Senin, 31 Agustus 2009

Brake Repair on a 2004 Audi A4 Quattro

Brake Repair on a 2004 Audi A4 Quattro

Quattro is an all wheel drive system created by and used in Audi vehicles including the 2004 Audi A4. The all-wheel drive system is supported by four wheel anti-lock disc brakes. To repair the Audi A4 disc brakes you will need to first diagnose the exact problem or component in disrepair. Once the target of your repair is recognized, you can perform the repair correctly with little previous experience.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Audi A4 in a location that will provide safety while changing the brake components. This location should be on a relatively flat surface, away from passing traffic.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel of the brake that requires repair, with the lug wrench.

    3

    Place the lifting jack beneath the frame of the Audi near the target brake. Lift the vehicle and place jack stands beneath the frame to support the car during the repair.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts and the wheel from the wheel bolts.

    5

    Pull the spring clip from the outside of the brake caliper with a pair of pliers.

    6

    Remove the two caliper slide bolts with a 7 mm hex socket and ratchet.

    7

    Pull the caliper from the caliper bracket and rotor.

    8

    Disconnect the brake line from the caliper by screwing the fastener for the line at the point of their connection. Allow the brake line to hang over the drip pan to capture any leaking brake fluid.

    9

    Remove the two bolts that hold the caliper bracket to the rotor using a 17 mm socket and ratchet. Pull the caliper bracket away from the rotor.

    10

    Pull the rotor from the wheel bolts.

    11

    Spray the new rotor with brake cleaner and wipe the entire rotor clean with a towel. Place the new rotor onto the wheel bolts.

    12

    Slide the new brake pads into the new caliper. The pads fit on either side of the caliper walls.

    13

    Connect the new caliper to the brake line and screw on the fastener that will hold the line to the caliper.

    14

    Place the caliper bracket onto the rotor and screw in the 17 mm bolts with the socket and ratchet.

    15

    Place the new caliper with new brake pads installed, onto the caliper bracket and screw in the caliper slide bolts with the 7 mm hex socket and ratchet.

    16

    Replace the spring clip into the outside of the caliper with the pliers. The spring clip fits into the holes on the outside of the caliper.

    17

    Replace the wheels onto the wheel bolts and screw on the lug nuts.

    18

    Lift the Audi to remove the jack stands before lowering the vehicle to the ground.

    19

    Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    20

    Press the brake pedal three times, holding the pedal down after the third depression for 15 seconds.

    21

    Lift the hood of the Audi and remove the master cylinder cap. The cap is located near the windshield on the driver's side of the vehicle.

    22

    Fill the master cylinder with brake fluid as needed. Replace the master cylinder cap and close the Audi's hood.

How to Replace the Rotor in a Dodge Durango

If your Dodge Durango shudders and vibrates when you hit the brakes, it's probably time to replace the rotors. Rotors don't need to be replaced very often over the lifetime of your vehicle, but if they get worn down or become warped then they definitely need to be swapped out. The process is the same across all model years and you can do it in your own garage.

Instructions

    1

    Buy rotors for your Dodge Durango at your local auto parts store. Replace all of the rotors at once, or at least replace the front or rear pair at the same time for safe braking performance.

    2

    Jack up your Durango using jacks and jack stands and block the wheels to prevent them from rolling while you work. Remove the tire and wheel assembly with a socket wrench or an air ratchet.

    3

    Remove the caliper and mounting bolts and suspend these with mechanic's wire being careful not to disconnect the brake line. Never let the caliper hang from the brake line as this could damage the line or cause a disconnection followed by a big mess.

    4

    Unscrew the retainers on the wheel studs and then remove the old rotor. If the rotor is stuck in place, use a light duty puller to remove it. Clean the hub and surrounding surfaces with a damp cloth to remove any corrosion or debris.

    5

    Place the new rotor into position on the hub and put the retainers back into place. Replace the caliper and brake line to their original position and then secure the two mounting bolts with a torque wrench.

    6

    Install the wheel assembly and tire, and then repeat the process for each additional rotor. When you're done, lower the vehicle, tighten the lug nuts with a torque wrench, and then test drive your Dodge Durango to make sure that the brakes are working properly.

Minggu, 30 Agustus 2009

How to Replace Front Rotors on a 1990 Mazda

How to Replace Front Rotors on a 1990 Mazda

It is not difficult to replace the front rotors on a 1990 Mazda if you have the proper tools. The brake rotors work along with the brake pads to stop your car when you push on the brake pedal. The master cylinder pushes brake fluid through the brake lines. This brake fluid then flows into the brake calipers, which push a piston out of the brake caliper. The pads squeeze the rotor between them to slow and stop the Mazda.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a level surface and turn off its ignition. Place a set of wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Loosen the tire's lug nuts with the lug wrench. Raise the front end of the Mazda up with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the vehicle and raise it to the frame.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts using the lug wrench. Pull the wheel off the car. Remove the brake caliper with a socket and ratchet and secure it to the strut using a wire tie. Do not allow the caliper to hang loose or you may stretch and damage the brake line.

    3

    Remove the two retaining screws from the face of the rotor using the screwdriver, turning counterclockwise. Pull the rotor off the wheel assembly.

    4

    Put the new rotor on the wheel assembly. Install the two retaining screws, turning them clockwise with the screwdriver. Place the brake caliper into the mounting bracket and tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet. Put the wheel on the car and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    5

    Place the jack under the vehicle and remove the jack stand from under the Mazda. Lower the car to the ground with the jack. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

How to Repair the Front Brake Calipers of a 2000 Ford Windstar

How to Repair the Front Brake Calipers of a 2000 Ford Windstar

The calipers on the Ford Windstar need to be in good working order or else you need to change them right away, because without them, your brakes will not work properly. It is the caliper that actually squeezes together the brake pads against the rotors to slow and stop the automobile. Signs that the brake calipers need replacing include the vehicle "lurching" when you try to stop, or taking longer to stop when you apply the brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Open the engine compartment of the Windstar and drain half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster. The master cylinder is on the firewall at the back of the engine compartment on the driver side of the vehicle. The lid will say, "Use only Dot 3" on it or something similar.

    2

    Place a set of wheel chocks behind the rear wheels of the Windstar. Raise the front of the vehicle with the automobile jack on the side that you are starting with. Place a jack stand under the vehicle near the jacking point and raise it to the frame. Loosen the lug nuts with the lug wrench and pull the wheel from the automobile.

    3

    Remove the brake caliper from the wheel assembly by loosening the two bolts on the back of the caliper with a socket and ratchet. Disconnect the brake hose from the brake caliper using a wrench. Disconnect the brake hose from the main brake line using a wrench and discard it. You will need to put new hoses on the calipers.

    4

    Connect a new brake hose to the main brake line and tighten it with a wrench. Attach the other end of the brake hose to the new brake caliper. Make sure you have the proper caliper for the side of the vehicle you are working on. The caliper will have an "L" for the left and an "R" for the right. Place the new brake pads in the caliper.

    5

    Place the caliper in the mounting cradle and secure it by tightening the mounting bolts with a socket and ratchet. Place the wheel back on the Windstar and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Repeat the procedure on the other side of the vehicle.

    6

    Add fresh brake fluid to the master cylinder when the project is complete, and bleed the air out of the brake lines. To do this, have someone pump the brakes several times and hold them in while you open the bleeder valve on the caliper to expel the air.

Sabtu, 29 Agustus 2009

How to Bleed Brakes on a 1998 Chevy Blazer

How to Bleed Brakes on a 1998 Chevy Blazer

Anytime you work on a vehicle's brake system you inevitably trap air in the brake lines. Even if you are careful, working on the brakes can force air into the system, requiring you to bleed out the air. The 1998 Chevrolet Blazer uses bleed screws at each wheel well to allow owners to release air from the lines. Bleeding the brakes is a multiple-step process and takes about an hour to do properly.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the vehicle with the jack one wheel at a time until the wheel clears the ground. Place a jack stand under the axle to secure the wheel; remove the tire's lug nuts with a lug wrench. Remove the tire and set to the side. Repeat for all four wheels until all four tires are removed and jack stands are located under each wheel's axle. If necessary, you can raise one wheel at a time and remove the tire before working on it.

    2

    Remove the cap from the brake fluid reservoir. Add DOT-3 brake fluid until the reservoir is full. While bleeding the brakes, monitor the reservoir to make sure it never drops below half full.

    3

    Loosen the bleed screw on the passenger rear tire. The screw will be located on the back-side of the drum near the axle. Place the rubber tubing over the line and drape it into a clear plastic bottle partially filled with DOT-3 brake fluid. Always start with the passenger rear as it is the farthest from the brake reservoir. You will work your way closer to the reservoir with each tire.

    4

    Have an assistant press the brake pedal firmly to the floor and hold it there. Loosen the bleed screw until the fluid pushes out into the tubing and bottle. You will see fluid and bubbles coming out of the bleed screw. Once the flow stops (a few seconds at most), tighten the screw quickly. Have the assistant release pressure on the pedal.

    5

    Repeat step 4 until only fluid is coming out of the bleed screw without any air bubbles. Once the air is bled out of that line, remove the tubing and firmly tighten the bleed screw.

    6

    Repeat steps 4 and 5 for the driver's rear brake, then the passenger's front brake, and finally, the driver's front brake. The bleed screws for the front brakes are pointed upward on the back of the caliper. Top off the brake fluid as necessary during the process.

    7

    Re-install all the tires and lug nuts. Lower the vehicle to the ground one wheel at a time, removing the jack stands as you do. Tighten the lug nuts to factory specifications and test the brakes with a slow driving brake test (while going slowly, quickly apply the brakes). You should feel no more looseness in the brake pedal. If any further looseness exists, troubleshoot the braking system for further errors or damage.

Kamis, 27 Agustus 2009

How to Fix the Rear Brake Pads on a 1994 Ford Taurus

How to Fix the Rear Brake Pads on a 1994 Ford Taurus

The 1994 Ford Taurus featured rear disc or rear drum brakes. Rear disc brakes required replacement of brake pads when the friction material of the pads wore down. Rear drum required the replacement of the brake shoes. While replacing the rear brake pads was a simpler process than replacing rear brake shoes, the rear calipers on the Taurus requires a special tool to retract the piston and make room for the new, thicker pads.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Taurus on a flat surface suitable for lifting and supporting the sedan.

    2

    Remove half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder with a brake fluid siphon and then dispose of the fluid. Replace the cap to the master cylinder.

    3

    Place a tire chock in front of one of the front tires and do not apply the parking brake.

    4

    Crack the rear lug nuts loose with a wheel nut wrench or tire iron. Only loosen them about 1/4-turn counterclockwise.

    5

    Hoist the rear of the Taurus up with a car jack one side at a time and then support the sedan onto jack stands in a safe location.

    6

    Finish removing the lug nuts and then remove the rear tires.

    7

    Place an open-end wrench on the upper inner slider pin and then remove the pinch bolt with a closed-end wrench. Repeat for the lower inner slide pin and pinch bolt.

    8

    Remove the caliper and then hang it to the rear coil spring with a caliper hanger or hook.

    9

    Place the 6-inch extension onto the ratchet and then match the tabs of the caliper reset tool to the two grooves in the rear caliper piston. Insert the tool onto the end of the extension and then tighten the rear caliper piston in a clockwise motion to retract it fully into the piston bore.

    10

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper bridge and then apply a light coat of the brake lubricant packet supplied in the replacement brake pads box to the upper and lower contact points on the bridge where the pad tabs seat onto.

    11

    Set the new brake pads into the caliper bridge and then replace the caliper over the pads and rotor. The pad springs will require you to push in on the caliper to align the caliper pinch bolts into the slider pins. Tighten the bolts with the closed-end wrench while retaining the slider pins stationary with an open-end wrench.

    12

    Repeat Steps 7 through 12 for the other wheel.

    13

    Replace the tire and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts as much as they will allow with the rear wheels elevated. Lift the Taurus again with the car jack enough to remove the jack stands and then lower the sedan slowly until it rests on the ground. Tighten the lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds using the torque wrench and socket.

    14

    Pump the brake pedal several times to extend the brake caliper pistons. Once the brake pedal feels firm, you'll have seated the brake pads to the rotors.

    15

    Check and fill the brake fluid in the master cylinder. Only add new brake fluid.

Brake Service Tips

Brake Service Tips

Most drivers will find that sooner or later, their car's brakes will need to be serviced. Brake repairs can range from the replacement of pads to the repair of rotors; the costs depend upon which repairs are needed and whether any damage is present. Before having your brakes serviced, there are some things you should know to prevent being taken advantage of by an auto repair shop or mechanic.

Discounted Prices

    Often you will find brake repair "specials" advertised in print or on television, but when you arrive at the auto shop, it's find a different story. This is due to unethical car repair shops advertising a certain price, but then telling customers there are other parts that also must be replaced, even if there are no other repairs needed. Avoid this altogether by either skipping advertised brake specials or declining additional suggested repairs.

Lifetime Services

    You may also encounter an offer of "lifetime" service. "Lifetime" service allows a customer to pay for a certain repair once, typically at a higher cost; should that part need to be repaired again, the auto repair shop will fix it at no additional cost. However, when it comes to brakes, it may be best to just avoid purchasing lifetime service. Consider brake pads, for example: the "lifetime" brake pads typically used are hard and tend to wear down your car's rotors; replacing a rotor is much more expensive than replacing a brake pad.

Inspection

    After servicing your breaks, the mechanic who worked on your car should clean all the components of your brake system to ensure there is no dust or squeaking. The mechanic should also add anti-seize compound to all bolt and lug nut threads to prevent them from rusting.

    When having your brake pads serviced, before you pay, ask to see the pads that were removed. Upon inspection, they should be visibly worn; otherwise, there is absolutely no reason to have had them replaced and no reason for you to pay for unnecessary services.

How to Disconnect a Brake Pushrod

A brake pushrod connects the brake pedal to the power brake booster in your vehicle. The rod itself actuates the brake booster, and helps to create the vacuum necessary for the booster to work properly. Since the brake booster is connected to the brake master cylinder, it also actuates the hydraulic fluid in the braking system. If you ever need to replace the brake booster in your vehicle, you'll need to know how to disconnect the brake pedal from the booster. This involves disconnecting the brake pushrod.

Instructions

    1

    Look on the rear side of the brake pedal. There is a cotter pin on the end of the brake pedal to pushrod retaining pin. Grab the end of this cotter pin and pull it straight out.

    2

    Use a punch or a small screwdriver to gently tap the brake pedal to get the pushrod retaining pin out of the mounting bracket.

    3

    Separate the brake pedal from the pushrod by pulling up on the brake pedal.

Rabu, 26 Agustus 2009

DIY Brake Replacement on a Ford Focus

DIY Brake Replacement on a Ford Focus

The brakes on the Ford Focus are responsible for stopping the car. The Ford Focus model cars come equipped with front and rear disc brakes. When the brake pedal is applied, the brake fluid travels through the brake lines. Once the brake fluid reaches the brake calipers, the cylinder inside of the caliper compresses the brake pads to the brake rotors. When the brake pads have been fully compressed to both sides of the brake rotors, the vehicle comes to a safe stop. It's a wise precaution to replace or have the brake rotors machine turned each time the brake pads are replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Ford Focus on a hard, level surface.

    2

    Loosen all of the lug nuts from the front wheels. Position the jack under the front of the Focus and jack the car up from the front cross member that is located under the engine.

    3

    Place the car stands under the proper jack points on both sides of the Focus. Lower the jack so that the front of the car is sitting securely on the stands. Leave the jack in place.

    4

    Remove both front wheels and place the wheels flat down. Move to the front driver-side wheel and locate the two mounting bolts on the back side of the caliper. There will be two plastic caps covering the two mounting bolts. Pull the plastic caps out and place them on the ground.

    5

    Insert the tip of the flat-head screwdriver behind the outer brake pad. Pry the outer brake pad back and forth until the brake caliper is loose. Then, loosen and remove the two Allen-head bolts from the rear of the brake caliper with an Allen wrench.

    6

    Pull the brake caliper off the side of the brake rotor with your hand. Hang the brake caliper to the front strut or to the frame rail with a small piece of rope.

    7

    Remove the two Phillips-head screws from the brake pads. Then, pull the inner brake pad out of the caliper. Slide the C-clamp into the caliper, facing the outer brake pad. Compress the outer brake pad against the caliper cylinder with the C-clamp until the cylinder has fully retracted inside the brake caliper.

    8

    Remove the C-clamp from the brake caliper. Pull the outer brake pad out of the brake caliper along with any other brake pad accessories. Put the new brake pads along with any new brake pad accessories into the brake caliper. Remove the rope from the caliper and position the caliper back onto the brake rotor. Put the two Allen-head bolts back in and tighten down tight. Put the wheel back on and tighten with the tire tool.

    9

    Follow the same steps above for replacing the brake pads on the front passenger side, rear passenger side and the rear driver side. When all of the brake pads have been changed, put the wheels back on and tighten down.

    10

    Crank the Focus and push the brake pedal in and out five or six times. This will remove any air from the brake system and match the new brake pads to the brake rotors. Turn the engine off and jack the Focus back up. Pull the stands out from under the car. Lower the Ford Focus to the ground and pull the jack out.

How to Make Double Flare Brake Lines

How to Make Double Flare Brake Lines

Vehicles in the United States all use a double flare brake line. The double flared line sits against a brake component (either the master cylinder inlet or outlet fittings, or the brake hoses at the slave cylinder). The flare refers to the end of the brake line tubing which is opened, or flared, to a 45-degree angle. The flare is then folded over onto itself, creating a secure, double flare. Making double flare brake lines is extremely challenging. While it is possible to do, most people ultimately fail in successfully making a stable double flare. This is due to the fact that making a double flare requires precision. If the flare is not perfect, the line will eventually suffer a catastrophic failure of the braking system, which could cause serious injury or death to everyone in the vehicle. If you're going to attempt making a double flare, you'll need specialized equipment and a lot of patience.

Instructions

    1

    Place a tube nut over the end of the steel brake line so that the threaded end is facing the end of the brake line you are going to be working on.

    2

    Make sure the ends of your brake line are free of any burrs and are true and level. You may need to use a tube cutter and a metal file to achieve this.

    3

    Place the end of the brake line into the line clamp, so that the brake line sticks out of the top of the clamp.

    4

    Set the brake line anvil used to make double flares on the face of the clamp. The anvil has two sides. One side is flat, and the other side is raised and fits into the center of the tubing. Set the flat side of the anvil against the clamp next to the brake line.

    5

    Adjust the exposed length of the brake line. There is a line on the center of the anvil that indicates how far the end of the brake line needs to be exposed. Adjust the end of the line until it matches up with the line on the anvil.

    6

    Tighten the anvil down. This is important. The brake line must not move once you tighten it down.

    7

    Place the raised end of the anvil into the center of the brake line.

    8

    Place the flaring tool over the anvil and clamp. The anvil has a large screw with a 45-degree angled bit at the end of it.

    9

    Tighten the flaring tool so that the end of the line bubbles out. Tighten it until the anvil sits flush against the clamp. Then remove the flaring tool and anvil. You will notice that the line has formed a bubble. If the line has moved at all, you must re-cut the line and start over.

    10

    Fit the 45-degree flaring end of the tool against the center of the tubing and tighten the flaring tool once more. As you do this, the bobble will fold over onto itself, forming a 45-degree double flare. The flare must be perfectly true and square, and the perfectly centered for it to hold in your vehicle's braking system.

How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a 2002 Mazda Protege

Worn brake pads on the 2002 Mazda Protege will emit a squeal to alert the driver that the brakes are in need of replacement. The sound comes from the wear indicators built into the brake pads' surface being exposed. Once exposed, the indicators make contact with the rotors to cause the noise. Replace the brake pads as soon as possible to avoid brake failure due to lack of brake pad material, as well as rotor damage from prolonged gouging from the wear indicators.

Instructions

    1

    Use a lug wrench to loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels of the Mazda.

    2

    Lift the back end of the vehicle with the lifting jack and place jack stands beneath the frame of the Mazda.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts and rear wheels of the vehicle.

    4

    Use a 14 mm wrench to remove the caliper slide pins from the rear brake calipers.

    5

    Lift the caliper from the rotor. Pry the brake pads from either side of the caliper with a flathead screwdriver or other flat pry tool.

    6

    Place the 4.5 mm Allen wrench into the caliper piston inside the caliper. Turn the wrench clockwise to screw the piston into the side of the caliper. The piston needs to be fully opened to accommodate the new brake pads.

    7

    Spread a thin layer of brake grease on the back of the new brake pads and clip them to the caliper walls. The metal clips can be fastened to the sides of the caliper by hand.

    8

    Place the caliper over the rotor and screw in the caliper slide pins with the 14 mm wrench.

    9

    Place the wheel on the wheel bolts and screw on the lug nuts. Lift the back end of the Mazda with the jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the rear tires back to the ground.

    10

    Press the brake pedal and hold it down for 10 seconds. Release the pedal and repeat the depression to return the rear caliper piston to the proper starting position.

    11

    Pull the hood release lever under the dashboard on the driver's side of the vehicle and lift the hood.

    12

    Remove the master cylinder cap located at the back, right-hand side of the engine compartment.

    13

    Check the level of brake fluid in the reservoir and add new DOT-3 brake fluid as needed. Replace the master cylinder cap and close the Mazda's hood.

Selasa, 25 Agustus 2009

How to Install Brake Pads on a Honda Civic

How to Install Brake Pads on a Honda Civic

Installing brake pads is a fairly rudimentary procedure, though it does take some car know-how and shouldn't be undertaken by amateurs. Honda Civics are straightforward vehicles and those with mechanical inclinations can install new brake pads pretty easily with the proper equipment. These instructions should be adequate for most contemporary years and models of Civics, though there may be some slight variations depending upon your particular vehicle.

Instructions

    1

    Jack up the front right side of the car, or use a hydraulic lift if you have access to one. You don't need to raise it especially high, just high enough to slip the tire off.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts with a lug wrench and carefully lift the wheel away from the car. Set the lug nuts somewhere safe where you can retrieve them when you need to replace the tire.

    3

    Find the caliper assembly on the front side of the rotor (the metallic disk behind the wheel). Remove the top bolt with a wrench, then loosen the bottom bolt.

    4

    Rotate the caliper on the bottom bolt until you can see the piston.

    5

    Look for a valve toward the top of the caliper covered by a rubber cap. Take the cap off and loosen the valve ever so slightly with a wrench. This releases brake fluid pressure on the piston.

    6

    While continuing to hold the valve firmly with the wrench, depress the piston using a C-clamp in your free hand. Then, still holding the piston down, retighten the valve. You should be able to remove the C-clamp safely.

    7

    Slip the old brake pads out of the caliper and replace them with new ones. The pads are often slightly different sizes, and one of them probably has a thin length of metal used to make the scraping sound that alerts you to the need to replace your brake pads. Make sure you match the orientation of the new pads to the orientation of the old.

    8

    Turn the caliper assembly back into position and tighten the bolts so that it stays in place. Make sure you put the cap on over the pressure valve as well.

    9

    Replace the tire, tighten the lug nuts, and lower the Honda to the ground.

    10

    Repeat the entire process with the brake assembly on the left-hand side.

Senin, 24 Agustus 2009

How to Install Brakes on a 1999 Ford F250 Truck

How to Install Brakes on a 1999 Ford F250 Truck

There is no piece of safety equipment on your 1999 Ford F-250 truck more pivotal than the brakes. When your brakes are worn, they will not be able to produce maximum stopping power, which could put you, your family, or other families directly into harm's way. In order to prevent this, it is important to maintain your brakes by regularly changing the brakes every 35,000 miles or when they begin to squeak during routine stops.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the front end of the F-250 using a jack. Make sure that your jack is rated to lift trucks and at least three tons. A normal car jack will not do.

    2

    Open the hood and open the brake fluid reservoir.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts on each of the front wheels using a tire iron.

    4

    Pull off the front wheels.

    5

    Remove the two bolts on each of the front brake calipers using a socket wrench.

    6

    Open the calipers and remove the worn brake discs inside. The brake discs may be stuck to the inside of the calipers, at which point you may use a flathead screwdriver to gently pry them free.

    7

    Use a C-clamp to force the piston in each of the brake calipers back into the housing. Make sure each piston is flush with the caliper.

    8

    Place the new brake pads into the calipers.

    9

    Slide the calipers back over the rotors and bolt them into place using a socket wrench and the bolts you removed earlier.

    10

    Put the wheels back onto the F-250 and bolt them in place using the lug nuts and tire iron.

    11

    Lower the front end of the truck and then lift the back end using the jack.

    12

    Repeat steps three through 10 for the back wheels.

    13

    Lower the back end of the F-250 using the jack.

    14

    Top off the fluid in the brake fluid reservoir and close the reservoir. Only pour new brake fluid into the reservoir.

Kamis, 20 Agustus 2009

How to Change Rear Disk Brake Pads

Although rear disc brakes only provide 25% braking capacity for a vehicle, the pads are smaller and thinner than front disc brake pads. Rear disc brakes can provide more consistent braking power to a vehicle than rear drum brakes, most often require less maintenance (concerning constant cleaning and adjusting) than rear drum brakes, and are easier to replace than rear drum brakes. Different makes and models use different types of calipers. To ensure you're removing the calipers correctly to replace the pads, always refer to a repair manual for the specific vehicle you're working on.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the rear of the vehicle or the entire vehicle and remove the rear hub caps, lug nuts (using the impact gun and a socket), and wheels.

    2

    Locate the caliper bolts and remove the with a hand ratchet and a socket. Some imports may have a pivoting caliper, meaning the only the lower caliper bolt is removed and the caliper pivots on the upper bolt and slides off. Refer to the repair manual for the specific vehicle you're working on.

    3

    Hang the caliper from a metal hanger or hook to the rear suspension or frame.

    4

    Use the proper compression device to compress the caliper piston inward. A set of large channel locks can be used or a large C-clamp. Some imports require a caliper reset tool to screw the piston of the caliper inward clockwise. Refer to the repair manual for the correct procedure. Compress the piston until it is fully seated inside the caliper piston bore. Reposition the caliper piston boot if necessary by pressing it back into place or pulling it away from the piston with your fingers to let a trapped air bubble out.

    5

    Remove the pads from the caliper or the caliper bridge and discard them.

    6

    Remove the old hardware from the caliper bridge if applicable. Inspect the rubber boots for the caliper slides and replace any damaged or worn boots. If necessary, clean the surface of the caliper slides using a wire brush wheel on a bench grinder.

    7

    Use the acid brush to spread some brake lubricant or anti-seize compound to the bridge where the old hardware/rattle clips were removed from. Install the new rattle clips and apply another coat of lubricant to the tops of the clips.

    8

    Place the shims on the pads if not they're not on already, and then install the pads into the bridge or the caliper.

    9

    Apply a coat of lubricant to the caliper slides before reinstalling the caliper. Some vehicles use a combination slide and caliper bolt as one components. Other may use a smaller bolt and a separate set of slides. For those types, remove the slides, clean them on the wire brush wheel if needed, and then coat them with lubricant before replacing them in the caliper.

    10

    Replace the caliper and tighten the caliper bolts. Repeat steps 2-10 for the other rear wheel.

    11

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Torque the lug nuts with the gun and an appropriate torque stick for the vehicle (a hand torque wrench is often recommended if available).

    12

    Pump the foot brake pedal to seat the pads to the rotors and restore pressure to the caliper pistons. Check and adjust the brake fluid level in the master cylinder before test driving.

How to Put Back Brakes on an A92 Buick Regal

The 1992 Buick Regal comes equipped with brake shoes instead of brake pads on the rear wheels. The brake shoes stop the rear wheels from turning by applying friction to the inside surface of the brake drum. When the rear brake shoes are engaged, the brake shoe springs work together to compress the brake shoes to the surface of the drum. Over time, the brake shoes will wear down and require replacement. Replace the brake shoes before the shoe thickness reaches 1/8-inch to prevent the brake shoes from damaging the drums.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 1992 Buick Regal on a level surface and turn the engine off. Position the wheel chocks in the front of and behind both front wheels.

    2

    Loosen all of the lug nuts from both rear wheels with a lug wrench or a tire tool.

    3

    Jack the rear of the 1992 Buick Regal up and place the jack stands under the proper rear jacking points on both sides of the car. Lower the rear of the car onto the jack stands and leave the jack in the up position.

    4

    Remove all of the lug nuts from the rear wheels. Pull both rear wheels off and place them flat down near each side of the car.

    5

    Move to the driver-side rear brake drum and position the brake drum puller over the top and bottom edges of the brake drum. Position the actuator of the puller over the center of the wheel hub. Turn the bolt head on the front of the actuator clockwise with a ratchet and a socket until the puller has pulled the brake drum completely off the brake shoes. Loosen and remove the puller from the brake drum.

    6

    Finish removing the brake drum with your hands. Place the brake drum on the ground. Remove the top two brake springs from the top of the brake shoe plate with the brake spring removal tool.

    7

    Remove the two lower brake shoe hold down springs from the retainers on each brake shoe with the brake spring removal tool. Pull the brake shoes off the brake shoe plate and place them on the ground.

    8

    Place the new brake shoes onto the brake shoe plate. Reinstall the bottom two retainer springs with the brake spring removal tool. Reinstall the top two brake shoe springs with the same tool.

    9

    Slide the brake drum over the new brake shoes. If the brake drum will not fit over the new brake shoes, adjust the brake shoes until the brake drum will fit over the new shoes. To adjust the brake shoes to compress inward, locate the brake shoe adjuster star wheel at the bottom the brake shoe plate. Use a flat-head screwdriver to turn the start gears clockwise to move the brake shoes toward each other. This will make the room needed for the brake drum to fit over the new brake shoes.

    10

    Slide the wheel back on and screw the lug nuts on tightly. Move to the passenger-side rear brake drum and repeat the same process as outlined in the steps above to replace the brake shoes. Slide the wheel back onto the wheel hub and screw the lug nuts on tightly.

    11

    Jack the 1992 Buick Regal back up and remove the jack stands. Lower the car back to the ground.

    12

    Finish tightening all of the lug nuts down tightly with the tire tool or lug wrench.

Rabu, 19 Agustus 2009

How to Tell If My Rear Brake Rotors Are Warped

How to Tell If My Rear Brake Rotors Are Warped

Rotors are key components of a car's braking system. When you press the brake pedal, fluid passes through the brake lines and presses against your car's brake pads. These pads squeeze the rotor, which is attached to the wheel, and the resulting friction slows your car. A warped rotor interferes with the brake system and can cause a failure to stop or damage to other parts of the system. Unfortunately, warped rotors in the front and rear produce similar symptoms. If your car is showing signs of a warped rotor, it may be best to have a mechanic determine which one is causing the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Pay attention to the way your brake pedal feels when you press it. Warped rotors cause pulsating pressure in the brake lines as the pads are moved in and out with any contours that may have developed in the rotor. If you can feel a pulsation in the pedal, your rotors have likely warped. (See reference 1)

    2

    Severe warping of rotors may cause the entire frame of the car to shake. You may be able to feel this shaking not only in the brake pedal but in the steering wheel as well. (See reference 1) Shaking in the steering column may be noticeable only when you are forced to stop quickly or from high speeds.

    3

    A slightly warped rotor can cause damage without being bent enough to produce any noticeable pulsation or shaking. If you are getting significantly fewer miles out of brake pads than their manufacturer suggests, there may be a slight warp in the rotor that is causing extra wear on the pads. (See reference 2)

How to Replace the Back Brake Rotors on a 2001 Pontiac Grand Am GT

Pontiac introduced the third generation Grand Am in 1999 and discontinued it in 2005 after the debut of the G6. Marketed as an economical alternative to the sporty Grand Prix, the Grand Am GT served Pontiac's thriftier buyers while providing them with a pseudo sports car appearance. The 2001 Grand Am GT had four-wheel disc brakes, a must for any driver concerned with performance. The Grand Am GT's back brake rotors should last about twice as long as the fronts, since the front brakes supply the majority of the braking effort.

Instructions

    1

    Jam two wheel chocks against the tread on the right-front wheel, one chock at the front and one at the back of the tire. Loosen each of the Grand Am's rear lug nuts with the lug wrench so you can remove them by hand later.

    2

    Lift the Grand Am's rear end with the jack. Position a jack stand under the rear frame on both sides. Lower the Grand Am onto the jack stands with the jack.

    3

    Remove the rear lug nuts and wheels to expose the rear brakes. Place a drop pan under the left-rear brake assembly. Wash away the brake dust and road dirt from the brake assembly with brake cleaner spray.

    4

    Unbolt the left-rear brake caliper with the socket wrench and a 13 mm socket. Lift the caliper off the brake rotor. Remove the old brake pads from the caliper and set the caliper in the rear suspension so it does not hang from the brake line.

    5

    Clean the inside of the caliper with brake cleaner to remove old grease, brake dust and road dirt. Apply a thin layer of white lithium grease to the caliper slides.

    6

    Compress the caliper pistons with the caliper piston tool. Insert the new brake pads, making sure to align the dowels on the outboard pad with their corresponding holes in the caliper.

    7

    Unbolt the caliper bracket with the socket wrench and socket. Remove the caliper bracket.

    8

    Slip the left-rear rotor off the hub and set it aside. Slip the new back brake rotor onto the hub.

    9

    Bolt the caliper bracket back on with the socket wrench and socket. Lower the brake caliper over the rotor and into the caliper bracket. Bolt the caliper to the caliper bracket with the socket wrench and socket and then tighten to 40 foot-pounds with the torque wrench.

    10

    Reinstall the wheel and lug nuts. Lift the Grand Am off the jack stands with the jack. Remove the jack stands by hand before lowering the Grand Am to the ground.

    11

    Tighten the rear lug nuts to 85 foot-pounds with a torque wrench. Remove the wheel chocks before driving the Grand Am.

Selasa, 18 Agustus 2009

How to Eliminate Brake Dust

How to Eliminate Brake Dust

Brake dust occurs during the normal operation of an automobile. Brake dust can never be completely prevented, but it can be easily controlled and cleaned with regular maintenance as part of the process of washing the car. Washing the rims, tires and wheels each time you wash the car keeps the wheels shiny while at the same time removing excessive brake dust buildup, which improves the performance of the braking system of an automobile.

Instructions

    1

    Pour three ounces of automotive soap in a measuring cup.

    2

    Pour the measured amount of soap into the bucket.

    3

    Fill the bucket halfway with water.

    4

    Wet one wheel at a time with the water hose. Wetting the wheel helps to loosen caked-on brake dust and mud from the rims and wheels and from around the brake pads.

    5

    Wet the brush with the soapy water. Use circular motions on each wheel to remove dust on the brake pads, rims and wheels of each tire.

    6

    Spray the wheel cleaner on a clean shop rag. Use circular motions to thoroughly clean the insides of the wheel.

    7

    Turn on the water hose on a low setting to rinse away the soap. Use a clean shop rag to wipe the wheel and apply wax to restore shine to the rims.

How to Replace the Rotor in a Jeep Grand Cherokee

If your Jeep Grand Cherokee seems to shudder and pulse when you hit the brakes, the rotors are probably the culprit. Rotors, also known as brake discs, become warped and worn down over time for various reasons. Luckily, the process for changing them is fairly simple and you can do it in your own garage.

Instructions

1999 to Present Jeep Grand Cherokees

    1

    Raise your Jeep using a jack and jack stands. Block the wheels to keep your Grand Cherokee from rolling while you work. Replace all of the rotors at once, or at least the front and rear end rotor pair at the same time.

    2

    Remove the first tire and wheel assembly and set aside. Unscrew the caliper adapter mounting bolts from the steering knuckle and then slide the caliper and attached brake line off of the rotor. Use mechanic's wire to suspend the caliper and keep the brake line from becoming disconnected or damaged while you change the rotor.

    3

    Discard the O-ring that secures the rotor onto the hub. Pull off the old rotor and then clean the hub and surrounding surfaces with a damp cloth.

    4

    Install the new rotor onto the hub and tighten the holding screws. Replace the caliper, adapter and brake line and tighten the mounting bolts with a torque wrench or air ratchet with an appropriate adapter. Torque to 65 to 85 ft. lbs. (90 to 115 Nm).

    5

    Replace the wheel assembly and tire and repeat the process for each additional rotor. Then lower the vehicle, tighten and torque the tire lug nuts, and then pump the brakes until the pedal is firm. Road test your Jeep to make sure that everything is working properly.

1993 to 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokees

    6

    Raise your Jeep Grand Cherokee on jacks with jack stands for added support. Block the wheels to keep your vehicle from rolling while you work. Remove the wheels and wheel assemblies.

    7

    Remove the caliper while keeping the brake line connected. Use mechanic's wire to hang the caliper out of the way while you work. Never hang the caliper by the brake hose.

    8

    Pull off the grease cap, cotter pin, nut cap, nut and washer from the spindle. Pull the hub toward you and then catch the outer bearing (it should fall out as you pull). Remove the hub and then remove the old rotor. Discard the inner seal.

    9

    Clean and then repack the hub and bearings with grease. Install the inner bearing and a new seal. Install the new rotor and hub on to the spindle. Next, install the outer bearing.

    10

    Install the washer and nut. Turn the rotor as you tighten the nut to 25 ft. lbs. (33 Nm) to seat the bearings with a torque wrench or an air ratchet with an appropriate adapter.

    11

    Replace the nut cap and a new cotter pin. Fasten the grease cap and then discard the mechanic's wire and mount the caliper and brake line back into place. Replace the wheel assembly and tire and then repeat this process for each additional rotor.

    12

    Lower the Jeep, tighten and torque the lug nuts and then pump the brake until you get a firm pedal. Road test your Jeep Grand Cherokee to make sure that the rotor installation was successful.

How to Remove the Front Caliper in a 1997 Ford Escort

How to Remove the Front Caliper in a 1997 Ford Escort

The brake calipers on your Escort work similarly to a vise when you depress the brake pedal. The piston on each of the calipers pushes out against the brake pads and causes them to squeeze against the surface of the rotors, stopping the car. Damage to the caliper often happens from a rip or tears in the rubber boot that surrounds the piston. This can cause the piston to freeze due to dirt drying out its lubricating grease. Ford suggests that you inspect the front and rear brake calipers every 10,000 to 15,000 miles. You can remove them for service or replacement right at home.

Instructions

    1

    Open the driver's door and apply the emergency brake on your Escort. Loosen the lug nuts on the front passenger's-side tire a quarter-turn counterclockwise with a lug wrench.

    2

    Raise the car with a hydraulic jack no more than 25 inches from the ground. This measurement includes the 10 inches that the car already sits off the ground. Place a jack stand under the frame rail across from the tire to help support the car's weight.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts completely with your lug wrench. Slide the tire off the studs and set it to the side of your work area. Place all of the lug nuts on the seat within the car so you don't lose or misplace them.

    4

    Set a 5-gallon bucket down just outside of the wheel well, near the brake caliper. Remove the two inner, lower caliper mounting bolts with your socket wrench. The caliper's piston has two bolts that hold it on the brake caliper. Do not remove the piston's bolts.

    5

    Grasp the brake caliper with both hands and carefully lift it off the rotor. Set the caliper down on the bucket with the brake line facing up.

    6

    Remove the banjo-bolt holding the brake line on the caliper with your socket wrench. Hold the brake line plug in one hand. Use your free hand to quickly lift the brake line away from the caliper, then swiftly clog the line with the brake line plug. Discard the two flat washers that sat beneath the brake line bolt and use two new washers during re-installation.

    7

    Clean up any brake fluid that may have dripped on the brake caliper or ground with a shop rag. Reverse this entire process to reinstall the front passenger's-side caliper. You can use the entire process to also remove and replace the driver's-side front caliper.

Senin, 17 Agustus 2009

Electric Brake Controller Installation in a 2005 Ford Expedition

The Ford Expedition is a full-size sport utility vehicle (SUV) that has been in production since 1997. It was originally a mid-size SUV, but has been Ford's largest SUV since the 2005 model year. The 2005 Ford Expedition has an anti-lock braking system (ABS), which requires a controller known specifically as a hydraulic control unit, or HCU. The HCU reduces the braking force on a wheel when it senses the wheel is rotating more slowly than the other wheels. This allows the vehicle to stop more effectively when the wheels lose traction.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the cables to the battery terminals with a socket wrench. This precaution avoids the possibility of an electrical discharge, which can damage the HCU. Disconnect the air cleaner and evaporative emissions (EVAP) canister in the engine compartment to gain access to the HCU under the air cleaner.

    2

    Label the five brake lines one through five, going from left to right. This will ensure you connect the brake lines correctly when you install the new HCU. Disconnect the brake lines from the HCU with a socket wrench. Plug the open ends of the brakes lines with clean cloth to keep brake fluid from leaking out.

    3

    Detach the electrical connector from the HCU, and disconnect the mounting bolts for the HCU with a socket wrench. Remove the HCU from its bracket.

    4

    Install the new HCU to its bracket, and tighten the bracket bolts to 22 foot-pounds with a torque wrench. Connect the brake lines to the correct ports on the HCU, according to the labels you made in step two. Tighten the fittings for brake lines one and three to 13 foot-pounds. Tighten the fittings for brake lines two, four and five to 18 foot-pounds.

    5

    Attach the electrical connector to the HCU. Connect the EVAP canister and the air cleaner with a socket wrench. Connect the cables to the battery terminals, and bleed the brake system.

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a GMC Sierra

Brake pads are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. They are an important part of your Ford F-Series' braking system. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a 1/4 inch, or risk damaging your F-Series' brake discs.

Instructions

Remove the Old Brake Pads

    1

    Park your car on a level surface. If you have a stick shift car, make sure the car is in gear. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

    2

    Open the hood of your car. Locate the master cylinder and brake fluid container. If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid in the plastic container and dispose of it the way you dispose of motor oil.

    3

    Raise the rear end of your F-Series with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

    4

    Use the socket wrench to remove the caliper bolts from the back of the caliper. Slide the caliper off of the disc brake and suspend it near the disc brake with a small bungee cord or coat hanger. Suspend the caliper housing so that you do not damage the brake hose.

    5

    Remove the inner and outer brake pads from the caliper. Remove the caliper clips and throw them away.

Install the New Brake Pads

    6

    Insert the new brake pads into the caliper. Slide the new clips (that come with the brake pads) onto the caliper mounting bracket.

    7

    Attach the caliper mounting bracket to the backing plate assemble.

    8

    Place the caliper on the steering knuckle and tighten the bracket bolts to 148 foot pounds (200 Nm) for a 15 series vehicle; 122 foot pounds (165 Nm) for a 25 series vehicle. Use the socket wrench to attach the clipper bolts and tighten them to 80 foot pounds (108 Nm).

    9

    Replace the tire wheel assembly. Lower the car to the ground. Pump the brake pedal a few times to seat the brake pads.

    10

    Add fluid to the master cylinder container to replace any you removed before you removed the old brake pads.

    11

    Season the brake pads by making only gentle stops when you are driving for the first week after you install the new brake pads. Try not to do any hard stopping when you are seasoning the brakes.

Minggu, 16 Agustus 2009

How to Replace the Rotor in a Honda Accord

The Honda Accord utilizes four brake discs (brake rotors) for braking. These rotors rarely need to be replaced, but if they become warped or worn down and can't be resurfaced, then it's time to swap them out for new. The process for changing rotors is simple and you can save plenty of money by doing the labor yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Buy a new set of rotors for your Honda Accord. Ideally, you should change all four brake rotors at the same time, but you can get away with changing just the front or rear end pair at the same time. Never replace just one, as this causes uneven and unsafe braking.

    2

    Drain about half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder to prevent overflow. Jack up your Honda with car jacks and jack stands. Block the wheels to keep your car from rolling while you work. Remove the first tire and wheel assembly and set it aside.

    3

    Undo the caliper mounting bolts. Slide the caliper assembly off of the old rotor. Hang the caliper from the car's undercarriage with mechanic's wire, being careful not to let the brake hose get disconnected.

    4

    Remove the holding screws on the rotor. Next, pull the old rotor off the studs and clean the hub and surrounding surfaces with a damp cloth.

    5

    Install the new rotor and fasten the holding screws. Discard the wire and slide the caliper and brake line back into position. Fasten the caliper mounting bolts with a torque wrench or an air ratchet with an appropriate adapter. Replace the wheel assembly and tire.

    6

    Repeat this process for each additional rotor. When you're done, lower your accord, tighten and torque the tire lug nuts. Then refill the master cylinder with new brake fluid.

    7

    Pump the brake until you get a firm pedal and road test your Honda Accord to make sure that the new rotor installation was successful.

How to Replace the Disc Brakes on a 1994 Mercury Sable

How to Replace the Disc Brakes on a 1994 Mercury Sable

The Mercury Sable was introduced for the 1986 model year, along with its sister car the Ford Taurus. The Mercury Sable continued in production from 1986 until 2009, when it was discontinued for a new line of Mercury vehicles. The 1994 Mercury Sable was equipped with the option of a 3.0-liter V-6 or a 3.8-liter V-6 engine. The disc brakes on the 1994 Mercury Sable include the front brake calipers, rotors, and brake pads. Replacement of the brake calipers is an option for completely replacing the disc brakes on the 1994 Sable. The process is known as C.P.R. or calipers, pads and rotors.

Instructions

Disc Brake Replacement (Including Caliper Replacement Option)

    1

    Loosen all of the lug nuts, but do not remove them. Lift the front of the Sable using jack with 2-ton or greater capacity. Place jack stands beneath the front frame rails or engine cradle frame, just inside the inner lower control arm ends. Remove the lug nuts completely from the front of the vehicle and remove the front wheel and tire assemblies.

    2

    Remove the front caliper bolts using a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket to turn the bolts counterclockwise. The caliper bracket bolts are located behind the brake caliper, on the inside of the wheel well. Slide the caliper halfway off the brake rotor using a pry bar or large, flat-head screwdriver.

    3

    Insert the pry bar into the hole in the middle of the caliper and pry the rear or inside brake pad away from the rotor. This procedure will compress the caliper piston. Continue prying the brake pad away from the back of the rotor until the caliper piston is completely compressed. If you are replacing the brake calipers, disregard this step completely.

    4

    Remove the caliper mounting bracket from the brake assembly, using a 3/8-inch drive ratchet to remove the mounting bolts. Removing the bracket separately from the caliper will allow for easier access to install new brake pads on an old caliper, or to install a brand-new caliper and brake pad set.

    5

    Remove the caliper and bracket by hand from the brake assembly and set the caliper onto the lower control arm. This is the large, metal piece underneath and behind the brake rotor and steering knuckle assemblies. You can hang the rotor from one of the strut spring rungs using a wire coat hanger if you so choose. Remove the brake rotor by hand.

    6

    Place a brake line clamp on the rubber line between the rear of the brake caliper and the frame of the Sable. Setting the clamp as close to the rear of the caliper as possible will decrease the amount of time needed to bleed the brakes at the end of this project. Remove the banjo bolt from the rear of the caliper, or the bolt that holds the brake line onto the back of the caliper. Use a 3/8-inch ratchet and socket to turn the bolt counterclockwise in order to remove it. Remove the brake line from the back of the caliper. Immediately discard the brake caliper into a drain pan. If you are not replacing the brake caliper, skip this step and go directly to Step 7.

    7

    Install the new brake caliper onto the brake line and insert the banjo bolt. Hang the new caliper from the front strut spring, using a wire coat hanger. Tighten the banjo bolt and rear brake line onto the caliper between 25 and 40 foot-pounds of torque, using a certified 3/8-inch drive torque wrench and socket. Remove the brake hose clamp form the rear of the brake caliper, if necessary.

    8

    Install the new brake rotor by hand and tighten one lug nut down onto the face of the new rotor to hold it in place during installation of the rest of the brake assembly. Install the caliper mounting bracket back onto the brake assembly and tighten the mounting bolts with a 3/8-inch drive torque wrench and socket to between 60 and 80 foot-pounds of torque. Remove the lug nut from the face of the rotor once you have the caliper bracket completely installed.

    9

    Install new brake pads into the caliper mounting bracket, making sure the wear indicator on the brake pads are on the inside, or back of the rotor. The wear indicator is a small, metal protrusion off the brake pads, with a 90-degree bend. There are two brake pads with indicators and two without in a set of pads. Lubricate the back of the brake pads, using certified caliper grease. Apply a thin film of grease onto the backing plates of the pads to decrease initial brake squeal caused by new brakes.

    10

    Install the caliper over the caliper bracket and rotor. Tighten the caliper mounting bolts to between 35 and 40 foot-pounds of torque, using a certified 3/8-inch drive torque wrench and socket.

    11

    Repeat steps 2 through 10 to complete the disc brake replacement on the second side of the Sable. Leave the wheels off the vehicle until you have completely installed both sides with new disc brakes and you have completed the next section of this project.

Bleeding the Front Brakes (Replacements of Calipers Only)

    12

    Lie or kneel near one of the front calipers. Visually inspect and locate the bleeder screw on the top-rear of the brake caliper. Instruct your assistant to sit in the driver's seat and to pump the brake pedal until the pedal stiffens up. If the brake pedal does not immediately stiffen, simply ask your assistant to remove his foot completely from the pedal and let you know when pedal returns to its topmost resting position.

    13

    Open the bleeder screw one and a half turns with a 3/8-inch ratchet and deep well socket. Instruct your assistant to depress the brake pedal -- slowly -- completely to the floor, and to say the word "down" when the brake pedal is at the bottommost point. Tighten the brake bleeder screw shut when you hear the word "down." Using the words "up" for when the pedal is up at the top or pumped up completely, and "down" for when the pedal is to the floor of the Sable will greatly decrease the chance of any miscommunication during this bleeding procedure.

    14

    Repeat the pumping of the brake pedal and the bleeding process at least three times per side on the Sable. When you have completely bled the brakes, the brake pedal will be stiff and rigid when pumped up. Bleeding the brakes removes air pockets in the brake system. Visually inspect and fill your brake fluid reservoir under the hood of the Sable, after you have bled the front brakes completely.

    15

    Install the front wheels onto the Sable and tighten the wheel lug nuts until they are snug against the face of the wheel. Raise the Sable with a 2-ton jack and remove the jack stands from beneath the Sable. Lower the car to the ground completely and tighten the wheel lug nuts between 90 and 110 foot-pounds of torque using a certified torque wrench and wheel nut socket.

Jumat, 14 Agustus 2009

How to Change the Brake Pads on a Mitsubishi Eclipse

The disc brake pads on a Mitsubishi Eclipse apply friction to the brake rotor in order to slow the vehicle. The two-door coupe Eclipse has been in production since 1990 and has also been sold as the Eagle Talon and Plymouth Laser in the United States. You'll most often need to replace the brake pads on a Mitsubishi Eclipse because of normal wear.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the Eclipse on a hoist, and use a socket wrench to remove the wheels with disc brakes. Drain one-third of the brake fluid from the master brake cylinder and release the parking brake. Disconnect the parking brake cable.

    2

    Remove the lower pin on the brake caliper with a socket wrench. Move the brake caliper assembly upward, and use a socket wrench to remove the outer brake shim, spring clips and brake pads from the brake caliper support. Push the brake piston into the brake caliper bore.

    3

    Discard the old brake pads and install the new brake pads. Use brake grease to lubricate all of the sliding and pivot points on the brake in addition to the lower pins on the brake calipers. Install the outer brake shim and spring clips onto the brake caliper support.

    4

    Use a torque wrench to apply the correct torque to any bolts as required for your particular vehicle. Install the lower pin on the brake caliper.

    5

    Repeat Steps 2, 3 and 4 for the remaining wheels with disc brakes.

    6

    Reconnect the parking brake cable, and replace the missing brake fluid in the master brake cylinder.

    7

    Put the wheels back on with a torque wrench, and lower the vehicle.

What Does Minimum Thickness on a Rotor Mean?

What Does Minimum Thickness on a Rotor Mean?

All disc brakes use a rotor and pads. A rotor is a flat, round piece of steel, roughly shaped like a pancake and located directly behind the wheel. When you depress the brake pedal, the pads squeeze the rotor, so the friction stops the wheel from turning. Engineers understand that pads wear out, so they design the system so pads are easily replaced. However, engineers further understand that rotors wear out, too. Because of the wear factor, rotors are manufactured with extra steel on the contact surfaces, so they can be repaired.

Anticipating the Future

    Engineers and designers anticipate the future. They understand pads and rotors wear out. Theoretically, rotors should last a long time. In fact, many do. If you change your brake pads as soon as a squeaking is heard, the pad won't wear completely through. If a pad wears through, the metal backing contacts the rotor, leading to scoring and deep gouging of the rotor surface.

Scoring Repair

    The only way to repair a scored rotor is by lathe turning. In this process, the rotor is mounted on a special lathe. The rotor is turned and a tool removes metal accurately. The scoring is removed and the rotor is replaced, provided the maximum standard for material removal isn't violated.

Rotor Warpage Repair

    Sometimes, even if a car owner faithfully replaces his brake pads, rotors warp due to excessive heat and rapid cooling. Suppose you do a lot of stop-and-go driving. The rotor heats up due to pad friction. On the way home, you hit a puddle that splashes cold water onto the hot rotor. The sudden shock of cold water hitting very hot steel warps the rotor. This is a common reason brake shops have to lathe turn warped rotors. Lathe turning a warped rotor also removes metal from the rotor faces and shops can't remove more than what's allowed.

Minimum Thickness Specified

    in the process of rotor repair, material must be removed from the rotor faces. Engineers studied how much material is removed and how much is left on. In the process of material removal, the rotor is made thinner. Safety limits are set for how thin a brake rotor can be before failure. This area is so important that laws have been passed prohibiting a shop from turning a rotor past the manufacturer's limit. For example, the State of Washington has legislation pertaining to brake rotor minimum thickness. (see reference 1, point 4). The state of Connecticut's inspection report for public service vehicles requires discarding a rotor that is past the manufacturer's minimum thickness specification(see reference 2). A brake shop can't lathe turn the rotor past this minimum thickness dimension. If it does, the rotor will be too thin, leading to brake failure. If the rotor is thinner than the minimum thickness limit, it has to be replaced.

Rabu, 12 Agustus 2009

How to Change Drum Brakes on a Chevy Cobalt

How to Change Drum Brakes on a Chevy Cobalt

The Chevrolet Cobalt, which replaced the Cavalier in 2005, is manufactured with a similar rear drum braking system. The shoes and interior surface of the drums are routine maintenance items, but changing the integral parts of the Cobalt's drum brakes is not extremely difficult.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the Cobalt at the rear wheel by placing the jack head onto a frame rail and pumping the lever until the wheel is in the air. (Do not place the jack onto the body or suspension.) Secure the jack with a jack stand in the same location.

    2

    Remove the rear wheel by turning the lug nuts counterclockwise. Take the wheel off of the hub and place it away from the work area.

    3

    Remove the drum by turning the keeper screw counterclockwise and sliding the drum from the brake assembly. Inspect the interior drum surface for scarring or pitting, and inspect the wheel cylinder on the brake assembly for leaks.

    4

    Remove the shoes by levering off the long springs with a screwdriver or brake tool, then turning the spring bolts in the center of each shoe counterclockwise. The shoes will slide off, directly away from the backing plate.

    5

    Replace the shoes with new units by pressing them into the brake assembly, then securing them with the spring bolts and long springs. Resurface or replace the drum and slide it over the shoes until it reaches the backing plate. Turn the keeper screw clockwise.

    6

    Replace the wheel by turning the lug nuts clockwise, in an alternating pattern. Remove the jack stand and lower the Cobalt from the jack by turning the pressure screw counterclockwise.

    7

    Repeat the procedure on the opposite brake.

How to Install the Front Brake Rotors on a 96 BMW 740IL

The 7-Series made its debut on U.S. soil in the 1986 model year, giving the BMW name the full-size, full luxury presence it was lacking. In 1996, the 10-year-anniversary model year of the 7-Series, two models were released: the 740iL and 750iL. The 740iL came standard with four-wheel-disc brakes and an antilock brake system. It also had a sensor mounted on the inner brake pad that alerted the driver, via a light on the dashboard, when the brake pads were wearing thin. Replacing the front rotors on this luxurious vehicle is slightly unorthodox, but it is still a straightforward process.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the BMWs front wheel bolts with a ratchet and socket. Raise the front of the vehicle with a floor jack and place jack stands under its frame rails. Lower the 740iL onto the jack stands. Remove the wheel bolts and remove the front wheels.

    2

    Trace the brake pad level sensor wire -- on the drivers side only -- until you find where it connects to the BMWs wiring harness. Press and hold the unlocking button on the wiring harness, then unplug it from the vehicles harness. Unfasten the retaining bolt that secures the pad level sensor bracket to the caliper, using a ratchet and socket, and pull the level sensor wire from its routing clip.

    3

    Instruct an assistant to press and hold the brake pedal. Remove the rotor-retaining screw in the center of the rotor with a ratchet and a hex-bit socket.

    4

    Find the out caliper-retaining clip -- the metal clip on the outer part of the caliper. Remove this clip by prying it out with a flat-head screwdriver.

    5

    Pull the plastic caps covering the caliper bolts from the caliper. Remove the two caliper pins with a ratchet and hex-bit socket, then pull the caliper up and out of the caliper bracket. Hang the caliper from a nearby suspension component with a bungee cord. If the outer brake pad did not fall out when you removed the caliper, pull the pad from the caliper.

    6

    Remove the two caliper bracket bolts with a ratchet and socket. Pull the caliper bracket off the steering knuckle.

    7

    Pull the rotor of the 740iLs hub. If the rotor does not pull off easily, lightly tap it with a rubber mallet to free it. Set a new rotor on the front hub, lining up its screw hole with that in the hub. Hand-tighten the rotor-retaining screw. Hold the rotor firmly to prevent it from turning, then tighten the rotor-retaining screw to 12 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    8

    Set the caliper bracket back on the front steering knuckle and hand-thread its retaining bolts. Torque the caliper bracket bolts to 81 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    9

    Position a drain pan under the caliper. Place an 8-inch C-clamp over the caliper so that its fixed part touches the rear of the caliper body and its screw part contacts the inner brake pad. Tighten the C-clamp until it touches the inner brake pad, then set a combination wrench on the bleeder valve -- the -inch metal valve -- on top of the caliper.

    10

    Turn the bleeder valve a half-turn counterclockwise to open it, then immediately start tightening the C-clamp to press the caliper piston into the caliper. Continue tightening the C-clamp until the piston stops moving, then immediately close the bleeder valve.

    11

    Pull the old inner brake pad from the caliper; notice that small metal clips hold it inside the cavity in the piston. The brake pad level sensor comes off with the inner brake pad. Line up the clips on the rear of the new inner brake pad with the cavity in the piston, then press the brake pad toward the piston until the pad is flat against the end of the piston. On the drivers side only, press a new pad level sensor into the groove on the top of the brake pad, nearest to the hole in the top of the caliper.

    12

    Set the outer brake pad in the caliper and immediately set the caliper on its bracket. Wipe all of the old grease off the caliper pins and apply a thin coat of new disc brake grease onto the smooth part of each pin. Hand-thread the caliper pins into the caliper, then torque them to 22 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and hex-bit socket.

    13

    Set the outer caliper-retaining clip so that the ends of its longest side are between the caliper bracket and the center hub of the rotor. Press the clip upward to insert its two tabs into the two holes in the outer part of the caliper.

    14

    Route the pad level sensor wiring in the same manner the old one was positioned. Hand-tighten the pad level sensor bracket bolt, then tighten it with a ratchet and socket. Press the pad level sensor wiring into the routing clip, then plug it into the BMWs wiring harness.

    15

    Press the plastic caps back in place over the caliper guide pins.

    16

    Repeat Steps 2 through 15 to replace the rotor on the other side of the 740iL.

    17

    Reinstall the front wheels on the 740iLs front hubs, then hand-tighten the wheel bolts. Raise the BMW off the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the wheel bolts, in a crisscross pattern, to between 95 and 111 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    18

    Press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm. Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir. Add DOT 4 brake fluid, as needed, to bring the level up to the Max" line on the reservoir.

    19

    Turn the ignition to the 1 position and leave it in that position for at least 30 seconds to reset the brake pad level light. Turn the ignition off.

Selasa, 11 Agustus 2009

How to Change the Rear Rotors on a Tiburon

How to Change the Rear Rotors on a Tiburon

The rear rotors on the Hyundai Tiburon perform the same function as those on the front. That means that you must inspect them the same way that you would those on the front to make sure that they are in good condition to keep your car safe. It is not difficult to replace the rotors, and each wheel will take about 30 minutes to complete. You can complete the project in your driveway, so there is no need to waste money taking the Hyundai to a repair shop.

Instructions

    1

    Open the engine compartment of the Tiburon and remove half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster. Put the fluid in the drain pan for later recycling. The master cylinder is on the back firewall on the driver side of the car.

    2

    Place the wheel chocks in front of the front wheels. Raise the Tiburon up with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the Hyundai near the jacking point, and raise it to the frame. Remove the wheel from the car using the lug wrench to remove the lug nuts.

    3

    Remove the brake caliper using a socket and ratchet. Secure the caliper to the rear strut using a wire tie. Do not allow the caliper to hang loose or you will stretch and damage the brake line. Pull the rotor away from the wheel assembly.

    4

    Put the new rotor on the wheel assembly. Cut the wire tie holding the brake caliper to the strut using the pliers. Put the caliper into the mounting bracket, and tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet. Put the wheel on the Tiburon, and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    5

    Remove the jack stand from under the Hyundai, and lower the vehicle to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel. After both sides are complete, pump the brakes several times until the pedal is firm so that you can make sure the brakes seat themselves against the rotors and are ready to operate. Add fresh brake fluid as needed.

How To Bleed The Brake System Of Air

Air in your brake lines can lead to a sense of softness or mushiness when you apply your brakes. It lowers the effectiveness of your car and can increase the possibility of accidents if you have to stop quickly. Luckily, it's possible to get the air bubbles out of your brake system without losing the fluid as well. Mechanics use a comparatively simple technique that requires only a basic knowledge of cars.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the hood on your car and add brake fluid to the brake fluid reservoir. You want to make sure there's plenty of fluid in the system while you bleed out the air.

    2

    Place a jack under the car and lift the tire off the ground. If you have access to a hydraulic lift, that's even better. You should start with the rear wheels first and then work your way to the front.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts with a wrench and remove the tire. Set the lug nuts aside somewhere where you won't lose them.

    4

    Locate the caliber body behind the tire and remove the rubber cap from the bleeder screw. Set the cap aside with the lug nuts.

    5

    Use a box-end wrench to cover the bleeder screw. Fit a length of plastic tubing over the nipple. Make sure the other end of the tubing is positioned over a proper waste storage container for the brake fluid.

    6

    Hold the wrench firmly in one hand and the container firmly in the other.

    7

    Ask a friend to work the brakes for you, first by pumping them several times and then holding them down until the end of Step 8.

    8

    Open the bleeder screw with the wrench. Let it stay open for several seconds. Then close the screw again, and tell your friend to release the brakes.

    9

    Double check the brake lines for any air bubbles and add more fluid to the reservoir if needed.

    10

    Replace the wheel and tighten the lug nuts before lowering the car back to the ground.

    11

    Repeat the process with the remaining three wheels as necessary.

    12

    Test your brakes by pumping them several times with the engine turned off. They should firm up within a few seconds.

How to Replace a Caliper on a GMC Safari

Replacing the caliper on a GMC Safari is not complicated. If you have the mechanical skills to replace the brake pads and/or rotors, you can certainly replace the caliper. You'll need someone to help you bleed the brakes after you replace the caliper, so grab your tools and recruit someone to give you a foot (to pump the brake pedal) when the time comes.

Instructions

How to Replace a Caliper on a GMC Safari

    1

    Park the Safari on a flat paved surface. Apply the parking brake and release the hood latch. Place a wheel chock behind one of the rear tires. Open the hood and suck out half the fluid from the master cylinder reservoir using the turkey baster and discard the fluid. Replace the master cylinder cover securely.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts to the wheel you're replacing the caliper on, using the breaking bar and a socket. Lift the Safari on the side using the floor jack. Place the jack stand under the lower control arm or under the front frame. Remove the lug nuts and wheel.

    3

    Pinch the brake hose with a brake hose clamp and remove the brake hose bolt on the caliper with the 1/2-inch drive ratchet and a socket. Place a drain bucket beneath the hose once it's removed from the caliper. Even though the hose is clamped, there may well be some slight leakage from the hose.

    4

    Remove the caliper slide bolts using the 3/8-inch drive ratchet and the 3/8-inch drive 3/8-inch hex head socket. Pry the caliper off with the flathead screwdriver. Remove the outboard pad from the caliper first, then extract the inboard pad by prying the hardware clip out of the caliper piston.

    5

    Open the box of the new caliper and determine if there is a caliper bridge equipped with it. Some aftermarket calipers may only come as half calipers. If the bridge came equipped, you may decide if you want to replace it. To do so, simply remove the two caliper bridge bolts with the 1/2-inch ratchet and a socket and remove the bridge.

    6

    Apply a light coat of silicon brake lubricant to the top and bottom contact points of the new or old bridge. If you removed the old bridge, replace it with the new one and replace the bolts and tighten. Remove the new caliper slide bolts from the new caliper and apply a coat of lubricant to them as well. Insert the inboard pad first by pressing the pad clip into the piston cavity. Install the outboard pad.

    7

    Place the caliper over the rotor and the caliper bridge. Insert the caliper slide bolts and tighten with the 3/8-inch drive ratchet and hex head socket.

    8

    Reconnect the brake hose and remove the old copper washers. Make sure they didn't stick to the hose and pry them out with the screwdriver if they did. Place the new copper washers (equipped with the new caliper) onto the head of the brake hose bolt through the brake hose flange and then place the other copper washer on the thread side of the bolt and insert it into the caliper. Tighten. Remove the brake hose clamp

    9

    Crack the bleeder screw open with a hand wrench and allow to gravity bleed by opening the master cylinder cap and filling the reservoir with new DOT 3 brake fluid. Leave the cap off for now. Be sure to position the drain bucket strategically beneath the bleeder screw. When brake fluid begins to trickle from the bleeder, close the bleeder screw and recruit your helper.

    10

    Fill the master cylinder up again and replace the cap securely. Have your helper carefully get into the Safari and pump the brake pedal five or six times. Have your helper hold pressure on the brake pedal. Open the bleeder screw until the brake pedal drops to the floor on them. Continue this process until no air bubbles are present in the brake fluid and the foot brake pedal feels normal. Have your helper carefully exit the Safari. Tighten the bleeder screw and cover it with the black rubber plug that came equipped with the caliper. Also, be sure there are is no brake fluid seeping from the brake hose connection.

    11

    Put the wheel and lug nuts on and tighten snugly. Lower the Safari and tighten the lug nuts alternately with the socket and an adjustable torque wrench set at 100 foot-pounds.

    12

    Check the level of the master cylinder one last time and add brake fluid as necessary. Replace the cap securely. Remove the wheel chock, release the parking brake and test drive.

Senin, 10 Agustus 2009

How to Make Hard Brake Lines

How to Make Hard Brake Lines

Hard brake lines are standard equipment on passenger cars, trucks and trailers. The lines, made from galvanized steel tubing, carry brake fluid from the master cylinder to the brake differential and the front and rear brakes. While making brake lines is not particularly difficult, you must guarantee that the pair of lines from the master cylinder to the brake differential are of equal length to ensure even braking. You can make hard brake lines using the appropriate size tubing and fittings for the brake system found on your car, truck or trailer.

Instructions

    1

    Measure the length of an existing or damaged hard brake line that connects between the master cylinder and brake differential. If a new line is needed, measure the distance from the appropriate master cylinder fitting to the appropriate brake differential fitting and add 16 inches to allow for configuring the necessary bends.

    2

    Cut a section of galvanized steel brake line to your dimension using a tubing cutter. The line will be sized to the exact length after it has been configured.

    3

    Make an "S" bend (two-way bend) near one end of the line using a tubing bender. Allow the end of the line to extend past the front of the bend enough to make a straight-on connection at the brake differential.

    4

    Slide a compression fitting on the end of the straight section near the two-way bend, making sure the threads of the fitting face the fitting on the brake differential. Flare the end of the line at the straight section using a flaring tool.

    5

    Slide the fitting against the flared end of the line. Thread the fitting into the appropriate port on the brake differential by hand. The fitting will be tightened later.

    6

    Establish the degree of bend that is needed at the upper section of the line to make a straight-on connection to the appropriate fitting on the master cylinder. Mark the point where the bend is needed.

    7

    Loosen and remove the lower fitting from the brake differential by hand. Bend the brake line at your mark using the tubing bender.

    8

    Thread the lower fitting onto the brake differential by hand. Determine whether the upper bend needs to be tweaked to allow a straight-on connection. Remove the line and make the final adjustment using the tubing bender.

    9

    Reattach the lower fitting to the brake differential by hand. Mark the point where the upper end of the line is cut to length at the master cylinder. Loosen the lower fitting. Remove the line and cut it at your mark with the tubing cutter.

    10

    Slide the upper compression fitting onto the line, making sure the fitting is facing correctly to attach to the master cylinder. Flare the end of the line using the flaring tool. Attach the brake line fittings at the brake differential and master cylinder. Tighten the compression fittings using an open-end wrench.

Minggu, 09 Agustus 2009

How to Replace Front Brake Pads on a Dodge Ram

Named after the hood ornaments that appeared on Dodge trucks in the 1930s and 1940s, the Dodge Ram was reinvented in 1981 to compete with the Ford and Chevrolet counterparts. The full-size pickup is available in 1/2-ton, 3/4-ton and 1-ton models. It is also available in two- or four-wheel drive. The front brakes on a Dodge Ram account for 80 percent of the braking power for the truck. Because of this, it is important to have the front brake pads inspected at certain mileage intervals.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the front of the Dodge Ram with a jack and place it on a jack stand below the lower control arm.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts using an impact gun and a suitable socket. Remove the wheel.

    3

    Use a pry tool to compress the caliper piston by prying the outboard pad against the rotor. Insert the pry tool into the front opening of the caliper and then position it onto the backing plate of the outboard pad. Pry against the rotor until there is side-to-side movement of the caliper. To compress the caliper piston enough to fit the new pads, continue prying until resistance is felt in the piston.

    4

    Use a 3/8 inch hand wrench to remove the upper and lower caliper bolts. Set them aside. Remove the caliper from the rotor. While supporting the caliper, remove the outboard pad first by prying off the retaining clips from the caliper housing using the pry tool. Remove the inboard pad next by unseating the retaining clip from the caliper piston bore. Hang the caliper to the suspension of the Ram using a wire coat hanger. Bend the hanger to make a suitable hanging device for the caliper. Use a caliper piston tool to compress the piston into the bore even more if necessary to fit the new pads.

    5

    Use a wire brush to clean the caliper and knuckle surfaces where the pads come into contact with them. Apply a coat of high-temp brake silicone lubricant and spread it out evenly with your finger. Wipe your hands clean with a shop rag.

    6

    Install the new pads onto the caliper. Place the inboard pad in first and then the outboard, making sure the retaining clips are seated properly.

    7

    Lubricate the caliper mounting bolts, collars, bushings and bores with the high-temp brake lubricant.

    8

    Place the caliper and pad assembly over the rotor. Align the caliper mounting bolts to the steering knuckle and tighten then with the 3/8 inch hand wrench. Use a torque wrench to tighten the bolts to 35-foot-pounds.

    9

    Repeat steps 2-8 for the other side. Install the wheels and then tighten the lug nuts between 120-140 foot pounds (refer to a torque specifications chart for your year Ram).

    10

    Pump the foot pedal several time to seat the brake pads to the rotors and then test-drive the Ram.

Sabtu, 08 Agustus 2009

How to Remove Honda Odyssey Rear Caliper Pads

The Honda Odyssey rear caliper pads are secured into the brake caliper with tabs that are integrated into the pad assembly. When the brake pads, also called brake linings, wear out on the pad, you'll need to replace the unit with a new brake pad. However, removing the pad from the caliper can be a bit tricky. Once you have the Odyssey off the ground and the wheel off, it's time to remove the pads from the caliper assembly.

Instructions

    1

    Locate the caliper pin bolt. This bolt is a small, 10 mm, bolt on the bottom of the caliper that secures the caliper to the caliper bracket. The pin bolt is the bottom-most bolt on the caliper. To get the pads out, you need to remove this bolt. Turn the bolt counterclockwise to remove it.

    2

    Remove the two 14 mm caliper mounting bolts on the top and bottom of the caliper.

    3

    Slide the caliper off the brake rotor.

    4

    Swing the caliper bracket open from the bottom of the caliper. The brake pads should come out with no trouble.

Best Brake Pads for Minivan

Best Brake Pads for Minivan

Since brake pads depend more on your driving style than the type of car you have, it's wise to look at the facts about different types of brake pads to make an educated choice for your minivan. Minivans are heavier than sedans or compact cars, so brake pads made with heavier materials are usually a better choice. There are pros and cons to each type of pad you can buy.

Fair: Nonasbestos Organic Brake Pads

    NAO brake pads, as they are sometimes called, are organically made from rubber, glass, carbon and synthetic fibers. These brake pads were designed in place of asbestos pads, which caused several problems and were eventually discontinued. Since these pads have no metal, they naturally make less noise, but they wear quickly. They also create quite a bit of dust.

Good: Low Metallic NAO Brake Pads

    These type of brake pads have a small amount of metal mixed in with the organic materials, usually around 10 to 30 percent. The metal helps with heat transfer and makes the pads brake better and last a little longer, but they create more noise than purely organic pads.

Better: Semimetallic Brake Pads

    Semimetallic brake pads usually have anywhere from 30 to 65 percent metal. They are made from other elements like wire, steel wool and graphite. The metals are mixed with various types of inorganic material to bond everything. These type of brake pads are great for minivans since these have better heat transfer and are durable. The downside to these types of brakes are that they usually wear down rotors quickly and make noise. They may also be faulty in colder weather.

Best: Ceramic Brake Pads

    Ceramic brake pads are usually the most expensive. They are made primarily of small amounts of metal and ceramic fibers, along with filler materials and bonding agents. These are generally cleaner and quieter than other types of brake pads. They last long and provide great braking without wearing down the rotors too quickly.

Excellent: Premium Brakes

    A newer type of brake pad on the market is specifically targeted at larger vehicles. These premium brake pads are designed for the best noise resistance and longest wear. They are typically very expensive, but are the best type of brake pads and the best value brake pads you can get for a minivan.

Jumat, 07 Agustus 2009

How to Get to the Firewall Master Cylinder on a Ford F-150

How to Get to the Firewall Master Cylinder on a Ford F-150

The master cylinder on your Ford F-150 model develops the necessary pressure in the brake system to slow or stop your truck. However, worn or damaged pistons, valves, cups or housing may leak, stop working and make your brake system fail. Luckily, it is possible to remove and install a new unit on your F-150 pickup truck yourself.

Instructions

Removing the Master Cylinder

    1

    Disconnect the ground, battery cable [the one with the negative sign (-) next to the battery post] using a wrench.

    2

    Locate the brake master cylinder on your Ford F-150. This is attached to the brake booster, a cylindrical, drum-like component mounted on the driver side of the firewall inside the engine compartment. The cylinder has a plastic reservoir tank mounted on top with an electrical connector on the side.

    3

    Remove as much brake fluid as possible from the master cylinder reservoir using a hand siphon pump.

    4

    Unplug the level-switch electrical connector from the side of the master cylinder reservoir.

    5

    Place one or more shop rags under the master cylinder to catch any brake fluid once you disconnect the brake lines.

    6

    Disconnect the brake lines from the master cylinder. Use only a tubing or line wrench to prevent damage to the line fittings.

    7

    Plug or cover the brake line openings and master cylinder ports with plastic bags to prevent contamination of the brake system.

    8

    Unbolt the master cylinder from the brake booster using a wrench or ratchet and socket.

    9
    The master cylinder and reservoir are mounted on the firewall [Ballista/Wikimedia.org].

    Remove the master cylinder from the engine compartment being careful not to bend or damage the brake lines. If the master cylinder on your F-150 model is fitted with an O-ring body seal between the cylinder body and brake booster, remove and discard it.

Installing the Master Cylinder

    10

    Transfer the reservoir and the two mounting reservoir seals from the old master cylinder to the new unit, if necessary.

    11

    Bench bleed the new brake master cylinder according to the instructions included with the new or rebuilt cylinder unit.

    12

    Set the new master cylinder in place using a new O-ring body seal and start the mounting nuts by hand.

    13

    Tighten the cylinder mounting nuts using the wrench or ratchet and socket.

    14

    Connect the brake lines to the master cylinder using the tubing or line wrench. Start the fittings by hand and then tighten the nuts.

    15

    Plug the level-switch electrical connector to the new master cylinder reservoir.

    16

    Connect the ground, battery cable using the wrench.

    17

    Bleed the brake system following the instructions in your vehicle service manual for your particular Ford F-150 model.

Kamis, 06 Agustus 2009

How to Remove Toyota Tundra Front Brake Calipers

How to Remove Toyota Tundra Front Brake Calipers

The full-size Toyota pickup started off as the T100 but was eventually renamed the Toyota Tundra. There have been two major redesigns to the truck body over that time, and like any other vehicle, they will need parts fixed or replaced. In the case of the brakes, if you notice a sticky caliper or that your brakes favor one side over the other, chances are the caliper needs to be replaced. The first step is to remove the caliper from the truck.

Instructions

    1

    Lift up the front of the vehicle using the jack and secure it on jack stands. Make sure the vehicle is completely secure on the jack stands before you crawl underneath it. Remove the front wheels using the tire iron and place them to the side, out of the workspace.

    2

    Place the brake line clamp on the rubber brake line then cinch it down to clamp onto the line. This will stop excess brake fluid from leaking--although a little will still come out--and keep spillage to a minimum.

    3

    Disconnect the brake line from the back caliper using the line wrench. You don't want to use a traditional wrench for this job because the tolerances aren't as tight, and you could round off the corners on the fitting, requiring you to replace the entire line.

    4

    Unbolt the caliper from the spindle using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket and place it to the side. The caliper may stick a little on the rotor because of pressure still in the caliper but, if you need to, pull the caliper towards you, pushing in the caliper a little bit and then pull the caliper off of the brake rotor.