Sabtu, 31 Oktober 2009

How to Replace the Brake Rotors on a 2004 Impala

How to Replace the Brake Rotors on a 2004 Impala

First introduced in 1958, the Chevrolet Impala 2004 model Impala came equipped with a base model 3.4-liter V-6 engine. A 3.8-liter V-6 and 3.8-liter supercharged V-6 were available in the LS and SS models. The brakes on the base model 2004 Impala are ventilated disc brakes in the front, and drum brakes in the rear. The 2004 Impala SS offered four-wheel disc brakes. Replacing the rotors on the 2004 Impala requires removal of all of the front brake components and someone with prior mechanical experience.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of the Impala. Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir. Use a turkey baster or small bottle siphon to remove the brake fluid 1/2-inch below the "Full" mark. Loosen the front lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the front of the Impala one corner at a time. Install jack stands beneath both front side frame rails, just inward from the lower control arms. Remove the front wheel lug nuts, then remove the front wheels.

    2

    Insert a pry bar into the inspection hole in the center of the caliper body. Gently pry the inboard -- toward the engine -- brake pad away from the brake rotor. Remove the caliper bolts with a ratchet and socket. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using the pry bar if needed. Hang the caliper from the front strut spring, using a metal clothes hanger or thin metal rod. Remove the outboard brake pad from the caliper with the pry bar.

    3

    Install a C-clamp around the inboard brake pad and the rear of the caliper body. Turn the C-clamp slowly to retract the caliper piston completely. Remove the C-clamp, then remove the rear brake pad with the pry bar.

    4

    Remove the caliper mounting bracket bolts with a ratchet and socket. Remove the caliper bracket. Remove the brake rotor from the hub by hand once the caliper bracket is out of the way. Set the rotor out of your work area. Apply a thin layer of caliper grease onto the front face of the wheel hub, where it joins together with the brake rotor. Set the new rotor over the lug stems and onto the hub by hand. Spin one lug nut onto one of the lug stems to hold the brake rotor in place temporarily.

    5

    Install the caliper bracket onto the brake assembly and tighten the bolts to 70 foot-pounds with a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket. Install the new brake pads onto the caliper. Apply a thin layer of grease onto the backing plates on the brake pads. Push the outboard pad on until the tabs align with the indents of the caliper. Insert the inboard pad so the spring on the rear of the pad enters the center of the caliper bore. Install the caliper onto the caliper bracket and tighten the bolts to 44-foot-pounds with the torque wrench and a socket.

    6

    Repeat steps 2 through 5 to replace the rotor and pads on the second side of the Impala. Remove the lug nuts from the faces of the new rotors, after you double check your torque on all of the brake bolts. Install the front wheels and snug the lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the Impala off the jack stands, and remove the stands from beneath the car. Lower the car to the ground. Tighten the front wheel lug nuts to 100-foot-pounds with the torque wrench and a wheel nut socket.

    7

    Enter the driver's seat of the Impala, and pump the brake pedal several times. If the brake pedal depresses to the floor of the vehicle more than twice, stop pumping the brakes and bleed the front brakes. Check the brake fluid reservoir level and fill if needed. Install the cap on the reservoir.

Jumat, 30 Oktober 2009

How to Remove the Brake Rotor from a 2003 Honda Accord

How to Remove the Brake Rotor from a 2003 Honda Accord

The braking system on a 2003 Honda Accord goes through a lot of abuse over the course of its lifetime, and eventually every component on it will need to be replaced. The brake rotors are one of the key components, as they are the parts that the brake pads clamp too. Eventually, those rotors will need to be removed so they can be turned or replaced, which can be done in under 15 minutes per corner.

Instructions

    1

    Use the jack to pick up the front end of the car, then put it down on the jack stands. Be sure that the vehicle is completely and solidly on the stands prior to working on the vehicle. Take off the front wheels using the tire iron.

    2

    Unbolt the brake caliper from the steering knuckle with the ratchet. Pull the caliper off of the rotor, being careful not to flex the rubber brake line. Then use the heavy-duty mechanics wire and a pair of pliers to support the calipers by the front suspension, so that the caliper isn't hanging by the brake line.

    3

    Place the tip of the impact screwdriver onto one of the screws on the face of the brake rotor. Twist the screwdriver to the left with one hand while hitting it with the hammer with the other. This will loosen the screw. Repeat the process for the other screw on the rotor.

    4

    Lift the rotor off of the hub using your hands. If it's frozen on the hub and won't come off, thread the 8mm bolts into the two threaded holes on the face of the rotor. Tighten them in place using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, until the rotor pops off of the hub. Then lift it off and set it to the side.

Kamis, 29 Oktober 2009

How to Adjust Electric Drum Brakes

How to Adjust Electric Drum Brakes

Camping trailers, enclosed cargo trailers and car haulers are all examples of trailers that may use electric drum brakes. An electronic brake controller mounted in the tow vehicle applies the trailer brakes automatically when the tow vehicle's brake pedal is depressed. The controller senses the amount of brake pedal pressure, the rate of deceleration and vehicle speed in determining how much pressure is applied to the trailer brakes. The electric drum brakes on the trailer must be adjusted properly for the brake controller to do its job; otherwise, you could have a handful when trying to stop a heavy rig.

Instructions

    1

    Raise one wheel at a time by placing a hydraulic jack under the axle and pumping the jack handle until the tire is off the ground. Chock the tires on the other side of the trailer to prevent movement. Place a jack stand under the axle of the wheel you have raised within a few inches of the brake backing plate. Lower the hydraulic jack so that the axle is resting on the jack stand.

    2

    Crawl under the trailer and locate the rubber access plug on the brake backing plate on the backside of the wheel and tire near the axle. Pry the plug out with a flat-tip screwdriver and place it aside.

    3

    Rotate the tire as if the trailer were being towed in a forward direction with one hand. Insert a flat-tip screwdriver in the access hole in the brake baking plate with the other hand and rotate the notched brake adjusting wheel in a clockwise direction until you feel braking resistance on the tire.

    4

    Back off the brake adjusting wheel by turning the flat-tip screwdriver counterclockwise one notch at a time until the tire rotates forward with very little force. Remove the screwdriver from the access hole. Push the rubber plug back into place until it is fully seated. Raise the axle with the hydraulic jack and remove the jack stand. Lower the hydraulic jack until the tire is on the ground, then remove the jack from under the trailer.

    5

    Repeat the entire procedure to adjust all remaining drum brakes on the trailer.

2005 Toyota 4Runner Front Brake Removal

The 2003-2009 year model Toyota 4Runner SUV, known as the third generation 4Runner, is equipped with four-wheel disc brakes. This is an improvement over the second generation 4Runner, which used less efficient drum type rear brakes. Basic maintenance on your 2005 4Runner's front disc brakes consists of replacing worn pads and inspecting the rotor for damage, neither of which requires you to remove the brake assembly. But if you need access to the axle or a few other parts of the 4Runner, it will be necessary to remove the brake assembly.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen all lug nuts on both front wheels. Raise the front of the 4Runner with the jack, and support both sides with jack stands.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts, and take off both front wheels.

    3

    Drain the brake fluid from the master cylinder. Remove the cap from the master cylinder in the engine compartment. Remove the dust cap from the bleeder valve, located on the inner top side of the cylinder assembly. Attach a length of tubing to the bleeder valve, and place the other end into a container. Use a wrench to open the valve. Direct an assistant to depress the brake pedal slowly; release it, and repeat. Continue, until no more fluid comes out of the bleeder valve. Close the valve.

    4

    Use a 10-mm union nut wrench to remove the brake line from the inner side of the cylinder assembly.

    5

    Remove the wire retaining pins from the top and bottom anti-rattle pins, and slide the pins out, towards the front of the cylinder. Use pliers, if necessary. Remove the wire anti-rattle spring from the outer edge of the cylinder assembly.

    6

    Pull the inner and outer pads and shims out of the cylinder.

    7

    Use a socket to remove the two bolts from the rear of the brake cylinder assembly, and remove the cylinder from the rotor.

    8

    Pull the rotor off the wheel lugs. If you intend to reinstall the same rotor, before removal, make a mark on the rotor and the axle hub, so you can realign them during reassembly.

    Repeat the procedure on the opposite brake assembly.

Rabu, 28 Oktober 2009

How to Change the Brakes on a 1994 Caravan

How to Change the Brakes on a 1994 Caravan

One of the most important safety features on your 1994 Dodge Caravan is the braking system. Over the course of time, your brake pads wear down. This can cause the brakes to become less effective in slowing your minivan down, or even cause the brakes to fail, which can lead to a serious accident. Like many vehicles, the caravan uses two types of brakes: drum brakes on the rear wheels, and disc brakes on the front wheels. Replacing the brake pads on your Caravan is a project that you can complete with the proper tools and knowledge.

Instructions

Rear Drum Brakes

    1

    Park the Caravan on flat ground. Place the van in "Park" and engage the emergency brake.

    2

    Jack up the rear of the van. Place a jack stand underneath the outer frame on each side, and slowly lower the van onto the jack stands.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts and take the rear tires off of the van.

    4

    Remove the rubber plug on the back of the wheel hub and slide a flat-head screwdriver through the slot. Rotate the sprocket inside the hub with an upwards motion.

    5

    Pry the dust cover and dust cover washer off of the front of the brake drum with a screwdriver.

    6

    Pull the cotter pin from the front of the axle hub with a pair a pliers and take the nut lock off of the axle stub, followed by the washer and the bearing.

    7

    Slide the brake drum off of the wheel hub.

    8

    Disconnect the springs on the top of the brake with a brake spring removal tool.

    9

    Slide the auto-adjuster cable off the top of the brake.

    10

    Disconnect the springs that connect the brake shoes at the bottom of the brake.

    11

    Take the adjuster assembly off of the brake (this is the sprocket that you rotated in Step 4).

    12

    Disconnect the spring retainer washer by pressing up on the nail head that is located on the back of the brake and twisting the spring retainer washer with a pair of pliers.

    13

    Disconnect the parking brake lever from the secondary brake shoes, and lift the brake shoes off of the brake.

    14

    Install the new brake shoes and re-assemble the brakes by reversing the steps you took to disassemble them.

Front Disc Brakes

    15

    Park the Caravan on flat ground. Place the van in "Park" and engage the emergency brake.

    16

    Jack up the front of the van. Place a jack stand underneath the outer frame on each side, and slowly lower the van onto the jack stands.

    17

    Remove the lug nuts and take the front tires off of the van.

    18

    Remove the threaded caliper guide pin with a socket wrench.

    19

    Press up on the front edge of the caliper to loosen the adhesive seals and slowly lift the caliper off of the rotor. Support the caliper with a piece of wire connected to the wheel hub.

    20

    Slide the brake pads (beginning with the outer pad) from the adapters.

    21

    Slide the new brake pads (inner pad first) back into position.

    22

    Lower the caliper back into position over the pads and rotor. If you need to retract the piston, place a small piece of wood over the piston and slowly compress it with a C-clamp.

    23

    Bleed the brakes.

    24

    Place the tires back on the minivan and lower it back onto the ground.

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Oldsmobile Alero

The Oldsmobile Alero is one of the few vehicles that have inboard and outboard brake pads in the rear disc brake system. This doesn't, however, make the disc brakes difficult to replace. Read further to learn how to replace the disc brakes in an Oldsmobile Alero in about an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Drain two-thirds of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir. Use a syringe or suction gun to remove the brake fluid from the reservoir. Store the brake fluid for use later on.

    2

    Lift the rear of the vehicle off the ground using a car jack. Support the Alero on all sides to prevent it from falling over while you replace the rear disc brakes.

    3

    Remove the rear wheels from the Alero. Loosen the lug nuts with a torque wrench. Set the wheels aside, face up, to prevent damaging the rims or hub caps.

    4

    Disconnect the caliper from the steering knuckle making sure to keep the brake hose intact. Rotate the caliper upwards and secure it to the vehicle with a wire, but don't hang it from the brake hose as it may cause damage.

    5

    Push in on the outer edge of the brake pad to release the mounting dowels. Push the outboard pad out through the bottom of the caliper. Pull the inboard pad out of the caliper.

    6

    Install the new inboard pad in the caliper by pushing it in so that the spring on the back of the brake pad snaps onto the caliper piston. Replace the outboard pad by pushing the dowels on the back of the pad into the mounting holes in the caliper.

    7

    Lay the caliper over the rotor onto the steering knuckle. Insert the caliper mounting bolts and sleeves then tighten with the torque wrench to 40 ft. lb. Replace the wheels and lower the Alero to the ground. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the pads.

How to Install 1967 Chevelle Brakes

How to Install 1967 Chevelle Brakes

The Chevelle is a mid-sized vehicle built by Chevrolet through the 1960s and '70s. Though it is a classic car, the brake system is not much different than modern braking systems. The front brakes make use of a caliper to press brake pads against rotors. The friction created by the pads and rotors causes the Chevelle to slow to a stop. Changing the brakes on a 1967 Chevelle is a relatively easy process that you can be complete in an afternoon.

Instructions

    1

    Open the Chevelle's hood and locate the master cylinder -- it is at the rear, driver's side of the engine compartment. Open the master cylinder reservoir by pushing the thin metal bar lock off of the metal cap and pulling the metal cap up.

    2

    Pull the rubber diaphragm out of the master cylinder reservoir and remove about 2/3 of the brake fluid, using a turkey baster. Transfer the removed fluid to a clean, small container.

    3

    Loosen the Chevelle's front lug nuts, using a ratchet and socket; do not remove the lug nuts at this time.

    4

    Raise the front of the Chevelle, using a floor jack, and place jack stands under the frame rails. Lower the vehicle until its weight is only on the jack stands.

    5

    Remove the front lug nuts and pull the front wheels from the Chevelle.

    6

    Locate the two caliper pins going through the top and bottom of the brake caliper. Pull the cotter keys from the inner portion of both caliper pins, using the needle-nosed pliers. Pull the pins out, through the outer part of the caliper, using the channel-lock pliers. A slight twisting motion will aid in the pins' removal.

    7

    Place an 8-inch C-clamp over the brake caliper. Position the clamp so the clamp's screw portion is touching the outer brake pad and the fixed part is touching the rear on the caliper's body. Tighten the C-clamp until it stops moving, this compresses the internal caliper piston.

    8

    Grab the caliper and pull it off of the brake system, notice the pads remain on the caliper braket -- the large metal bracket the caliper attaches to. Attach the caliper to the suspension spring, using a bungee strap.

    9

    Grab the brake pads and pull them off of the caliper bracket. Slide the new pads onto the caliper bracket in the same position the old ones were.

    10

    Place the caliper over the brake pads and slide the caliper pins through the caliper. Insert new cotter keys, included with the brake pads, into the holes in the inner portion of the caliper pins.

    11

    Repeat Steps 6 through 10 for the brakes on the Chevelle's other side.

    12

    Place the front wheels on the Chevelle and hand-tighten the lug nuts.

    13

    Raise the Chevelle off of the jack stands, using the floor jack, and remove the jack stands from under the vehicle. Lower the Chevelle to the ground.

    14

    Tighten the lug nuts, in a criss-cross pattern, to 100 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and socket.

    15

    Press and release the brake pedal prior to driving. This extends the caliper piston back out.

    16

    Check the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir, it must be between the "Min" and "Max" lines on the reservoir. Add fluid from the small container to adjust the level. Place the rubber diaphragm back in the master cylinder reservoir, place the metal cap on the reservoir and pull the locking bar back over the cap. Close the Chevelle's hood.

Selasa, 27 Oktober 2009

How to Replace Nissan Brake Rotors

The rotors on a Nissan are the round metal plates that are mounted to the axle behind the wheels--the discs in "disc brakes." If the rotors are cracked, worn or other wise damaged, the Nissan will not stop correctly and the vehicle will shake and vibrate. Changing the rotors is basically the same on all Nissans but the nuts and bolts that secure the brake housing to the rotors will vary from model to model.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the nuts on the wheel using the wheel nut wrench. Raise the Nissan's frame using the jack and support the frame on vehicle stands. Pull the wheels off the Nissan.

    2

    Loosen the nuts that secure the brake housing to the top of the rotor using the ratchet set. Pull the brake housing off the rotor. If there is a metal frame that supports the brake housing around the rotor, loosen the nuts securing the frame and pull it off the rotor.

    3

    Pull the rotor off the axle and slide the new rotor onto the axle. Replace the metal frame to the rotor if needed and tighten the securing screws. Replace the brake housing to the top of the rotor and tighten the securing screw.

    4

    Replace the wheels to the axle of the Nissan and tighten the wheel nuts using the wheel nut wrench. Raise the Nissan and remove the vehicle stand. Lower the Nissan to the ground and repeat these steps for the other three brake rotor.

Senin, 26 Oktober 2009

What Causes Brake Vibration?

What Causes Brake Vibration?

Few things can be as frustrating as taking your vehicle to your mechanic and being given a generic diagnosis along with an alarming repair estimate. Issues with a vehicle's braking system often fall into this category. While understanding exactly what is causing the problem won't make the repair bill any cheaper, it will help your peace of mind if you know the money was well spent.

Warped Rotors

    There are no such things as "warped rotors." This is a generic term usually used by mechanics because detailed explanation of the cause would be lengthy and involved. While the term gives a general idea of why the brakes are performing strangely, it does not accurately describe the cause. Rotors do not truly warp, but are instead displaying an uneven surfacing condition, that is more easily described as "warped" to the layman customer. This can cause confusion because the true causes differ in how they are corrected, resulting in what may seem unusual repair costs for a simple problem.

Lateral Runout

    Lateral runout is the measurement determining whether two axes' are parallel with each other. With automotive brakes, this is the measurement between the brake rotor axis and the spindle axis. When factory tolerances become too great, the rotor and spindle are not parallel, resulting in high points on the rotor contacting the brake pads during rotation when the brakes are not applied. This contact is slight, but has the effect of unevenly wearing away material from the rotor, resulting in an uneven rotor surface. This results in pulsation at the brake pedal when pressure is applied, vibration and shaking at the wheel because the rotor surface is no longer flat.

Corrosion

    When a vehicle sits for prolonged periods or is driven in areas where salt is used on road surfaces, rust and corrosion can form on the brake rotors where the brake pads do not cover their surface. When the vehicle is driven, this causes uneven wearing of the rotor surface resulting in the rotor having variations in its thickness. This causes the higher points on the rotor to push back on the brake cylinder during braking, leading to vibration and shimmying.

Minggu, 25 Oktober 2009

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a 1999 Maxima

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a 1999 Maxima

The 1999 Nissan Maxima uses brake discs, calipers and pads on its rear wheels. The Maxima's rear brake pads work with the parking brake, so you may not need to change them as often as you would the front brake pads, but you should still inspect them whenever you change the front ones. The procedure for replacing the rear brake pads is slightly different than the procedure for changing the front ones.

Instructions

Removal Procedure

    1

    Siphon at least two thirds of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir; use a suction or siphon tool such as a turkey baster or syringe that you've never used for anything else and won't use again for any other task afterward.

    2

    Block the front wheels with large blocks or wheel chocks; raise the car's rear end and support it on jack stands. Remove the rear wheels, using the tire iron.

    3

    Disconnect the parking brake cable clip and unhook the cable from the parking brake lever.

    4

    Unscrew and remove the upper caliper bolt with a wrench and pivot the brake caliper down and off the mounting bracket.

    5

    Remove the inner and outer brake pads from the mounting bracket, then remove the pad retainers from the upper and lower ends of the mounting bracket. Pull the anti-rattle spring out of the caliper, inspect it for damage and reinstall it (or replace it, if necessary).

    6

    Disconnect the shims from the backing plates of the old brake pads.

    7

    Pull the slide pins out of the mounting bracket, wipe the bracket off, apply a high-temperature grease to it (you can apply it with your finger) and install the pins back into the bracket.

Installation Procedure

    8

    Connect the shims to the backs of the replacement brake pads. Apply an anti-squeal compound to the shims (in-between the edges and the center of the shims).

    9

    Install the upper and lower pad retainers into the caliper mounting bracket, then install the replacement outer and inner brake pads.

    10

    Turn the caliper piston with a pair of needle-nose pliers to retract it back into the caliper--you can also use a special tool from an auto parts store to turn it.

    11

    Pivot and swing the brake caliper back up into position on the mounting bracket. Apply the upper bolt and tighten it to 28 and 38 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench.

    12

    Hook the parking brake cable back onto the lever and connect the cable clip to the brake assembly.

    13

    Reconnect the wheels and lower the car to the ground after changing both of the rear brake assemblies.

    14

    Fill the brake master cylinder with fresh brake fluid.

Sabtu, 24 Oktober 2009

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Mercury Cougar

The Mercury Cougar comes equipped with either disc or drum brakes in the rear. If your Cougar has disc brakes you will need to purchase tool T87P-2588 from the Mercury dealership in order to replace them. Read further to learn how to perform this simple brake job with this specialized tool.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Drain half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir. Use a syringe and insert it in the reservoir to siphon the brake fluid. Set the brake fluid aside so you can replace it later.

    2

    Lift the vehicle from the ground using a car jack. Verify that the vehicle is stable on all sides. Keep children and animals away from the car while it is off the ground to prevent injury or death.

    3

    Remove the wheels from the Cougar. Use a torque wrench to loosen the lug nuts. Take off the wheels and set them aside, facing up to prevent damage.

    4

    Take out the cotter and guide pin. Use a pair of needle nose pliers to remove the pins.

    5

    Disconnect the caliper locating pin cover. Remove the caliper locating pin using needle nose pliers.

    6

    Rotate the rear disc brake caliper so that it doesn't block the brake rotor and anchor plate. Leave the brake hose intact. Take out the inner and outer disc brake pads.

Installation

    7

    Install the new disc brake pads using the rear caliper piston adjuster, tool T87P-2588, to turn the rear disc brake piston clockwise. This will make the necessary room to insert the pads.

    8

    Insert the inner and outer disc brake pads. Reposition the brake caliper over the pads.

    9

    Wipe the locating pin threads with a lint free cloth to remove grease. Apply a drop of thread locking agent.

    10

    Grease the locating pin using disc brake caliper slide grease. Install the pin and tighten it to 30 foot pounds using a torque wrench. Insert the guide and cotter pins.

    11

    Replace the wheels. Tighten the lug nuts to 62 foot pounds using a torque wrench. Pull the parking brake and pump the brake pedal several times to adjust the brakes. Lower the vehicle and replace the brake fluid.

How to Replace Suzuki Swift Auto Brakes

The Suzuki Swift is a compact car that was manufactured with a hydraulically actuated braking system, which requires routine maintenance. You can easily replace or resurface the friction surfaces of the brake components. The average backyard mechanic can replace the brakes on a Swift in about two hours.

Instructions

Front brakes

    1

    Raise the front of the Swift with the floor jack, placing the jack onto a frame rail and pumping the lever until the wheel is in the air. Position a jack stand on the frame rail for support. Do not place the jack or jack stand on the suspension or body.

    2

    Remove the wheel by turning the lug nuts in a counterclockwise direction with the lug wrench. Pull the wheel from the hub and place it aside.

    3

    Remove the caliper by using a socket wrench to turn the rear twin mount bolts in a counterclockwise direction; then slide the caliper off the rotor. Remove the pads from the caliper pistons by levering the retainer clip with a screwdriver and pulling the pad free. Set the caliper onto the control arm for support; do not let it dangle by the brake lines.

    4

    Remove the rotor by pulling it free of the hub. Replace it with a new or resurfaced unit by pushing it over the hub.

    5

    Replace the pads in the caliper by pressing them to the pistons and securing the retainer clips. Slide the caliper over the rotor and turn the rear mount bolts clockwise until they are snug.

    6

    Replace the wheel by turning the lug nuts clockwise in an alternating pattern.

    7

    Lower the Swift from the jack stands using the floor jack.

    8

    Repeat the entire process on the opposite front wheel.

Rear Brakes

    9

    Lift the Swift at a frame rail just in front of the rear wheel, then place a jack stand onto a frame rail for support.

    10

    Remove the wheel by turning all lug nuts counterclockwise with the lug wrench, then setting the wheel aside.

    11

    Remove the drum by turning the keeper screw counterclockwise and pulling the drum from the brake assembly.

    12

    Change the shoes by levering the long springs from the shoe hooks with a brake tool, then turning the primary spring bolt counterclockwise. Slide the shoes away from the backing plate.

    13

    Replace the shoes with new units by sliding them onto the brake assembly, then turning the primary spring bolt clockwise. Lever the long springs back onto the shoe hooks with a brake tool. Check the wheel cylinder for leaks, and check the adjustment bolt at the bottom for excessive play. Replace the drum by pressing it over the shoes and securing the keeper screw in a clockwise fashion. Replace the wheel, and lower the Swift from the jack stands. Repeat the entire process on the opposite rear brake.

How to Replace Brake Rotors on a Toyota Avalon

How to Replace Brake Rotors on a Toyota Avalon

The Avalon is a four-door sedan introduced by Toyota in 1995. The early model-years were based on the Camry platform with a different body and exterior. The Avalon has evolved into a full-sized sedan, with a large interior and many safety features. Four-wheel disc brakes are one of the safety features on the vehicle. The brake rotors will require replacement due to wear or damage.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Avalon on a flat, paved surface. Use a floor jack to raise the car and secure it on jack stands.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts from the wheel you will be working on with a lug wrench then pull off the wheel and set it aside. If you have difficulty removing the lug nuts, use an impact wrench.

    3

    Remove the bolts securing the brake caliper to the brake caliper bracket with a metric wrench. Remove the brake caliper from the brake rotor by pulling the caliper away from the caliper bracket. Use a piece of wire to secure the brake caliper to the car, reducing tension on the brake line. Remove the brake pads from the brake caliper bracket.

    4

    Loosen and remove the bolts holding the brake caliper bracket to the car with a metric wrench, ratchet and socket. Remove the brake caliper bracket and set it aside.

    5

    Pull the brake caliper towards you and remove it from the wheel hub.

    6

    Install the new brake rotor onto the hub and tighten a single lug nut by hand to secure it in the proper position.

    7

    Reattach the brake caliper bracket to the wheel hub and secure it with its bolts. Use a torque wrench and socket to tighten the bolts to the manufacturer's specified torque. Insert the brake pads into the brake pad caliper bracket.

    8

    Remove the wire holding the brake caliper to the vehicle. Insert a brake pad spreader tool to compress the brake pistons into the caliper assembly. Place the brake caliper into the brake caliper bracket and insert the bolts. Use the torque wrench to tighten the caliper bolts to the manufacturer's recommended specification.

    9

    Loosen and remove the lug nut for the brake rotor. Remount the wheel onto the hub and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Perform Steps 2 through 9 for each brake rotor requiring replacement.

    10

    Raise the vehicle with the floor jack, remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts to 90 ft.-lbs. of torque with the torque wrench and a socket.

How to Measure Brake Pressure

How to Measure Brake Pressure

Testing the brake pressure on your car brakes can help you determine whether there is a leak in the break lines. Brake pressure can also be used to diagnose other issues with your brakes before they fail. The pressure in your brake lines is what stops the car when you press the brake pedal.

Instructions

    1

    Place the car on a stable, flat surface, and apply the emergency brake.

    2

    Place the jack under the car on the metal frame of the car near the brake you will be testing. Lift the car barely; you want the car to touch the ground so you can remove the lug nuts without the wheel spinning.

    3

    Remove the hub cap if it has one, and proceed to remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    4

    Lift the car with the jack high enough so you can remove the wheel. This will give you access to the brake caliper.

    5

    Remove the bleeder valve from the brake caliper. Use the wrench to remove the valve. The valve usually is on the back side of the caliper.

    6

    Attach the proper adapter to your brake caliper. The brake pressure test kit comes with many adapters; test each one until you find the one that fits. It snaps in place with gentle pressure.

    7

    Connect your brake pressure gauge to the adapter you placed on your brake caliper.

    8

    Read the brake pressure from your gauge. Have someone help you by entering the car and pressing down on the brake pedal; this will cause the needle on your gauge to rise, showing you the brake pressure.

Jumat, 23 Oktober 2009

How to Remove the Wheel Bearing Hub Assembly in a Durango

How to Remove the Wheel Bearing Hub Assembly in a Durango

Older cars used to use a few bearing packs and seals to allow the front rotors to move. This meant that every time you wanted to turn the brake rotors when doing a brake job, you had to replace the bearings as well. Dodge Durangos use a sealed bearing-and-hub assembly, which makes changing the brakes easier and cheaper. When the bearings start to go out, you have to replace the entire assembly, which should take about 30 minutes to do per side.

Instructions

    1

    Set the truck on jack stands by lifting it up with the jack. Remove the wheels using a tire iron. Unbolt the brake caliper from the steering knuckle with a 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Hang the caliper from the upper control arm using the bungee cord.

    2

    Slide the rotor straight off the wheel hub and set it to the side. Unbolt the speed sensor, if your truck is equipped with one, using an open-end wrench. Unbolt the halfshaft nut on the center of the hub with an open-end wrench, then pull the steering knuckle down with both hands to free the halfshaft, if you have a 4WD vehicle.

    3

    Unbolt the wheel hub from the steering knuckle using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Disconnect the wiring to the hub using your hands. Take the assembly off the steering knuckle.

Kamis, 22 Oktober 2009

How to Repair the Front Disc Brakes on a 1998 Silverado 2500

Repairing the brakes on the Chevy Silverado is the same process whether you are changing them on the four-wheel drive, or the two-wheel drive. You can save money by doing the brakes yourself. Each wheel will take you about a half-hour to complete. You want to make sure you thoroughly inspect the brake rotors when you remove the pads. If you put new brake pads on rotors that have grooves etched into them, you will wear the new pads out much faster and the brakes may not be as effective.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Silverado on a level surface. Pop the hood on the engine compartment. Locate the master cylinder on the back firewall of the truck and siphon two-thirds of the brake fluid from it with the turkey baster. Place the fluid in the drain pan to recycle later. Insert wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Raise the Silverado with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the truck close to the jacking point and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench and pull the wheel from the truck.

    2

    Place the C-clamp on the brake caliper while it is still on the mounting bracket. Turn the handle on the C-clamp until the caliper forces the caliper piston back into the housing. Remove the caliper bolts with a socket and ratchet. Pull it from the wheel assembly. Remove the brake pads from the caliper. Clean the caliper surfaces with the wire brush.

    3

    Insert the new brake pads into the caliper. Place the caliper on the mounting bracket and tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet. Place the wheel on the truck and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Silverado. Lower the truck to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

    4

    Replace the brake fluid in the master cylinder and bring it to the recommended level. Pump the brakes until the pedal is firm.

How to Remove the Brake Rotor On My 1999 Nissan Maxima

How to Remove the Brake Rotor On My 1999 Nissan Maxima

If you feel a vibration when you are braking, you may need to remove the rotors on your 1999 Nissan Maxima. You may take them to a mechanic to have them machined to remove any warping issues in the rotors. Otherwise, you may have to replace them. It is advised that you check your rotors as soon as you feel an issue with the braking to avoid more severe damage to your vehicle.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the side from which you are going to remove the rotor. To do this, use the lug wrench that came with your 1999 Nissan Maxima or find the appropriate size socket from your socket set. You will not be removing the lug nuts at this point, you simply need to loosen them.

    2

    Place the jack under the frame of the vehicle and raise it until the tire is not touching the ground.

    3

    Place jack stands under the frame of the vehicle. This is imperative to ensure you are working under safe conditions.

    4

    Finish taking all lug nuts off the wheel so you can remove the rim from the car.

    5

    Remove the pin bolt located on the brake caliper. This is typically a 10mm bolt that holds the caliper to the A-frame.

    6

    Remove the brake caliper assembly from around the brake rotor and secure it out of the way using a length of wire.

    7

    Pry off the grease cap from the center of the rotor.

    8

    Remove the cotter pin, adjusting cap, insulator and wheel bearing lock nut from beneath the grease cap.

    9

    Remove the wheel hub and rotor from the vehicle.

How to Replace Front Rotors on a Mazda 6

How to Replace Front Rotors on a Mazda 6

If you notice your brakes are screeching or no longer brake as effectively, it's time to inspect your Mazda 6's braking system. If you notice significant wear or rust on the rotor, then it's time for it to be replaced. Replacing your front brake rotor sounds complex, but it's actually a fairly easy process. All it takes is the right set of instructions and a little elbow grease and you'll have your Mazda 6 road safe in no time.

Instructions

    1

    Park your car on flat surface, and put a stopping block down behind the opposite wheel from the one you'll be working on to assure yourself the car will not be moving anywhere. Put on a face mask and safety glasses before you begin working on the brakes, since some brake pads and brake dust can contain asbestos.

    2

    Jack up the car, and support it on jack stands. Loosen all the lugs holding the wheel in place with a lug wrench or tire iron. Firmly grip the wheel in both hands, and pull it away from your car to access the brake system. Inspect the braking system: if you notice any significant rust buildup, scarring, wear or warping on the rotor, then it's time to replace it.

    3

    Remove the two mounting bolts for the brake line, and gently slide the brake line out to gain more play for removing the caliper. Remove the two caliper bolts, and gently lift the caliper from the caliper mount. Gently set it aside or tie it with a bungee cord out of the way. Pay extra attention not to kink or pinch the caliper flex hose to avoid damaging the brake fluid line.

    4

    Remove the two bolts holding the caliper mounting bracket in place, and gently remove the caliper mounting bracket from the rotor. Use a heating torch to heat up the outside area around the two Philips screws holding the rotor in place; this will allow you to unscrew them without stripping the heads. Remove the two Phillips screws.

    5

    Firmly grip the rotor with both hands, and pull it off the axle plate. If it's very stubborn and won't pull off, use a rubber mallet to help it along. Clean the axle plate with brake parts cleaner from any residual rust from the old rotor. Clean the new rotor with brake parts cleaner and wipe it down with a clean shop rag. Slide the new rotor onto the mounting until it's flush with the axle plate.

    6

    Reconstruct the braking system in the reverse order. Place the wheel back on and secure in place with lugs. Lower your car to the ground and your braking system should now be as responsive as it was when it was brand new.

Rabu, 21 Oktober 2009

How to Check the Brake Booster in a 1986 Ford Ranger

Ford used a brake booster in the 1986 Ranger to reduce brake pedal effort and increase power to the hydraulic brake system. Brake boosters require no special maintenance other than periodic checks for case damage or leaks in the vacuum hose. Damage to the internal diaphragm, valve or return spring cannot be repaired, and the booster must be replaced as a unit if such damage is present. Brake drag or excessive brake pedal travel accompanied by a groaning sound from the booster when the brakes are actuated are indicative of a maladjusted booster pushrod.

Instructions

Inspection and Adjustment

    1

    Inspect the booster case for signs of obvious damage. Breaks or holes in the booster case prevent the booster from properly operating.

    2

    Inspect the engine vacuum hose for breaks, leaks or kinks that may affect the vacuum powering the brake booster. Replace the hose as necessary.

    3

    Remove the two nuts holding the master cylinder onto the brake booster studs using a ratchet and deep socket. Carefully pull the master cylinder away from the booster until it comes free of the booster studs. Do not break or kink the brake lines attached to the master cylinder during this process.

    4

    Measure the protrusion of the brake rod using a machinists rule. Keeping the machinists rule parallel to the brake rod, and measure from the tip of the rod to the brake booster case where the studs exit the case

    5

    Adjust the rod until the protrusion is between 0.980 to 0.995 inches, using a wrench.

    6

    Install the master cylinder onto the brake booster studs. Install the two nuts onto the studs and tighten them to 13 to 25 foot-pounds using a torque wrench and deep socket.

Booster Removal

    7

    Remove the two nuts holding the master cylinder onto the brake booster studs, using a ratchet and deep socket. Carefully pull the master cylinder away from the booster until it comes free of the booster studs. Do not break or kink the brake lines attached to the master cylinder during this process.

    8

    Loosen the clamp on the vacuum hose where it connects to the brake booster, using a screwdriver. Remove the vacuum hose from the brake booster.

    9

    Locate the brake linkage and brake light switch inside the passenger compartment on the upper end of the brake pedal.

    10

    Disconnect the electrical connector from the brake light switch.

    11

    Remove the cotter pin from the end of the brake pedal stud, using needle-nose pliers. Slide the brake light switch, brake booster pushrod and spacers off the stud.

    12

    Locate the two brake booster mounting studs coming through the firewall near the brake booster pushrod inside the passenger compartment. Remove the nuts from the studs using a ratchet and deep socket.

    13

    Pull the brake booster away from the firewall and lift it out of the engine compartment.

Booster Installation

    14

    Measure the protrusion of the brake rod on the new booster using a machinists rule. Keeping the machinist's rule parallel to the brake rod, and measure from the tip of the rod to the brake booster case where the studs exit the case.

    15

    Adjust the rod until the protrusion is between 0.980 to 0.995 inches, using a wrench.

    16

    Align the new brake booster and mounting studs with the holes in the engine compartment firewall and push it into place.

    17

    Install the nuts onto the brake booster mounting studs inside the passenger compartment and tighten them to 13 to 25 foot-pounds using a torque wrench and deep socket.

    18

    Slide the spacers, booster pushrod and brake light switch onto the brake pedal stud. Install the cotter pin in the stud, using needle-nose pliers.

    19

    Install the brake booster vacuum hose onto the booster and tighten the vacuum hose clamp, using a screwdriver.

    20

    Install the master cylinder onto the brake booster studs. Install the two nuts onto the studs and tighten them to 13 to 25 foot-pounds using a torque wrench and deep socket.

Senin, 19 Oktober 2009

How Long Do Brakes Last?

Operated under proper driving conditions, brake pads can last between 50,000 and 60,000 miles. However, there are multiple factors and driving habits that can reduce the life of the brakes, and those that can make them last longer, too.

Effects

    Hitting the brakes at higher speeds wears down the pads greatly. It takes a third more energy to stop the car at 65 mph than it does at 55.

Geography

    Cars that drive in very hilly areas will invariably have their brakes last less because of the strain gravity puts on them.

Considerations

    Coasting, or driving without using the accelerator, will help reduce speed energy without using the brakes, thus making them last longer.

Size

    The heavier the car is, the more strain it will have on the brakes as well as gas mileage. This includes excess weight from carrying several objects in the car.

Warning

    Never use the left foot to apply the brake pedal. The risk of hitting the accelerator and brake together will cause excessive wear and possible damage to the brakes.

Minggu, 18 Oktober 2009

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 2003 Ford Windstar

The brake pads on your 2003 Ford Windstar clamp down on the brake disc to help slow down your vehicle. The pad material on the Windstar is a ceramic material and will eventually wear down over time through regular use. When the pad material is one-eighth inch thick or less, you need to replace the pads. Replacement brake pads can be purchased from most auto-parts stores.

Instructions

    1

    Jack the Windstar up on the front jack point located behind the radiator with the floor jack.

    2

    Place a jack stand under the front pinch welds and lower the vehicle onto the stands.

    3

    Unbolt the lug nuts using an impact wrench and pull the wheel off the hub.

    4

    Loosen the lower caliper-pin bolt and the upper caliper-mounting bolt with a socket wrench.

    5

    Swing the caliper up and open from the bottom and pop out the old brake pads. Then, insert the new brake pads.

    6

    Close the caliper and tighten the pin bolt and upper caliper-mounting bolt. The rest of the installation is the reverse of removal.

How to Change Rear Brake Rotors on an Uplander Van

Rear brakes account for about 25 to 30 percent of the braking power on the Uplander, so when the rotors begin to warp or become excessively scored, you'll want to replace them. Rotors are discs that are secured to the wheel hub. On the Uplander, the wheel and the caliper hold the rotor in place, while the caliper and brake pad applies clamping force to the rotor.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts by turning them 45 degrees counterclockwise with a tire wrench. Do not unseat the wheel from the wheel hub assembly.

    2

    Place the floor jack under the rear jack point and raise the van into the air.

    3

    Place jack stands under the rear pinch welds.

    4

    Lower the van onto the stands and finish removing the lug nuts. Pull the wheel off the wheel hub assembly.

    5

    Remove the mounting bolts on the brake caliper and slide the caliper off the rotor.

    6

    Secure the brake caliper to the coil springs above the brake system with zip ties.

    7

    Remove the brake rotor by sliding it straight off the hub. You may need to use a rubber mallet to persuade the rotor to come off the hub assembly.

    8

    Install the new rotor and reassemble the brake assembly. Installation is the reverse of removal.

    9

    Spray the entire brake hub assembly with brake parts cleaner. Remove all traces of oil, dust, dirt and debris.

    10

    Mount the wheel back on the wheel studs by lining up the holes on the wheel to the studs on the hub assembly and tighten the lug nuts down.

    11

    Lower the Uplander to the ground and torque the lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds. To do this, set the dial on the torque wrench to 100 foot-pounds. Place the socket end of the wrench over the lug nuts and turn them clockwise until the clutch disc in the head of the torque wrench slips. You will hear an audible clicking sound.

How to Change the Front Rotors on a 1998 Ford Expedition Four by Four

How to Change the Front Rotors on a 1998 Ford Expedition Four by Four

The Ford Expedition brake rotors will shake if there is warping. This may feel like the SUV is "wobbling" when you apply the brakes. Mechanics call it "run-out." Another way to damage the rotors is by allowing the brake to wear too far beyond the recommended thickness. When they get beyond that point, the rivets start to cut grooves into the rotors. You may be able to machine the surface smooth again, but if the grooves are too deep, the rotor will be too thin to be safe.

Instructions

    1

    Place the wheel chocks behind the rear tires of the Expedition.

    2

    Jack the Expedition, using the automobile jack, and place a jack stand near the jacking point. Raise the jack stand to the frame.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts, using the lug wrench, and remove the wheel from the Ford. Remove the brake caliper, using a ratchet and socket. Secure the caliper to the strut, using a wire tie. Do not allow it to hang loose, or you will damage the brake line.

    4

    Remove the grease cap from the wheel, using the screwdriver as a pry tool. Remove the cotter pin, using the pliers to pull it out of the shaft.

    5

    Remove the retaining nut, using the proper size wrench. Remove the spindle nut with the wrench. Remove the bearing retainer ring, using the screwdriver, and pull the wheel bearing off the shaft. Pull the wheel rotor off by hand.

    6

    Put the new rotor on the wheel assembly. Install the wheel bearing on the shaft, followed by the bearing retainer. Replace the spindle nut, and tighten it with the wrench. Install the retaining nut, and tighten it with a wrench. Place a new cotter pin through the retaining hole, and spread it apart with the pliers. Tap the grease cap onto the wheel with the rubber mallet.

    7

    Replace the wheel on the Expedition, and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the SUV, and lower the vehicle to the ground. Repeat the process on the next wheel.

Sabtu, 17 Oktober 2009

How to Install the Rear Rotors on a Toyota Land Cruiser

How to Install the Rear Rotors on a Toyota Land Cruiser

You have to make sure that the brake rotors on your Toyota Land Cruiser stay in good condition. There should be no grooves on the surfaces and no warping. A brake rotor could warp if it gets very hot and then go through a puddle of cold water. Not cleaning the wheel hub properly when you service the brakes can cause "run-out," another sort of warping. If you take the rotor off for any reason, you need to clean the wheel hub thoroughly with a wire brush.

Instructions

    1

    Place the wheel chocks in front of the front wheels of the Land Cruiser. Raise the rear of SUV with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under it near the jacking point and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench and pull the wheel from the Toyota.

    2

    Loosen the caliper bolts with the socket and ratchet. Secure the caliper to the shock absorber using a wire tie. Pull the rotor from the wheel assembly. Thoroughly clean the wheel hub with the wire brush.

    3

    Place the new rotor on the wheel assembly. Cut the wire tie holding the caliper to the shock absorber with the pliers. Place the caliper back on the mounting bracket and tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet. Install the wheel on the Land Cruiser and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    4

    Remove the jack stand from under the Land Cruiser. Lower the SUV to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

How to Fix the Brakes on a 2002 Ford Mustang

How to Fix the Brakes on a 2002 Ford Mustang

The Ford Mustang was introduced in 1964 and became known as the 1964-1/2 Mustang. Since then the Ford Mustang has continued to inspire competition among American muscle cars such as the Chevrolet Camaro, Dodge Charger and Pontiac Trans Am. The 2002 Ford Mustang featured a 3.8-liter V-6, capable of producing 190-horsepower. A 260-horsepower 4.6-liter V-8 was available in the 2002 Mustang GT. The 2002 Mustang had front disc brakes, which included calipers, pads and rotors. Replacement of the front brakes should be performed by someone with prior mechanical experience.

Instructions

2002 Ford Mustang Caliper, Pad and Rotor Replacement

    1

    Loosen the front wheel lug nuts with the tire iron. Raise the front of the Mustang using the low-profile jack, one corner at a time. Place a jack stand beneath both front sub-frame rails, just inward from the lower control arms. Do not place the jack stands beneath the lower control arms because they are unstable. Remove the lug nuts when the vehicle is properly lifted and supported, then remove the front wheels from the Mustang.

    2

    Place a set of flat-nose pliers on the rubber brake hose about 1 inch behind the front caliper. This will help prevent fluid loss and lessen brake bleeding times at the end of this project. Remove the banjo bolt from the rear of the brake caliper, then remove the brake hose from the caliper completely.

    3

    Remove the caliper bolts from the rear of the caliper with the ratchet and socket, then discard the bolts. Remove the caliper completely from the brake assembly, using a small pry bar if necessary. Remove the old brake pads from the caliper bracket and discard them. Remove the brake caliper anchor plate bolts with the ratchet and a socket, then remove the anchor plate.

    4

    Remove the brake rotor retaining clips, if equipped, with needle-nose pliers. Remove the old brake rotor from the front hub by hand. Apply caliper grease to the outboard face of the hub spacer, which the rotor mounts against. Install a new brake rotor, and add one lug nut to a stud to hold the rotor in place. Snug the lug nut up by hand. Spray the outboard and inboard faces of the new rotor with aerosol brake cleaner. Use half of the can to do both sides of one rotor.

    5

    Install the brake caliper bracket and tighten the bolts to 95 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket. Install the new brake pads onto the caliper bracket. Two of the brake pads have a metal L-shaped protrusion, or wear indicator. The indicator-equipped pads go on the inboard side of each rotor. Apply a light coating of caliper grease onto the shim plates on the rear of the both brake pads.

    6

    Install the new brake caliper onto the brake assembly, and tighten the new caliper bolts to 25-foot-pounds for a dual piston caliper, or 65-foot-pounds for a single piston caliper. Use the torque wench and socket to tighten these bolts. Install the new copper crush washers that come with the new caliper, then install the brake line against the back of the caliper. Tighten the banjo bolt to 25-foot-pounds with the torque wrench and a socket.

    7

    Repeat Steps 2 through 6 to complete the caliper, pad, and rotor replacement on the second side of the Mustang. Proceed to the brake bleeding section of this article when you have completely installed both sides properly.

2002 Ford Mustang Brake Bleeding Procedures

    8

    Ask your assistant to sit in the drivers seat of the Mustang. Ask him to depress the brake pedal to the floor and hold it. Open the brake bleeder screw on the caliper with an open-end wrench. Allow the air to escape the caliper, then retighten the screw immediately. Ask the assistant to allow the brake pedal to extend back to its upright position. Repeat this step three times per caliper. Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir, and add fluid to the Full mark every time you switch sides.

    9

    Ask the assistant to pump the brake pedal about five to 10 times and hold his foot on the pedal. Open the bleeder screw to allow the air to escape the caliper. Repeat this step on each side of the vehicle until only brake fluid comes out of the caliper. Fill the brake fluid reservoir every time you switch sides of the car. Fill the reservoir to the Full mark when you have completely bled both sides of the Mustang.

    10

    Install the front wheels onto the Mustang, and snug the lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the car off of the jack stands, and remove them from beneath the car. Lower the car to the ground, and tighten the lug nuts immediately to 105 foot-pounds of torque, using the torque wrench and a wheel nut socket.

Jumat, 16 Oktober 2009

How to Replace a Brake Line in a Pontiac Bonneville

Factory brake lines are rubber and can cause inconsistent braking or become damaged over time. For the discontinued Pontiac Bonneville, finding replacement parts can be difficult. You may need to have a mechanic help you locate the correct replacement part.

Instructions

    1

    Top off the brake fluid in the reservoir and tighten the cap to minimize fluid loss while replacing the brake line. The Bonneville's brake fluid reservoir is located on the driver's side rear corner.

    2

    Remove the wheel after safely supporting the car on jack stands. Locate the brake line and trace the section you'll remove, starting from the brake hose.

    3

    Study the section of brake line, paying special attention to how it is bent. Bend the replacement line the same way. You may need to bend the replacement line more, or possibly cut it if it is longer.

    4

    Disconnect the bolts at each end of the line to remove it. Use two line wrenches to remove the two bolts on each connector. Disconnect the end on the brake hose first.

    5

    Install the new line so you attach the brake hose end last. Thread the bolts by hand and then tighten with the line wrenches.

    6

    Remove any air from the system. Open the bleeder valve on the brake caliper and connect a tube to a container of brake fluid. Have another person purge the air by pressing down on the pedal.

    7

    Attach the Bonneville's wheel and continue with the wheel on the other side. Top off the brake fluid level and test the brakes after replacing all the lines.

How to Repair the Brakes on a 1992 Honda Accord LX

How to Repair the Brakes on a 1992 Honda Accord LX

Earning a four-star safety rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the Honda Accord has long been a favorite among American drivers and has consistently made the annual list of the top five selling cars in the U.S. for more than two decades. However, the Accord's most important safety feature is really no different than that of other vehicles -- the braking system. Without regular brake maintenance, you could find yourself in serious trouble if you need to make a sudden stop. Fortunately, replacing the brake pads on your Accord is relatively inexpensive, if you opt to do the work yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Park your Honda Accord on a level surface and place wheel chocks or blocks behind the three wheels you won't be working on.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts with the lug end of a tire iron or a lug nut wrench.

    3

    Look under the car near the wheel you'll be working on and locate the jack notch -- a small, flattened part of the frame that is designed to accommodate a jack. Place a floor jack directly under it and raise your vehicle just high enough to allow clearance for the tire to be removed.

    4
    The calipers house the brake pads on your Accord.
    The calipers house the brake pads on your Accord.

    Unscrew the lug nuts and remove the tire. This will expose the caliper assembly, which locks around an upper section of the rotor by means of two caliper bolts.

    5

    Remove the caliper bolts with a 12 mm socket wrench.

    6
    Use a bungee cord or rope to hang the caliper from the shock absorber.
    Use a bungee cord or rope to hang the caliper from the shock absorber.

    Lift off the caliper assembly, being careful not to damage the brake line that connects it to your Accord. Because the brake line isn't long enough to allow you to lay the caliper on the ground, carefully hang it from the shock absorber with a bungee cord or rope.

    7

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper and thoroughly clean the assembly with brake cleaner. Clean the rotor as well.

    8

    Turn the piston, which can be found inside the caliper behind the outer brake pad, clockwise with a piston tool or a large flat-head screwdriver until it's fully retracted.

    9

    Spread a small amount of brake grease on the back of your new pads, being careful not to lubricate the sides that come in contact with the rotor. Push the new pads into the caliper.

    10
    Use a 12 mm socket wrench to tighten the caliper bolts.
    Use a 12 mm socket wrench to tighten the caliper bolts.

    Return the caliper to its original position, locking it into place by replacing and tightening the caliper bolts. Don't forget to remove the bungee cord or rope.

    11

    Return the wheel to your Accord and tighten the lug nuts.

    12

    Lower the vehicle and remove the jack.

Kamis, 15 Oktober 2009

How to Install a Brake Hose

Servicing or replacing components in a hydraulic braking system usually allow air to enter the brake system. Air, like any gas, is compressible. In the system the trapped air acts like a cushion, creating a soft brake pedal feel and unsafe condition All trapped air must be bled out.When replacing any hydraulic line in the braking system, the system must be bled following the specific procedures outlined in your vehicles service manual.

Instructions

Removing and replacing brake system lines or hoses.

    1

    Follow service manual instructions for your year model vehicle to bleed of hydraulic pressure. Depending on brake system, this may require a scan to to manually open trapped air in the brake system valves.

    2

    Using the appropriate line wrench for the line you are replacing, slowly turn ferrel counter clockwise until disconnected from system. Repeat procedure for other end of brake line.

    3

    Install the new brake line making sure both ends of the line are tightened snuggly to fitting.

    4

    Consult service manual for brake system air bleeding procedure and adjust appropriately.

How to Locate Car Brake Lines

Locating brake lines on your car is an easy task in most cases. In the event that the car has run over something that may have damaged the undercarriage of the car, or if the brake pedal goes to the floor, checking the brake lines is a must.

Instructions

    1

    Check the brake lines by putting the car on a lift so that you can see them. If you don't have access to a lift, jacking the car up and putting jack stands under the car will suffice.

    2

    Start from the master cylinder that is usually located under the hood on the driver's side, or by checking the lines from each wheel.

    3

    Check the master cylinder for its fluid level. If the fluid is low, you have a leak somewhere. Generally, fluid level doesn't drop unless your brake shoes or pads are especially worn. Make sure to add fluid so that the cylinder is full and replace the cover.

    4

    Look at the master cylinder. If the cylinder is wet in any area, change it. However, if it isn't leaking, that still doesn't mean it is working properly.

    5

    Travel down the undercarriage of the car and check the line to see if it's leaking. Sometimes running your hand over the lines is necessary because brake fluid is clear and hard to detect.

    6

    Follow the brake lines on both sides of the car to the wheels. The usual places that leaks develop is at the juncture where the lines attach to the wheel cylinders. Check the wheel cylinders for leaks. If they're wet, they need to be replaced.

Rabu, 14 Oktober 2009

How to Form Brake Line Ends

How to Form Brake Line Ends

The process of forming the end of brake line tubing is known as flaring. In use, a threaded flare nut compresses the end of the flared brake line with the beveled seat inside a hydraulic fitting to provide a leak-proof, pressure resistant connection. The do-it-yourself vehicle owner can properly form the ends of brake line tubing with the use of a flaring kit. The time from set-up to completion is 20 minutes or less with a few additional tools.

Instructions

    1

    Cut the brake line to the length necessary for the specific application using the circular tubing cutter.

    2

    Clear the opening of the cut end of burrs with the tapered reamer. Turn the reamer slowly and in one direction only. Take care not to use excessive pressure as this may reduce the wall thickness of the tubing.

    3

    Place the threaded flare nut over the end of the brake line to be formed. Make sure that the threaded end is facing towards the end of the tubing.

    4

    Loosen both die clamps of the flaring block.

    5

    Insert the tubing into the proper size hole in the flaring block. Position the tubing so that the end is level with the upper surface of the die. Tighten the die block clamps firmly to avoid slippage during the forming process.

    6

    Apply a small amount of brake fluid onto the end of the tubing surface with a brush to reduce friction between the tubing and the flaring anvil. The anvil is beveled to a point and enters uniformly to make contact with the inner wall of the tubing.

    7

    Place the die block with the tubing into the bench vise. Tighten securely.

    8

    Attach the anvil frame onto the die block with the beveled anvil centered over the open end of the brake line tubing.

    9

    Slowly start tightening the anvil by turning in a clockwise direction until the point has entered the end of the tubing and has made uniform contact with the inner walls.

    10

    Check the die block clamps to make certain they are tight and holding the brake line tubing firm.

    11

    Apply brake fluid around the area of the anvil where it meets the edges of the brake line.

    12

    Slowly turn the anvil half a turn and stop. Turn the anvil counterclockwise to back it off to check the flaring progress. Continue in this manner until the outer edge of the brake line meets the seat of the die. Do not apply pressure beyond this point.

    13

    Loosen the anvil and remove it from the die block.

    14

    Inspect the formed end of the brake line for cracks or splits.

    15

    Loosen the die clamps and remove the brake line.

Selasa, 13 Oktober 2009

How to Change a Honda Master Cylinder

The master cylinders on a Honda are generally good for the life of the vehicle. However, a seal failure inside the master cylinder can cause the cylinder to fail. This usually results in an initially firm brake pedal that slowly sinks to the floor. When this happens, you should replace the master cylinder so that you get consistent brake pressure pedal feel.

Instructions

    1

    Place a catch pan under the vehicle and directly under the brake master cylinder.

    2

    Place shop rags directly under the brake master cylinder to control any leaks when you remove the cylinder.

    3

    Mark the location of each brake line to the master cylinder with masking tape and permanent marker.

    4

    Remove the brake line to master cylinder connection with a tube nut wrench. To do this, slide the tube nut wrench over the brake line and orient the wrench so that it fits over the end of the tube nut, then turn the nut counterclockwise.

    5

    Remove the brake master cylinder to brake booster mounting nuts and slide the master cylinder off the brake booster.

    6

    Install the new brake master cylinder. Installation is the reverse of removal.

Senin, 12 Oktober 2009

Replacing Brake Rotors on a Jeep Liberty

Replacing Brake Rotors on a Jeep Liberty

Replacing the brake rotors on a Jeep Liberty is easy with the right tools. Generally, you should change the rotors at the same time you are replacing brake pads. You might sometimes need to replace the rotors without replacing the brake pads, but it is rare. Like the brake pads, when you replace rotors, you should do so in pairs.

Instructions

    1

    Place a set of wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Jack up the Jeep with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the vehicle, and raise it up to the frame.

    2

    Remove the wheel using the lug wrench. Remove the brake caliper using a socket and ratchet. Secure the caliper to the strut using a wire tie. Never allow the caliper to hang free or you will damage the brake line. Remove the rotor retaining clips with pliers. Pull the rotor off the wheel.

    3

    Put the new rotor on the wheel, and attach the retaining clips by pushing them on with the pliers. Put the brake caliper in place on the bracket, and tighten the retaining bolts using the socket and ratchet.

    4

    Put the wheel back on the Jeep, and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the vehicle. Lower the Jeep to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

How to Change the Brakes on a 2000 Lexus E300

How to Change the Brakes on a 2000 Lexus E300

The 2000 Lexus E300 luxury sedan was one of Lexus' most popular models. This car is well known for its reliability, performance, and safety. Much of the safety is lost when the brakes begin to wear down and are in in need of replacement. Though this only happens every 30,000 miles or so, it is imperative that the brakes are changed when they need to be, so that the Lexus can maintain it stopping power and keep you and your family safe on the road.

Instructions

    1

    Place one heavy object, such as a brick, closely behind each of the back wheels.

    2

    Lift the front end of the Lexus using a jack and jack stands.

    3

    Remove all of the bolts on the front left wheel using your car's tire iron.

    4

    Pull off the wheel to remove it.

    5

    Unscrew both of the bolts on the brake caliper using a wrench.

    6

    Pull off the caliper and remove the brake pad inside. You may find it useful to pry it off gently with a flathead screwdriver.

    7

    Push the piston back into the caliper using a C-clamp.

    8

    Place the new brake pad into the brake caliper and slide it back into the brake rotor.

    9

    Bolt the brake caliper back into place using the two bolts you removed in step five.

    10

    Place the wheel back onto the car and tighten the bolts using the tire iron.

    11

    Repeat steps three through 10 for your front right wheel.

    12

    Remove the jack stands and lower the Lexus' front end.

    13

    Move the bricks to the front of the front wheels.

    14

    Use a jack and jack stands to lift up the E300's back end.

    15

    Repeat steps three through eleven for the back deals.

    16

    Remove the jack stands and lower the back end of the vehicle.

Brake Bedding Procedures

Modern disc brake systems have a tendency to make noise. Since it is understood that all noise is caused by vibration, the key to elimination of annoying brake noise is to eliminate vibration. One of the easiest ways is proper bedding of new pads, before they have a chance to develop vibration. A thorough brake job will prevent or eliminate noise.

Fresh Brake Surfaces

    The key to successful bedding is to start with new or freshly machined rotors. This will allow the surfaces to mate without interference from glaze and contamination from the previous set of brake pads. Pad compounds differ in composition depending on manufacturer; as a result, some compounds will leave a glaze on the rotor that is not compatible with other manufacturer's compounds. This can cause noise ranging from squealing to groaning. Fresh surfaces eliminate this problem.

Bedding Procedure

    Before the vehicle is put into service, bed the new pads. This is also called seating or burnishing the pad, and should be done every time. During the test drive, perform 8 to 10 easy stops from 30 miles per hour to a stop. Allow about 30 seconds between stops to allow the brake system to cool. During the test drive, avoid overheating the brakes with hard stops, or stops from highway speeds. This will cause glazing, and ruin the surface you are trying to build during the bedding procedure.

Cooling.

    After the test drive, park the car and allow the brake system to cool completely. After the bed-in procedure, minor noise may still occur during the first 500 miles of use, and then stop. Avoid overheating the brake system during this initial 500 miles as well. More information about brake pad replacement procedures can be found at http://www.diy-auto-repair.com/brakerepair.html and other sites online.

Minggu, 11 Oktober 2009

How to Remove Brake Rotors From a 2003 Toyota Corolla

How to Remove Brake Rotors From a 2003 Toyota Corolla

Toyota recommends having your rotors ground every time you replace the brake pads on your 2003 Corolla. Most machine shops charge less to grind the rotors when they are off the car, giving you an incentive to remove them. However, when the rotors get too thin, they should not be ground but rather replaced. Thin rotors tend to overheat or even ripple, causing the car to shimmy and shake when you brake.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the hub cap with your fingers or a screwdriver. Loosen the lug nuts slightly with a lug wrench. Lift the wheel off the ground with a jack. Remove the lug nuts and the wheel.

    2

    Remove the two bolts on the back side of the brake caliper with a socket wrench. Remove the brake caliper and prop it out of the way behind the disc brake.It will still be attached by the flexible brake line.

    3

    Slide the brake shoes out of the brake mount with your fingers, being careful not to get oil or grease on them. Remove the two bolts on the back side of the brake mount. Remove the brake mount and set it aside with its screws.

    4

    Remove the cotter pin from the axle by bending it straight with a screwdriver, then pulling it out with pliers. Slide the nut cover off of the axle. Remove the large nut underneath the cover with a wrench or channel lock pliers.

    5

    Pull the rotor off of the axle, being careful to catch the wheel bearings. Wipe the grease off the bearings. Clean the inside of the rotor with a rag.

Sabtu, 10 Oktober 2009

How to Replace a Drive Belt on a Ford Fiesta

How to Replace a Drive Belt on a Ford Fiesta

The Ford Fiesta has been around since the 1970s. Built as a compact vehicle, it has been a staple in Europe and South America in the last few decades, and the Fiesta is making a comeback in American with a 2010 model. But whether having an older model or newer Fiesta, you'll still have to fix it on occasion. This includes the drive belt, essential in powering the air conditioning, power steering pump and engine coolant fans.

Instructions

    1

    Check that the belt is in contact with the pulleys and that it's in good shape. The belt is found at the front of the car. If the belt is loose, frayed or worn, it needs replacement.

    2

    Remove the old belt. Use a wrench to loosen the mounting bolts on the alternator, where the pulleys are found. Loosening the bolts will cause the pulleys to loosen.

    3

    Push the alternator toward the engine and move the belt from the alternator pulleys.

    4

    Take the old belt to an auto parts store and match it with the new belt you're purchasing. It's important to have the exact size of the replacement belt relative to the old belt.

    5

    Place the new belt on by slipping it over the pulley. The belt will fit over the pulley rims with the pulley still loose on the alternator mounting.

    6

    Apply tension to the belt and then pull the alternator away from the engine. When the belt is taut, tighten the bolts until they are tight. Check that the belt is tight around the pulleys and that it can't slip off.

    7

    Recheck the tension of the belt. Run the engine for 10 minutes. Turn it off and check the belt. If it is still tight around the pulleys, your job is done.

How to Remove the Front Rotors on a Toyota Tacoma

How to Remove the Front Rotors on a Toyota Tacoma

The rotors on your Tacoma should typically last through three sets of brake pads. That does not account for severe driving conditions, however, such as continuous towing or everyday travel on mountainous roads. You will often notice the first signs that the rotors are deteriorating when you depress the brake pedal. You may feel hard grinding or have to apply the brakes sooner to effectively stop your truck. The front rotors can sometimes be resurfaced rather than replaced, depending on the amount of wear. You can remove them for inspection right at home with a few tools in 30 minutes or less.

Instructions

    1

    Apply the emergency brake on your Tacoma. Loosen the lug nuts a quarter-turn counterclockwise with a lug wrench on the front, passenger's-side tire.

    2

    Raise the truck with your hydraulic jack. Place a jack stand on the left of the hydraulic jack. Lift the support arm on the jack stand until it equals the height of the hydraulic jack.

    3

    Remove each of the lug nuts by hand and slide the tire off the hub assembly studs. Place the lug nuts in a safe location free of dirt and debris. If the lug nuts get contaminated, they may cross-thread and damage the studs.

    4

    Locate the caliper mounting bracket bolts at the rear of the rotor. The brake caliper sits in and is bolted to the mounting bracket. The caliper has two bolts and the bracket has two bolts that sit just below the calipers. Remove only the bracket bolts, using your socket wrench, not the calipers.

    5

    Attach one end of your 6-inch bungee cord to the shock tower's spring. Lift the mounting bracket and caliper off the rotor. Suspend the assembly with the available end of the bungee cord. Do not hang the assembly by the brake line. Stick the hook on the bungee cord through one of the bracket's bolt eyelets.

    6

    Remove the rotor by pulling it straight off the studs. If the rotor does not pull straight off, turn it with both hands to the left and right to free it. Reverse this procedure to install your new passenger's-side rotor. Repeat the entire process to replace the driver's-side rotor.

Jumat, 09 Oktober 2009

How to Change Car Brake Shoes

Brake shoes are used in drum brakes, which are often used on the rear wheels of cars, especially larger vehicles. Changing brake shoes is more complicated than changing the brake pads on disc brakes, as there are multiple springs and other objects you must disconnect on the brake drum. Consult an automotive guide or mechanic before you try to change brake shoes yourself, in case the process varies for your car. Like pads, brake shoes should always be changed in pairs on both sides.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the end of the car on jack stands, and remove the wheel. Loosening the jug nuts before lifting the car will make it easier to remove the wheel.

    2

    Remove the brake drum; if it is held on with pressed metal washers, cut them off with a good cutting tool. Mark the relationship between the drum and axle with chalk or washable paint, and release the parking brake; then slip the drum off.

    3

    Disconnect the hub and bearing assembly from the axle by removing the four retaining bolts. This isn't a mandatory step, but it will make it easier to reach the shoes.

    4

    Clean the entire assembly with brake cleaner spray. Never blow brake dust away with compressed air. Place a drain pan under the assembly to catch any dripping residue.

    5

    Disconnect the springs from the trailing shoe using pliers, starting with the spring on the adjuster level; then remove the retractor spring from each shoe. Remove the trailing shoe with the adjuster level, then the adjuster screw assembly, then the leading shoe. Separate the trailing shoe from the parking brake lever.

    6

    Clean the backing plate and the adjuster screw assembly. Use a high-temperature grease to lubricate the backing plate's shoe contact areas, and the adjuster screw assembly's threads and socket end.

    7

    Connect the replacement trailing shoe to the parking brake lever, place it on the backing plate, and connect the retractor spring to its hole on the shoe. Reinstall the adjuster screw assembly with the trailing shoe, then install the adjuster level.

    8

    Place the new leading shoe on the backing plate, and see that it engages with the adjuster screw assembly. Connect the retractor spring to the trailing shoe. Connect the actuator spring to the leading shoe, and stretch it to connect to the adjuster level.

    9

    Reinstall the brake drum, turning the star wheel on the adjuster screw so the drum slips onto the shoes without rubbing them. Attach the wheels, and lower the car after changing the brakes on both sides.

1998 Toyota Corolla Brake Drum Removal

1998 Toyota Corolla Brake Drum Removal

Removing the rear brake drums from your 1998 Toyota Corolla may be one of the simplest jobs you can do on your car, assuming the lug nuts are not rusted or damaged. Nevertheless, this job is essential for the safety of your vehicle, allowing you to service your rear brake shoes and drums. Toyota recommends inspecting your brake pads, shoes, drums and rotors every 15,000 miles, and more frequently if you drive regularly on dusty or muddy roads.

Instructions

    1

    Park your 1998 Corolla on level ground. Turn off the car, leaving it in gear (to keep the front wheels from turning). Securely block the front wheels with wheel chocks. Disengage the parking brake.

    2

    Slightly loosen the rear lug nuts with a lug wrench. Jack up the rear of the Toyota Corolla. Remove the lug nuts and rear wheels.

    3

    Remove one of the brake drums by pulling it off the lug screws. If it won't come off, repeatedly strike the flat surface of the drum with a hammer (near the lug screws). Repeat pulling and hammering until the drum comes off. Repeat with the other brake drum.

How to Replace Boat Trailer Brakes

How to Replace Boat Trailer Brakes

Because the brakes of a boat trailer are secondary to the brakes of the vehicle that's towing it, it's easy for a boat owner to disregard the scraping or grinding sound coming from the trailer. But the time to discover your trailer's brake pads have completely worn down is not when you're speeding down a hill with a 6,000-pound boat on your tail. Avoiding that dangerous situation is worth the effort, considering the fact that changing your boat trailer's brake pads is relatively easy and inexpensive --- if you do the work yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Park your boat trailer on a paved, flat surface.

    2

    Loosen each wheel's lug nuts with a tire iron or lug nut wrench. Don't completely remove them.

    3

    Place a floor jack under the trailer's frame and raise it to a height that will allow you to place a jack stand under it on one side. Lower the trailer onto the jack stand.

    4

    Repeat step 3 on the other side of the trailer.

    5
    Use a tire iron or lug nut wrench to remove your boat trailer's lug nuts.
    Use a tire iron or lug nut wrench to remove your boat trailer's lug nuts.

    Select a wheel to work on first and finish removing its lug nuts.

    6
    The caliper can be found on the rotor, viewed here from the top.
    The caliper can be found on the rotor, viewed here from the top.

    Grasp the wheel with both hands and pull it toward you to remove it. Hugging the upper edge of the rotor will be the caliper, which houses the brake pads.

    7

    Remove the caliper bolts with a socket wrench. Although you will then be able to pull the front half of the caliper away from the back half, it will remain attached to your boat trailer by the brake line.

    8
    Use a bungee cord or rope to hang the caliper from the fender or wheel well.
    Use a bungee cord or rope to hang the caliper from the fender or wheel well.

    Hang the caliper from the fender or inside of the wheel well with a bungee cord or rope to avoid damaging the brake line.

    9

    Remove the worn brake pads from the caliper.

    10
    Be careful not to get grease on the side of the brake pad that comes into contact with the rotor.
    Be careful not to get grease on the side of the brake pad that comes into contact with the rotor.

    Apply a small amount of grease to the backs of the new brake pads. Be careful to avoid getting lubricant on the sides that come into contact with the rotor.

    11

    Place the new brake pads in the caliper and remove the caliper from the bungee cord or rope.

    12
    Use a socket wrench to tighten the caliper bolts.
    Use a socket wrench to tighten the caliper bolts.

    Return the caliper to its original position. Replace the caliper bolts, and tighten them with a socket wrench.

    13

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts.

    14

    Repeat steps 5 through 13 for the opposite wheel.

    15

    Lift the boat trailer off the jack stands using a floor jack. Remove the jack stands and lower the trailer to the ground.

How to Replace a Brake Line in a Dodge Durango

If you drive your Dodge Durango through intense conditions, you may want to improve the quality of parts like the brake line. Replacing the stock line with a stainless steel one can help your brakes last longer. Don't take attempt to replace the brake line unless you are knowledgeable about your Durango's brake system.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the car on jack stands made for your Durango. Remove the wheel in order to access the brake line and the bake caliper (for bleeding the system at the end).

    2

    Open the hood and look inside the engine. Locate the brake master cylinder, which should be near the driver's side in the engine compartment and mounted to the power brake booster. Trace the brake lines running from it and to each wheel.

    3

    Remove the section of brake line by disconnecting the bolts (and possible brackets) that support it. Use a line or flare nut wrench. line You'll need two wrenches if the connectors are attached with two bolts each.

    4

    Install the new replacement line. Make sure it's a pre-fabricated brake line with the tube ends already flared and the fittings installed.

    5

    Bleed the brake system to remove air. Open the bleeder valve on the caliper and connect a vinyl tube to a container of brake fluid. Have another person press on the brake pedal until the air is gone.

    6

    Refill the master cylinder with as much fluid as needed. Attach the wheel back on and lower the truck. Test the brakes after replacing the entire line.

Selasa, 06 Oktober 2009

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Hyundai Santa Fe

Brake pads are an important part of the Hyundai Santa Fe's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a quarter inch or risk damaging your Santa Fe's brake discs.

Instructions

Remove the old Brake Pads

    1

    Park your car on a level surface. If you have a stick shift car, make sure the car is in gear. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

    2

    Open the hood of your car. Locate the master cylinder and brake fluid container. If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid in the plastic container and dispose of it the way you dispose of motor oil.

    3

    Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

    4

    Use the socket wrench to remove the lower caliper bolt from the back of the caliper. Rotate the caliper up.

    5

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper.

Install the new Brake Pads

    6

    Insert the pads into the caliper.

    7

    Place a large C-clamp on the body of the caliper and slowly tighten the clamp evenly. Compress the piston until it is flush with the caliper.

    8

    Lower the caliper and use the socket wrench to attach the lower caliper bolt. Tighten the bolt to 16 to 24 foot lbs. (22-32 Nm).

    9

    Replace the tire wheel assembly. Lower the car to the ground. Pump the brake pedal a few times to seat the brake pads.

    10

    Add fluid to the master cylinder container to replace any you removed before you removed the old brake pads.

    11

    Season the brake pads by making only gentle stops when you are driving for the first week after you install the new brake pads. Try not to do any hard stopping when you are seasoning the brakes.

How to Do Brake Shoes

How to Do Brake Shoes

On modern automobiles, drum brakes are located only on the rear wheels. Rear brakes wear much more slowly than front disc brakes, and therefore are changed less frequently. However, badly worn rear brakes can cause depressurization of the braking system and a loss of stopping power. Specific tools are needed for brake shoe replacement, and they can be found at any auto parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Place wheel blocks in front of and behind the front tires and kick them in tightly. This will prevent your car from moving while you are servicing the rear brakes.

    2

    Slightly loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels--only about one turn--and then jack up the back of your car until the rear tires are no longer touching the ground. Place two jack stands beneath the rear axles to support the vehicle and finish removing the lug nuts and pull off the wheels.

    3

    Remove the brake drums from the wheel hub. Brake drums are located directly behind the wheels. They are placed on the wheel studs and cover the entire brake assembly. If they don't slide off of the wheel studs easily, they can be tapped with a hammer to loosen them. Do not strike the brake drums too hard, or they may warp and need to be replaced.

    4

    Examine the inside of the brake drums for excessive wear and scoring. If they are less than 1/8 inch thick, they need to be replaced. If they are still thick but have scoring or deep grooves, they can be taken to a machine shop to be resurfaced.

    5

    Inspect the brake shoe and linkage area. On the top is the wheel cylinder, which exerts pressure on the brake shoes, forcing them into the brake drum and providing stopping power for your vehicle. The brake shoes are on the left and right side. They are long and flat, and are attached with various springs and linkage. Some of the linkage is behind the wheel hub--the part that holds the wheel on and allows it to spin. If brake fluid has leaked on to any of these parts, you need to replace the wheel cylinders.

    The brake linkage and hardware is fairly complex and most cars have slightly different designs. Complete the rest of the steps here one wheel at a time so that you can reference a properly assembled wheel to ensure everything goes back together correctly.

    6

    Remove the brake shoe return springs with the spring tool. This spring is located on the upper side of the brake linkage area. Depending on the vehicle, there may be one or two return springs per wheel. There may also be a spring located on the lower side, connecting the bottom of the brake shoes. Remove this as well if it is present.

    7

    Remove the spring retainer clips with the brake shoe removal tool. Each brake shoe has one spring retainer, facing you, inside the curve of the contact surface. Hold the rear of the clip, behind the brake assembly, so it doesn't spin freely while you are trying to unscrew it.

    8

    Remove the brake shoes and linkage. They will come apart easily without the retaining springs. Swap out the old brake shoes for the new ones. These match identically and must be placed on the correct side of the brake assembly.

    9

    Install the linkage and brake shoes the same way you took them off. Reference the brake assembly on the opposite wheel to ensure correct placement of the pieces. When everything is in place, screw in the brake shoe spring and retaining clip to hold it together.

    10

    Slide the brake drums back on and reinstall the wheels. Activate the emergency brake on your vehicle to tighten the lug nuts while the rear tires are still off of the ground.