Kamis, 30 April 2009

How to Change an ABS Module

The ABS module is the part of a vehicle that controls the anti-lock braking system in almost all vehicles, especially newly-manufactured vehicles. It is on the firewall and comes as a part of the power pump assembly. It is attached to the vehicle by Torx screws. It is possible for an ABS module to short out or malfunction. Save money by purchasing the new part and replacing it yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Set the parking brake on your vehicle. Place a wooden block behind one of the rear tires to prevent it from rolling at all. As an additional measure of protection, engage your emergency brake. Loosen the lug nuts on the front driver-side tire.

    2

    Use the jack to lift the vehicle in the air by placing the jack under the axle by the front driver's side tire. Lower the vehicle until it is sitting on the stand.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts completely using the tire tool and remove the tire from the hub.

    4

    Unfasten the 11 Torx screws along the plastic fender liner, located on the inside of the wheel well, to remove the plastic fender lines --these are behind the tire in the void area of the vehicle's frame.

    5

    Locate the windshield washer bottle inside the engine compartment after you remove the fender liner. It is above the wheel well inside the engine compartment. Unfasten the three bolts that secure it, using a nut driver.

    6

    Place the plastic drain pan on the ground beneath the windshield water bottle. Remove the rubber hose that connects to the bottle using your hand and rake the bottle off the firewall.

    7

    Find the ABS module, which is behind where the windshield washer bottle was on the firewall. Unfasten the electrical wiring harness, using your hand, and unplug the power pump wire.

    8

    Unfasten the remaining six Torx screws to remove it from the entire pump assembly. Remove the ABS module from the engine compartment and place your new one in.

Selasa, 28 April 2009

How to Bleed Brakes After Installing a Brake Wheel Cylinder

How to Bleed Brakes After Installing a Brake Wheel Cylinder

Component replacement can be difficult when repairing a brake hydraulic system, but the job is not complete until all the air has been purged from the new part. Air may have also been introduced to any point in the system hydraulically linked to the replaced cylinder. Domestic vehicles are usually plumbed with the rear brake system isolated from the front brake hydraulics. Some Asian cars and most European models link one front and one rear brake. These plumbing methods prevent total system failure if a brake line ruptures. In that case, the intact portion of the system still functions. You need only bleed the portion of the system that was opened during the cylinder replacement.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the master cylinder reservoir cover, or lid, and fill the reservoir to the maximum fill level with new brake fluid. Open the bleeder screw of the new wheel cylinder a half-turn, using a line wrench. Monitor the fluid level in the reservoir while allowing gravity to force fluid into the opened wheel cylinder.

    2

    Close the bleeder screw when fluid begins exiting the screw. Check the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir throughout the bleeding process. Force one end of the rubber hose onto the wheel cylinder bleed screw and place the other end in a clear, clean bottle or jar. Add enough brake fluid to the clear container to keep the hose end submerged.

    3

    Have an assistant depress the brake pedal firmly while you open the bleed screw. The brake pedal should sink to the floor when the screw is opened. Close the screw, then have your assistant release the brake pedal. Continue in this manner until air bubbles are no longer seen leaving the submerged hose end. Repeat this process at the other wheel cylinder, or whatever component is hydraulically linked to the wheel cylinder that was replaced.

Senin, 27 April 2009

How to Do Rear Brakes on a Chevy Nova

The Chevrolet Nova was in production from 1962 to 1979, with models produced from 1962-1968 known as the Chevy II Nova. These vehicles were equipped from the factory with rear drum brakes. Drum brakes use curved brake shoes attached to a drum backing plate. The brake drum is mounted to the drive axle and rotates along with the wheel. When the brake pedal is pressed, a hydraulic cylinder applies an outward force against the brake shoes pushing them against the brake drum and slowing the vehicle.

Instructions

Removing the Rear Brake Drums

    1

    Raise the rear of the vehicle according to instructions listed in the owners manual and support with jack stands placed underneath the rear drive axle.

    2

    Remove the rear wheels and tires.

    3

    Remove the brake drum by pulling it off the lug studs. Do not use a hammer to strike the inboard lip of the brake drum to remove it.

Disassembling the Rear Brakes

    4

    Pull the bottom of the brake shoes away from each other and remove the adjusting screw.

    5

    Push the bottom of the brake shoes together and remove the adjusting screw spring.

    6

    Removing the spring that connects the leading brake shoe (the shoe on the front side of the drum) to the adjusting link at the top of the brake backing plate.

    7

    Remove the spring that connects the trailing brake shoe (the shoe on the back side of the drum) to the stud at the top of the brake backing plate.

    8

    Remove the adjusting link that connects the adjuster lever to the stud at the top of the brake backing plate.

    9

    Remove the hold-down spring and clip on the leading brake shoe. Place one finger over the retaining pin on the inboard side of the brake backing plate. Press down on the hold-down spring and turn the retaining clip 1/4 turn. Release the spring and remove the shoe along with the adjuster lever.

    10

    Remove the hold-down spring and clip on the trailing brake shoe, using the same technique listed in the step above. Remove the trailing shoe, by separating it from the parking brake lever.

    11

    Remove the parking brake strut and spring from above the axle.

    12

    Discard the brake shoes. Clean all the levers and springs, along with the brake backing plate, with an automotive solvent. Replace any parts that are broken or overly worn.

Reassembling the Rear Brakes

    13

    Place the parking brake strut between the top of the axle and the wheel cylinder, behind the axle flange. The spring on the parking brake strut should be pointed toward the front of the vehicle.

    14

    Place the leading brake shoe into position on the front half of the brake backing plate. Insert the retaining pin through the mounting hole on the inboard side of the backing plate and through the mounting hole in the leading shoe. Slide the hold-down spring and retaining clip over the retaining pin. Press down on the hold-down spring and rotate it 1/4 turn to secure the shoe.

    15

    Align the adjuster lever mounting hole with the mounting hole on the trailing brake shoe. Lift the trailing shoe into position on the rear half of the brake backing plate. The adjuster lever should be on the outboard side of the trailing shoe. Attach the parking brake lever to the trailing shoe by inserting the tab at the top of the parking brake lever into the slot in the top of the trailing shoe. Install the retaining pin, hold-down spring and retaining clip on the trailing shoe using the same technique you used for the leading shoe.

    16

    Install the brake shoe return spring on the leading shoe and connect it to the stud at the top of the brake backing plate.

    17

    Press down on the bottom of the adjuster lever and connect the actuating link to the adjuster lever and the stud at the top of the brake backing plate.

    18

    Install the brake shoe return spring on the trailing shoe and connect it to the stud at the top of the brake backing plate.

    19

    Pull the bottom of the brake shoes away from each other and insert the adjuster between the shoes. The star wheel on the adjuster screw should be closer to the trailing shoe.

    20

    Push the bottom the the brake shoes together and connect the adjusting screw spring to the holes on the bottom of each brake shoe just above the adjusting screw.

Reinstalling the Brake Shoes

    21

    Slide the brake drum over the lug studs.

    22

    Reinstall the rear wheels and tires.

    23

    Lower the vehicle.

How to Change the Rear Rotors on a Dodge RAM

The Dodge Ram pickup truck series is manufactured with rear disc brakes, using hydraulically actuated calipers and pad/rotor friction surfaces. The rotor part of the system may become warped or damaged and require replacement, which can take the average backyard mechanic about 30 minutes per side.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the truck onto the jack stands with the floor jack, placing the stands at the frame rails. Do not place the stands on suspension components or the body of the truck.

    2

    Remove the rear wheels by turning their lug nuts counterclockwise. Set the wheels away from the truck.

    3

    Remove the calipers by turning the rear caliper mount bolts counterclockwise, then sliding the caliper off of the rotor. Set the caliper onto the axle, or suspend it with tie straps, but do not let the caliper hang by the brake lines.

    4

    Remove the hub extension nut by turning it counterclockwise.

    5

    Remove the keeper screws that hold the rotor in place, if applicable, by turning them counterclockwise.

    6

    Pull the rotor free and replace it with a new unit by pressing the rotor onto the hub, then turning the keeper screws clockwise.

    7

    Replace the hub extension nut buy turning it clockwise.

    8

    Replace the caliper by sliding it back over the rotor, then turning the rear mount bolts clockwise. It is recommended that the pads be changed at the same time as the rotor, but it is not required.

    9

    Repeat steps 3 through 8 on the remaining brake rotor on the opposite side.

    10

    Replace the wheels by turning the lug nuts clockwise, in an alternating pattern. Lower the truck from the jack stands with the floor jack.

How to Remove Rear Brake Rotors on the 2001 Acura TL

The Acura TL arose in 1996 as the long-awaited replacement for the Legend. The 2001 Acura 3.2TL, like most other high-end luxury cars, came standard with front and rear disc brakes. This allows for optimal stopping power and stability, as the rear disc brakes keep the front of the car front lurching in hard braking conditions. Replacing the rear rotors on the 2001 3.2TL is not a tough task, but it does require a special tool to compress the caliper piston you may rent this tool from an auto parts store, if you do not wish to purchase one.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Unscrew the master cylinder reservoir cap and siphon out about half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder with a clean turkey baster. Transfer the siphoned fluid to a small container.

    2

    Loosen the Acuras rear lug nuts with a ratchet and socket, but dont remove them. Raise the rear of the vehicle with a floor jack, and slide jack stands under the rear lower control arms. Lower the vehicle onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheels off the rear hubs.

    3

    Remove the two caliper bolts with a ratchet and socket, while holding the caliper pins steady with a combination wrench. Pull the caliper up and off the caliper bracket, and hang it from a nearby suspension component with a bungee cord.

    4

    Pull the brake pads off the caliper bracket.

    5

    Remove the two caliper bracket bolts with a ratchet and socket, and pull the caliper bracket from the rear hub. Pull the rotor from the rear hub. If the rotor is stuck to the hub, lightly tap the rear of it with a rubber mallet until it is free.

    6

    Repeat Steps 3 through 5 to remove the rotor on the other side of the TL.

Installation

    7

    Set a new rotor on the rear hub. Set the caliper bracket in place on the rear hub and hand-tighten the caliper bracket bolts. Tighten the caliper bracket bolts to 29 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    8

    Pull the old pad slippers the metal shims out of the caliper bracket and discard them. Press new pad slippers into the caliper bracket; they are formed and can only fit in one direction, the pad slippers are part of the brake hardware kit. Slide new brake pads into the caliper bracket.

    9

    Compress the caliper piston using a caliper piston tool. This process varies, depending on the style of tool used, but the idea is to twist the caliper piston clockwise as you push it into the caliper. Once you fully compress the piston, using the caliper piston tool to rotate the piston until the notches in it line up with the tabs on the rear of the inner pad.

    10

    Set the caliper back onto the caliper bracket and hand-tighten the caliper bolts. Tighten each caliper bolt to 17 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket, while holding its respective caliper pin steady with a combination wrench.

    11

    Repeat Steps 1 through 4 to replace the rotor on the other side of the TL.

    12

    Reinstall the rear wheels onto the rear hubs and hand-tighten the rear lug nuts. Raise the TL off the jack stands with a floor jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the TL to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts, in a crisscross pattern, to 80 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and socket.

    13

    Press and release the brake pedal repeatedly until the pedal feels firm. Check the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir and fill it to the Max line with DOT 3 brake fluid. Tighten the cap onto the master cylinder reservoir.

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a 2007 Chevrolet HHR

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a 2007 Chevrolet HHR

The Chevrolet HHR is a retro-style, five-door hatchback sedan introduced in 2006 by General Motors to compete with Chryslers popular PT Cruiser. The HHR is still rolling off of assembly lines as of 2010, virtually unchanged from its original design. The HHR comes standard with a four-cylinder, fuel-injected engine, a five-speed manual transmission and power front disc brakes. The brake pads on your HHR will wear over time and will need to be periodically replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Set the parking brake of your HHR. Work on one side of the car at a time. Raise the car with a hydraulic jack placed under the jacking position marked with an arrow on the front of the running board. Remove the front wheel by loosening and removing the five lug nuts with a lug wrench turned in a counterclockwise direction. Set the wheel and nuts aside.

    2

    Remove the brake caliper from the brake rotor by loosening and removing the caliper holding bolts with a 15 mm wrench turned in a counterclockwise direction. Pull the bolts from the mounting holes and set them aside. Pull the caliper away from the rotor and hang it out of the way with a bungee cord placed in the hole in the upper inner fender. Use care, when handling the caliper, as the flexible rubber brake line will still be attached to it.

    3

    Slide the two brake pads from the caliper and discard them. Place a C-clamp over the piston in the caliper and tighten the clamp handle in a clockwise direction to compress the piston back into the caliper. Back off the clamp handle in a counterclockwise direction and remove it from the caliper.

    4

    Slide two new brake pads into the slots in the caliper. Unhook the bungee cord and remove it from the caliper. Place the caliper back over the brake rotor, making sure the rotor is centered between the two pads. Push the caliper bolts through the mounting holes and tighten them with a 15 mm wrench in a clockwise direction.

    5

    Place the wheel back onto the hub and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench in a clockwise direction. Lower the hydraulic jack and remove it from under the car once the wheel is on the ground. Tighten the lug nuts again with the lug wrench in a clockwise direction.

    6

    Repeat the above procedures for the other front wheel.

Minggu, 26 April 2009

How to Replace a Brake Line in a GMC Sierra

A lot of GMC Sierra owners put these trucks through tough conditions. So strengthening your Sierra's brakes by replacing the brake lines will improve braking performance. Make sure you know which sections of brake line you are replacing; the sections closest to the calipers are the easiest for a non-expert to work on.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the truck on jack stands that safely support a GMC Sierra. Remove the wheels to reach the brake lines you are replacing.

    2

    Locate the brake master cylinder. This is in the rear of the Sierra's engine compartment, near the driver's seat (since it must connect to the brake pedal).

    3

    Trace the brake lines as they run from the master cylinder to each wheel. Look over each line to see what sections it may be divided into. Take note where and how the lines are bent and bend the replacement lines the same way.

    4

    Remove the brake line by disconnecting the connector bolts. Use two line wrenches as there should be two bolts at each connector. Remove the line at the caliper brake hose first to avoid damaging the hose.

    5

    Install the replacement brake line, starting at the end closest to the master cylinder. The new line should be measured and bent to match the original line.

    6

    Bleed the brake system. Connect the opened bleeder valve on the caliper to a container of brake fluid with a vinyl tube. Have another person press on the brake pedal to remove the air. Top off the master cylinder afterward.

    7

    Attach the wheels and move to the other end of the truck. Test the brakes once the entire brake line has been installed.

How to Replace a Brake on a BMW 528i

The BMW 528i model vehicles come equipped with four-wheel disc brakes. The braking system is designed to stop the car by applying pressure from the brake pads to the brake rotors. When the brake pedal is pushed in, the brake caliper cylinder compresses the pads against the inner and outer sides of the brake rotor. The friction from the pads sliding against the brake rotor is the process that stops the wheels from turning. Over time, the brake pads will wear down. Change the pads before they reach one-eighth of an inch in thickness.

Instructions

    1

    Park the BMW 528i on a flat surface in a safe location. Set the parking brake.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts from both front wheels about one-quarter of a turn with a tire tool or a lug wrench.

    3

    Jack the front of the BMW 528i up and set the jack stands under the designated front jacking points. Slowly lower the jack until the car is sitting securely on top of the stands.

    4

    Remove all of the lug nuts from both of the front wheels. Pull the wheels off and place them down flat.

    5

    Locate the two upper and lower hex-head mounting bolts on the back of the front driver side brake caliper. Loosen and remove the two bolts with a ratchet and a 7mm hex-head socket.

    6

    Slide the flat head screwdriver through the access hole on the front of the brake caliper. Pry the caliper back and forth until it is loose enough to remove from the rotor. Pull the caliper off of the rotor and hang it to the steering arm behind the wheel hub with a bungee cord.

    7

    Pull the inner brake pad out of the metal retaining clip inside of the caliper. Place the adjustable end of the C-clamp inside of the caliper facing the outer brake pad. Compress the outer brake pad against the caliper cylinder with the C-clamp until the cylinder is fully compressed inside of the caliper housing. Unscrew the C-clamp and remove it and the outer brake pad from the caliper.

    8

    Inspect the inner and outer sides of the brake rotor for wear and grooving. If the wear or grooving is excessive, replace the rotor with a new rotor. If the wear or grooving is minimal, have the rotor machine turned by a machine shop.

    9

    Insert the new brake pads into the metal retaining clips inside of the brake caliper. Remove the bungee cord from the caliper and hang the caliper back over the side of the brake rotor Screw the two mounting bolts back into the rear of the caliper. Tighten the bolts down tight with the ratchet and the 7mm hex-head socket. Slide the wheel onto the wheel hub and screw all of the lug nuts completely onto the studs.

    10

    Move to the other three wheel hubs and repeat the same steps above for replacing the brake pads. After all of the pads have been replaced and the wheels have been secured to the wheel hubs with the lug nuts, jack the car back up and remove the jack stands. Lower the car back to the surface.

    11

    Tighten all of the lug nuts with the tire tool or lug wrench.

    12

    Crank the engine and pump the brake pedal four or five times to properly set the new pads to the right distance from the sides of the brake rotor. Turn the engine off. Test drive the BMW 528i around in a safe location to test the operation of the new brakes.

Sabtu, 25 April 2009

How to Use Brake Pliers

How to Use Brake Pliers

Brake pliers are often considered the most valuable tool in any auto-mechanic's tool kit. The design of the brake pliers keep them lightweight, durable and strong, and they work well with brake tube that is 3/16 inch and 1/4 inch. Brake pliers are handy for bending or adjusting brake lines, as well as aligning the brake lines during repairs or replacements. The ends of the brake pliers are specially designed to allow the mechanic to bend the brake tubing without distorting the shape, which saves both time and money.

Instructions

    1

    Determine whether the brake line's tubing is 3/16 inch or 1/4 inch. Holding the brake line's tubing in one hand, use the appropriate (3/16 or 1/4 inch) space in the brake pliers to close the pliers around the tubing where the bend is needed. With minimal effort, rotate the wrist of the hand holding the brake pliers to create the bend in the brake lines. Loops or spirals can also be formed this way, making brake lines that are too long fit the vehicle.

    2

    Locate the brake lines tubing on the vehicle and then determine where adjustments are needed. Using the appropriate section of the brake pliers (3/16 or 1/4 inch), close the brake pliers over the brake line's tubing in the desired location and, while supporting the brake line's tubing with one hand, rotate the wrist of the hand holding the brake pliers to produce the bend(s) where needed to adjust the length or size of the brake lines.

    3

    Hold the brake pliers and close the ends around the brake line's tubing near the very end of the tubing, just next to the tube nut. The brake pliers allow you to hold the tubing tightly without risking damage to the tubing, which is helpful when attaching new brake lines or adjusting current brake lines already on the vehicle. The brake pliers will also allow you to hold the brake lines in spaces your hands will not fit.

    4

    Locate the section of the brake line's tubing that will be cut. Secure the brake pliers around the tubing in that section and use the edge of the pliers as a guide to ensure the cut in the lines is straight and even.

Kamis, 23 April 2009

How to Assemble a Dodge Truck Brake

Most Dodge truck models come equipped with disc brake pads on the front wheels and brake shoes on the rear wheels. The disc brake pads stop the front wheels from turning by applying friction to each side of the brake rotors. The brake shoes stop the rear wheels from turning by applying friction to the inside surface of the brake drums. The brake pads and the brake shoes wear down over time and must be replaced. Replace the pads and the shoes before the brake material thickness reaches 1/8 inch.

Instructions

How to Assemble a Brake Pad

    1

    Insert the inner and outer brake pad into the retaining clips inside the brake caliper. Inspect the brake rotor for damage, such as grooving and wear. If the damage is excessive, replace the rotor. If the damage is minimal, have the rotor machine-turned by a machine shop. If the rotor has no damage, leave the rotor alone.

    2

    Slide the caliper over the rotor and onto the caliper mount. Screw the two rear caliper mounting bolts into the back of the caliper. Tighten the caliper bolts with the ratchet and socket.

    3

    Finish tightening the caliper bolts to 25 foot pounds with a torque wrench and a socket. Slide the wheel onto the hub and turn the lug nuts onto the lugs until the lug nuts are tight.

How to Assemble a Brake Shoe

    4

    Tap the brake spring retainers from old brake shoe with the rubber mallet. Tap new brake spring retainers through the new brake shoe. Install the retainer clips back over the front of the retainers with the spring retainer tool. Turn the tool clockwise until the retainer clip locks onto the retainers. Position the brake shoe back onto the backing plate and reattach the parking brake lever to the rear brake shoes with your hand.

    5

    Reattach the lower hold-down springs over the spring retainers and into the holes of the backing plate with the spring removal tool. Make sure each end of the springs are secured to the brake shoe and the backing plate.

    6

    Reattach the top return springs to the top of the brake shoe and to the anchor pin at the top of the backing plate with the brake spring removal tool. Look over the brake shoe to ensure that all of the braking hardware is properly installed.

Rabu, 22 April 2009

How do I Release the Brakes on a 1996 GMC Truck?

The 1996 GMC truck comes equipped with disc brake pads on the front wheels and brake shoes on the rear wheels. If the brake pads or the brake shoes wear down too far, they can cause damage to the brake rotors or the brake drums. The damage can range from excessive grooving to excessive wear. Applying brakes to damaged brake rotors or brake drums can sometimes result in the brakes getting stuck. Once the brakes get stuck, they will need to be released from the rotors or the drums before the brakes can be replaced.

Instructions

Releasing the Front Brake Pads

    1

    Pull the 1996 GMC truck onto a flat surface and set the parking brake. Turn the engine off.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts from the front and rear wheels about one-quarter of a turn with a tire tool or a lug wrench.

    3

    Jack the front end up with a jack and place the jack stands under the proper front jacking points. Lower the truck onto the stands. Pull the jack out and move it to the rear of the truck. Jack up the rear of the truck and place the other jack stands under the proper rear jacking points. Lower the truck onto the jack stands and leave the jack in place. Finish removing the lug nuts from the front and rear wheels. Pull the wheels off and place them flat down on the surface.

    4

    Locate the brake caliper that is mounted to the front driver's side brake rotor. Loosen and remove the two mounting bolts on the back side of the brake caliper with a ratchet and a metric socket. Slide the end of a small pry bar between the brake rotor and the outboard brake pad that is on the back side of the brake rotor. Pry the outboard brake pad back and forth until the caliper is loose enough to remove from the rotor.

    5

    Pull the caliper off of the top of the brake rotor and hang it to one of the suspension components behind the wheel hub assembly with a bungee cord. Pull the brake pads out of the caliper. Inspect the brake pads for excessive wear. Also, inspect the brake rotor for excessive wear and grooving. Replace the brake pads and the brake rotor, as needed. Move to the passenger side front wheel and repeat the same process to release the brake pads from the rotor.

Releasing the Rear Brake Shoes

    6

    Slide under the driver's side rear of the truck and locate the adjustment hole on the lower part of the brake shoe backing plate. The adjustment hole will have a rubber plug inside of it. Pry the rubber plug out of the hole with the tip of a flathead screwdriver.

    7

    Shine the flashlight through the adjustment hole and locate the start gears on the brake shoe adjuster. Push the gears one at a time counterclockwise with the screwdriver until the brake shoes have fully retracted away from the inside of the brake drum. Use the flashlight to inspect the movement of the brake shoes, if needed. This process will release the brake shoes from the brake drum.

    8

    Move over to the front of the driver's side rear wheel and pull the brake drum off of the hub with your hands. If the drum is stuck, use a hand held sledge hammer to tap the back of the drum until it is loose. Pull the drum off and place it on the ground.

    9

    Inspect the brake shoes and the brake drum for damage such as excessive grooving or excessive wear. Replace the shoes and the drum if needed.

    10

    Move to the passenger side rear wheel and repeat the same process to free the brake shoes from the brake drums.

How to Replace F150 Rotors

How to Replace F150 Rotors

A rotor or disc on the Ford F150's braking system can become scratched or worn down over time, or it may develop deep grooves if you drove it with bad brake pads. You need to replace a scratched, grooved or worn down rotor. The F150 does use disc brakes on all four wheels, so you may need to change a rotor on either the front or rear wheels. The exact method of changing might vary on older models of the F150 (ones made prior to 1997)

Instructions

    1

    Raise the F150 on either the front or rear end and support it on jack stands. Remove the wheel for the brake disc that needs replacing.

    2

    Unbolt and remove the brake caliper with a wrench and make sure the caliper doesn't hang by its hose (hanging it with a strong wire is best). If you are working on a front wheel/disc, unbolt and remove the caliper mounting bracket from the disc.

    3

    Remove the grease cap, wheel bearing and spindle nuts and the outer wheel bearing with its washer; all this is only needed for a front disc on a two-wheel drive model.

    4

    Slip the brake rotor off of the axle studs.

    5

    Slip the new brake rotor onto the axle studs. It may help to temporarily thread the wheel's lug nuts onto a few of the studs to hold the rotor in place.

    6

    Reconnect the grease cap, wheel bearing and spindle nuts, outer wheel bearing with its washer and caliper mounting bracket if you have changed a 2WD front disc. Reconnect the brake caliper with its bolts.

    7

    Remove the lug nuts from the rotor if you placed them there, then reconnect the wheel and lower the truck.

Selasa, 21 April 2009

Brake Rotor Tools

Brake Rotor Tools

Brake rotors are what stop the vehicle when the brake pedal is pressed. The brake rotors rotate while the vehicles is in motion and have brake pads on either side of them that close when the automobile is stopped. The brake pads press against the brake rotors, causing a groove to be created in the rotors. The tools used to check the life of the brake rotors are essential.

Digital Measuring Tool

    Once the tires are removed from the automobile, the brake rotors are accessible and the wear groove can be seen. Before doing any work on the brake rotor, check to determine if the wear on the rotors is beyond the allowable limit. A digital measuring tool or caliper can be used to check this wear. This measuring tool slides over the brake rotors and then tightened to check the depth of the groove made by the brake pads. The pressure of the brake pads against the rotors is what causes the vehicle to stop. The wear groove made in the brake rotors should not exceed .003 inch.

Rotor Access Tools

    The brake rotors need to be replaced if there is too much wear. The mechanic needs to remove the brake pads and calipers to gain access to the rotors. A technician or mechanic needs a caliper separating tool and star tool in order to remove the brake pads and access the brake rotors. The star tool is used to loosen the brake line or brake hose, which holds the brake fluid. This drain plug is loosened with the star tool and drained so the brake pads can be removed. The star tool looks just like a five- or six-pointed star and attaches to a socket wrench or ratchet. Once the brake fluid is drained off, a caliper spreading tool is attached to the inside of the brake pads to push the pads open so they can be slid off the brake rotors.

Wrench, Socket and Ratchet

    The brake pads should be hung from a bungee cord and not allowed to hang freely on the brake hose in order to eliminate damage to the brake line. Once the brake pads have been removed from the brake rotors, the mechanic uses a ratchet and socket to remove the brake rotors from the axle assembly. The brake rotors are attached to the axle with a large retaining bolt, and once this bolt is removed, the brake rotors can be slid off the wheel studs. The wheel studs are what hold the tire onto the vehicle and what fthe lug nuts tighten onto.

How to Replace Dodge Ram Disc Brakes

You have to change the brakes on the Dodge Ram periodically. There is no set time period before you need to change the brakes, since wear is relative to how much you use them. You can save some money on the job by changing the brakes yourself and avoiding the labor charges at the repair shop. When you change the brake pads, inspect the brake rotors as well to be sure there is no damage to them, such as grooving on the surface, warping, or cracking. If there are any defects present, have the rotors resurfaced or replace them.

Instructions

    1

    Open the engine compartment and siphon the brake fluid with the turkey baster until it is at the minimum level. Place the fluid in the drain pan. You must recycle it, since you cannot reuse it in the master cylinder. Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels. Raise the Ram with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the truck near the jacking point and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench and take the wheel off the truck.

    2

    Push the caliper piston into the housing, using the screwdriver as a pry tool, before you take the caliper off the wheel assembly. Loosen the bolts on the brake caliper using the 3/8-inch hex socket and ratchet. Pull the caliper from the cradle. Slide the brake pads out of the caliper.

    3

    Slide the new brake pads into the caliper and place it on the mounting cradle. Tighten the mounting bolts with the hex socket and ratchet. Place the wheel on the truck and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Dodge Ram. Lower the truck to the ground and repeat the process on the other wheel.

    4

    Add brake fluid to the reservoir as necessary to bring it to the proper level. Pump the brake pedal until it is firm to seat the brake pads on the rotors.

How to Remove a Brake Switch on a 1992 Cadillac

The brake switch in 1992 Cadillacs operate very simply: When you depress the brake pedal, the linkage contacts the switch and causes the brake lights to activate. When this switch goes out, so do your brake lights, which is a guaranteed way to get your car pulled over by the police--or worse, cause a wrec. Fortunately, fixing and replacing the switch is easy--albeit awkward to get to --and shouldn't take more than 15 minutes to accomplish.

Instructions

    1

    Lie on your back and use the flashlight to shine up into the interior of the dashboard to locate the brake switch. It's connected to the brake pedal mounting bracket, so follow the pedal vertically into the dashboard and then locate the switch, which is about 4 inches long and has two electrical connections leading out of it.

    2

    Unplug the electrical connections to the switch using your hands. If you can't get the tabs on the harnesses loose, use the flat-head screwdriver to pry the connector off the switch.

    3

    Pull the switch out of the brake pedal bracket.

Senin, 20 April 2009

How to Change the Brakes on a 2003 Chevy Z71

How to Change the Brakes on a 2003 Chevy Z71

Replacing the brake pads on the Chevy Z71 is similar to the process on most trucks. The only variations would be if the truck is not a 4x4. The brake pads are mounted against the surface of the rotor. When the brake pedal is depressed, pressure is applied to the pad by the calipers and the master cylinder, pressing the pad against the rotor, slowing or stopping the truck. Changing the brake pads at the right time will keep the rotors and other parts from wearing out before their time.

Instructions

    1

    Move the Z71 to level ground and put the transmission in park. Apply the parking brake. Raise the hood.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on both front tires with the lug wrench. The lug wrench is a tool that comes with your vehicle and is usually found behind the seat. Turn the lug nuts in a counterclockwise rotation to loosen them.

    3

    Install the floor jack in front of the truck. Find the center cross member of the frame directly in line with the front wheels and place the jack on the cross member. Jack up the truck until the front tires are just off the ground.

    4

    Take the two safety jack stands and install them on the frame just behind the wheel on both sides of the truck. Adjust them to the proper height and insure they are locked. Lower the truck onto the stands and leave the jack under the frame along with the jack stands.

    5

    Remove the lug nuts from one of the wheels and lay the wheel to the side.

    6

    Use the pry bar to pry the brake caliper piston back. This will allow you to remove the brake pads. Install the flat tip of the pry bar between the brake pad and the rotor, then pry the pads away from the rotor.

    7

    Remove the brake pins that are located at both ends of the brake pads with the pliers. Remove the brake pads and clean the surface of the rotor. Install the C-clamp on the caliper piston and remove the top off the master cylinder, which is located under the hood on the firewall. Turn the C-clamp until the piston is fully retracted. Remove the C-clamp.

    8

    Install the new brake pads, aligning the grooves on the pads with the locking pin holes. Install the locking pins. Mount the wheel on the studs and install the lug nuts and tighten them in a clockwise direction until they are snug.

    9

    Repeat the process for each wheel. When finished, remove the jack and safety jack stands. Tighten all the lug nuts in a cross pattern on each wheel until tight. This will insure that the wheel is secure. Be sure the brake fluid reservoir on the master cylinder is filled to the proper level as indicated on the side of the reservoir. Put the top back on the master cylinder. Close the hood and pump the brakes several times before moving the truck.

How to Do a Brake Job on a Pontiac Vibe

How to Do a Brake Job on a Pontiac Vibe

The Pontiac Vibe is mechanically identical to the Toyota Matrix so the repair manuals available cover both cars. Replacing your brake pads is one of the simple jobs you can do at home to save money while keeping your car running well. Brakes are equipped with squeal pads that will make a noise when the pad is wearing thin. If you've been hearing your brakes squeal when you come to a stop, it's probably time to replace the brake pads.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen, but do not remove, the lug nuts on the front wheels with a lug wrench. Raise one side of the car with a jack. Position a jack stand underneath the frame rail behind the front tire and lower the jack. Raise the other side of the car and put another jack stand underneath the frame rail. Lower the car onto the jack stands with the jack. Place chocks behind the rear wheels of the car.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts from the front wheels then remove the wheels from the car. Remove the two bolts holding the brake cylinder assembly onto the brake disc. Be careful not to damage the brake fluid line attached to the brake cylinder. Slide the cylinder assembly off the disc. Use a piece of stiff wire to hang the brake line to prevent damage.

    3

    Pry the brake pads out of the cylinder assembly with a flat head screwdriver. Note the orientation of the brake pads, shims and squeal plate. Install the new brake pads in the same orientation as the old ones. Use a pair of pliers to push the brake pads apart far enough so that you can slide them over the brake disc.

    4

    Reinstall the mounting bolts to 79 foot-pounds of torque with a torque wrench. Repeat the above steps for the other front wheel. If you are unable to pry the brake pads apart far enough to slip them over the disc, you may need to bleed the brake line. Locate the bleeder plug on the back of the cylinder assembly. Loosen the plug and attach a vinyl tube to the bleeder plug and put the other end of the tube in a jar. Pry the pads apart until you can slip them over the disc. Tighten the bleeder plug to 74 foot-pounds of torque.

    5

    Remount the front wheels. Tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern. Start with the top nut then draw an imaginary star to the lower left and tighten that nut. Continue the star pattern to the upper right, upper left then lower right.

    6

    Raise one side of the car with the jack until you can remove the jack stand. Remove the jack stand and lower the jack. Raise the other side and remove the other jack stand then lower the car. Remove the wheel chocks. Tighten the lug nuts to 103 foot-pounds of torque, again using a star pattern.

What Is a Hydraulic Hose?

What Is a Hydraulic Hose?

A hydraulic hose is a high-pressure, synthetic rubber, thermoplastic or Teflon reinforced hose that carries fluid to transmit force within hydraulic machinery. Hydraulic machinery began to be used in the early 1940s when engineers discovered that hydraulic systems were more compact, lighter in weight and self-lubricating. World War II spurred development of hydraulic machinery for military applications. The development of flexible hydraulic hoses further opened the way for development of a wide array of new, high-powered machines based on hydraulic technology.

Construction

    Hydraulic hoses are made in three basic parts. An inner tube carries the fluid. It is reinforced with a sheath of braided wire, spiral wound wire or a textile based yarn. A third protective outer layer provides protection from weather, abrasion or oil or chemicals. Hydraulic hoses are designed or custom-made specifically for use in specific mechanical applications. In most cases hydraulic hoses are designed to be specific sizes, lengths and have custom connectors to work in specific machines.

Lifespan

    Hydraulic hoses are not permanent. A variety of factors can impact the lifespan of a hydraulic hose. Flexing the hose too much, twisting it, kinking, stretching, crushing or scratching the surface can reduce hose life. Too low or too high operating temperatures will break down hoses as will sudden sharp rises or drops in internal pressures. Using the wrong size, type or weight of hoses can also cause hoses to break down. Hoses should be replaced before they fail, especially with hydraulic heavy machinery, brakes or safety critical hydraulic machinery. Hoses show swelling, cracking, blisters and bubbles when worn or may show virtually no signs at all. Replace hoses as often as recommended by the manufacturer to prevent accidents.

Purpose

    Hydraulic systems have the ability to multiply torque or apply force in a simple way. Mechanical systems would require an intricate system of gears, chains, pulleys and levers, to move machinery at a distance from the engine. Hydraulic systems, however, can transmit force from a force engine to the place where it needs to be in order to do the work simply by stringing hydraulic hoses between the two. Fluids transmit force effectively because they do not compress. The force that is applied at one end of a hydraulic hose travels to the opposite end of the hose with little loss of power. Changes in size of hoses along the way can increase or decrease the force applied at the opposite end.

Advantages

    Hydraulic hoses can turn forces from a few ounces of pressure into hundreds of tons of output. Using hydraulic hoses, hydraulic machines can create very powerful low speed torque and manage speed and movement of machines with extreme accuracy. A single hydraulic pump or compressor can, through hydraulic hoses power many different machines and machine functions at widely varying power levels at the same time. Hydraulic powered machines can operate safely in areas where there are flammable vapors and electrical or electronic devices could set off explosions.

Hose Ratings

    Every hose has specific ratings for specific types of fluid they are designed to carry, working temperature ranges and pressure limits for that specific hose. Usually they are printed on the hose or fittings. In some case they print a model number on the hose and provide a spec sheet for the various models.

Caution

    Hydraulic systems operate under high pressure to drive machinery. Hoses that fail at high pressures can whip about with extreme violence and injure bystanders or machine operators. Hydraulic hoses should be checked and replaced according to manufacturers recommendations.

Minggu, 19 April 2009

How to Replace the Brakes on a 2002 Dodge Grand Caravan ES

How to Replace the Brakes on a 2002 Dodge Grand Caravan ES

After considering the cost of getting the brakes on your 2002 Dodge Grand Caravan ES fixed at a repair shop, you may find it beneficial to replace them yourself. Your brake pads wear out every 20,000 to 40,000 miles, depending on your driving style. Replacing the brakes can be done at your home with only a few tools and some free time.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen, but do not remove the front lug nuts using a ratchet and socket.

    2

    Jack up the front of the vehicle and secure it with jack stands.

    3

    Remove the front lug nuts and pull the front wheels from the vehicle.

    4

    Examine the rear of the brake caliper and locate the caliper bolts. These are the two bolts that hold the caliper to the bracket. There will be one at the top and one at the bottom.

    5

    Loosen and remove the caliper bolts using a ratchet and socket. The bolts will have 2-inch long pins at the end of them.

    6

    Pull the caliper from the bracket. The brake pads will remain attached to the caliper. Hang the caliper from the front strut using a bungee cord.

    7

    Remove the outer most pad by prying it toward the open side of the caliper using a screwdriver.

    8

    Compress the caliper piston by placing the c-clamp over the inner brake pad and screwing the c-clamp until the piston is completely inside the caliper.

    9

    Remove the inner brake pad by prying it out of the piston until you can grab it, then pull it the rest of the way out with your hands.

    10

    Place the new inner brake pad on the caliper by sliding the metal fingers into the caliper piston. Make certain that the pad is fully seated in the piston.

    11

    Slide the outer pad onto the caliper.

    12

    Place the caliper on the bracket and tighten the caliper bolts.

    13

    Torque the caliper bolts to 35 ft-lbs. using a torque wrench and socket.

    14

    Repeat steps 4 through 13 for the other side of the vehicle.

    15

    Replace the front wheels and hand-tighten the lug nuts.

    16

    Raise the vehicle from the jack stands using the floor jack. Remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle.

    17

    Tighten the lug nuts to 110 ft-lbs. of torque using the torque wrench and socket.

How to Replace the Front Rotors on a 2001 KIA Optima

The 2001 model year marked the initial release of the Kia Optima. The Optima remained as the largest and most luxurious of Kia models until the 2004 release of the larger and more luxurious Amanti. The 2001 Optima came standard with a 149-horsepower, 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine, and had an optional 2.7-liter V-6 engine, which produced 170 horsepower. Front ventilated disc brakes and rear drum brakes brought the 2001 Optima to a stop on four-cylinder models, whereas V-6 models used four-wheel disc brakes. Replacing the front rotors on the 2001 Kia Optima requires removing the brake calipers and pads.

Instructions

    1

    Remove about half of the brake fluid from the Optima's brake master cylinder, using a clean turkey baster. Transfer this fluid to a small container.

    2

    Loosen, but do not remove, the vehicle's front lug nuts, using a ratchet and socket. Raise the front of the Optima, using a floor jack. Position jack stands beneath the Kia's subframe and lower the Optima onto the jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and pull the wheels off the Kia. Work on one side of the car at a time, so you'll always have a complete assembly as a visual reference.

    3

    Pull the ends of the pad-retaining spring from the holes in the outer part of the caliper, using needle-nose pliers.

    4

    Remove the caliper-to-bracket bolts, using a ratchet and socket, while holding the guide pin steady with a combination wrench. Pull the caliper off the brake system and secure it to a suspension component, using a bungee strap. Remove the brake pad retaining spring.

    5

    Pull the brake pads from the caliper bracket. Remove the two caliper bracket-to-steering knuckle bolts and pull the caliper bracket from the steering knuckle.

    6

    Remove the two retaining screws on the center of the brake rotor, using a Phillips screwdriver. If the screws do not loosen easily, lightly tap the heads of the screws with a hammer to free them.

    7

    Pull the rotor off the Kia's hub and discard the rotor. If the new rotor has lubricant on it as a protectant, clean it off with spray brake cleaner. Set the new rotor on the hub, lining up the screw holes on the rotor with those on the Optima's hub. Tighten the retaining screws with a Phillips screwdriver.

    8

    Set the caliper bracket back on the Kia's hub and tighten the caliper bracket-to-hub bolts to 51 to 63 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and socket.

    9

    Insert the new brake pads in the caliper bracket, so the wear indicator tab faces downward on the inner part of the caliper bracket.

    10

    Place the old inner brake pad in the caliper, so it touches the caliper piston. Compress the caliper piston by positioning an 8-inch C-clamp over the caliper so the screw part touches the brake pad and the fixed part touches the rear of the caliper body. Tighten the C-clamp until the piston presses into the caliper. Remove the C-clamp.

    11

    Apply a thin coat of disc brake grease to the rear of the brake pads.

    12

    Set the caliper on the caliper bracket and tighten the caliper guide pins to 16 to 24 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and socket, while holding the guide pin with a combination wrench.

    13

    Repeat Steps 3 through 12 for the rotor on the other side of the Optima.

    14

    Reinstall the front wheels and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Raise the Optima off of the jack stands and remove the stands. Lower the Kia to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts to 65 to 87 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and socket.

    15

    Press and release the Kia's brake pedal until it feels firm. Check the brake fluid in the master cylinder and add new DOT 3 brake fluid until the level reaches the "Max" line. Close the master cylinder lid.

    16

    Pump the brake pedal until it is firm, before driving the car.

    17

    Take the old brake fluid to an automotive fluid recycling center. Many auto parts stores take old fluids free of charge.

How to Replace Pathfinder Brake Pads

How to Replace Pathfinder Brake Pads

The braking system on your Nissan Pathfinder is one of the most important safety features on the vehicle. Reliable, consistent braking depends on a well serviced, regularly inspected brake system. Worn brake pads can result in uneven braking, difficulty stopping, noise when braking, and excessive wear on other braking and steering components. Brake pads are inexpensive and relatively easy to replace. With a few hand tools, this job can be performed in a driveway or garage.

Instructions

Removal and Installation

    1

    Park your Nissan Pathfinder on a flat, level surface with the parking brake fully engaged and the wheels securely chocked. Raise the front of the Pathfinder and support it using jack stands placed securely under the front cross member.

    2
    Wheel/tire assembly.
    Wheel/tire assembly.

    Remove the lug nuts that attach the wheel/tire assembly to the hub. The lug nuts are five or six large hexagonal nuts located in a circular pattern around the center of the wheel. Use the lug wrench to turn the nuts counterclockwise until they can be removed from the threaded studs. Remove the wheel/tire assembly from the Pathfinder by pulling the sides of the wheel/tire directly away from the wheel hub.

    3

    Use the 8-inch c-clamp to fully compress the brake caliper. Place the fixed jaw of the c-clamp over the back of the brake caliper and tighten the screw pad onto the outer brake pad until the caliper is fully compressed. Be careful not to pinch or kink the brake line on the rear of the caliper. Remove the c-clamp.

    4
    Brake rotor with caliper removed.
    Brake rotor with caliper removed.

    Remove the lower slide bolt from the caliper using the socket wrench. Turn the slide bolt counterclockwise until it is loose and then pull it directly out of the back of the caliper. Pivot the caliper up and slide the brake pads out of the retainers by pulling the pads away from the brake rotor. Pull the retainer clips out of the retainers using pliers. Any shims will come out with the brake pads and should be reinstalled in the same position on the new pads.

    5

    Grease the corners of the brake pad retainer clips and reinstall them in the slots in the pad retainer. Reinstall the new brake pads by sliding them into the slots in the brake retainers until they are seated against the brake rotor. Swing the caliper down into position. Slide the lower caliper slide bolt into the lower hole on the back of the caliper and turn it clockwise with the socket wrench until it is securely tightened. Align the holes in the wheel/tire assembly with the threaded studs on the hub and reinstall the lug nuts. Use the lug wrench to tighten the lug nuts securely. Repeat Steps 2 through 5 on all wheels that are to have brake pads replaced. The process is identical for the rear brakes, except that the vehicle should be supported using jacks stands placed securely under the rear axle with the front wheels chocked.

Sabtu, 18 April 2009

Ford Brake Repair Instructions

Some Ford models, like the Mustang, have brake rotors and calipers on all four wheels, so repairing tyhe brakes is simply a matter of changing the pads within the calipers. On many other models, you need to deal with brake drums and shoes on the rear brakes, which is much more complicated.

Disc Brake Pads

    Siphon out half the brake fluid from the reservoir with a siphon kit or never-used turkey baster to prevent overflow. Raise the vehicle and remove both wheels on the end that you're working on; you must change the brakes on both sides. At some point you need to depress the caliper piston with a C-clamp to make room for the new pads, so doing this first is a good idea. Also, clean off the brake assembly with brake cleaner spray.

    Remove the caliper's mounting bolts; this usually requires a regular socket wrench on most Ford models. Once you remove the caliper from its mounting bracket, hang it somewhere secure with a coat hanger wire. Don't let it hang by its brake hose. Remove and discard both brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket along with the spring clips. It helps to remove the guide pins and clean them. Apply high-temperature brake grease before re-installing them. You should also apply anti-squeal compound to the new brake pads' backing plates. Install new spring clips into the bracket followed by the new pads. Hold the pads against the disc as you place the caliper back in position, then apply and tighten the mounting bolts. Replace the wheels, lower the vehicle and refill the brake cylinder reservoir once you've changed the brakes on both wheels.

Drum Brake Shoes

    Block the front wheels and release the parking brake before raising the rear end and removing the wheels. Remove the rear drum and brake assembly--this may require removing socket wrench bolts--to open up the drum and find the shoes. To disengage the shoes and springs from the cylinder, slide the shoe assembly down until it disengages from the cylinder's top and then tilt the shoes to lift them past the retaining plate. Unhook the lower retracting spring from the leading shoe. Spread the shoes apart at the bottom to remove the adjusting screw and its spring and the adjuster lever so you can remove the leading shoe. Pull the parking brake cable spring back with diagonal cutting pliers and unhook the cable end from the trailing shoe's parking brake lever so you can remove that shoe.

    Remove the parking brake lever from the old trailing shoe by spreading its retaining clip with a screwdriver and attach it to the front of the new trailing shoe. Lubricate the cylinder's backing plate with brake grease in the spots where the shoes make contact.

    Install the vehicle's parking brake lever onto the new trailing shoe. Connect the trailing shoe to the new leading shoe with the lower retracting spring and slide the shoes onto the cylinder's retaining plate. Insert the trailing shoe's hold-down pin, spring and retainer along with the adjuster screw assembly. Position the adjuster level onto the parking brake lever's pin, install the leading shoe with its hold-down pin, spring and retainer. Use pliers to stretch and connect the adjuster screw spring to the notch on the adjuster level. Center the brake shoes in place by wiggling them on the backing plate.

    Reconnect the drum to the assembly. To adjust the shoes properly, remove the rubber plug from the backing plate and insert a narrow screwdriver into the hole; turn the star wheel until the brakes drag slightly as the drum turns and then turn in the opposite direction until the drum turns freely.

How to Repair a Brake Light Switch

Repairing a brake-light switch, the small mechanism that's responsible for activating your brake lights when you depress the brake pedal in your vehicle, is a fairly simple task.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure your vehicle is turned off, in park, with the emergency brake activated. Remove the floor mat on the driver's side and set it aside Feel under the dashboard toward the top of the brake pedal to locate what feels like a small nodule on the floorboard.

    2

    Use the flashlight to help you see the 12-millimeter nut that holds the bracket switch in place. Use an appropriately sized ratchet or lockjaw wrench to loosen and remove the bolt. Set the bolt aside. Use your fingers to manually turn the switch to the left to loosen it.

    3

    Wipe away any debris. Set the bracket back on the switch and, without replacing the nut, depress the brake pedal to check the brake lights. Note the distance between the pedal and the switch if the brake lights come on. This is the correct distance between the two and indicates the correct amount of foot pressure needed to activate the lights.

    4

    Hold the switch firmly in the bracket as you replace the nut to keep it in the correct location. Secure the nut with the ratchet or wrench to ensure the switch stays in place. Depress the pedal a few times to check your work and make sure the nut stays put.

Jumat, 17 April 2009

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 2002 Acura TL Type-S

Changing the brake pads on the Acura TL Type-S is not too challenging a job, which should take you about half an hour for each wheel and can be done in your driveway or garage. The brake pads work together with the rotors to create friction that slows and stops the Acura. It's this friction that wears out the brake pads and the rotors, although the rotors wear out at a much slower rate. You can use this procedure on both front and rear wheels.

Instructions

    1

    Open the engine compartment and siphon 2/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster. Put the fluid in the drain pan for recycling. Place the wheel chocks behind the rear wheels of the Acura. Raise the vehicle with the jack. Place a jack stand under the Acura near the jacking point and raise it to the frame. Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench and remove the wheel.

    2

    Loosen the bottom bolt on the brake caliper with the socket and ratchet. Pivot the brake caliper up off the rotor. Remove the brake pads and shims from the caliper. Check the rotor for cracking or other damage. If damage is present, you will need to replace the rotors as well. Push the piston into the caliper housing using the piston tool.

    3

    Place the new brake pads in the brake caliper. Install the brake pad shims behind the brake pads. Push the caliper down on the rotor. Tighten the bolt with the socket and ratchet. Replace the wheel on the Acura and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    4

    Remove the jack stand from under the car. Lower the Acura to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel. Add brake fluid to the wheel cylinder to bring it to the proper level. Pump the brakes until the pedal is firm to seat the brake pads on the rotors.

How to Install a 1993 Buick Brake Spring

The 1993 Buicks came equipped with drum-type rear brakes. The rear wheel hubs mount the brake drum. A fixed backing plate supports the hydraulic wheel cylinder, brake shoes and springs. Brake pressure is supplied from the master cylinder to the wheel cylinder, which expands and pushes the brake shoes into contact with the drum. Special springs hold the shoes in place on their pivot and the wheel cylinder, and return the shoes to the standby position after braking pressure is released. Constant heating and cooling cycles due to braking friction tend to make these springs lose strength and require replacement frequently. You must elevate the rear of the Buick and remove the wheels and brake drums before installing the springs.

Instructions

    1

    Rotate the wheel hub until the two slotted holes are at the 5 and 7 o'clock positions. Place the right brake shoe into position against the wheel cylinder and the pivot. Reach through the slotted hole, and hook the pivot spring into the hole on the bottom of the shoe with a pair of needle-nose pliers. Repeat this process for the left shoe.

    2

    Hold the shoes in place against the wheel cylinder. Reach over the top of the hub and connect the actuator spring to the top holes in both brake shoes with the pliers.

    3

    Pry the bottom loop of the retractor spring over the spring alignment peg at the bottom of the backing plate with a flat-head screwdriver. Lever the top of the retractor spring away from the hub with the screwdriver until you can snap the spring into the retaining hole about halfway up the shoe.

How to Change the Rear Brake Rotors on a Mini Cooper

How to Change the Rear Brake Rotors on a Mini Cooper

The Mini Cooper is a small, front-wheel drive economy car that is manufactured by BMW. The Mini Cooper comes standard with disc brakes on the front and rear wheels. Disc brake pads are pressed against the brake rotor to slow the vehicle's momentum when the brake pedal is pushed. This action creates friction which will eventually wear the brake rotors thin, which necessitates their replacement for safe braking action.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts on each rear wheel with a lug wrench. Jack up the rear of your Mini with a hydraulic floor jack until its wheels are off the ground. Place a jack stand under each frame rail at the rear of the car. Lower the floor jack. Finish removing the lug nuts and remove the rear wheels.

    2

    Pull the brake sensor connector from the brake caliper and push it aside. Remove the caliper retaining bolts from the back side of the caliper with a socket and ratchet in a counterclockwise direction. Place the bolts aside. Pull the caliper straight off the brake rotor and hang it to the rear suspension strut with a bungee cord so it is out of the way.

    3

    Remove the bolts from the brake caliper bracket with a socket and ratchet and place them aside. Pull the caliper straight off the rotor and place it to the side.

    4

    Remove the single bolt that attaches the rotor to the wheel hub with a socket and ratchet. Rap the rotor with a rubber mallet from the back side to loosen it from the wheel hub and remove it from the vehicle. Push a new rotor onto the wheel hub and tighten the retaining bolt in a clockwise direction.

    5

    Slide the caliper bracket back over the new rotor and tighten the retaining bolts. Remove the bungee cord from the caliper and place it over the bracket. Tighten the caliper retaining bolts. Push the brake sensor connector back into the caliper until it is fully seated.

    6

    Repeat steps 2 through 5 to replace the other rear rotor. Replace the rear wheels and tighten the lug nuts. Remove the jack stands from under the car and remove the floor jack. Tighten the lug nuts in a criss-cross fashion. Depress the brake pedal a few times before driving the car to re-seat the brake pads against the rotors.

Kamis, 16 April 2009

How to Change Front Disk Brakes on A 2002 Ford F150

How to Change Front Disk Brakes on A 2002 Ford F150

Ford recommends that you inspect or replace the front disk brake pads every 15,000 miles on your F-150. However, strenuous driving conditions, like using your truck to repeatedly tow heavy loads, will cause undue wear and tear on the brake pads. Worn-down front brake pads will cause your truck's stopping distance to increase. Defective brake pads can also lead to irreversible rotor damage if they're not promptly serviced. With a few tools, you can change the front brake pads on your 2002 Ford F-150 right at home. The total time the job will take should not exceed 90 minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Open the driver's door on your Ford F-150 and engage the emergency brakes. The tire's lug nuts and various other bolts may break off if they're hot. Therefore, if you have recently driven the truck, wait 60 minutes before you continue with the repair.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on your F-150's front driver-side tire a quarter turn with a lug wrench. Raise the truck with its factory-supplied jack and place a jack stand on the immediate right of the jack for added support during the repair.

    3

    Remove all of the lug nuts from the wheel studs and place them in a safe location that will remain free of dirt. Take the tire off the wheel studs and lean it against the side of the truck or bumper.

    4

    Place an 8-inch C-clamp around the outer body of your F-150's brake caliper. Observe the inner brake pad before you begin. Behind the inner brake pad, you should see two round metal pistons pushing against its surface. You have to use the C-clamp to compress both of the pistons. At the front of the brake caliper, you should see two round cutouts in the caliper through which the surface of the outer brake pad is visible.

    5

    Move the C-clamp up to the top cutout at the front of the brake caliper. Wind the C-clamp's screw downward until it touches the surface of the outer brake pad. Begin by tightening the C-clamp five full turns clockwise. Loosen the C-clamp and move it down to the bottom cutout at the front of the brake caliper. Wind the C-clamp's screw down again until it touches the brake pad, and then tighten the C-clamp another five full turns clockwise. Alternate this tightening sequence until both of the pistons at the rear of the inner brake pad are completely leveled out into the brake caliper.

    6

    Locate the brake caliper's two mounting bolts. One bolt sits at the top rear of the caliper, and the other bolt sits at the bottom rear of the caliper. Remove both of your F-150's caliper mounting bolts with a socket wrench.

    7

    Attach your three-foot bungee cord by its hook to the shock tower's spring. Lift the brake caliper off the brake pads and hang it by the bungee cord's available hook. Do not hang the brake caliper by the brake fluid line. Instead, hang it by one of its bolt holes.

    8

    Remove the old outer brake pad by simply lifting it out of the mounting bracket. Install the new outer brake pad in its place. Remove the old inner brake pad in the same fashion, and then reinstall the new inner brake pad.

    9

    Unhook the brake caliper and lower it back down over your F-150's new brake pads. Thread both of the caliper's mounting bolts by hand and tighten them as much as you can. Set a 3/8-inch drive torque wrench to 25 foot-pounds, and secure both of your truck's caliper mounting bolts in place. Remove the bungee cord from the spring, and set it to the side of your work area.

    10

    Mount your F-150's tire back onto the wheel studs and start each of the lug nuts by hand. Tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern with your lug wrench until they're all snug. Remove the jack stand and lower your truck jack until the tire meets the ground, but not completely. Continue tightening your truck's lug nuts in the star pattern again, this time until completely secured.

    11

    Lower your F-150 down to the ground completely and remove the truck jack. Sit in the driver's seat and begin pumping the brake pedal. Once you feel the brake pedal firm up or fail to depress, stop pumping it. Repeat this entire procedure to change the passenger's-side front disk brake pads on your 2002 Ford F-150.

How to Troubleshoot a Power Brake Check Valve

The check valve is a small, inexpensive component; but, it is a vital component of an automobile power brake system. The check valve is a one-way valve that allows air to be sucked out of the brake power booster, but does not allow air to flow back through the check valve and into the booster. This is a critical safety feature of the power brake system, in that it ensures the booster will have enough retained vacuum for two or three applications of the brakes, even if the engine suddenly stops. Testing the operation of the booster check valve is not a difficult task and can be completed at home.

Instructions

    1

    Park the automobile on level ground. Open the hood, and find the vacuum booster. It is a round, somewhat dome-shaped contraption, mounted to the rear wall of the engine compartment, more-or-less in line with the brake pedal. It should be near, and a bit below, the brake fluid reservoir.

    2

    Find the vacuum hose that runs from the engine to the vacuum booster. It is normally a black, rubber hose approximately 3/4-inch in diameter. Follow the hose to where it connects to the engine intake manifold. Disconnect the hose at the engine, by first removing the hose or clamp that holds it in place, using pliers or a screwdriver. Slip the hose off the nipple. This will probably require some wiggling, twisting and pulling, as the hose will have a snug fit.

    3

    Insert the turkey baster into the hose end, and push it in, to seal it. Squeeze the baster, to force air into the hose. If the booster check valve is working properly, you should not be able to force air through the check valve into the vacuum booster. Unfortunately, a blocked vacuum hose will have the same effect. Remove the baster from the hose.

    4

    Squeeze the baster bulb, insert the baster into the hose end, and push it in, to seal it. Release the bulb, to see if it will suck air out of the hose. If the vacuum hose is not plugged, and the booster check valve is working properly, you should be able to easily suck air out of the vacuum booster.

Rabu, 15 April 2009

How to Remove Stubborn Bolts

How to Remove Stubborn Bolts

Rusted or extremely tight bolts can be impossible to get out on their own. To remove them, you may need a little extra help. There are several ways you can remove a stubborn bolt. Through trial and error, you'll learn which works best for you. Here are some ideas to try the next time you have a stuck bolt.

Instructions

    1

    Pour penetrating oil, found at most hardware stores, onto the bolt. Liberally soak it and try to get it into the shafts, the twisted part of the bolt, if possible. Let the penetrating oil sit for several hours.

    2

    Use a ball-peen hammer and a chisel to chip away at the bolt. Any rust holding the bolt in place should chip off.

    3

    Pour Diet Coke onto the bolt. This can be used instead of penetrating oil or if the penetrating oil won't work. Scrub the bolt with a stiff material such as stainless steel wool. Hydrogen peroxide can also be used in the same way. Wait a few hours before scrubbing it off.

    4

    For stubborn bolts, use a propane torch to heat the bolt, and pour cold water over it after it has turned red from the heat. This will help the bolt to crack and loosen, allowing it to be taken out. Do not use this method if you have poured any liquids over the bolt, such as penetrating oil, which can be extremely flammable.

How to Fix a Brake Line Leak

How to Fix a Brake Line Leak

Leaking brake lines are a serious concern on a vehicle. Loss of brake fluid reduces pressure on the brake lines and can cause a lack of stopping power when you press the brake pedal and attempt to stop. The risk of accident and injury from a vehicle unable to stop properly is serious and any brake line defects should be repaired immediately. The brake line hose is a simple part to replace and does not require a mechanic if you have the tools and basic automotive knowledge.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the vehicle with the jack at the end where the repair is needed. Prop the vehicle on the jack stands to keep it stable while you work.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the tires and remove the wheel on the side where the brake line is leaking.

    3

    Spray lubricant on the fittings on the old brake line. Use the regular wrench to stabilize the fitting and hold it in place while using the line wrench to loosen the nut on the fitting and remove the end of the brake line. Repeat at the other end. Remove the brake line.

    4

    Place the new brake line at the bottom fitting and tighten into place using the double-wrench method used to remove the old line. Attach the hose and tighten the fittings at the other end using the same technique.

    5

    Add brake fluid to the reservoir in the engine compartment to replace what was lost. Replace the wheel on the car. Test out the brakes to be sure the pressure has returned and the vehicle stops properly. It may be necessary to pump the brakes a few times when they are first used.

Senin, 13 April 2009

How to Adjust the Rear Drum Brakes With the Tires On

How to Adjust the Rear Drum Brakes With the Tires On

Unlike disc brakes, which are self-adjusting by their design, the drum brakes commonly utilized on the rear wheels of many vehicles do require an initial adjustment whenever new linings are installed and may require routine readjustments in cases where the self-adjusters aren't working properly. Adjustment of drum brakes is a relatively simple task that most home mechanics can easily learn to perform without even having to take the rear wheels off the vehicle. Drum brake adjustment with the rear wheels in place will, in fact, allow you to adjust them very accurately.

Instructions

    1

    Place wood blocks, or the equivalent under the front tires, to serve as wheel chocks. Jack the rear of the vehicle high enough to obtain a comfortable work space beneath it. Adjust the two jack stands and place one on either side, under the axle housings for rear-wheel drive vehicles, or under the subframe for front-wheel drive. Rock the vehicle slightly to insure that it is solidly supported on the stands.

    2

    Locate the brake adjustment access opening on the rear of the backing plate. This is normally located at the bottom of the plate. Remove the rubber plug, if there is one present, using a small straight screwdriver.

    3

    Inspect the self-adjuster through the access opening, using a flashlight or work light. Spray it with brake cleaner. Insert a plastic wand into the spray head of a can of penetrating oil. Carefully spray the exposed adjuster threads, taking care not to get oil on the brake linings. Allow it to penetrate for a few minutes.

    4

    Insert a brake spoon into the access opening far enough to engage the teeth on the adjuster wheel. If the adjuster is working properly, it will only turn in one direction and you will hear a clicking sound as you turn the adjuster wheel.

    5

    Place one hand on the tire and slowly rotate it as you tighten the adjuster. Keep this up until you feel resistance on the rear wheel. When you feel a moderate resistance, stop. Repeat this procedure on the other wheel. Try to get the resistance on both wheels as equal as you can.

    6

    Remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground. Press the brake pedal. It should feel firm and solid. Start the vehicle, put it in reverse and slowly back up and stop a few times. This will even out the rear adjusters.

How to Change the Brakes on a 2005 Wrangler

The 2005 Jeep Wrangler comes with front and rear disc brakes. The disc brake pads are designed to stop the Wrangler by applying friction to the turning brake rotor. When the brake pedal is pushed in, the brake caliper pushes the inside and outside brake pads against the brake rotor. The friction from the pads against the turning brake rotor is what stops the Wrangler. It is important to replace the disc brake pads before the pads wear down to one eighth of an inch; if the pads wear down too much, the wear indicators inside the pads will damage the rotors.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the 2005 Jeep Wrangler to a safe and secure work area. Engage the parking brake and open the hood.

    2

    Open the lid from the brake fluid reservoir. Insert the tip of the basting syringe inside of the brake fluid and suck out a syringe full of brake fluid. Place the syringe full of brake fluid in a sage area. Put the lid back on the reservoir and lower the hood but do not latch it.

    3

    Loosen each of the lug nuts from the driver side front wheel and the passenger side front wheel with a lug nut tool such as a tire tool or lug wrench.

    4

    Slide the floor jack under the front of the 2005 Jeep Wrangler and jack the front end up from a safe jacking point. Once the Wrangler is high enough, place the two safety stands under the frame rail on each side of the Jeep. Position the safety stands near the back of the front wheel compartments so the safety stands can evenly and securely hold the weight of the front end. Slowly lower the jack until the front end is on the stands and stop the jack. Leave the jack up.

    5

    Finish removing the lug nuts from the driver side front wheel and the passenger side front wheel. Remove both wheels and position the wheels in a flat position to prevent rolling.

    6

    Locate the brake caliper component on the side of the front driver side brake rotor. The brake caliper is the component that houses the brake pads. Unscrew and remove the two slide pin bolts from the back of the caliper with a ratchet and a socket.

    7

    Slide the tip of the pry bar into the opening on the side of the brake caliper. Pry the outside brake pad toward the back of the brake caliper until the caliper is loose enough to remove from the rotor. Remove the pry bar.

    8

    Pull the brake caliper off of the brake rotor with your hands. If the caliper is stuck, tap the top and bottom of the brake caliper with the rubber mallet to loosen the calipers grip on the brake rotor. Pull the caliper off.

    9

    Hang the caliper to the steering knuckle behind the wheel hub assembly with a piece of mechanics wire. Pull or pry the inside brake pad out of the caliper retaining clip with the pry bar. Position the c-clamp over the outer brake pad and the back of the caliper. Turn the c-clamp clockwise to push the outer brake pad against the caliper cylinder until the cylinder compresses completely inside of the caliper. Unscrew the c-clamp and remove it from the caliper.

    10

    Inspect the front and back of the brake rotor for excessive wear and grooving. If the rotors have grooves, the rotors will need to be machine turned by a machine shop or a auto repair shop. If the brake rotor has excessive wear and grooving, the brake rotor will need to be replaced.

    11

    Pry the outside brake pad out of the caliper retaining clip with the pry bar. Position the new inside and outside brake pads into the caliper retaining clips. Remove the mechanics wire and slide the caliper back over the side of the rotor. Secure the slide pin bolts back into the back of the caliper with the ratchet and socket. Make sure each bolt is very tight.

    12

    Slide the wheel back on the hub and screw the lug nuts onto the lugs. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug nut tool. Move to the other three wheels and replace the brake pads by repeating the same steps above. When the brake pad replacement job is complete, jack the Jeep Wrangler back up and remove the safety stands. Lower the Jeep and remove the jack.

    13

    Tighten each lug nut with the lug nut tool until all of the lug nuts on each wheel are tight. Then, crank the 2005 Jeep Wrangler and push the brake pedal in and out a few times to seat the new brake pads to the rotor. This will also remove any air from the braking system. Turn the engine off.

    14

    Raise the hood and squirt the brake fluid back into the reservoir from the syringe. Then, check the fluid level inside the brake fluid reservoir. Add fluid if it is low and put the lid back on the reservoir.

    15

    Close the hood and drive the 2005 Jeep Wrangler around the test the new brake pads. Driving the Jeep around will also completely seat the new pads to the brake rotors.

How to Compress a 1999 Mazda 626 Brake Caliper

In their never-ending quest to make new and improved changes to their vehicles, automobile manufacturers sometimes forget to make replacing parts a user-friendly task. One good example is compressing the piston back into the brake caliper on the 1999 Mazda 626. It&039;s not that Mazda doesn&039;t want you to replace the brake pads yourself; just like any auto maker would, it wants to make sure the job is done right. Compressing the piston on your 626’s brake caliper requires a few special tools but can be done at home. The repair should take you 45 minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Open the drivers door on your 626 and apply the cars emergency brake. Raise and support the cars hood, then remove the cap on the brake fluid reservoir.

    2

    Siphon half of the brake fluid from the reservoir with a baster. Dont discard the fluid because you can use it later. Set the baster to the side of the work area in an upright position.

    3

    Loosen the lug nuts on the front drivers-side tire with a lug wrench 1/4 of a turn counterclockwise.

    4

    Raise the car with a car jack, then place a jack stand into position on the right of the car jack to help support the car&039;s weight.

    5

    Remove all of the lug nuts from the tire and then slide it off the hub assembly. Place the tire along with its lug nuts to the side of your work area.

Front Caliper Compression

    6

    Loosen the top caliper mounting bolt with a socket wrench and remove the bottom caliper mounting bolt completely. Lift the bottom of the caliper upward and off the rotor, then retighten the top mounting bolt to hold the caliper in this position.

    7

    Remove both brake pads and their shims. Insert the Mazda piston compression tool into position as if it were the brake pads themselves, and then begin turning the bolt on the tool with a socket wrench clockwise. As you&039;re turning the tools bolt, notice that the flat pads on the tool are expanding. This is what you want to happen. Keep turning the bolt until you see that the piston on the caliper has completely retracted, then remove the tool. If youre unable to acquire the Mazda tool, see "Tips."

    8

    Install your new brake pads and shims just as you removed the old ones. Loosen the top caliper mounting bolt, then lower the caliper back over the rotor. Install the bottom caliper bolt and tighten it by hand until it&039;s snug. Set your 3/8-inch drive torque wrench to 29 foot-pounds, and then tighten both caliper bolts until secured.

    9

    Mount the tire back onto the hub assembly and return each of the lug nuts by hand to insure proper threading. Tighten the lug nuts until snug, then remove the jack stand. Lower the car until the tire makes contact with the ground, then reset the torque wrench to 90 foot-pounds. Continue tightening the lug nuts completely.

    10

    Lower the car completely and remove the car jack. Release the emergency brake and pump the brake pedal until you feel it stiffen. Then repeat the front-caliper compression procedure for your passenger-side tire.

Rear Caliper Compression

    11

    Place a wheel block in front of both of the front tires, then loosen the lug nuts on the drivers-side rear tire with your lug wrench. Raise and support the car at the rear just as you did in the front-caliper compression procedure.

    12

    Remove the rear tires lug nuts and then slide the tire off the hub assembly. Before you remove or loosen the calipers mounting bolts, look on the back of the caliper and you should see a hex bolt. This hex bolt (manual adjusting gear) is the secret to compressing the piston on the rear brake calipers.

    13

    Attach a 1/2-inch hex bit socket to your socket wrench, then turn the hex bolt on the caliper counterclockwise until you cant turn the bolt anymore. Once the bolt stops turning, the piston will have completely compressed itself back into the caliper. Then you can proceed with changing the brake pads and shims.

    14

    Tighten the rear caliper mounting bolts to 28 foot-pounds and the rear tire&039;s lug nuts to 90 foot-pounds with your 3/8-inch drive torque wrench. Pump the brake pedal again until it stiffens before you repeat the compression procedure for the passenger-side rear tires brake caliper.

    15

    Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir last. If you need to add more brake fluid, use the fluid in the baster. Place the cap back onto the brake fluid reservoir, shut the hood and remove both wheel blocks from the front tires.

Minggu, 12 April 2009

What Is a Brake Hose?

Vehicles require a monumental range of components, and some of these are more necessary than others. A brake hose is one of these components, used as a part of the brake system to stop the vehicle.

Features

    Brake hoses are reinforced, high-pressure, flexible hoses that carry brake fluid through the hydraulic brake system. A government standard exists to ensure that brake hoses are safe to use. The hoses are usually made of several layers: an inner rubber layer that the hydraulic fluid passes through, a layer of fabric (usually rayon), another rubber layer and then a layer of protective covering. On the ends are attachments, which vary with vehicle design.

Connection

    Brake hoses connect the brake assemblies located on the wheels to the brake lines. Pressure on the brake pedal is transferred to the brakes in the wheels through the brake hoses by means of the brake fluid.

Considerations

    Horsepower is the unit of power that measures the rate an engine does work. Horsepower is calculated through measuring the resistance that occurs when the brake is applied. Brake hoses therefore are an integral part of measuring horsepower.

Sabtu, 11 April 2009

How to Fix a 1990 Cadillac Seville Brake Caliper

How to Fix a 1990 Cadillac Seville Brake Caliper

A burning smell coming from the brakes of a 1990 Cadillac Seville typically indicate problems with the brake caliper -- specifically, they may be "dragging" on the wheel. Loss of braking power can also point to the brake calipers' pistons being frozen. In both cases, the calipers should be replaced immediately to avoid potential injuring. You can rebuild a brake caliper in about an hour or so, making the total repair time for each wheel about two hours.

Instructions

    1

    Open the engine compartment and depressurize the hydraulic accumulator for the brakes. Drain half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using a turkey baster, and place it in the drain pan for later recycling. Place a set of wheel chocks behind the rear wheels of the car. Lift the Cadillac with an automobile jack.

    2

    Place a jack stand under the Seville near the jacking point. Raise the jack stand up to the frame. Remove the wheel from the Cadillac by loosening the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Place two of the lug nuts back on the wheel to hold the rotor in place. Loosen the caliper bolts with a socket and ratchet, and pull it out of the cradle.

    3

    Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper using a wrench. Disconnect the brake hose from the steel brake line using a wrench. Discard the brake hose. Move the caliper to the worktable and strip it by removing brake pads, shims, springs and pins.

    4

    Remove the caliper piston by placing a block of wood that is a little thicker than both brake pads combined behind the piston. On the back of the caliper housing is an opening. Place an air line on the opening and force the piston out with low-pressure air. Do this carefully, and make sure you are wearing your safety glasses.

    5

    Remove the seals from the caliper using a tool that will not scratch the surfaces. This can be a piece of wood or plastic, as long as it does not scratch. Install the new o-rings and caliper piston. Place the dust cover on the caliper. If the caliper has sufficient damage so that you cannot easily get it apart, you will need to replace it.

    6

    Place a new set of brake pads in the caliper. Place the caliper on the Cadillac's mounting cradle and secure it with the retaining bolts by tightening them with a socket and ratchet. Connect a new brake hose to the steel brake line, and tighten it with a wrench. Connect the brake hose to the caliper, and tighten it with a wrench.

    7

    Replace the wheel and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Seville. Lower the car to the ground and repeat the procedure on the other wheel. Add brake fluid to the master cylinder when the project is complete. Have a helper to pump the brakes and hold them while you open the bleeder valve to expel the air from the brake lines.

How to Replace a Caliper in a Ford Mustang

The Mustang may be the most popular muscle car, but it won't matter without good brakes. Replacing a part as important as a brake caliper, in a Mustang or any model, should be done with the assistance or advice from a trained mechanic.

Instructions

Removing Old Calipers

    1

    Lift and secure the car onto the jack stand. Remove the tire and wheel.

    2

    Remove the retaining clip, parking brake cable and conduit. These are only attached to the rear calipers.

    3

    Disconnect the caliper flow bolt, the lower caliper locating pin and the caliper mounting bolts. Discard the flow bolt sealing washers and the mounting bolts.

    4

    Rotate the brake caliper about 90 degrees away from the anchor assembly and remove it.

Installing New Calipers

    5

    Position the new caliper assembly in place on the anchor plate. Tighten new mounting bolts to 25 foot pounds on a front caliper and 24 foot pounds for a rear caliper.

    6

    Connect the caliper flow bolt with new copper sealing washers. Tighten the bolt to 52 foot pounds.

    7

    Install the retaining clip, parking brake cable and conduit onto the new caliper.

    8

    Attach the wheel and tire. Lower the car off the jack.

    9

    Pump the brake pedal repeatedly to position the brake pads before moving the car. Then test the brakes on the road.

Jumat, 10 April 2009

How to Install Brakes in a Dodge Caravan

How to Install Brakes in a Dodge Caravan

Installing brakes in your Dodge Caravan is a difficult job. You are dealing with one of the most important safety components of your vehicle. If you choose to install new brakes yourself (professional installation is always recommended), the process can vary depending on the type of brake calipers your van uses. Look to the type of bolts the caliper has to determine this.

Instructions

Removing Old Brakes

    1

    Siphon at least two thirds of the brake fluid from the brake master cylinder using a syringe or similar tool. Dispose of the fluid as per your local ordinances.

    2

    Raise the end of the van, front or back, depending on which brakes you are installing and support the van on jack stands. Remove the wheels on both sides.

    3

    Clean the entire surface of the brake assembly with an aerosol brake cleaner, placing a drain pan underneath to catch the residue. Never use compressed air.

    4

    Compress the caliper's piston into its bore with a C-clamp; if you are replacing the caliper, this isn't needed. Watch the fluid level in the master cylinder as you compress the piston. Make sure it doesn't overflow.

    5

    Remove the brake calipers by removing their mounting bolts; depending on the type of calipers, these can require a socket or hex wrench. If the caliper uses hex bolts, it also has anti-rattle clips that you must pry off with a flat screwdriver.

    6

    Hang the caliper from the van's shock absorber spring with strong wire, or rest it on the leaf spring; don't let it hang by the hose. Disconnect the caliper from the hoseremove the banjo boltonly if you're replacing the caliper.

    7

    Pull out the brake pads. The outer pads are always in the caliper mounting bracket. If the caliper uses hex bolts, the inner pad is in the caliper; if the caliper uses regular bolts, the inner pad is in the mounting bracket.

Installation

    8

    Remove, clean and re-install the anti-rattle clips in the caliper mounting bracket. Do the same with the guide pins and lubricate them with a high-temperature brake grease.

    9

    Apply anti-squeal compound to the backing plates of the new brake pads, then install them. If the brakes use calipers that require hex bolts, the inner brake pad goes into the caliper with its retaining spring seated into the piston bore. All other pads go into the mounting bracket.

    10

    Mount the caliper onto its mounting bracket; if it's a replacement caliper, connect it to the brake hose using the banjo bolts. Tighten the caliper mounting bolts to 125 foot-poundsthis is the case for both types of bolts.

    11

    Reconnect the wheels and lower the van once you've installed the brakes on both sides. If you changed a brake caliper, do not do this or the following steps until you bleed the brakes (see Section 3).

    12

    Add brake fluid to the master cylinder reservoir until it is full. Use DOT Type 3 fluid.

    13

    Set the brakes by pumping the pedal multiple times.

Bleeding the Brakes

    14

    Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir with DOT Type 3 brake fluid and close the reservoir.

    15

    Place a length of clear tubing over the bleeder valve for the caliper you installed. Place the tube's other end into a container partially filled with brake fluid.

    16

    Open the bleeder valve while another person pushes on the brake pedal; open it just enough to let a flow of fluid leave the valve and look for air bubbles in the container. Close the valve and have the assistant release the pedal once the flow slows down.

    17

    Repeat the previous step until there are no more air bubbles, then close the valve and remove the tube.