in the rear. The caliper piston pushes the brake pad inward, which then contacts the rotor. The brake rotor, mounted to the axle hub, then comes to a stop from the friction applied by the brake pads. As the pads latch onto the rotor, the pad surface slowly wears away until you must eventually replace the pads.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on both rear wheels using the lug wrench. Place the wheel chocks in front and behind the left-front tire.

    2

    Roll the floor jack under the rear differential of the S10, lift the pickup with the jack and then place the jack stands under the rear axle. Lower the truck onto the jack stands.

    3

    Take off the rear lug nuts and wheels by hand. Move them out of the way, making sure to keep all the lug nuts together so none go missing.

    4

    Lay the drop pan down under the left-rear brake assembly and thoroughly clean the brakes with the brake cleaner spray. Remove as much brake dust as you can with the spray, to avoid breathing any of it.

    5

    Remove the caliper bolts with the socket set and then lift the brake caliper out of the caliper mounting bracket by hand. Pull the old brake pads out of the caliper and discard them.

    6

    Clean the inside of the caliper with the brake cleaner, allow it to dry for about a minute and then apply a thin layer of white lithium grease to the caliper slide pins.

    7

    Force the caliper pistons back into the caliper with the caliper piston tool. Remove the tool and insert the new brake pads. Put the caliper back into the caliper bracket, thread the bolts back in by hand and then tighten them with the socket set.

    8

    Repeat steps four through seven on the right-rear and then reinstall the wheels and lug nuts.

    9

    Lift the S10 off the jack stands with the floor jack, remove the jack stands and then lower the truck to the ground. Move the chocks out from under the right-front wheel and then tighten the lug nuts to 100 ft-lbs. with the torque wrench.

Minggu, 08 November 2009

How to Remove the Brake Pads on a 2000 Silverado 1500

How to Remove the Brake Pads on a 2000 Silverado 1500

The 2000 Chevy Silverado 1500 got a more powerful, V-8 engine and got an added fourth door as standard equipment instead of optional. The half-ton pickup still has all around disc brakes with anti-lock which provides added security to its passengers as well as ease for the do-it-yourself mechanic. Disc brakes are much easier to change than drum brakes and to change all four tires it should only take two hours.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen all of the lugs 1 to 2 full rotations with the tire iron. Set the wood blocks in front of the tires that will not be removed.

    2

    Jack up the vehicle high enough that the wheels are off of the ground. Place jack stands under a stable location, such as under the axle. Remove the tires and set them and the lugs aside.

    3

    Loosen the bottom bolt of the caliper mounting bracket with the socket wrench. Lift the bracket up and slide the old brake pads out.

    4

    Compress the caliper with a C-clamp. Place the clamp against the caliper, in the center of the bracket, and compress it until it is flush with the bracket.

    5

    Install the new brake pads by slipping them into the same spot that the old ones were in.

    6

    Re-bolt the bracket to the rotor. Put the tire back on and tighten the lugs by hand only. Lower the vehicle and then tighten the lugs with the tire iron.

Sabtu, 07 November 2009

How to Remove the Rotors From 1991 Honda Accord

The 1991 Honda Accord is a dependable, sporty family car. Originally styled as a sports sedan, the Accord has not lost its spark over the years. Many Honda Accords from the 1990s era are still running strong today, albeit with regularly maintenance. Regular maintenance keeps Honda's older generation of Accords on the road. One such job is that of replacing the brake rotors. Before you can get the brake rotors replaced or milled, you will need to remove them.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car on a level, paved surface.

    2

    Use the jack on the driver's side front wheel to raise the car up so the tire is off of the ground.

    3

    Slide one of the jack stands under the car's frame and lower the car onto the stand.

    4

    Use the lug wrench to unscrew the lug nuts and pull the tire off of the studs.

    5

    Use the socket wrench to remove the mounting bolts from the brake caliper. Then pull the caliper off of the rotor.

    6

    Slide the rotor off of the wheel hub.

    7

    Repeat this process for each of the remaining three wheels so that at the end of the process the car is on four jack stands and all four rotors have been removed for milling or replacement.

Kamis, 05 November 2009

Chevrolet Colorado Brake Problems

Chevrolet Colorado Brake Problems

The Chevrolet Colorado has had multiple brake problems before 2010. Brakes locking without notice, squealing and grinding noises and brake light malfunctions are the most common complaints.

ABS Malfunctions

    Numerous complaints have been made to consumer advocate groups about the anti-lock brake system on the Chevrolet Colorado. The brakes lock without notice, often throwing the driver into the steering wheel. The ABS sensor often malfunctions, causing the ABS to not work.

Brake Noise

    Chevrolet Colorado owners report a widespread problem with the brakes squealing or grinding. Chevrolet has advised shaving the brakes or backing off the brakes, but many owners report the problem continues even after spending hundreds of dollars on repairs.

Brake Lights

    The most common complaint with the Chevrolet Colorado is failure of the brake lights. The lights either come on and will not go off or do not come on at all. Serious accidents have been reported because following drivers cannot tell if the Colorado is braking. Chevrolet has issued two recalls for this problem. The first was in April of 2006, and the second was in July of 2009. They included Colorados for model years 2004-2009.

Rabu, 04 November 2009

How to Remove a Mitsubishi Lancer Brake Rotor

The Mitsubishi Lancer has been around since 1973. Americanized as the Dodge or Plymouth Colt, the Colt Lancer, the Chrysler Valiant Lancer and the Eagle Summit, the vehicle was redesigned by Mitsubishi Motors employing eight different generations. While removing the rotors will vary depending on the model year, the following instructions are for the rotor removal of the seventh and eighth Lancer generation, which started in late 1999 and continues to the present. Refer to a repair manual for instructions for older models, which have rotors with pressed bearings.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood and remove one-third of the brake fluid from the master cylinder of the Mitsubishi Lancer using a brake fluid baster. Discard the fluid. Secure the cover to the master cylinder.

    2

    Lift and support the Lancer on a car lift or floor jack and jack stands.

    3

    Remove the hub caps, if applicable, and then remove the lug nuts from the wheels using an impact gun and socket. Remove the wheels.

    4

    Remove the lower lock pin from the caliper on front-wheel-drive Lancers. Swing it upward and then secure it to the suspension using a wire coat hanger bent into a makeshift hook. On all-wheel-drive Lancers, remove the retaining pins from the caliper and then extract the pads from the body of the caliper.

    5

    Inspect the hub facing of the rotor for retaining screws. Some Lancer models will have two rotor retaining screws holding the rotor secure to the hub. Remove these screws by tapping them with a hammer and an impact screwdriver with an appropriate bit.

    6

    Remove the rotor from the hub. If you're replacing the rotor and it is stuck to the hub due to rust and corrosion, you can break it free by tapping the flat fin of the rotor with a hammer. If you intend to reuse the rotor, place two appropriate sized bolts---8 mm by 1.25 mm---into the two other bolt holes (not the retaining screw holes) on the hub facing of the rotor. Tighten the bolts alternately to draw the rotor off the hub evenly using a wrench until the rotor separates from the hub.

    7

    Remove the rotor.

    8

    Clean the wheel hub facing using a die-grinder and disc to remove any corrosion or rust. Clean the edges as well.

Selasa, 03 November 2009

How to Repair a Leaky Brake Line

How to Repair a Leaky Brake Line

Just like any part of your car, brake lines are subject to wear and tear. As a result, they can develop leaks over time. The leak may not be bad at first. However, if left unattended, a leaking brake line can lead to serious problems. It also poses a safety risk. With these steps, though, you can repair the brake line and be back on the road in a matter of a couple of hours.

Instructions

Prepare Your Vehicle

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front tires if you have front wheel brakes. If you have rear wheel brakes, loosen the lug nuts on the back wheels.

    2

    Jack up the vehicle and set it on jack stands.

    3

    Remove the tires. You want to be able to see the brake lines attached to the brake caliper, which rests over the rotor.

    4

    Open the hood and locate the master cylinder. This is usually located on the right-hand side of the engine, near the front windshield. You should see the brake fluid reservoir tank.

Isolate the Problem

    5

    Locate the the source of the leak by running your finger along the brake line, moving away from the master cylinder. The source of the leak will be easy to locate in this manner because your finger will, in all likelihood, come away wet. You will also probably feel where the line is worn or frayed.

    6

    Double-check to make sure where, on the master cylinder, the damaged line connects to.

    7

    Mark the line with chalk or a piece of duct tape so you know which line you will have to replace.

Replace the Line

    8

    Loosen the end of the brake line attached to the master cylinder using a line wrench.

    9

    Loosen the other end of the brake line attached to the brake caliper using the line wrench. Use a drip pan to collect any brake fluid that leaks out.

    10

    Attach the end of the replacement brake line to the brake caliper. Use your fingers to get it started then switch to the line wrench to tighten it completely. Repeat this step, attaching the other end to the master cylinder.

    11

    Bleed the brake line by having someone step on the brakes. Make sure all air is released. When all the air is released, the brake pedal should feel firm under your foot when you pump it.

    12

    Fill the master cylinder with brake fluid.

    13

    Reinstall the tires, tighten the lug nuts, remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle with the jack. Test the brakes by pumping them a few times.

Minggu, 01 November 2009

How to Replace Rear Drum Brake Shoes

How to Replace Rear Drum Brake Shoes

One of the most important systems on your car or truck is its braking system. As time goes on and you add miles to your car, your brakes will eventually wear down and need to be replaced. On many car models, the rear brakes are drum brakes, a type of brake with the brake shoes inside a drum attached to the wheel which press out against the inside of the drum to slow the car down when the brakes are applied. Replacing the drum brakes is a job that you can do in a few hours.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car on a flat surface and place a brick or piece of cinder block in front and back of the front tires to prevent the car from rolling.

    2

    Jack up the rear of the car and remove the tires with a lug wrench.

    3

    Remove the brake drums.

    4

    Clean the wheel off with compressed air. Wear gloves and safety goggles and avoid touching the dust on the wheel as it could contain asbestos deposited by the brake pads.

    5

    Use the brake spring removal tool to disconnect and remove the springs from the wheel, starting with the outer spring.

    6

    Locate the small metal tab at the bottom of the wheel and lift it up. Remove the auto-adjuster cable.

    7

    Detach the two springs on the bottom of the wheel and remove them. These are the spring-loaded brake shoe retainers.

    8

    Pull the auto-adjuster arm forward then out.

    9

    Remove the brake shoes.

    10

    Clean the wheel with brake wash, again wearing rubber gloves and safety goggles to avoid contact with the residue on the wheel.

    11

    Lubricate the points where the brake shoes attach to the wheel with non-drying silicone brake lubricant.

    12

    Place the new brake shoes onto the wheel and secure them in place by attaching the spring-loaded retainers to the wheel.

    13

    Reattach the adjuster-arm spring, adjuster cable and brake shoe springs.

    14

    Slide the auto-adjuster arm into position and attach the auto-adjuster cable to it.

    15

    Place the brake drum on the wheel, followed by the tire.

    16

    Replace the brake shoes on the other side the same way. Slowly lower the car to the ground when you're done.

How to Change Brake Discs

Bad brake pads, if not replaced on time, can cut deep grooves in brake discs, making the brake repair more costly. Sometimes, the discs can simply be removed and refinished to remove the grooves, but the discs have a minimum thickness that must be met. If the discs have grooves that can't be refinished, you need to change the brake discs, and you likely need to change the discs on both sides.

Instructions

    1

    Prepare the car by draining half the brake fluid from the master cylinder with a siphon and disconnecting the negative battery cable. Raise the vehicle's front end on jack stands and remove the wheels with a lug wrench. Block the rear wheels to keep the vehicle from accidentally rolling.

    2

    Separate the brake caliper from the disc by removing the upper and lower mounting bolts. Hang the caliper somewhere away from the disc with a strong wire--never let the caliper hang by its attached brake hose.

    3

    Pull the brake pads out of their shims and clips on the caliper mount, and discard them. It is likely they need to be replaced if the brake disc needs changing. Remove the caliper mount from the disc by removing its bolts.

    4

    Pull the brake disc off of the wheel hub. If it's stuck, insert bolts into two of the open holes on the disc and tighten them with the wrench to make the disc pop loose.

    5

    Remove all glaze from the replacement disc by rubbing it in circular motions with sandpaper or an emery cloth. Install the disc onto the threads on the wheel hub.

    6

    Install the caliper mount onto the brake disc. Remove the shims from the mount and apply an anti-squeal compound to their backing plates before reinstalling them. Install new brake pads into the shims. Connect the caliper back on its mount, compressing the caliper pin into its bore with a C-clamp first.

    7

    Reconnect the wheels after both brakes have been changed, and lower the car. Refill the master cylinder to the required level with fresh fluid, then reconnect the battery. Apply the brake pedal multiple times until it feels firm, thus setting the new brakes.