Selasa, 30 Juni 2009

How to Change Drum Shoes on a Honda Civic

How to Change Drum Shoes on a Honda Civic

The Honda Civic was produced with rear drum brakes for much of the model run, and replacing the shoes in the Civic's rear brake assembly is considered routine maintenance. The shoes and drum surface use friction to stop the wheel, and these friction surfaces wear out over time. The average backyard mechanic can replace the shoes in a Civic in about 30 minutes per brake.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the rear of the Civic by placing the jack head in front of the rear wheel on the frame rail. Pump the lever until the wheel is in the air. Do not place the jack onto the body or suspension, as this could cause damage from the focused weight. Place a jack stand close to the jack head on the same rail for support.

    2

    Remove the rear wheel by turning the lug nuts counterclockwise and pulling the wheel from the hub. Set the wheel away from the work area.

    3

    Pull the drum from the brake assembly by sliding it directly away from the backing plate. Later models have keeper screws that hold the drum in place; remove the keeper screw (on the front face of the drum) by turning it counterclockwise. With the drum removed, inspect the interior surface of the drum and check the brake assembly for debris or leaks.

    4

    Remove the shoes by levering off the long retainer springs with a brake tool (basically a bent screwdriver with a notched tip), then turning the primary spring bolt counterclockwise. Some spring bolts are held in with tension caps, which can be turned either direction to remove them. Slide the shoes directly away from the backing plate, and out of the brake assembly.

    5

    Replace the shoes with new units by sliding them onto the brake assembly and securing the primary spring bolt on each shoe. Replace the long retainer springs, if necessary, and lever them back onto the shoe hooks. Set the adjustment bolt (between the shoes at the bottom) on some models by turning it clockwise until there is just a little slack.

    6

    Replace the drum by sliding it over the shoes to the backing plate, and securing it's keeper screw, if applicable. Replace the wheel and turn the lug nuts clockwise, in an alternating pattern. Remove the jack stand and lower the Civic from the jack. Repeat the entire procedure on the opposite brake. The Civic had drums brakes in the rear, and disk brakes in the front.

How Do I Replace the Master Brake Cylinder on a 1992 Pontiac Bonneville SE?

The master brake cylinder is essential to the proper operation of the Pontiac Bonneville braking system. Without it, there is no way to distribute the fluid necessary to stop the car throughout the system. When you know that you need to replace the master cylinder, do not drive your car or you risk not being able to stop. It does not take long to replace the master cylinder. You can do it in your driveway in about two hours.

Instructions

    1

    Pop the hood on the car and locate the master cylinder on the back firewall. It will be on the driver's side. Siphon the fluid from the reservoir with a turkey baster. Place the fluid in a drain pan for recycling. Disconnect the negative battery cable, using a wrench to loosen the terminal nut.

    2

    Unplug the fluid level sensor (if there is one) on your master cylinder by unplugging it. Disconnect the reservoir hose and plug it if your car has an ABS system. Disconnect the brake lines from the master cylinder with a wrench. Use a wrench to loosen the collar nuts and remove the bolts from the master cylinder to the power booster. Pull the master cylinder away from the power booster assembly and out of the car.

    3

    Place the new master cylinder against the power booster and fasten the bolts with a wrench. Attach the brake lines to the master cylinder and tighten the collar nuts with the wrench. If your Bonneville has an ABS system, connect the reservoir hose to the master cylinder. Plug in the fluid level sensor if your car has one.

    4

    Add fresh brake fluid to the master cylinder. Starting with the rear passenger wheel, have someone to help you pump the brake pedal several times and hold it while you open the bleeder valve at the wheel to let the air out of the system. Repeat the process on all wheels until the air is gone.

How to Make Parking Brake Adjustments in a Chevy Cobalt

Make parking brake adjustments to your Chevy Cobalt easily from inside the vehicle. Avoid taking your Cobalt to the mechanic shop. Save yourself some time and money adjusting your parking brake at home. All you need are a few simple tools and a way to raise your Chevy Cobalt rear wheels. Adjust your Chevy Cobalt when the brake does not hold the car in park when parked on a slope.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the cover over the console with a screwdriver. Locate the parking brake lever inside the Chevy Cobalt, between the driver's seat and the front passenger seat.

    2

    Locate the adjuster nut on the two rods sticking out from the back of the console. Use your wrench to adjust the nuts on and use your pliers to hold the rods. Move the adjuster nut and then test the Chevy Cobalt.

    3

    Raise the Chevy Cobalt rear end using your jack. Then support the rear wheels with the jack stands, placing them under the car.

    4

    Test the rear wheels for any tension in the wheels by moving spinning them around. They should spin easily if there is no tension. Reverse the adjuster nut inside the vehicle using your pliers or wrench if you find tension in the rear wheels.

    5

    Lower your Chevy Cobalt using the jack and remove the jack stands that are supporting the rear wheels.

Minggu, 28 Juni 2009

How to Remove a Brake Drum From a Mercury Sable

The rear brakes on your Mercury Sable use a drum-and-shoe configuration. While the drums are very durable, they can wear and will require resurfacing from time to time. If you are replacing the rear brakes on your Mercury, you will need to access the shoes and hardware by removing the drums. If the drums are worn too much, replacement may be necessary. Replacement drums are available from most auto-parts stores or through the Mercury dealership.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the rear of your Mercury with a socket and breaker bar or lug wrench. Raise the rear of your Mercury with a jack, then position a set of jack stands under the rear suspension. Lower the jack, setting the car on the jack stands.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts from the rear wheels, then slide the wheels off the car. Set the wheels aside and put the lug nuts in a safe spot so you do not lose them.

    3

    Check the area at the base of the wheel studs, verifying weather the factory-installed drum retainers are still in place. If they are, pry the retainer off the wheel stud with a flat screwdriver and discard the retainers.

    4

    Grasp the brake drum on either side with your hands and pull it straight off the car. Move to the opposite side of the car and repeat the process to remove the second brake drum.

How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads in My Dodge Avenger

Dodge Avengers have four-wheel disc brake systems that provide superior brake wear and performance over older drum-style brake systems. The rear brakes provide lateral stabilization for the Avenger when stopping. Without properly functioning rear brakes, you'll lose control of the car every time you come to a halt. The brake pads wear down over time as part of their design functionality. Once they've worn thinner than 3-mm you need to replace them. Anyone with basic auto-repair skills can replace the rear brake pads on a Dodge Avenger.

Instructions

    1

    Shove the wheel chocks against the front and back of the right-front tire. Loosen the Avenger's rear lug nuts with your lug wrench by turning them counterclockwise.

    2

    Lift the back end of the Avenger with the floor jack. Support it on jack stands. Take the rear lug nuts and wheels off the Dodge by hand.

    3

    Set the drip pan below the Avenger's right-rear brake assembly and wash the brake dust off the rotor and caliper with brake cleaner.

    4

    Remove the caliper bolts with your socket set. Lift the caliper out of the mount and remove the old rear brake pads by hand. Discard the old pads.

    5

    Wash the caliper pistons and slides with brake cleaner. Lube the slides with a generous amount of white lithium grease.

    6

    Push the pistons back into the caliper with the caliper tool. Install the new rear brake pads by hand.

    7

    Set the caliper into the mount and bolt it in place with your socket set. Reinstall the back tires and lug nuts.

    8

    Lower the Avenger off the jack stands. Tighten the rear lug nuts to 85 ft.-lbs. with your torque wrench. Move the wheel chocks before operating the car.

How to Change the Brakes on a 2005 RAV4

The RAV4 hit the U.S. market in 1996, two years after it made its debut in Japan. Throughout its lifespan, the RAV4 steadily became more refined. The 2005 RAV4 came standard with four-wheel disc brakes and a 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine that produced 161 horsepower. Just recently, the front brake pads on my 2005 RAV4 started grinding and I found this process made replacing the pads pretty simple.

Removing the Pads

    On my 2005 RAV4, there were two bolts holding the caliper in place and I used a ratchet and socket to remove them, while holding the caliper pins in place with an open-end wrench. The pads stayed in the caliper bracket after I removed the caliper, so I just slid them out. There is a series of shims on the pads, so I noted the position of each shim and pried the shims off of the pads with a flat-head screwdriver.

Check and Replacing the Rotors

    The rotors on my 2005 RAV4 had some serious grooves on them, so I had to remove the caliper bracket by removing its two bolts -- these were pretty tight, so I used a breaker bar and socket -- then pulled it off of the front spindle assembly. The rotors came off by pulling them off the front hub. One of them was stuck to the hub, so I just tapped it with a rubber mallet to free it, then pulled it off. The new rotors slid right back onto the front hub with no problems, then I reinstalled the caliper bracket and torqued the bolts to 78 foot-pounds.

Reinstalling the Pads

    I installed the shims in the same way they were before I removed them from the old pads and coated the outermost shim with disc brake grease to minimize squealing. Then I just slid the pads back into the caliper bracket, lowered the caliper onto the bracket and tightened its bolts to 20 foot-pounds. After I finished up with both sides, I tightened up the lug nuts to 76 foot-pounds in a crisscross pattern. I then took the car down to a small parking lot down the road from my house and did about 20 stops from 25 mph without locking up the brakes to burnish the new pads and rotors, and my RAV4 was ready for the roadway again.

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a Hyundai Elantra

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a Hyundai Elantra

Changing the rear brakes on your Hyundai Elantra is a relatively easy task. However, it requires careful attention to detail. In addition, you should consider servicing both rear tires at the same time; this will help you avoid brake pull every time you apply the brakes due to uneven part wear. Follow these simple steps to replace the brakes in a matter of minutes.

Instructions

To Remove

    1

    Park your Hyundai Elantra in a safe place with enough room for you to work around the rear of the vehicle. Loosen the wheel lugs on the rear tires. Raise the rear of the car with a floor jack and safely support it on jack stands. Remove the tires.

    2

    Pry the grease cup off the wheel hub, using a standard screwdriver. Remove the cotter pin and nut ring--if equipped--using a pair of nose pliers. Remove the nut from the axle stub using an axle socket and ratchet. Remove the wheel bearing and brake drum.

    3

    Remove the upper return spring from the brake assembly; then depress the small spring cups. Hold the brake shoes against the backing plate. Rotate them 90 degrees using slip joint pliers to release the center pins.

    4

    Disengage the brake shoes from the wheel cylinder on top. Be careful not to damage the rubber dust covers. Remove the lower return spring. Disengage the parking brake cable from the operating lever attached to the shoe facing the rear of the vehicle. Disengage the adjuster spring attached to the adjuster lever on the shoe facing the front of the vehicle. Remove the brake shoes and the center adjuster bolt from the vehicle.

To Install

    5

    Wipe clean the backing plate with a shop rag and brake parts cleaner. Apply a light coat of wheel bearing grease to the raised pads on the backing plate. Attach the operating lever to the new brake shoe with the larger lining on it. Connect the parking cable to the operating lever.

    6

    Install the adjuster level and spring to the other brake shoe and center both shoes with the adjuster bolt on the backing plate. Install the spring cups and pins to hold the shoes on the backing plate. Install the lower and upper return springs. If necessary, remove the other brake drum to guide yourself visually during this installation.

    7

    Install the new brake shoes on the opposite wheel, following Step 3 through Step 6. Install the rear brake drums. Apply wheel bearing grease to the wheel bearing and install. Tighten the axle nut and reinstall the grease cup.

    8

    Remove the rubber plug from the back of the backing plates and adjust the new shoes, using a star wheel tool. Insert the tool though the hole and turn the star wheel on the adjuster bolt. Turn the wheel manually at the same time until the shoes drag slightly against the drums. Install the rubber plug and tires.

    9

    Lower the vehicle and depress the brake pedal several times to make sure the new brakes are correctly adjusted.

How to Change Drum Brakes on a Neon

How to Change Drum Brakes on a Neon

Replacing the brake drums is not commonly required. Still, they will wear and may require replacement at some point. Allowing the brake shoes to wear too far down is a common cause of damage to the brake drums, so be sure to check the brakes regularly and change them as needed. The Neon uses brake drums on the rear of the car only. You will find replacement parts through the Dodge dealer or at most auto-parts stores.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels of your Neon with a lug wrench, but do not remove them from the studs. Raise the rear of the car until the tires are off the ground several inches, using a jack, then place a set of jack stands under the rear suspension to support the car.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts from the wheel studs and set them aside. Pull the tires off the car and set them off to one side for now.

    3

    Locate the inspection hole in the brake drum backing plate from the back side. Insert a small flat screwdriver into the hole and lift the adjuster tang slightly, then slide a brake spoon into the hole and turn the adjuster down, pulling the brake shoes away from the drum.

    4

    Grasp the drum with both hands and pull it straight off the brake shoes. Install the new drum, sliding it over the shoes and wheel studs. Push it all the way on until it bottoms out on the wheel hub and will not go any farther.

    5

    Turn the brake adjuster with the brake spoon until the shoes just start to drag on the new drum when you rotate it. Move to the opposite side and repeat the process.

    6

    Install the wheels on the car, followed by the lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts with a lug wrench. Raise the car off the jack stands with a jack. Remove the jack stands from under the car and lower the jack , setting the car on the ground.

    7

    Tighten the lug nuts with the weight on the tires. After several days of normal driving, recheck the lug nuts to ensure they have not loosened up.

How to Change the Master Cylinder on a 1996 Honda Accord

How to Change the Master Cylinder on a 1996 Honda Accord

A broken master cylinder will make stopping your car much more difficult, and could even cause an accident due to the increase in stopping distance. That's why it's important to replace your master cylinder as soon as possible. Do-it-yourself mechanics only need a few basic tools to do the job, and can should be able to complete it within a few hours.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect the battery cables.

    2

    Disconnect the brake pedal linkage from the master cylinder (the linkage connects high above the brake pedal in the passenger compartment).

    3

    Disconnect the electrical terminals and brake lines from the master cylinder. Take care while doing this because the brake fluid might be under high pressure.

    4

    Unbolt the bolt on either side of the master cylinder that holds it to the brake booster.

    5

    Bolt the new master cylinder in place. Re-attach the brake lines and electrical connections.

    6

    Reconnect the brake pedal linkage. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid and bleed the brake lines.

Sabtu, 27 Juni 2009

How to Change Front Brake Calipers

This article describes 8 steps to replace the calipers on the front brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Changing the front calipers on your car is not the toughest job in the world. It can have some difficult moments, and it is often a dirty job. If you do not rush the job, it can be fairly simple and save you several dollars over paying to have it done. Start the job by purchasing new calipers and rounding up your wrenches, brake fluid, lug wrench, jack, and stands.

    Break the lugs nuts on the first wheel loose, but do not remove them.

    Position the jack under the car and raise the tire off of the ground. It is a good idea to go ahead and raise the car enough to slide your stand into place and lower the car onto it while leaving the jack in position under the car. Finish loosening and remove the lug nuts. When these have been removed, lift the tire and wheel off of the car and roll it out of the way for now.

    2

    You are now ready to remove the break line from the caliper.

    Place a pan under the back of the rotor and brake assembly to catch the brake fluid that will seep out when you remove the brake line from the caliper. Leave the cap on the brake fluid reservoir to slow the leakage of fluid during the replacement.

    There is usually a short piece of rubber tubing just above the caliper. If it is there, clamp it shut to conserve brake fluid and prevent excess air from entering the line. Use an end wrench and remove the brake line from the back of the caliper where it screws into the unit. Carefully swing the brake line back or to the side and out of the way. You do not want to put a kink in this line or you may have to run a new one from the master cylinder all of the way to the caliper. Position the pan to catch any fluid dripping from this line.

    3

    Remove the fasteners that hold the caliper in position.

    There are several varieties of fasteners that hold the calipers in place on cars and trucks. You may have to examine the new caliper to be certain what these fasteners look like and where they go. Once the fasteners are removed, set them aside because they will be needed to attach the new caliper when the time comes.

    4

    You need to compress the caliper to get it off of the rotor.

    On some cars, all that is necessary is to pull the caliper forward and the pressure against the roto will be enough to push the cylinder back into the caliper. If this does not work, you can use a "C" clamp reaching from the back to the front of the caliper and push the cylinder in as you tighten the "C" clamp. A large pair of channel locks will do the same thing faster most of the time. Lift the caliper away from the rotor and set it aside.

    5

    Install new brake pads while changing the caliper.

    Brake pads are relatively inexpensive. This is a good time to change them while it is simple to do. Just slip the new pads into position before putting the caliper back onto the car. Now, you will have done a brake job while replacing a faulty caliper. Once the brake pads are in position, slide the caliper into place. Replace the fasteners to secure the caliper onto the rotor.

    6

    Remove the plastic plug and screw the brake line into place on the new caliper.

    Once the brake line is secure, loosen the bleeder on the back of the caliper to allow brake fluid to begin to fill the caliper cylinder. Monitor the brake fluid reservoir and keep it filled. This will prevent air bubbles from entering the brake line. This can cause brake failure when you start driving the vehicle. Allow gravity to pull the fluid through the line until is runs freely from the bleeder. Tighten the bleeder and replace the cap onto the fluid reservoir.

    7

    Pump the brakes several times until the pedal seems full and solid.

    Refill the fluid reservoir and put the cap back on it. Inspect the new caliper and brakes to make sure that there are no leaks and the brakes are sitting properly in place. Lift the tire back into position sitting on the lugs. Screw the nuts onto the studs until all of them have been replaced. Raise the car up enough to remove the stand. Lower the jack until the tire makes good contact with the pavement. Tighten the lug nuts and finish lower the jack and remove it. Replace the hub cap if there is one. Put away your equipment and tools.

    Take the car for a slow speed test drive.

    This is to make sure the brakes are working properly. The car should stop quickly and smoothly. This should complete the job. The car is ready for the street.

How to Repair Rear Disc Brakes

How to Repair Rear Disc Brakes

One minor drawback of disc brakes is that rear disc brakes must also incorporate the parking brake mechanism, and this makes service slightly more complicated. Regardless, vehicle owners can save themselves money by learning the relatively simple basic rear disc brake service procedures.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a level surface. Put an automatic transmission in park, or put a manual transmission in first or reverse gear. Do not set the parking brake. Securely block the front wheels to prevent the vehicle from rolling. Loosen the lug nuts about one full turn each. Jack the vehicle and support it securely on a safety stand. Completely remove the lug nuts and pull the wheel off.

    2

    Remove the two caliper bolts. Some models have rubber caps over the caliper bolt heads. If these are present, pry or pull them off, taking care not to damage them. Grip the caliper and rock it back and forth a few times to spread the brake pads slightly, then lift the caliper off the disc and hang it out of the way on a wire hook or a bungee cord. Be careful not to kink or stretch the flexible brake hose.

    3

    Pry or pull off any retaining clips that hold the brake pads in the caliper. Be careful to avoid damaging the clips so that they can be reused. Slide the brake pads and shims out of the caliper.

    4

    Push the caliper piston back into the cylinder with a brake piston retractor. Place the swivel on the end of the retractor spindle on the piston face and place the metal plate of the retractor against the inner surface of the outer caliper frame. Turn the retractor spindle clockwise to advance the spindle and force the piston back into the cylinder bore. Take care not to pinch the rubber boot seal between the piston and cylinder.

    5

    Pull the disc off the hub. Some discs have retaining bolts or screws. Remove these if they are present. On other models there is a central hub nut that must be removed before removing the disc. If the disc is difficult to remove, first check to be sure the parking brake is off. If the disc is seized to the hub, firmly tap the center area of the disc with a mallet to loosen it. Do not hit the disc's outer rim or the braking surface area.

    6

    Measure the brake pad lining thickness with a finely graduated ruler. If it is less than the manufacturer's recommended minimum lining thickness, or if the linings are damaged or unevenly worn, replace the pads. The minimum recommended lining thickness can be found in the manufacturer's shop manual or the aftermarket equivalent repair manual, or you can ask at an auto parts store.

    7

    Measure the disc thickness with a brake disc micrometer at several places around the disc and compare it against the manufacturer's recommended minimum thickness as stated in the shop manual. If a shop manual is not available, check the outer rim of the disc as the minimum allowable thickness is often stamped into the metal of the outer disc rim. Replace the disc if the measured thickness is below the specified minimum, or if it is deeply scored, warped or cracked. Any minor disc damage can be repaired by having the disc machined at a brake shop or auto parts store.

    8

    Reassemble the brake by following the steps in reverse order. Coat the caliper bolts with brake grease before reinserting them into the caliper mounts. Start the vehicle and test the brake operation. Replace the wheel and lower the vehicle.

Jumat, 26 Juni 2009

How to Fix Brakes on a Dodge RAM 2000

Certain 2000 Dodge Ram model trucks came with front and rear brake pads, but most of the 2000 model Dodge Ram trucks came equipped with front brake pads and rear brake shoes. The front brake pads stop the truck by applying friction to the sides of the brake rotor; whe rear brake shoes keep the rear wheels from turning by applying pressure to the inside surface of the brake drums. You should change the brake pads and the brake shoes out before the brake material thickness reaches 1/8 inch, as xcessively worn brakes can damage the brake rotors and drums.

Instructions

Replace the Front Brake Pads

    1

    Pull the 2000 Dodge Ram onto a flat surface and shut the engine off. Apply the parking brake.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts from all four wheels about one-quarter of a turn counter-clockwise with a tire tool.

    3

    Jack the front end of the 2000 Dodge Ram up and set the jack stands under the proper front jacking points. Lower the truck onto the top of the stands.

    4

    Finish removing all of the lug nuts from all four wheels. Pull the wheels off and place the wheels near the work area on each side of the truck to begin the front brake pad replacement process on the front driver side of the truck.

    5

    Locate the two caliper mounting bolts on the back side of the brake caliper. Loosen and remove the two bolts with a ratchet and a metric socket. Slide a flathead screwdriver between the brake rotor and the outboard brake pad. Pry the brake pad back and forth until there is enough slack in the caliper to remove it from the rotor.

    6

    Pull the caliper off of the rotor and hang it on one of the suspension components behind the wheel hub assembly. Remove the inboard brake pad from the caliper. Slide the c-clamp around the outboard brake pad and the back side of the caliper. Turn the c-clamp clockwise against the brake pad to compress the caliper cylinder completely inside of the caliper housing. Remove the c-clamp and the outboard brake pad out of the caliper.

    7

    Insert the two new brake pads into the brake caliper. Inspect the brake rotor for any damage. If the damage is excessive, replace the rotor with a new one. If the damage is minimal, have the rotor machine turned by a machine shop. Slide the caliper back over the brake rotor onto the caliper mount. Screw the two caliper mounting bolts back through the rear of the caliper and tighten with the ratchet and socket. Torque the caliper bolts to 23 ft-lbs with a torque wrench and a metric socket.

    8

    Slide the wheel back onto the wheel hub. Screw the lug nuts onto the lugs and tighten the lug nuts until the wheel begins to turn. Move to the front passenger side wheel and repeat the same process as outlined above for replacing the brake pads. Crank the engine and compress the brake pedal in and out a few times to position the new brake pads to the proper distance from the sides of the brake rotors. Turn the engine off.

Removing the Rear Brake Shoes

    9

    Jack the front end up and remove the jack stands. Lower the 2000 Dodge Ram to the ground and remove the jack. Position the jack under the rear end of the truck and jack it back up. Place the jack stands under the proper rear jacking points. Lower the truck onto the stands and leave the jack in the upright position. Begin the brake shoe replacement process on the driver's side rear wheel.

    10

    Locate the rubber plug on the back side of the wheel hub assembly. Pry the rubber plug out of the hub plate with a flathead screwdriver; this will allow you access to adjust the brake shoes. Slide the brake adjusting tool inside of the access hole and press downward on the star adjusting gears to retract the brake shoes away from the brake drum. Remove the adjustment tool

    11

    Slide the brake drum off of the wheel hub. If the drum is stuck, use a hand-held sledgehammer to tap the brake drum loose.

    12

    Locate the two upper retaining springs on both brake shoes. Remove the upper springs with the brake spring removal tool.

    13

    Remove the bottom hold-down spring with the brake spring removal tool. Unhook the brake shoe adjusting cable from the rear brake pad and the anchor at the top of the wheel hub assembly plate with the spring removal tool.

Installing the New Brake Shoes

    14

    Pull the brake shoes apart and place them on the surface. Tap the spring retainers out of each brake shoe with the hand-held sledgehammer. Tap the new spring retainers into the new brake shoes with the hammer.

    15

    Position the new brake shoes onto the front of the wheel hub. Reattach the hold down spring with the spring removal tool to hold the brake shoes in place.

    16

    Install the top retainer springs with the spring removal tool. Attach the brake adjustment cable to the rear brake shoe and to the anchor on the top of the backing plate with the spring removal tool. Install all of the new braking accessories that comes with the new brake shoe kit in place of using the old braking accessories.

    17

    Slide the brake drum back over the brake shoes. Slide the adjustment tool back through the rear of the backing plate and adjust the brake pads toward the brake drum until the shoes actually touch the pads. Then turn the brake adjustment gear in the opposite direction so that the new brake shoes are sitting about 1/8 inch from the brake shoes. Remove the tool

    18

    Inspect the brake job to ensure that all of the retainer springs, hold down springs, retainers and the adjustment cable are all properly in place. Move to the passenger side rear wheel and repeat the same process outlined above for installing new brake shoes. Slide the wheels back onto the hubs and screw the lug nuts onto the lugs. Tighten the lug nuts down until the rear wheel begins to turn. Jack the rear of the 2000 Dodge Ram up and remove the jack stands. Lower the truck and remove the jack.

Selasa, 23 Juni 2009

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Plymouth Neon

Brake pads are an important part of your Plymouth Neon's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a quarter inch or risk damaging your Neon's brake discs.

Instructions

    1

    Park your car on a level surface. If you have a stick shift car make sure the car is in gear. Do not set the parking brake. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

    2

    Open the hood of your car and locate the master cylinder. If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid in the plastic container and dispose of it the way you dispose of motor oil.

    3

    Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

    4

    Use the socket wrench to remove the caliper guide pin bolts from the caliper. Lift the caliper up and away from the steering knuckle. Use a small bungee cord or wire hanger to hang the caliper in the wheel well. Do not let the caliper hang from the brake hose.

    5

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper. Pry the outer retaining clip over the raise portion of the caliper and slide brake pad out. Pull the inner brake pad away from the caliper piston until the retaining clip comes free.

How to Replace Rear Brake Pads on an Audi A6

The rear brake pads on an Audi A6 use a caliper and rotor design for maximum clamping power. However, the downside to increased performance is increased wear and tear. You will need to check the brake pads on the A6 every six months for wear. When the pad material is down to 1/8 inch thick, you'll need to replace the pads.

Instructions

    1

    Break loose the rear lug nuts on the A6. Turn them 1/4 turn counterclockwise with a tire wrench.

    2

    Raise the rear of the A6 onto jack stands. Use the rear jack point behind the trunk to lift up on the car. Then, place jack stands on the rear jack supports in the rear of the vehicle. They are located on the side of the vehicle just behind the front doors on the bottom of the car. Then, lower the A6 onto the jack stands.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts, and pull the wheel off the rear hub.

    4

    Remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts with a socket wrench and 13mm socket. The rear calipers are unlike most calipers, because they have a nut that turns with the caliper bolts. To remove the mounting bolts, you'll need to hold this retaining nut still with a crescent wrench or open-end wrench while removing the mounting bolts.

    5

    Pull the caliper off the rotor. The pads should fall right off, because the A6 doesn't use a retainer on the rear caliper.

    6

    Retract the caliper piston with the caliper piston tool. Slide the tool over the grooves in the piston and turn the piston clockwise to retract the piston back into the caliper.

    7

    Slide the new pads into the caliper so that the curved end of the pad is facing inward toward the caliper.

    8

    Slide the caliper back over the rotor and put the brakes back together. Assembly is the reverse of disassembly.

How to Replace a Caliper in a Mercury Villager

The Mercury Villager minivan in no longer in production, so finding replacement parts like brake calipers can be tough. Consult an expert or mechanic on the right parts to use. It may be best to let these people handle all service on your Mercury vehicle.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Raise the van securely on a jack stand and remove the wheel.

    2

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper at the fitting bolt. Discard the old washers on the bolt. Plug the hose with a small piece of plastic.

    3

    Unscrew and remove the two caliper pin bolts. Remove the caliper from the rotor; it should pivot upward and slide off. Be sure to not drip brake fluid onto the paint.

Replacement

    4

    Make sure all parts are clean dirt and debris. If the replacement caliper's piston isn't bottomed in the bore, compress it in there with a C-clamp and a used brake pad.

    5

    Install the replacement caliper onto the rotor. See that the inboard and outboard brake pads are properly positioned.

    6

    Lubricate the locating pins with silicone grease or other dielectric compound. Install the two pin bolts into the caliper.

    7

    Connect the brake hose back to the caliper, using new copper washers with the banjo bolt.

    8

    Bleed the brake system to remove air. With a plastic hose connected to the bleeder valve, have another person depress the brake pedal several times, and then hold down on it.

    9

    Put the tire and wheel assembly back in place. Add extra brake fluid if needed. Lower the van.

    10

    Pump the brake pedal multiple times slowly until you have a firm pedal, indicating the brake pads are properly seated. Then road test the vehicle.

Senin, 22 Juni 2009

How to Replace a Rear Brake Line in a Jeep Cherokee

How to Replace a Rear Brake Line in a Jeep Cherokee

The rear brake lines on a Jeep Cherokee include a rubber high-pressure hose and two steel lines. Replacing one or all of the lines requires a few minutes and necessitates bleeding the brakes after the repair is completed. The steel lines are available in many lengths from your local auto parts store; you will need to bend them to the shape required. The rubber hose is also available at any auto parts store or Jeep dealer and is a direct-fit part that you just bolt into place.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the rear of your Jeep with a floor jack, and support the Jeep under the frame with a set of jack stands. Be sure to chock the wheels to keep the Jeep from rolling or moving.

    2

    Find the brake lines that run along the top of the rear axle housing. They run from the wheel cylinders to a splitter block on the driver's side of the housing that connects to the rubber high-pressure hose.

    3

    Place a drip pan under the rear axle before removing the line. Remove the damaged line by unscrewing the fitting that threads into the splitter block with a wrench.

    4

    Follow the line to the wheel cylinder and unscrew the fitting that attaches the line to the back of the wheel cylinder with a wrench. Remove the line from under the Jeep.

    5

    Install the new line under the Jeep by inserting the fittings into the splitter block and the wheel cylinder. You will need to gently bend the line to run along the top of the axle so it does not get hung up or damaged.

    6

    Tighten both fittings with a wrench, being careful not to strip the fittings when you tighten them. Bleed the brake system completely before driving the Jeep.

Minggu, 21 Juni 2009

How to Replace a Caliper in a Jeep Grand Cherokee

Jeep drivers can often drive their vehicles hard and like to perform maintenance themselves. However, replacing a brake caliper is not a small task. Make sure you have everything needed, know everything about your Jeep and consult a mechanic beforehand.

Instructions

Remove the Old Caliper

    1

    Raise and support the truck up on the jack stand, then remove the wheel and tire assembly.

    2

    Siphon a small amount of fluid from master cylinder reservoir to avoid overflow during reinstallation. Use a clean suction gun.

    3

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper at the banjo bolt. Discard the gasket washers.

    4

    Unscrew and remove the caliper slide bolts. Remove the caliper from the adapter.

Install the New Caliper

    5

    Install the caliper on the adapter. Make sure the slide pin bolts are free of debris and lightly lubricated before installing them.

    6

    Verify that the slide pin boot is fully covering the pin. Lift one end gently off the boot to equalize the air pressure and then release the boot.

    7

    Connect the brake hose to the caliper, using new copper washers. Make sure the hose has no twists or kinks before tightening the banjo bolt.

    8

    Fill the master reservoir as needed with fresh fluid and bleed the brake system.

    9

    Reinstall the wheel and tire. Lower the vehicle and verify the brake fluid level. Pump the brake pedal until it's firm and test the brakes on the road.

How to Replace a Rear Brake Rotor on a Ford Explorer

How to Replace a Rear Brake Rotor on a Ford Explorer

The rear brake rotors on the Ford Explorer are subject to the same stress that the front rotors experience. Brake rotors work with the brake pads, using friction to slow and stop your Explorer. The brake caliper houses a piston. When you push on the brake pedal with you foot, it forces brake fluid through the lines. That brake fluid pushes the piston out on the caliper. That causes the brake pads to squeeze the rotor between them until the Ford stops.

Instructions

    1

    Place a set of wheel chocks in front of the front tires. Jack the Explorer up using the automobile jack. Place the jack stand under the Ford near the jacking point and raise it to the frame.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench and pull the wheel off the Explorer. Remove the brake caliper using the Torx socket and the ratchet. Secure the caliper to the rear spring or the shock absorber using a wire tie. Do not allow the caliper to hang loose or you will damage the brake line.

    3

    Pull the brake rotor off the wheel assembly. Put the new rotor in place on the wheel assembly.

    4

    Cut the wire tie holding the caliper to the shock absorber with the pliers. Place the caliper in the mounting bracket and tighten the retaining bolts with the Torx socket and ratchet. Place the wheel back on the Explorer. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    5

    Remove the jack stand from under the Ford and lower the vehicle to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

Sabtu, 20 Juni 2009

How to Remove a 1984 GMC Dually Truck Drum

The rear drums on a 1984 GMC dually are a part of the parking brake system, and also provide additional braking power to the front brakes. These drum brakes wear down over time, but they can be relined. If the you need to service the rear brakes in any way, you first need to remove the drums from the truck. This should take about 15 minutes to do.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the rear of the dually by the axle using the jack. Put the heavy-duty jack stands underneath the axle and adjust them high enough to keep the rear wheels off of the ground.

    2

    Unbolt the outer rear rim using the tire iron. Slide the outer rim off of the axle with both hands. Then remove the inner rear wheels from the axle.

    3

    Grip the drum with both hands and pull it off of the axle. If the drum won't move, look behind the drum and locate the adjusting screw which is on the top side of the axle. Turn the adjusting screw counterclockwise several turns using the flathead screwdriver. Pull the drum off of the axle.

How to Inspect a Brake Power Booster

Your car's braking system is one of the most important systems in your vehicle, contributing to the safety of you and those around you. The power booster is a main component of the power braking system and needs to be routinely maintained and inspected often.

Instructions

    1

    Know where the brake power booster is located. In most vehicles, the power booster is located between the firewall and the master cylinder. It utilizes atmospheric pressure to provide assistance to the braking system. ABS is also part of this system.

    2

    Perform a series of checks on the power booster system. First, depress the brake pedal and start the engine with the pedal down. If the pedal goes down slightly after the engine starts, it is operating normally. Depress the pedal a few more times while the engine is running to make sure there is no change in the resistance.

    3

    Check the air tightness by starting the engine and letting it run for a couple of minutes, then turn it off and depress the brake pedal. See if the pedal goes down further the first time you press it down, then gradually less each time after. If so, the booster is air tight.

    4

    Access the power booster by removing the master cylinder and everything on the way to it. Be careful not to kink or unhook the brake lines. You simply want to get in there and look for physical signs of excessive corrosion, any damage or other debris.

The Cost to Have Brake Calipers Replaced

The Cost to Have Brake Calipers Replaced

The cost to replace the brake calipers on your vehicle depends on the type of car you own, the number of calipers you are replacing and the repair shop you go to.

Cost of Parts

    The cost of parts of a common, domestic car such as a 2005 Ford Taurus will be less expensive than the cost of a newer luxury foreign car such as a 2011 BMW 750Li. In December 2010, according to RepairPal, one caliper for a common car ranges from $76 to $176, while a caliper for a newer luxury car costs between $83 and $295.

Cost of Labor

    Labor costs for a more common car ranges from $90 to $115, and labor costs of a more expensive, rare car ranges from $168 to $215. You can save this repair cost by doing it yourself.

Total Cost

    The total cost of parts and labor for replacing one caliper on a more common car is around $166 to $291, while the total cost of replacing a caliper on a less common (more expensive) car is around $251 to $510.

Jumat, 19 Juni 2009

How to Install Compression Fittings on Steel Brake Lines

How to Install Compression Fittings on Steel Brake Lines

Steel brake lines are designed to withstand far greater pressure levels than normal rubber brake lines. When you jam on the brakes in a car with normal rubber brake lines, the response can be soft and pressure can be lost as the line stretches in response to the force within. With stainless steel lines, the extra pressure is directed towards the calipers instead of being lost on the way. In addition to better braking response, stainless steel lines will also provide a firmer feeling brake pedal. Attaching steel brake lines will require you to install compression fittings.

Instructions

    1

    Cut your stainless steel brake lines to the required length using a metal snips to cut the steel braids and a razor blade to cut the inner rubber tubing. Place the compression-fitting cap over the metal braids without removing or altering them in any way. Twist it onto the line making sure to leave the threaded portion of the cap facing outward. Slide the compression cap down the brake line away from the cut end.

    2

    Unravel about 1/2-inch of the stainless steel braiding at the cut end creating a small cone shape. Place the ferrule or brass ring over the rubber portion of the brake line but under the feathered stainless braids.

    3

    Slide the third and last piece of the compression fitting onto the brake line, through the brass ferrule and into the rubber line firmly. Bring the compression cap up and over the other two components and tighten the threads to create one solid compression fitting. Do not allow any metal braids to get into the threads.

How to Change Brakes & Rotors on a 2004 GMC Sierra

How to Change Brakes & Rotors on a 2004 GMC Sierra

The brake system on the 2004 GMC Sierra consists of components such as brake pads, brake calipers and brake rotors. Each of these components work in conjunction with the others to bring the Sierra to a stop: When the driver pushes on the brake pedal, the brake fluid pressurizes against the cylinder inside the brake caliper; the cylinder then pushes the outer brake pad towards the brake rotor; finally, once the outer brake pad is compressed to the back of the brake rotor, the inner brake pad compresses to the front of the brake rotor to stop the vehicle. You will have to change any of these components of the brake system when they no longer function properly.

Instructions

    1

    Park the 2004 GMC Sierra on level ground, giving yourself plenty of working room.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the driver's side front wheel, using the tire tool, then loosen the lug nuts on the passenger's side front wheel.

    3

    Slide the jack under the front of the 2004 GMC Sierra. Position the jack under the cross-frame, beneath the engine. Jack the front of the Sierra up, and as soon as the truck is high enough, place the safety jack stands under each designated jacking point, behind each front wheel; then, slowly lower the Sierra until the jacking point is on top of the jack stands. Leave the jack in the "Up" position.

    4

    Remove the front driver's side wheel and the passenger's side wheel. Place both wheels near the front of the Sierra.

    5

    Move back to the driver's side front wheel and locate the upper and lower bolts on the back of the brake caliper. Remove the upper and lower caliper bolts with a 1/2-inch drive ratchet and a socket. Place the flat-head screwdriver between the outer brake pad and the outer face of the brake rotor. Wiggle the screwdriver back and forth, until the brake caliper loosens its grip of the brake rotor.

    6

    Slide the bottom of the caliper straight up, until the top of the caliper comes off the rotor, then attach the brake caliper to the steering knuckle located directly behind the wheel hub. This will prevent the brake caliper from hanging by the brake line.

    7

    Pull the inner brake pad out of the caliper, then position the C-clamp inside the caliper facing the outer brake pad. Slowly, compress the outer brake pad against the caliper cylinder by turning the C-clamp clockwise. Continue compressing the cylinder until it has fully retracted inside the caliper housing.

    8

    Unscrew the C-clamp and remove it from the brake caliper. Pull the outer brake pad out of the caliper, along with any other braking hardware. Install the new brake pads into the brake caliper along with any new braking hardware, such as any clips or shims.

    9

    Tap the back side of the brake rotor with the rubber mallet (Tap the back of the brake rotor in different areas each time that you tap it with the mallet.) Continue tapping the brake rotor until it loosens enough be pulled off the wheel studs. Pull the brake rotor straight off the wheel studs, using your hands.

    10

    Push the new brake rotors onto the wheel studs until the brake rotor is completely seated on the back of the wheel hub. Slide the brake caliper with the new brake pads back onto the brake rotor. Screw the rear caliper bolts back in and tighten then securely with the ratchet and socket.

    11

    Follow the same exact steps outlined above for replacing the brakes and rotors on the front passenger's side, the rear driver's side and the rear passenger's side wheels. Once that you have finished installing all of the brake pads and rotors, the new brake pads will have to be set to the new brake rotors.

    12

    Crank the engine and pump the brake pedal in and out five or six times to set the new brake pads to the proper distance from the new brake rotors. Turn the engine off. Jack the 2004 GMC Sierra back up and remove all of the jack stands. Lower the Sierra back to the ground. Open the hood and check the brake fluid level in the brake fluid reservoir. Add brake fluid, if necessary.

Kamis, 18 Juni 2009

How to Test a Brake Booster Check Valve

How to Test a Brake Booster Check Valve

Nearly all of today's automobiles are equipped with power-assisted brakes. The power assist system makes use of an ingenious booster that is powered by the vacuum generated in the engine intake manifold. For safety's sake the system must operate for at least one or two brake applications even if the engine stops, and a small check valve is therefore incorporated to maintain the booster vacuum under these conditions. If the booster does not seem to be performing properly it is wise to test the check valve to eliminate it as a possible cause of the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle and open the hood. Locate the vacuum booster. This is a dome-shaped assembly that is mounted to the rear wall of the engine compartment on the driver's side, in-line with the brake pedal. Locate the vacuum hose that runs from the engine intake manifold to the vacuum booster.

    2

    Trace the vacuum hose back to the engine intake manifold connection. Undo the hose clamp or clip using pliers or a screwdriver and slip the hose off the connection point.

    3

    Blow air into the hose. Use your mouth if you don't mind eating a bit of engine dirt. Alternatively, slip an aspirator bulb over the hose end and squeeze. In a pinch, turkey basters make great aspirators. If the check valve is functioning properly it should prevent you from blowing air into the hose.

    4

    Suck air out of the hose. If the line is not blocked and the check valve is functioning properly you should be able to easily suck air out of the hose.

Rabu, 17 Juni 2009

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a 1989 Audi 200

When thinking of Audis, most people think of the luxurious and performance-oriented R8, TT or A4, with classic Audis falling by the wayside. The 1989 Audi 200 is one of those models. Compared with modern Audis, this sedan is neither stylish nor powerful, but when compared with luxury cars of its era, the roughly $34,000 Audi 200 was tops. Mechanically, the 200 was ahead of its time, standard-equipped with a 2.2-liter, turbocharged in-line five-cylinder engine that pumped out an impressive 162 horsepower and 177 foot-pounds of torque. It also came standard with four-wheel disc brakes, a rarity in the 1980s. Replacing the rear brake pads on this old-school luxury vehicle is a straightforward task that any experienced do-it-yourselfer can complete.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the rear lug nuts with a ratchet and socket and raise the rear of the vehicle with a floor jack. Slide jack stands under the Audis rear cross member and lower the vehicle onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheels from the rear hubs.

    2

    Remove each of the two caliper bolts with a ratchet and socket while holding each bolts respective guide pin steady with a combination wrench. Pull the caliper from its bracket and hang it from a nearby suspension component using a bungee strap.

    3

    Slide the brake pads from the caliper bracket. Remove the two caliper bracket bolts, then pull the caliper bracket from the rear hub.

    4

    Pull the rotor from the rear hub. If the rotor will not pull off easily, lightly tap the rear of it with a rubber mallet to free it.

    5

    Inspect the rotor for any defects, including deep grooves, uneven wear, mirrorlike shine or evidence of grinding. If any defects exist, replace the rotor with a new one. Alternatively, if you have access to a micrometer, measure the thickness of the rotor and compare it to its minimum refinishing thickness of 0.335 inches. If it is at least that thick, have a machine shop or auto repair shop resurface the rotor.

    6

    Slide the original or new rotor onto the rear hub and position the caliper bracket back on the rear hub. Hand-thread the caliper bracket bolts, then tighten them to 48 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    7

    Insert new brake pads into the caliper bracket.

    8

    Remove the caliper from the bungee strap and find the Allen key-shaped hole in the center of the caliper piston. Using a ratchet, a 6-inch socket extension and an Allen-bit socket, turn the caliper piston clockwise while pushing the piston toward the caliper body until the piston inserts completely into the calipers bore.

    9

    Set the caliper on the bracket and hand-thread new caliper bolts into the caliper. Tighten the caliper bolts to 26 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and socket, as you use a combination wrench to keep each bolts respective guide pin from turning.

    10

    Repeat steps 2 through 9 to replace the brake pads on the other side of the Audi.

    11

    Install the wheels back onto the rear hubs and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Raise the 200 off the jack stands, using a floor jack, then remove the jack stands. Lower the Audi to the ground and tighten the lug nuts to 90 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    12

    Press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm, then check the fluid level in the 200s master cylinder reservoir. If the fluid level is not at the Max line, unscrew the cap from the master cylinder reservoir and add DOT 4 brake fluid until it reaches the Max level, then tighten the cap.

2000 Plymouth Neon Brake Specs

The 2000 Plymouth Neon has disc brakes on the front and disc or drum brakes on the rear. The disc brakes have two important measurements: minimal rotor machining and nominal rotor thickness. The rear drums have two measurements, as well: drum discard and nominal drum diameter.

Front Rotor

    All 2000 Plymouth Neons have front disc brakes. The minimal rotor machining specification is the thinnest the rotors may be and still be eligible for machining or resurfacing; this measurement is .803 inches. The nominal thickness -- the thickness of the rotor new -- is .861 to .871 inches.

Rear Rotor

    Rear rotors on a 2000 Plymouth Neon have minimal machining thickness of .285 inches. The nominal thickness rating for the rear rotors is set at .344 to .364 inches.

Rear Drum

    Some 2000 Plymouth Neons are equipped with rear drum brakes, which have different, but similar, ratings. The drums are measured in overall inside diameter as opposed to total thickness. The drum's discard diameter, the largest diameter the drum can be before it must be replaced, is 7.921 inches. The nominal diameter, or new diameter, of the rear drum is 7.875 inches.

Honda Air Condition Troubleshooting

Honda Air Condition Troubleshooting

Honda air conditioners do not add cold to the driving area. Air conditioners remove heat and moisture from the air. Knowing how the air conditioner functions is important to do any repairs. If you spend time looking for ways to add cold then youll never fix a problem. An Honda air conditioner has four separate functions for removing controlling heat: the thermostat, fan, the compressor and drive belt. Repairing a Honda air conditioner (A/C) unit means troubleshooting all four components.

Troubleshooting the compressor

    The heart of the Hondas A/C is the compressor. Compressors have a certain amount of coolant, the additive responsible for effectively removing heat from surrounding air. Compressing the coolant makes it colder and as it gets colder removes the heat from air circulated around the coolant. Check the coolant levels in the A/C unit and refill with the correct coolant as needed. Hondas more than 20 years old may require a coolant no longer available to the public. Check the owners manual or look on the side of the compressor for coolant specifications. If your Honda needs older coolant you will have to have it serviced by a certified vehicle air condition mechanic. These professionals are the only technicians allowed today to handle older coolants.

    Repairing a compressor, however, involves replacement. Air conditioner compressors, however, are not welded but attached by screws and bolts. Removing the compressor and installing a new one is just a matter of removing the mounts, disconnecting the coolant inlet and outlet attachment, and completing the process in reverse for installation.

    Make sure, though, to bleed all the coolant before disconnecting the coolant fittings. Coolant is under pressure. Located on the coolant tubing is a small outlet valve similar to a tire valve. Depress it until the coolant is expelled.

Troubleshooting Drive Belt

    A flywheel in the main serpentine drive belt powers the air conditioner compressor. The belt is found on the front of the engine and winds around other flywheels for the oil, water, power brake and steering (if equipped) pumps, and on some Hondas the radiator fan. A slipping belt causes the compressor to spin sporadically, and warm air may be the first sign the belt needs replacing before larger problems happen.

    Check the belt for damage. If there is any belt slack or fraying, replace immediately. Loosen the belt tension wheel with a fitting socket to change the belt. A diagram on the front of the motor diagrams the proper winding to get all the flywheels attached to the belt.

Troubleshooting Fan

    A fan behind the dashboard drives the cold air through the Hondas dashboard vents. The fan could be directly behind, underneath and behind on the other side of the firewall--the sheet metal separating the engine bay from the passenger area depending on the model.

    Locate the fan and make sure it operates correctly. If a blade is broken, you will need to replace the fan. Use the correct tool to tighten the fan blade to the drive shaft if it is loose. Clean the fan of any dirt buildup, grease or oil. Fans do not need lubrication.

Troubleshooting Thermostat Controls

    Make sure the fuse for the A/C unit is not burned through. If the air conditioner will not operate with or without the fuse, replace the fuse. Also, check inside the dashboard for any loose or broken connections. Repair any loose or split wires.

    If the temperature control unit will not respond to any settings it needs to be replaced. You wont have to use a soldering tool because all the connections are screws or snap connections. Taking out the old thermostat and putting in a new one is not hard.

How to Repair the Disc Brake on a Volvo

The disc brakes on the Volvo are not hard to repair. You can save a great deal of money changing the brakes yourself, because labor rates are high at the repair garages. It will only take about 45 minutes to complete each wheel. When you are changing the brake pads, inspect the brake rotor for damage, such as grooves from the brake pads, cracking, or any other type of damage. When you change brakes, you need to do all brakes on an axle.

Instructions

    1

    Open the engine compartment, and lift the cover from the reservoir of the master cylinder on the driver side. It will be at the back firewall. Siphon enough brake fluid from it with the turkey baster to bring it down to the minimum level. Place the fluid in the drain pan for recycling.

    2

    Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Raise the Volvo with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the car near the jacking point, and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench, and pull the wheel from the car.

    3

    Remove the retaining spring from the brake pads using the pliers. Remove the caliper retaining pins with the socket and ratchet. Pull the caliper from the cradle and remove the old brake pads.

    4

    Push the caliper piston into the housing using the piston tool. Insert the new brake pads in the caliper, and place it back in the cradle. Tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet.

    5

    Put the wheel on the Volvo and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the car. Lower the Volvo to the ground.

    6

    Repeat the process on the other wheel.

Selasa, 16 Juni 2009

How to Change the Brakes on an F150

How to Change the Brakes on an F150

The brake pads on Ford F-150 trucks are the main component in the braking system. The brake pads are inside the brake calipers. When the brakes are applied from inside of truck, the cylinder inside each brake caliper will compress and cause the brake pads to close against the brake rotor. Once the brake pads are applied to the brake rotors, the truck will come to a stop.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Ford F-150 on a level surface, and shut the engine off. Set the emergency brake.

    2

    Jack the front of the truck up, and place the jack stands securely and evenly under the front axle. Lower the truck onto the jack stands. Make sure the truck is stable on the jack stands.

    3

    Remove the driver's side front tire with the lug wrench. Turn the lug nuts counter-clockwise to remove them.

    4

    Slide the tire off of the hub, and set the tire to the side. Locate the brake caliper bracketed to the top of the brake rotor. The brake pads are inside the brake caliper.

    5

    Remove the two caliper mounting bolts in the rear of the caliper. The caliper mounting bolts on Ford F-150 trucks require either a 1/2-inch or a 9/16-inch socket to remove. Turn the brake caliper mounting bolts counter-clockwise to remove them from the rear of the caliper.

    6

    Slide the caliper off the top of the brake rotor. Brace the caliper so does not hang from the brake line.

    7

    Remove the outer brake pads from the inside of the brake caliper. Slide the end of the C-clamp inside the brake caliper so it matches up with the caliper cylinder.

    8

    Turn the C-clamp clockwise to compress the cylinder into the caliper housing. Continue turning the C-clamp until the caliper cylinder is fully compressed. This will give you room to slide the new brake pads in place.

    9

    Slide the new brake pads inside the brake caliper the same way the old pads came out. Slide the caliper back over the top of the rotor. Screw the mounting bolts back in place.

    10

    Tighten the brake caliper mounting bolts with a 3/8-inch socket. Slide the tire back onto the lugs, and screw the lug nuts back on. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    11

    Jack the Ford F-150 up, and remove the jack stands. Lower the truck to the ground. Start the engine, and pump the brakes until the brake fluid has compressed the brake caliper cylinder back against the brake pads. The brakes will go from a spongy feel to a tight feel. When the brakes feel tight, the fluid has fully compressed the brake pads against the brake rotor. Job complete.

How to Install the Brake & Rotors for a 1995 Acura Integra

How to Install the Brake & Rotors for a 1995 Acura Integra

Learning how to properly install the brakes and rotors on your Integra not only saves money, it teaches an invaluable skill that's used repeatedly. Wear and tear naturally occurs to the brake system during every day driving. However letting your brakes and rotors go unchecked for extended periods puts you at a greater risk of not being able to stop the car. Acura recommends inspecting or replace the brake pads every 7,500 to 15,000 miles. The rotors should also be inspected for damage during this interval as well. Changing the brakes and rotors on the 1995 Acura Integra with a few tools, you can complete this repair in one hour or less right at home.

Instructions

Front Brakes and Rotors

    1

    Engage the emergency brake on the Integra and then use a lug wrench to loosen the driver's side tire lug nuts. Do not fully remove the lug nuts just slightly loosen them.

    2

    Raise the car with a car jack and place a jack stand on the right three inches from the car jack. Do not remove the car jack leave it in place for extra support.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts from the tire and then using both hands; slide the tire off its studs. Store the lug nuts in a safe location; don't leave them on the ground. If dirt gets into the lug nuts threads, it can cause cross-threading when you try to reinstall them.

    4

    Place an 8-inch C-clamp around the body of your brake caliper and then wind it shut slowly until it contacts the surface of the outer brake pad. Observe the round piston currently pushing on the back of the inner brake pad. This piston must be compressed back down into its bore hole. Wind the C-clamp shut until you see that the piston has completely gone down then loosen and remove the C-clamp.

    5

    Remove the lower brake caliper mounting bolt with a socket wrench. Grasp the brake caliper and pivot it upward to access the brake pads. You do not have to remove the top caliper mounting bolt. If pivoting the brake caliper seems difficult slightly loosen the top caliper mounting bolt to make it easier to move the caliper.

    6

    Notate the position and direction of each of the brake pads and shims. Remove and replace the brake pads along with their shims one at a time. The pads and shims simply slide out of their mounting position. Insert the new brake pad then apply three vertical beads of anti-squeal grease on the top of the brake pad then install the shim.

    7

    Lower the brake caliper back into position and thread the lower mounting bolt by hand. Tighten the lower mounting bolt and the top bolt if you loosened it with a 3/8-inch drive torque wrench set to 23 ft-lbs.

    8

    Remove the two inner upper and lower caliper mounting bracket bolts with a socket wrench. The bracket holds the brake pads and the caliper so don't remove the caliper bolts again mistakenly.

    9

    Place a 5-gallon bucket next to the bracket within the wheel well. Pull the entire mounting bracket off the rotor and set it down on the top of the bucket. Remove the two screws on the face of the rotor with a Phillips screwdriver and then pull the rotor off the hub toward you. Install the new rotor by reversing this step.

    10

    Install the mounting bracket by placing it back over the rotor into its original mounting position. Reset the 3/8-inch drive torque wrench to 80 ft-lbs. and secure the bracket's bolts in place. Remove the 5-gallon bucket and remount the tire onto the hub studs. Set the 3/8-inch drive torque wrench to 95 ft-lbs. and secure the lug nuts in place using a star tightening pattern.

    11

    Remove the jack stand, lower the car, and then release the emergency brake. Pump the brake pedal slowly until you feel the pedal stiffen. Repeat this entire process to replace the passenger-side brake pads and rotor.

Rear Brakes and Rotors

    12

    Replace the rear brake pads and rotors by following the same procedure as the front except one detail. The entire brake caliper has to be removed instead of pivoting it up like the front caliper. With the rear brake caliper removed use a lock nut wrench to rotate the piston clockwise to force it down into its bore hole.

    13

    Reinstall the brake caliper after you have replaced the brake pads. The cut-out on the inner brake pad has to align with the cut-out on the brake caliper's piston. Rotate the caliper piston back and forth until you get it to align correctly with the inner brake pad. Once aligned tighten the caliper mounting bolts to 17 ft-lbs. with a 3/8-inch drive torque wrench.

    14

    Remove the mounting bracket just as you did for the front bracket. Remove the two screws on the face the rotor, pull the rotor off and reinstall the new rotor in reverse. Tighten the mounting bracket bolts to 28 ft-lbs. with the 3/8-inch drive torque wrench. Remount the tire and tighten its lug nuts in a star pattern as well to 95 ft-lbs. with the 3/8-inch drive torque wrench. Pump the brake pedal again until it stiffens before you replace the other rear brake pads and rotor.

Minggu, 14 Juni 2009

How to Adjust Ford Drum Brakes

How to Adjust Ford Drum Brakes

Many times restoring proper brake pedal height and parking brake function is just a matter of adjusting the rear drum brakes on your Ford vehicle. As the brake shoes wear, the distance between the shoe and the drum increases. This causes the brake pedal or parking brake lever/pedal to move farther before the shoes make contact with the drum. Adjustment of the Ford drum brake system is well within the average home mechanic's ability.

Instructions

    1

    Place wheel chocks behind the front wheels to prevent vehicle movement when the rear wheels are off. Raise the rear of the vehicle with the floor jack, and place jack stand under the frame. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stands to support the weight of the vehicle. Never rely on the floor jack alone to support the vehicle. Remove the rear wheels and place them, along with the lug nuts, out of the work area. This prevents tripping hazards, and lug nut loss.

    2

    Remove the drum, and inspect the rear brake shoes and drum for damage. Locate the star wheel adjuster. This serrated wheel shaped piece is between the lower edges of both shoes. As the wheel is turned, it expands on contracts the shoes. Remove the rubber plug in the back of the backing plate behind the star wheel adjuster.

    3

    Install the drum onto the shoes. Turn the star wheel with the brake-adjusting tool, until the shoes contact the drum. The shoes should not be so tight that the drum cannot turn, but there should be a slight drag on the drum as it is turned.

    4

    Reinstall the wheels and lower the vehicle. Check parking brake function by applying the parking brake, and putting the vehicle in gear. The parking brakes should hold under slight torque load from the engine.

How to Make Your Own One Man Brake Bleeder

Great weather means great driving ahead. We all need a nice safe car to enjoy the roads down the line. And your brakes should always be in order. A spongy pedal could mean a few different things. Should it be that you need a brake fluid change or flush, here's a way to finish the job right, with your very own one man bleeder. Here's eHow to do it!

Instructions

    1

    So first, finish the first part of the brake job. Make sure you tighten all your ends and keep everything clean. Grab the rest of your tools and parts as listed. Then get to the finishing touch, bleeding the brakes, by yourself!

    2

    Next you'll assemble the bleeder. Its simple! Take the vacuum hose, cut it to 2-3 inches and attach it to the threaded end of the bleeder valve. Clear hose is preferred so that you can see the fluid pass through. It isn't necessary because you will ultimately see bubbles and fluid pass through the speed bleeder's tip.

    Grab a cup to collect the waste brake fluid too!

    3

    Now attach the other end of the hose to the bleeder valve on the caliper or wheel cylinder. Place your cup so that the speed bleeder valve will drip into the cup.

    Keep in mind that with the pressure behind your foot, it will squirt out.

    4

    Loosen the bleeder valve on your car and now you can easily purge your braking system of air and impurities all by yourself!!

Sabtu, 13 Juni 2009

Do I Need to Bleed Brakes When Replacing Pads?

Do I Need to Bleed Brakes When Replacing Pads?

Replacing brake pads and bleeding of brakes are both normal parts of routine brake maintenance, but they are not necessarily connected one to the other. Changing the brake pads does not necessarily require a brake bleeding.

Brake Bleeding

    Bleeding the brakes is done to remove any air trapped in the brake lines. It should also be done regularly in order to remove any contaminated brake fluid or solid contamination from the brake hydraulic system.

Brake Pad Replacement

    Brake pads routinely wear out and must be replaced. A routine pad replacement does not create a situation where air or contamination could be introduced to the brake hydraulic system, so bleeding of the brakes is not normally required. Regardless, it is a good idea to have the brakes bled when the pads are changed simply because it is easier to do this when the brake parts are already exposed.

Abnormal Circumstances

    Sometimes during a brake pad change, there can be a problem retracting the brake piston or a problem with the flexible brake lines. Under these conditions, there is a chance that air or contamination enter the brake fluid, and the brakes should be bled as a precaution.

How Do I Replace Front Rotors on a Saturn Sl1?

How Do I Replace Front Rotors on a Saturn Sl1?

Replacing rotors on your Saturn is a regular part of your vehicle maintenance. Rotors need to be inspected for wear during normal brake pad service. One thing to keep in mind about rotors, however, is that they need to be replaced much less frequently than your brake pads. With proper tools, this job can be completed right in your home garage.

Benefits

    Rotors that are worn or scored tend to wear down your brake pads very quickly, which can ultimately lead to brake failure. Changing your rotors will improve your brake performance and will slow the pace of overall brake wear.

Time Frame

    With the help of a friend, you can expect to complete rotor replacements in about an hour.

Cost

    As of 2010, new rotors range in price from $25 to $40 per wheel. Shop around.

Rotor Replacement

    Park your Saturn on level ground and apply the parking brake. Remove lug nuts from the wheels that need rotor replacement. Lift the car with a jack and support with a jack stand. Remove caliper bolts then remove the caliper mounting bracket, but do not let the caliper hang by the brake line. Slide out the brake pads. Remove the caliper mounting bracket bolts. Pull the bracket from the rotor and set it aside. Remove the worn rotor from the wheel hub and replace with the new rotor. Replace the caliper mounting bracket on the rotor and screw the bracket bolts back in. Replace or put in existing brake pads, making sure to apply brake grease to the backs of the pads. Put a C-clamp over the pistons to force them back into the caliper. Place the caliper over the brake pads and screw in the caliper bolts. Replace the wheels and lug nuts.

How to Replace the Power Brake Booster in a Ford

How to Replace the Power Brake Booster in a Ford

The power brake booster on your Ford vehicle uses vacuum created by the engine to apply extra power to the brake pedal, which increases braking ability and decreases pedal feel. If the booster develops a leak or starts to have issues, you'll have increased pedal feel, and although you won't lose your brakes entirely, it will become more difficult to stop as the leak gets worse. In this case, the project vehicle is a 1997 Ford F-150 truck, but the process is similar for other vehicles.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Crawl underneath the dashboard and follow the brake pedal up under the dash until it connects with the brake booster. Disconnect the clip that connects the booster to the pedal, and then slide the booster linkage off of the pedal assembly.

    2

    Peel back the firewall padding, and then use the 3/8-inch ratchet, extension and sockets to unbolt the brake booster from the firewall. You may need a 3/8-inch universal joint to access some of the bolts.

    3

    Pop the hood and unbolt the master cylinder from the brake booster, using an open-end wrench. Pull off the vacuum line from the booster, then pull the master cylinder away from the booster, and let it hang off the brake lines.

    4

    Pull the brake booster off of the firewall and place it to the side.

Installation

    5

    Slide the replacement booster into the firewall, then crawl under the dash and bolt it in place, using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket.

    6

    Reconnect the pedal linkage to the booster, using the factory clips.

    7

    Go under the hood and slide the master cylinder onto the mounts on the booster and bolt it in place, using an open-end wrench. Plug the vacuum line back in place with a firm push.

Jumat, 12 Juni 2009

How to Adjust the Rear Brakes on a 1998 Jeep Wrangler

How to Adjust the Rear Brakes on a 1998 Jeep Wrangler

Adjusting the rear brakes on a 1998 Jeep Wrangler will allow for more proportional braking throughout the entire vehicle. The front brakes of the Jeep absorb up to 85 percent of the braking. Adjusting the rear brakes can reduce the wear on the front brakes. Performing this job should take no more than two to three hours, even if you have never done this type of work before. You can find all the tools needed at an auto parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the rear of the Jeep using a 2-ton jack. Place jack stands underneath the rear shock towers.

    2

    Remove the rear wheels from the Wrangler.

    3

    Use a hammer to gently tap the brake drum loose. Remove the brake drum.

    4

    Adjust the star-shaped wheel at the base of the brake drum assembly. Rotate the star to expand the brake shoes outward.

    5

    Repeat Step 4 until the brake drum resists going back onto the vehicle. If the drum goes on and off easily, then continue to tighten the brakes. Spray the drum brake assembly with brake cleaner to remove brake dust and accumulated debris.

    6

    Reinstall the brake drum. Install the wheels back on the vehicle. Lower the jeep.

How to Change Spark Plugs in a GS300 Lexus

How to Change Spark Plugs in a GS300 Lexus

The spark plugs in your GS300 Lexus complete the compression process that makes your engine run. As fuel and oxygen are drawn into the cylinders, the piston comes up and at the top of the stroke, the spark plug ignites the mixture. The resulting explosion forces the piston back down. If the spark plug does not pass the electrical charge into the cylinder, the car will misfire and the engine will "sputter." Replacing spark plugs is not difficult. You can finish the project in about an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Measure the gap for each of the new spark plugs with the feeler gauge. The "gap" is the space between the filament and the firing point at the top of the spark plug. You measure the space in between the firing point and the filament with the appropriate blade on feeler gauge. In this case, the gap for the Lexus spark plugs should be .044 thousandths. Spark plugs are factory set but you should still check each one.

    2

    Pull the spark plug wire off the plug by grasping the boot as close to the engine as possible and pulling it gently away from the spark plug. Remove the plug from the cylinder head using the spark plug socket and ratchet and discard it.

    3

    Place a new plug in the cylinder head of the GS300. Tighten it with the ratchet and spark plug socket. Be careful not to cross-thread the plug or you will damage the cylinder head. Plug the spark plug wire back on the plug. Repeat the process on the next plug.

Kamis, 11 Juni 2009

How to Adjust the Parking Brake Equalizer on Disc Brakes

How to Adjust the Parking Brake Equalizer on Disc Brakes

You can adjust the parking brake equalizer on your vehicle with disc brakes right from your home garage, saving yourself time and money. The equalizer takes up the slack in the parking brake cable. The parking brake cable slackens and stretches out over time with use. You will know its time to adjust your parking brake when you park your car on a downhill slope and engage the parking brake but the vehicle slips forward. Adjusting the parking brake restores function to the parking brake system.

Instructions

    1

    Put wheel chocks behind the front wheels. Place the floor jack under the rear frame and raise up the vehicle. Slide jack stands under the vehicle next to each rear wheel. Lower the car onto the jack stands.

    2

    Release the parking brake. Remove the center console between the drivers seat and the front passengers seat by removing the screws that hold the console cover in place with a screwdriver.

    3

    Lift up on the parking brake about 6 to 8 notches. Try to spin the rear wheels with your hands. If they move, disengage the parking brake and find the adjuster nut attached to the parking brake cable. Turn this nut clockwise with a socket set until its difficult to engage the parking brake up to six clicks.

    4

    Spin the rear wheels again. They should be locked. Put the console cover back in place and reattach the screws that hold it there. Raise up the vehicle, remove the jack stands, lower the car to the ground and remove the wheel chocks.

How to Replace Brake Pads on a Toyota Camry

The Toyota Camry model cars come equipped with brake pads on the front of the vehicle. The braking system on the Toyota Camry is designed to compress the brake pads against the brake rotor to bring the Camry to a stop. When the brake pedal is pushed inward, the cylinder inside of the brake caliper pushes the front brake pads towards the brake rotor to stop the car.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Toyota Camry in a safe and level working area. Open the hood and secure the hood in place with the locking rod.

    2

    Remove the cap from the reservoir that holds the brake fluid to relieve any air pressure when the caliper piston is compressed. The reservoir is located towards the rear of the engine on the driver's side. Close the hood.

    3

    Loosen, but do not remove, the lug nuts from each front tire.

    4

    Jack up the car from the metal cross bar under the center of the engine. Place a jack stand under each side of the frame rail behind each front tire. Lower the Camry securely onto the top of the jack stands.

    5

    Finish unscrewing the lug nuts from the wheels and remove both front wheels and set them aside. Start replacing the brake pads on the front driver's side.

    6

    Locate the brake caliper on the brake rotor. The brake caliper is the component that compresses the brake pads against the brake rotors to stop the car.

    7

    Loosen and remove the two top and bottom mounting bolts from the back side of the brake caliper with the 1/2-inch drive ratchet and socket.

    8

    Locate the open window on top of the brake caliper. Slide the small pry bar inside of the open window and compress the caliper cylinder inward by prying the rear brake pad towards the engine. Once the caliper cylinder is compressed, pull the brake caliper off the brake rotor.

    9

    Hang the brake caliper to the wheel hub or the frame rail with a bungee cord. Do not let the brake caliper hang by the brake line.

    10

    Remove the old brake pads from inside of the brake caliper. Then, put the new brake pads inside the brake caliper. Make sure that the new pads are installed inside of the caliper in the same direction as the old pads.

    11

    Put the brake caliper back over the brake rotor. Screw the two top and bottom mounting bolts back into the back of the caliper. Tighten down the two mounting bolts with the ratchet and socket.

    12

    Put the driver's side wheel back onto the hub and screw the lug nuts back on. Tighten the lug nuts until the wheel begins to turn with the lug wrench. Follow these same exact steps for removing and replacing the brake pads on the front passenger side.

    13

    Jack the Camry back up and slide the jack stands out from under the frame rails. Lower the Camry to the floor.

    14

    Tighten the lug nuts down completely tight with the lug wrench. Open the hood and go back to the engine compartment and screw the cap back onto the brake-fluid reservoir.

    15

    Crank the Toyota Camry and push the brake pedal in and out five or six times. This will bring the new pads to the proper distance from the facing of the rotor. Turn the engine off and close the hood.

Selasa, 09 Juni 2009

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 1999 Ford Windstar

How to Change the Brake Pads on a 1999 Ford Windstar

The 1999 Ford Windstar featured front disc brakes on the front-wheel drive minivan. The rear brakes were most commonly rear drum brakes, but there were also models made with rear disc brakes. Disc brakes use brake pads and rotors, whereas rear drum brakes use brake shoes and brake drums. While disc brakes are always featured in the front braking system, rear disc brakes are slightly superior to rear drum brakes in performance, but can require more replacement than rear drum brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Windstar on a flat surface which would be suitable for lifting and supporting the vehicle safely and then open the hood.

    2

    Use a brake fluid suction device to remove 1/2 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir and then discard the fluid. Replace the cover to the master cylinder reservoir.

    3

    Place a wheel block against one of the tires on the opposite axle of which you're going to be replacing brake pads on. Make sure the vehicle is in park and only apply the parking brake if you're replacing the front brake pads. The parking brake applied will not allow you to remove the rear calipers if you're replacing rear brake pads.

    4

    Break the lug nuts loose on the two tires of the same axle you're replacing the brake pads on using the tire iron. Only turn the lug nuts 1/4 turn counterclockwise to break them loose.

    5

    Lift the axle of the Windstar--one side at a time--using the jack and then support the vehicle onto jack stands in a safe and secure manner.

    6

    Remove the lug nuts and then remove the wheels.

    7

    Remove the guide pin bolts on the front calipers or the caliper bolts on the rear calipers using a suitable box-end wrench.

    8

    Use the small pry tool to gently pry the caliper off of the rotor and knuckle assembly and the use a length of wire to tie the caliper onto the coil spring to support it.

    9

    Use the C-clamp to compress the piston of the caliper fully into the caliper bore.

    10

    Remove the brake pads from the anchor plate. Use the small pry tool if necessary. Remove the slippers on the anchor plate abutments on the rear disc brakes. These should be replaced and supplied in the box of the replacement brake pad set.

    11

    Inspect the rotors for any rust pits, hot spots or surface cracks. Any of these symptoms present on the surface of the rotor should require replacement of the component. If not, use the sand paper to remove the glazing surface on the surface of both sides of the rotor.

    12

    Place silicone brake lubricant on the front brake pad insulators or the rear replacement slippers after reinstalling them on the anchor plate abutments.

    13

    Place the new pads into the anchor plates. Be sure to align the notches on the rear pads backing plates appropriately.

    14

    Replace the caliper over the rotor and pads assembly and align the guide pin bolts or the caliper bolts back into the calipers. Tighten the front caliper guide bolts to 38-foot lbs. with the torque wrench and a socket. Tighten the rear caliper bolts to 14-foot lbs. with the torque wrench and a socket. Repeat this procedure for the opposite side of the same axle.

    15

    Replace the wheels and lug nuts and tighten the lug nuts so they are snug to the hub of each wheel. Slowly lower the vehicle using the jack to remove the jack stands and then torque the lug nuts in a star pattern to 100-foot lbs. with the torque wrench and a socket.

    16

    Pump the foot brake pedal several times to seat the pads to the rotors and extend the brake caliper pistons. Recheck the brake fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir and add only new brake fluid to the full mark if necessary. Replace the cap to the master cylinder reservoir and test drive the Windstar.

How Do I Separate the Rotor From the Hub of a 4X4 Ford Bronco?

The Ford Bronco was a popular SUV for Ford, and sold well until it was discontinued in 1996. The vehicles were known for their off-road prowess because of their heavy-duty front suspension. The truck uses a disc-brake front end, with a traditional wheel hub. Separating the two is a fairly straightforward process, although if the rotor is stuck on the hub, it can become a bit more difficult. This should take approximately 30 minutes to do per side.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the front of the Bronco using the jack. Put the jack stands underneath the front end and set it down. Take off the tires with the tire iron.

    2

    Locate the pins holding the caliper to the steering knuckle, which sit one on top and one on the bottom of the caliper. Hammer them into the spindle using the punch and dead-blow hammer. Pinch the pins shut using the needle-nose pliers, then pull out the pins. Pull the caliper off the rotor.

    3

    Pull the rotor off the hub with both hands. If the rotor is frozen on the hubs, tap the rotor from the back side with the dead-blow hammer, spinning the rotor in the process so you can pop off the rotor evenly.

How to Change the Brakes on a PT Cruiser

How to Change the Brakes on a PT Cruiser

The PT Cruiser features front disc brakes as standard equipment. Regularly changing the brakes on your PT Cruiser helps preserves its braking performance and your safety on the road. Worn brake pads can cause a number of problems, including poor stopping power, grinding noises on braking and damage to the brake caliper and rotor. Changing the brakes is a straightforward task that takes less than an hour.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood and disconnect the negative terminal cable from the battery. Remove the brake master cylinder cover and remove one-third of the brake fluid from the cylinder with a brake fluid siphon. Properly dispose of the fluid and replace the cover on the master cylinder.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel with a lug wrench. Raise the front of the vehicle with a floor jack and support the front end with jack stands. Remove the lug nuts from the wheel and pull the wheel off the axle.

    3

    Place a C-clamp on the outboard pad in the opening of the caliper and the rear caliper housing. Tighten the C-clamp until the caliper piston is pushed inside the caliper. Locate the two 13 mm bolts at the rear the caliper and remove them with a ratchet and socket. Lift the center section of the brake caliper off of the rotor.

    4

    Remove the brake pads and caliper slides from the caliper. Apply a small amount of brake lubricant to the top of the new caliper slides and place them in the caliper, along with the new brake pads.

    5

    Slide the center section of the caliper over the brake pads and tighten the 13 mm bolts with a ratchet and socket. Fit the wheel over the axle and reattach the lug nuts by hand.

    6

    Remove the jack stands from underneath the vehicle and lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts with a lug wrench. Reconnect the negative terminal cable to the battery.

    7

    Turn on the car and pump the brake pedal five times to move the pistons into place. Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder and refill it to the MAX line if needed.

Senin, 08 Juni 2009

How to Replace the Front Brakes on a 2002 Honda Accord SE

How to Replace the Front Brakes on a 2002 Honda Accord SE

The front brakes on the Honda Accord are anti-lock disc brakes. The function of anti-lock disc brakes relies on three key parts. First, the rotor must be smooth and consistent. Second, the brake pads must have enough padding surface to withstand the friction and resulting heat that is caused by braking. Third, the brake caliper, which houses the brake pads, holds the pads in place around the rotor and delivers the piston to the brake pads. The caliper piston is extended by the brake fluid when the brake pedal is depressed. Any of these components may need to be replaced when fixing the brakes of the 2002 Honda Accord SE.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Honda on a relatively flat surface, away from traffic, with ample space to work on both sides of the vehicle. Place tire blocks behind the rear tires. Apply the parking brake.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels with the tire iron. Place the lifting jack under the frame in the front of the vehicle, near the front bumper, and lift until the front tires are 2 inches clear of the ground. Place jack stands beneath the front frame and lower the vehicle onto the stands.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts and pull the front wheels from the wheel bolts. Turn the steering well to the left.

    4

    Remove the two caliper bolts on the right brake using a 5/8-inch Allen wrench. Pull the caliper away from the brake rotor. Use the 10mm wrench to loosen the clamp that holds the brake line to the caliper.

    5

    Pull the rotor from the wheel bolts. If the rotor is stuck to the wheel bolts, lightly tap the "top hat" section of the rotor (the center part of the rotor that protrudes from the main surface of the disc) with a hammer.

    6

    Spray the new rotor with brake cleaner. Wipe the rotor with a clean towel, making sure to remove all brake cleaner and packaging oil from the surface of the new rotor.

    7

    Place the new rotor onto the wheel bolts with the "top hat" section facing outward.

    8

    Connect the brake line to the new caliper, and tighten the clamp with the 10mm wrench. Slide the new brake pads onto the new caliper, and place the caliper over the rotor. Tighten the caliper bolts with the 5/8-inch Allen wrench.

    9

    Turn the steering wheel to the right and remove the caliper bolts on the left brake. Remove the caliper, disconnect the brake line, replace the rotor, and install the new components as you did on the other side of the Accord.

    10

    Turn the steering wheel so that the wheels are pointed forward. Replace the front wheels onto the wheel bolts and screw on the lug nuts. Lift the Honda to remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground and tighten the lug nuts with the tire iron.

    11

    Press and hold the brake pedal for 10 seconds. Repeat three times to inject brake fluid into the new calipers, and position the caliper pistons correctly.

    12

    Lift the hood of the Honda and remove the cap to the master cylinder. Fill the master cylinder with DOT-3 brake fluid. Replace the cap, and close the hood.