Sabtu, 28 Februari 2009

How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Jeep Grand Cherokee

Brake pads are an important part of your Jeep Grand Cherokee's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a quarter inch or risk damaging your Grand Cherokee's brake discs

Instructions

Remove the old Brake Pads

    1

    Park your car on a level surface. If you have a stick shift car, make sure the car is in gear. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

    2

    Open the hood of your car. Locate the master cylinder and brake fluid container. If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid in the plastic container and dispose of it the way you dispose of motor oil.

    3

    Raise the rear end of your Grand Cherokee with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

    4

    Slide the prybar into the caliper opening and using the outer brake pad as a fulcrum, push the piston back into the piston assembly. Pry the spring out of the caliper.

    5

    Use the socket wrench to remove the caliper bolts from the back of the caliper. Also remove the pins under the bolts and the pin bushing caps, the small caps at the ends of the pins.

    6

    Slide the caliper off of the anchor and suspend it near the disc brake with a small bungee cord or coat hanger. Suspend the caliper housing so that you do not damage the brake hose.

    7

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper.

Install the new Brake Pads

    8

    Insert the new brake pads into the caliper. Slide the caliper back into the caliper anchor.

    9

    Use silicone grease and apply a thin coat of grease to the caliper pins. Use the socket wrench to tighten the bolts and pins to 21 to 30 foot lbs. (29 to 41 Nm). Install the pin bushing caps, the small caps on the ends of the pins.

    10

    Reinstall the caliper spring between the caliper and the anchor first, then attach the other end of the spring in the lower caliper hole. It helps to hold the spring in place with your thumb while you maneuver the spring end out and under the anchor.

    11

    Add fluid to the master cylinder container to replace any you removed before you removed the old brake pads.

    12

    Season the brake pads by making only gentle stops when you are driving for the first week after you install the new brake pads. Try not to do any hard stopping when you are seasoning the brakes.

How to Change the Brake Rotors on a 2002 Honda Odyssey

How to Change the Brake Rotors on a 2002 Honda Odyssey

Honda Odyssey brake pads are equipped with a simple device that warns you when the brakes need service. However, it is a good idea to visually inspect the brake pads to get an accurate view of the condition. If the brake pads wear beyond the recommended level, the rivets will eventually start cutting into the rotors, causing significant damage.

Instructions

    1

    Place the wheel chocks behind the rear tires, and jack the Honda up with the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the Odyssey, and raise it up to the frame of the vehicle.

    2

    Remove the wheel with a lug wrench. Remove the brake caliper, using a socket and ratchet to loosen the bolts. Secure the caliper to the strut with a wire tie. Remove the caliper bracket mounting bolts with the socket and ratchet, and pull the bracket off of the wheel assembly. Remove the rotor retaining screws, and slip the rotor off of the wheel.

    3

    Put the new rotor on the wheel, and install the retaining screws, using the screwdriver. Reinstall the caliper bracket. Tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet. Attach the brake caliper, and tighten the retaining bolts with the socket and ratchet.

    4

    Put the wheel on the car, and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Remove the jack stand from under the Honda, and lower the car to the ground. Repeat the process on the other wheel.

Jumat, 27 Februari 2009

How to Replace a Brake Line in a Honda Accord

The brake line in a Honda Accord, or any other vehicle, is a complex pipe system that sends the brake fluid from the master cylinder to the calipers on the wheel. Replacing the stock pipes closest to the wheels with stainless steel ones is a job you may be able to do yourself. The process may be slightly different if your car has anti-lock brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Lay out the entire replacement brake line kit for your model year Accord. Know each section and which end of the car it goes to. Read over all instructions that come with the kit.

    2

    Lift the car on jack stands and remove the first wheel.

    3

    Study the brake line from the hose to the last section connected by bolts. Bend the replacement line in the same way.

    4

    Remove the brake line by disconnecting the bolts with two line wrenches. There should be two bolts on each connector.

    5

    Install the replacement line. Attach the bolts by hand first, then tighten them with the line wrenches.

    6

    Bleed the brake system to remove air from it. Open the bleeder valve on the caliper and connect it to a container of fluid with a vinyl tube. Have another person hold down on the pedal to purge the air.

    7

    Replace the wheel and move onto the next brake section. Refill the brake fluid reservoir and test the brakes after all lines are replaced. The reservoir on an Accord is in the rear corner of the driver's side and usually has a black cap.

Kamis, 26 Februari 2009

How to Change the Front Brakes on a 2004 Buick Century

Buick equipped the 2004 model-year Century with hydraulic disc brakes mounted on the front wheels. The master cylinder delivers hydraulic pressure, generated by brake pedal pressure and augmented by a vacuum brake booster, to the brake caliper through special high-pressure lines. Pressure in the brake circuit causes the caliper to compress and clamp the friction pads against the brake rotor. Friction pads (brake pads) are made of composite friction material on a steel backing plate. Use and poor rotor condition wear the brake pads and make replacement necessary.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Wipe the master cylinder reservoir cap with a clean shop rag. Remove the reservoir cap.

    2

    Inspect the fluid level in the reservoir. Remove fluid from the reservoir with a hand siphon if the fluid level is higher than halfway between the maximum fill line and the minimum fill line.

    3

    Raise the front of the vehicle with a jack. Support the vehicle with jack stands.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts with a lug nut wrench. Slide the tire and rim off of the lugs on the hub. Reinstall two of the lug nuts onto their lugs by hand to retain the brake rotor.

    5

    Place a large C-clamp over the caliper and clamp against the outer brake pad and the back of the caliper. Tighten up the clamp to compress the caliper piston and release the caliper from the rotor. Release and remove the C-clamp.

    6

    Remove the bottom caliper bolt with a wrench. Rotate the caliper upwards, using the upper caliper bolt as a pivot.

    7

    Remove the brake pads from the bracket. Remove the sheet metal retainer guides from the bracket. Inspect the mounting hardware and the caliper dust boot for damage and replace if necessary.

Installation

    8

    Install an old pad in the caliper and place the C-clamp over the caliper. Compress the caliper piston fully into the caliper.

    9

    Install new retainer clips onto the caliper bracket. Slide the new brake pads into the bracket and clips.

    10

    Remove the C-clamp and old brake pad from the caliper. Rotate the caliper down into position over the rotor. Install and torque the lower caliper bolt to 70 ft. lbs. with a 3/8-inch torque wrench.

    11

    Remove the two lug nuts by hand. Install the wheel and the lug nuts onto the lugs and torque the lugs to 100 ft. lbs. with a 1/2-inch torque wrench and socket.

    12

    Raise the vehicle with a jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground.

How to Install Brakes on a 1997 Ford Explorer

How to Install Brakes on a 1997 Ford Explorer

Brake pads are common wear items that require prompt replacement. The 1997 Ford Explorer is fitted with disc brakes at all four wheels, and these brakes require service when common signs of brake wear, including screeching and squeal upon brake pedal application become present. With the right tools and enough free time, Explorer owners can install new brakes on their vehicle themselves and save money on repairs in the process.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood and disconnect the negative terminal on the battery. Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel with a lug wrench before raising the vehicle.

    2

    Use a floor jack to raise the vehicle and support the vehicle with jack stands. Finish removing the lug nuts from the wheels. Grab the wheel with both hands and pull it off of the hub to expose the brakes.

    3

    Use a ratchet and socket to remove the two bolts located at the rear of the caliper. Lift the caliper off of the rotor and caliper bracket, and then suspend the caliper in mid-air using mechanic's wire.

    4

    Remove the old brake pads from the caliper bracket. Place one of the old pads over the caliper pistons and attach a C-clamp to the pad and the back of the caliper. Tighten the C-clamp to push the piston back within the caliper housing.

    5

    Place the new pads on the caliper housing and slide the caliper back into place. Insert the mounting bolts for the caliper and tighten them with the ratchet and socket.

    6

    Repeat the procedure for the other wheels, as needed. When finished, mount the wheels onto the hub and hand-tighten the lug nuts. Remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground. Finish tightening the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

    7

    Reconnect the negative terminal cable to the battery and close the hood. Press the brake pedal at least four to five times in order to set the new pads properly.

How to Know If my Toyota Car is Recalled

How to Know If my Toyota Car is Recalled

Due to an alarming number of reports about accelerators sticking on Toyota cars, Toyota is recalling many of the vehicles. Over 3.8 million vehicles are said to be affected by the recall, the largest for Toyota to date. The problem stemmed from the removable floor mat on the drivers side of the car. If the floor mat is allowed to move at all it could become lodged under the accelerator and cause the car to gain speed. Some people have reported cars going as fast as 120 miles per hour. Some of these incidents have resulted in wrecks and even death. It is very important for you to first inspect your floor mat to make sure it is the proper size for your car. If you have replace your cars floor mat, even with a Toyota approved floor mat you may be at risk of harm. If you notice your accelerator is stuck you should try to press firmly on the break. If you can reach down and remove the floor mat you can attempt to do so but if all else fails you need to throw your car into neutral. The motor will rev up but that is much better than being stuck behind a steering wheel running uncontrollably down the road.

Instructions

    1

    The first thing you should do is review the list of recalled cars. Currently it is affecting:
    Toyota CamryModel Year 2007-2010
    Toyota Avalon Model Year 2005-2010
    Toyota Prius Model Year 2004-2009
    Tacoma Model Year 2005-2010
    Toyota Tundra Model Year 2007-2010
    Lexus ES350 Model Year 2007-2010
    Lexus IS250 and IS350 Model Year 2006-2010

    2

    If you car is on the list it is strongly suggested that you remove the drivers side floor mat. This is the mat that you would take out when you vacuuming your cars floor. It will not affect your cars driving ability so just take it out better safe now than sorry later.

    3

    After you have removed the floor mat you should wait for the recall letter or you can contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's hot line at (888) 327-4236, Toyota at (800) 331-4331 or Lexus at (800) 255-3987 for more information.

    4

    Remember if your vehicle's accelerator becomes stuck the best thing you can do is try to slow down the car. If the breaks do not work you will need to put the car in neutral with the shifter then turn the key to the accessory power setting. This will still give you control of the stirring wheel and you will be able to come to a stop. For vehicles with a push button start you can hold the button down for three seconds to stop the engine.

Rabu, 25 Februari 2009

How to Change the Rear Drum Brakes on a 1996 Saturn SW1

How to Change the Rear Drum Brakes on a 1996 Saturn SW1

The drum brakes in your 1996 Saturn SW1 work by pushing a pair of brake shoes against the inside of a drum that is attached to the lug nuts. This creates friction and slows the wheel. Eventually, the shoes wear out and need to be replaced. The brakes should be inspected every 15,000 miles or whenever you notice squealing or unusual vibration while braking. You can pick up replacement shoes at most auto parts stores.

Instructions

    1

    Release the parking brake on your Saturn. Loosen the rear lug nuts with a lug wrench and raise the wheel with a jack. Lower the vehicle onto a jack stand and remove the wheel and brake drum. The lift point is immediately ahead of the rear wheel, just inside the edge of the body panel.

    2

    Remove the lower spring with a pair of needle-nose pliers. Remove the small spring that holds the automatic adjuster arm against the adjuster's star-edged nut. A spring holds each shoe in place. Press in each spring retainer and twist the pin 90 degrees to release the springs and shoes.

    3

    Disconnect the adjuster assembly that secures the two brake shoes. Turn the star-edged nut in the center of the adjuster to shorten it if necessary. Place the adjuster down carefully, making note of its orientation for when you reinstall it later.

    4

    Remove the brake shoes, twisting them to remove the upper spring more easily. The parking brake lever is connected to one of the shoes with a pin and retaining clip. Pry out the clip to remove the lever.

    5

    Install the replacement shoes in the reverse of removal. Spray the entire assembly with brake system cleaner before reinstalling the brake drum. Repeat this process for the other side.

    6

    Apply the brakes on the vehicle several times, both in forward and reverse, to automatically adjust the shoes. Once the brake pedal feels firm, the car is safe to take out on the road.

How to Change the Front Brake Pads on an F-250 Truck

How to Change the Front Brake Pads on an F-250 Truck

Regularly checking the brakes on your Ford F-250 should be included as part of the truck's routine maintenance. Brakes, especially front brake pads, will wear down after time. According to the 2 Car Pros website, front brake pads tend to wear out twice as fast as rear brakes. If you use your F-250 for towing or hauling heavy loads, this will put an even greater strain on the front brakes. If you find the truck's pads are worn, you can save money by installing them yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Choose which side you want to work on first. Then use your tire iron/lug wrench to break loose the lug nuts on the wheel. It doesn't matter which you side start with, but you must change both the front left and right side brakes when installing new pads on your F-250.

    2

    Place the jack under your truck and lift it so that the tire is off the ground. For safety, place one or two jack stands under the frame of the truck.

    3

    Remove the lug nuts and wheel and then place them to the side. Look at your F-250's rotor. If it looks like it's in good shape, proceed with Step 4. If the rotor is damaged or appears severely worn, you must have it replaced or repaired before installing new pads. A bad rotor will quickly ruin your new pads.

    4

    Use the correct size wrench or socket to remove the two bolts located on the back of the caliper. The size of the bolts may vary depending on the model year of your Ford F-250. Once the bolts are removed you should be able to pull the caliper off the rotor. If the caliper won't budge, try tapping it a few times with a rubber mallet.

    5

    Fasten the caliper on top of the rotor with plastic tie-downs or a bungee cord and then remove the old brake pads. Pay special attention to how the brake pads are positioned in the bracket. You must attach the new pads in precisely the same manner.

    6

    Save one of the old brake pads and position it on the inside of the caliper, against the piston. With the old pad braced against the caliper piston, attach your C clamp and tighten it against the pad until the piston is squeezed back into the caliper. After the piston has been fully depressed, remove the C-clamp and old brake pad.

    7

    Insert the truck's new brake pads into the bracket. Remember, the pads must be installed exactly as the old pads were. The pads should simply clip into place.

    8

    Remove the tie-down or bungee cord from the caliper and slide the caliper back over the F-250's rotor. Line up the bolt holes in the caliper with those on the mounting bracket and replace the caliper bolts. Be sure to completely tighten the bolts.

    9

    Replace the wheel and lug nuts, tightening the lug nuts as much as you can with the truck still off the ground. Then, remove the jack stands and lower your F-250. Finish tightening the lug nuts and move on to the other side's front brakes. The brake pads on both sides are installed using the same procedure.

How to Fix the Brakes on a Chevy Blazer

Your Chevy Blazer is only as reliable as its brakes. A large vehicle like the Blazer needs good brakes even more than other vehicles. If you're finding it harder to stop or hear any grinding noises, get the brakes fixed immediately. The most common method of fixing the brakes is to simply replace the brake pads within the caliper, which need replacement every 60,000 miles at the most. But other parts, like the calipers and discs, might need replacing too.

Instructions

    1

    Drain 2/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir using a siphon or similar device. Raise and support the Blazer's front or rear end on jack stands--whichever end you are fixing the brakes on--and remove the wheels. Place the lug nuts on the wheel studs to keep the brake disc in place.

    2

    Clean the entire brake assembly with aerosol brake cleaner, using a drain pan to catch the residue. Don't use compressed air or any petroleum-based solvents to clean the brakes.

    3

    Remove the lower mounting bolt on the brake caliper and swing it upward to access the brake pads. Pull the pads out of the mounting bracket followed by the upper and lower pad retainers. Replace the retainers with the pads if they are distorted or cracked.

    4

    Inspect the condition of the brake caliper and replace it if it is cracked or damaged in any way. To remove it, disconnect the brake hose by removing the inlet fitting bolt and plug the hose with rubber immediately. Remove all the caliper's mounting bolts; hold the rear caliper's slide pins with an open-end wrench so they won't turn while removing the bolts.

    5

    Replace or refinish the brake disc if there are deep grooves in it. Disconnect the caliper mounting bracket after removing the caliper by removing the bracket bolts, then remove the wheel lug nuts and pull the disc off. Cut away any retaining clips on the studs if they are there.

    6

    Install all repaired or replaced parts in reverse order of removal, starting with the disc, mounting bracket, pads and caliper. Apply an anti-squeal compound to the backs of both brake pads before installing them. Compress the caliper's piston into its bore with a C-clamp so the pads will fit.

    7

    Bleed the brake system if you needed to disconnect the brake hose from the caliper. Place a clear tube on the caliper's bleeder valve with the tube's other end in a container of brake fluid. Have an assistant repeatedly press the brake pedal as you open the bleeder valve until all air is purged.

    8

    Replace the wheels and lower the vehicle after changing the brakes on both sides of the Blazer. Refill the master cylinder reservoir with fresh brake fluid. Seat the bake pads by pressing on the pedal until it feels firm.

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a Pontiac Grand Prix

Brake pads are an important part of your Pontiac Grand Prix's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a quarter inch or risk damaging your Grand Prix's brake discs. This procedure covers all Grand Prix models, including the RPO Z7Us.

Instructions

Remove the old Brake Pads

    1

    Park your car on a level surface. If you have a stick shift car make sure the car is in gear. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

    2

    Open the hood of your car and locate the master cylinder. If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid in the plastic container and dispose of it the way you dispose of motor oil.

    3

    Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

    4

    Remove the parking brake cable from the back of the caliper. Use the pliers to remove the cable clip (restraining clip). This step is done only for Grand Prix RPO Z7Us.

    5

    Hand-tighten two lug nuts to the studs to hold the disc rotor in place while you work on the caliper. Remove the bolt and washer holding the cable support bracket to the caliper. The cable support has the parking brake cable and brake hose attached to it. This step is not done for Grand Prix RPO Z7Us.

    6

    Use the socket wrench to remove the caliper guide pin bolts. Slide the caliper off of the disc rotor and hang it in the wheel well with a small bungee cord or wire hanger; Don't let the caliper hang from the brake hose.

    7

    Remove the brake pads and shims from the caliper. Throw away the shims.

Install the new Brake Pads

    8

    Use the spanner tool to rotate the piston clockwise all the way into the caliper. Make sure the notches on the piston are at the 6 and 12 o'clock positions. There is a boot (rubber seal) around the piston bore. Lift the seal's inner edge and press out any trapped air. Insert the brake pad clips into the caliper support.

    9

    Apply a thin coat of lubricant to the parts of the inner pad that come in contact with the caliper piston and mounting areas. As you install the brake pads in the caliper support, make sure the wear sensors are downward and at the leading edge of the rotor when the tire rotates. Push the brake pads into the support, holding the metal shoe edge against the spring end of the pad clips. This slightly bends the spring ends and lets the notches engage with the support. This step does not apply for the Grand Prix RPO Z7U.

    10

    Swing the caliper back into place over the brake pads and replace the mounting bolt. Reconnect the cable support bracket and tighten the bolt to 32-ft.lb. (43 Nm). Remove the lug nuts holding the rotor in place. For the Grand Prix RPO Z7U, Slide the caliper back into place on the disc rotor. Reconnect the parking brake cable. Insert and tighten the caliper mounting bolts to 44 foot lb. (60 Nm).

    11

    Replace the tire wheel assembly. Lower the car to the ground.

    12

    Pump the brake pedal a few times to seat the brake pads. Do this before trying to move your car.

    13

    Add fluid to the master cylinder container to replace any you removed before you removed the old brake pads.

    14

    Season the brake pads by making only gentle stops when you are driving for the first week after you install the new brake pads. Try not to do any hard stopping when you are seasoning the brakes.

How to Change the Shoes on a 2003 PT Cruiser

How to Change the Shoes on a 2003 PT Cruiser

Brake shoes are used on a brake drum assembly, working mainly on a car's rear wheels to operate with the parking brake. The brake shoes on a 2003 PT Cruiser are very similar to the shoes on most vehicles. Changing the shoes is a complex process that involves working with the multiple springs and levers that control the shoes as they work with the brake drum. It can always help to talk with your mechanic before beginning.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Raise the car and support it on jack stands, blocking the front wheels. remove the two rear wheels and release the parking brake.

    2

    Pull the drum brake off. If it doesn't slip off, insert a screwdriver into the access hole behind the drum and turn the adjuster wheel within the hole, retracting the shoes to loosen the drum.

    3

    Spray aerosol brake cleaner on the entire brake assembly, using a drip pan to catch all residue that runs off of the brakes.

    4

    Unhook and disconnect the adjuster spring from the assembly -- the vertically positioned spring on the side -- using locking pliers and then remove the upper and lower return springs.

    5

    Disconnect the hold-down spring and retainer on the leading brake shoe -- this often takes a special tool from an auto parts store -- and remove the shoe. Remove the rod-like adjuster that is in between the two shoes at the upper end.

    6

    Pry open the retainer on the parking brake lever until you can remove it, then remove the trailing shoe's hold-down spring ad retainer and remove the shoe, separating it from the parking brake lever.

Installation

    7

    Apply high-temperature grease to the spots on the backing plate's sides and upper end where the shoes come in contact with the plate.

    8

    Connect the replacement trailing shoe to the parking brake lever using its wave washer and retainer, securing the retainer within the pin groove with pliers. Connect the shoe to the brake assembly with its hold-down spring and retainer.

    9

    Insert the adjuster into position on the trailing shoe and then install the leading shoe, making sure it engages with the adjuster. Apply the leading shoe's hold-down spring and retainer.

    10

    Install and hook the lower return spring into position with the pliers, followed by the upper spring and the adjuster actuating spring.

    11

    Insert the brake drum back on and turn the adjuster wheel with the screwdriver until the brakes drag against the drum when you turn it. Back off the adjuster until the drums just avoid dragging.

    12

    Reconnect both wheels after changing the shoes on both sides and lower the Cruiser off the jack stands.

Selasa, 24 Februari 2009

How to Replace the Brake Booster on a 1998 Surburban

The brake booster on a 1998 Chevrolet Suburban assists the master cylinder in pushing the brake fluid to the brakes. This booster makes applying force to the pedal substantially easier, and should it fail, then the brakes will become very difficult to apply. Should that happen, you need to replace the brake booster as soon as possible with a new one so that you don't risk getting into an accident.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Suburban and put on the parking brake. Look underneath the dash and find the connection from the brake booster to the top of the brake pedal. Take off the clip that holds the pedal to the linkage with your hands. Unbolt the brake booster from the firewall with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket.

    2

    Unbolt the master cylinder from the booster with an open-end wrench. Pull the master cylinder off of the booster, then pull the vacuum line off of the brake booster. Take the booster away from the engine bay and discard it.

    3

    Install the replacement booster onto the Suburban and bolt it in place with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Reconnect the brake pedal to the brake booster with the factory clip.

    4

    Mount the master cylinder on the booster with the open-end wrench and the factory bolts. Plug the vacuum line into the check valve on the replacement booster. Pump the brakes several times with your foot with the engine running to verify that the booster builds vacuum.

How To Change The Brakes on a Hyundai Elantra

How To Change The Brakes on a Hyundai Elantra

The braking system on a Hyundai Elantra is made up of three key parts. The entire system requires frequent inspection, repair and (if necessary) replacement to ensure that the vehicle meets governmental safety standards and the standards expected by Hyundai owners. The brake pads are most-often replaced as they are the parts that endure the most frequent punishment, but the calipers and rotors are components that need to be replaced when in disrepair.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Elantra in an area that will allow you to safely work on both sides of the vehicle. Put the transmission in "park" and apply the parking brake.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels with the tire iron or a 14-millimeter socket and ratchet.

    3

    Lift the Hyundai with the lifting jack and place jack stands beneath the frame of the vehicle. Lower the vehicle onto the stands, leaving at least two inches between the tires and the road.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts and the wheels from the wheel bolts. Place a drip pan beneath the brake.

    5

    Reach behind the caliper and pull the brake line away from the caliper. Allow the brake line to hang above the drip pan.

    6

    Remove the two caliper bolts with the 13-mm wrench. Pull the caliper away from the rotor. Inspect the rotor for scoring. If the rotor is scarred, have it resurfaced or replaced altogether.

    7

    Place the new brake pads into the new caliper. The pads will slide onto either side of the caliper, fixed to the sides by thin metal clips.

    8

    Connect the brake line to the new caliper at the brake fluid nozzle. Place the caliper over the rotor and screw in the caliper bolts with the wrench.

    9

    Place the wheels onto the wheel bolts and screw on the lug nuts.

    10

    Lift the Hyundai and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground and tighten the lug nuts with the tire iron or socket and ratchet.

    11

    Press and hold the brake pedal three times. Lift the hood of the Hyundai, remove the master cylinder cap and fill the container with brake fluid has needed.

How to Replace Rear Brakes in a Chevy Astro

How to Replace Rear Brakes in a Chevy Astro

The Chevy Astro van may be equipped with both brake pads and shoes on its rear brakes. The pads work with the brake pedal while the shoes primarily work with the parking brake. Whether you are changing the pads or shoes, you need to change them for both of the rear wheels together. The procedure can vary, depending on the year of the van and if it has disc brake pads on the rear wheels or not.

Instructions

Preparation

    1

    Block the van's front wheels with chocks then raise the rear end with a floor jack and support it on jack stands.

    2

    Remove the lug nuts from the rear wheels with a tire iron.

    3

    Clean off the brake assembly with aerosol brake cleaner. Catch all residue in a drip pan and dispose of it according to local ordinances.

Brake Pads

    4

    Hold onto the brake caliper's upper slide pin with an open-ended wrench and remove the upper mounting bolt with a second wrench. Pivot the caliper down and off the mounting bracket.

    5

    Pull and remove the brake pads out of the mounting bracket.

    6

    Squeeze anti-squeal compound onto the backing plates of the new brake pads and wait a few minutes for the substance to set.

    7

    Insert the pads into the caliper mounting bracket.

    8

    Place the caliper back into position on the mounting bracket and apply its mounting bolt.

Brake Shoes

    9

    Unbolt and remove the brake caliper with a wrench, hanging the caliper by a wire to avoid stretching the brake hose. Unbolt and remove the caliper mounting bracket then slip the brake disc off the studs.

    10

    Expose the inner parking brake cable underneath the van by pulling the equalizer towards the rear of the van then clamp down on the cable with padded locking pliers to keep it extended.

    11

    Slide the brake shoe down so it clears the retaining clip, then slide it up and off the actuator. Lift one end over the central axle flange and work the shoe's circumference around the flange to remove it.

    12

    Turn the brake assembly's adjuster star wheel--located at the top of the assembly--inward with a screwdriver and make sure that the seats for the shoe line up parallel to the backing plate.

    13

    Slip one end of the replacement shoe behind the axle flange and work it around the flange. Slide the shoe under its retaining clip and make sure the ends seat into the slots on the adjuster screw.

    14

    Reinstall the disc and turn the star wheel until the shoe starts dragging against the surface inside the disc. Remove the disc and back off the adjuster until the disc doesn't drag when you install and turn the disc.

    15

    Release the pliers from the parking brake cable and reconnect the mounting bracket and brake caliper with their bolts.

    16

    Reinstall the wheels and lower the van off the jack stands with the jack. Tighten the lug nuts with the tire iron once the vehicle is on the ground.

Minggu, 22 Februari 2009

How to Replace a Rear Brake Cylinder

The rear brake cylinder is one of the numerous components of your brakes' overall hydraulic system. Two internal pistons are positioned on each side of the rear brake cylinder. When you press down on your brake pedal, these pistons extend outward from the inside of the cylinder and come into contact with the inside of the brake drum, producing friction that brings the vehicle to a stop. If your cylinder blows and contaminates the brake shoes, cleaning it will not fix the problem; instead the rear brake cylinder must be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the lug nuts. Using the lug wrench, turn the lug nuts until they are approximately half-way off the tire. Loosening the lug nuts before you place the car on the jack allows you to loosen them without the tires turning. However, you don't want to completely remove the lug nuts until the car is off the ground.

    2

    Secure the vehicle to keep it from rolling. In order to keep the vehicle from rolling while you're working on it, place the wheel blocks in front and behind the front tires.

    3

    Lift the car. Place the jack under the rear frame of the car to lift the back end of the car off the ground. Once the rear of the car is in the air, place the jack stands under the frame -- on both sides of the car -- to secure it in place.

    4

    Lubricate the brake lines. Place the drain pan under the brake lines to catch any fluid that may leak out. Then spray the penetrating lubricant on the brake line that is attached to the wheel cylinder to make it easier to remove the brake drum.

    5

    Remove the brake drum. Start by removing the rubber plug on the brake plate to loosen the drum. Then pull the brake drum off. The drum can be difficult to get loose. While the lubricant helps, it's often necessary to use a brake spoon and thin-headed screwdriver to pry the brake drum loose.

    6

    Remove the brake fitting. The brake fitting is adhered to the wheel cylinder and needs to be lubricated before you remove it. Simply spray the penetrating lubricant around the fitting and pry the it off the wheel cylinder. This should be done in a slow steady motion so you don't damage the brake fitting.

    7

    Disconnect the upper brakes. Using the brake shoe pilers, carefully disconnect the upper brakes from the seated retainer. If you aren't replacing the brake shoes, you still need to remove the brake shoe return springs on the two upper brakes. To do this simply disassemble the seated retainer using the brake shoe spring tool.

    8

    Remove the rear wheel brake cylinder and replace it with the new one. Remove the retaining bolts first, then the rear brake cylinder. Once the old piece is removed, replace it with the new brake cylinder and replace the retaining bolts.

    9

    Put the brakes back together. Start by putting the brake shoe return springs back on and reassembling the seated retainer. Then reconnect the upper brakes, put the brake fitting back on and replace the brake drum. Make sure you plug the rubber plug on the brake drum back in.

    10

    Top off the brake fluid and bleed the breaks. You need another person to help you bleed the brakes. Simply tell them to pump the brakes while you open the master cylinder's bleeder screw. Repeat this process until the brakes feel normal in both firmness and height.

Can You Replace Semi-Metallic Brake Pads With Ceramic?

Can You Replace Semi-Metallic Brake Pads With Ceramic?

There are many variables to consider before replacing your brake pads. Vehicles are manufactured with a specific type of brake pads and almost all vehicle manufactures strongly recommend replacing pads with the same base pad the vehicle came with. However, there are both benefits and side-effects, depending on the application, to switching brake pad types on your vehicle.

Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Pads

    Original equipment pads can come in a variety of different materials. This depends on vehicle weight and braking distribution. Non-asbestos organic pads, semi-metallic pads and ceramic pads may be featured on the vehicle from the manufacturer. Whether or not switching the type of pad on your brakes will be beneficial is a difficult question. The answer is maybe or maybe not. While you may achieve one or two of your desired intentions from switching brake pad composition types, you may find adverse side-effects by switching.

    One of the difficulties of switching to OEM ceramic break pads is that there is more than one type of ceramic pad. Although all are labeled ceramic, their composition may differ. It can cost you time and money figuring out which composition of pad is the best for your needs.

    Your largest barrier to finding out what's best for your vehicle is that the vehicle manufacturers, the aftermarket brake pad manufacturers and the brake installation centers are not all on the same page. Conflicting information from all three can confuse you and the more information you absorb about the matter, the less you have may feel you have learned. Dealerships are going to want to sell you OEM pads, aftermarket companies are going to want to sell you their pads and installation centers are going to want to sell you what they have in stock. This is equivalent to calling a ski resort to find out the conditions before you head out for the slopes. They're not going to tell you it's icy so don't bother coming. They'll use a term like "frozen packed granular."

Ceramic Pads

    There are many differences of opinions on break pads. Some think ceramic pads are more forgiving to the surface of the rotor, while others think their harder pad composition makes them less forgiving.

    Ceramic pads, as any other type, can comprise up to 20 different ingredients. Most often, ceramic pads do not use metal fibers or steel wool. However, there are also semi-ceramic pads which may contain these products. A true ceramic pad integrates ceramic pieces and copper filings. This makes a harder brake pad then semi-metallic; however, depending on the weight of the vehicle and it's friction heat factor, it may not produce the same stopping distance as the semi-metallic. Consider the next contradiction. A true ceramic pad will produce less brake dust that clings to the wheels of a vehicle. If this is a desired intent, you may be trading aesthetic value over braking power.

Semi-Metallic Pads

    Many believe that semi-metallic pads are the most aggressive pad on the market. Metal filings and steel wool will produce unsightly brake dust on wheels and emit annoying brake squeals when under demand. The metallic composition is believed to be the harshest on rotor surfaces, but again this depends on the vehicle application. Others believe ceramic pads produce more noise and rotor deterioration.

Consider Your Goal

    If you own a large truck or SUV and want to switch from semi-metallic to ceramic brake pads, the best answer is probably don't. The braking temperature will exceed what the ceramic pads can handle and this can be a safely hazard. If you have a smaller vehicle and concerned with brake dust, brake squeals or warping rotors, by all means, throw the dice and take the gamble. You may find the ceramic stops better than the semi-metallic and still achieves other intentions like minimal brake dust and braking noises.

    Many parts stores and aftermarket brake pad companies offer lifetime warranties on their pads. If you do not accomplish the desired outcome with the conversion, many will allow you to upgrade (for a small fee) or downgrade (usually with no refund) to achieve the type of braking you're looking for.

Jumat, 20 Februari 2009

How to Replace Brake Pads on a 1993 Saturn

How to Replace Brake Pads on a 1993 Saturn

The 1993 Saturn models all featured front disc brakes with pads. Most featured rear drum brakes, but there were also some manufactured that used rear disc brakes and pads. While the procedure to replace the front brake pads is generally universal between all the 1993 Saturn models, there is one significant difference when replacing the rear pads. The piston of the caliper has to be screwed into the caliper bore instead of compressed into it in order to make room for the thicker replacement pads.

Instructions

    1

    Park the car on a flat surface suitable for lifting the car onto jack stands. Remove the hub caps with the lug wrench by unscrewing the lug caps on the Saturn. Apply the parking brake only if you're replacing the front brake pads. A brick or piece of two-by-four can be used to wedge in front of one of the front wheels if replacing rear brake pads.

    2

    Crack the lug nuts loose using the lug wrench and turning the lug nuts counterclockwise just enough to back them off the wheel rim.

    3

    Raise the Saturn with the jack and support it onto jack stands under the frame rail. Use the pinch/rocker panel if replacing the rear pads. Repeat for both sides so the axle is completely elevated off of the ground.

    4

    Remove the lug nuts and then remove the wheels.

    5

    Use a box-end wrench to remove the upper and lower caliper pins.

    6

    Pry the caliper off of the pad and caliper anchor bracket using a small pry bar.

    7

    Use a length of heavy-duty wire to tie around the caliper and then support it to the coil spring of the strut.

    8

    Use a 4-inch C-clamp to compress the front caliper piston inward by placing the top of the clamp on the rear caliper housing and the drive of the clamp inside the hollow caliper piston. Tighten the clamp slowly. For rear calipers, use the caliper retracting tool to turn the piston inward and align the notches of the piston at 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock with the caliper standing upright.

    9

    Remove the upper and lower brake pad retaining clips on the caliper anchor. Use the pry bar to pry them off if necessary and then discard the old clips.

    10

    Install the new upper and lower retaining clips onto the caliper anchor and then apply a light coat of silicone-based brake lubricant to the brake pad seats on the clips.

    11

    Spray an even amount of anti-squeal brake spray onto the backing plates of the brake pads and then allow three-to-five minutes for the spray to cure. Insert the brake pads into the seats of the caliper anchor plate.

    12

    Remove the caliper from the heavy-duty wire and then place it over the pads and anchor assembly. Apply an even coat of silicone-based brake lubricant to the unthreaded portion of the caliper pins and then align them into the caliper. Tighten the pins to 37-foot pounds with a socket and the torque wrench.

    13

    Repeat steps 5 through 12 for the other side of the axle. Always replace brake pads in complete sets, both inboard and outboard pads for each left and right side of the same axle.

    14

    Replace the wheels and lug nuts. Use the lug wrench to tighten the nuts so they are flush to the hub and then raise the Saturn with a jack high enough to remove the jack stands--one side at a time. Lower the car to the ground.

    15

    Tighten the lug nuts in a crisscross pattern with the torque wrench and a socket to 100-foot pounds. Replace the hub caps.

    16

    Pump the foot brake pedal several times to extend the compressed caliper pistons and seat the pads to the rotors, and then disengage the parking brake or remove the brick or wood before test-driving the vehicle.

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a Saturn Ion

How to Replace the Front Brake Pads on a Saturn Ion

Saturn introduced the Ion in 2003 and last produced it in 2007. General Motors manufactured the Saturn Ion and its predecessor, the popular S-series Saturns. The design on the braking system of the Ion was adapted from the S-series cars and required the same procedure to replace the front brake pads. The front brakes work much harder than the rear brakes and as a result require more frequent servicing.

Instructions

    1

    Place the Saturn Ion in gear or "Park" on a flat surface and apply the parking brake.

    2

    Crack the front lug nuts loose on both front tires using the lug wrench. Do not turn them more than a half-turn counterclockwise. Just loosen them enough to free them from the hub of the vehicle.

    3

    Lift each front end of the Ion with the car jack and place a jack stand under each front rocker panel or frame rail and continue to remove the tires.

    4

    Place the key in the ignition and turn the key one click forward to unlock the steering wheel. Turn the steering wheel so the front caliper and knuckle assembly of the first wheel having the pads replaced is extended outward past the fender well, then turn the ignition key back to the "Off" position. Repeat this step for the other wheel when finished with the first one.

    5

    Remove the lower lock pin on the caliper with a box-end wrench.

    6

    Use the pry tool or screwdriver to pivot the caliper upward and rest it on top of the knuckle assembly.

    7

    Remove the old pads (inner and outer) and remove the upper and lower pad clips on the caliper bracket bolted to the knuckle. (Use the pry tool or screwdriver to carefully pry the clips off the bracket without bending them.) Some pad sets have replacement pad clips, but not all do. If the replacement brake pad set does not supply replacement clips, clean the old ones thoroughly with brake-parts cleaner spray and a small wire brush.

    8

    Install replacement pad clips or insert the cleaned original ones back onto the upper and lower portion of the caliper bracket. Apply a level coat of high-temp brake lubricant to the clips where the tabs on the pads will contact them. Wipe any lubricant off the rotor, or rotate the rotor away from the caliper to expose it and spray the rotor with the brake-parts cleaner spray to wash off (on both sides) any lubricant that gets on the surface of the rotor.

    9

    Insert the new pads (inner and outer) into the caliper bracket.

    10

    Compress the piston of the caliper with a C-clamp until it is fully seated inside the caliper bore. Inspect the rubber piston boot and pinch and lift any area that looks distorted to release any trapped air from the boot. The boot should sit slightly below the piston and be even all the way around the piston. Pivot the caliper downward over the pads and replace the lower lock pin. Tighten the pin to 27 foot-pounds with the torquing ratchet and a socket.

    11

    Replace the wheels and lug nuts. Tighten the nuts in a crisscross pattern until they are tight to the hubs as much as is possible with the front axle raised.

    12

    Lower the Ion back to the ground and then torque the lug nuts (employing the same crisscross pattern) with the ratchet set between 85 to 95 foot-pounds and a suitable socket.

    13

    Pump the brake pedal several times until it feels firm. Release the parking brake and test-drive the Ion.

Rabu, 18 Februari 2009

How to Change the Brake Fluid in Trailer Brakes

How to Change the Brake Fluid in Trailer Brakes

If you've never changed the brake fluid in your trailer, consider this: Over time, brake systems absorb moisture, causing vapor pockets to form when the brake fluid heats up. Because vapor pockets interrupt the steady flow of brake fluid, the result could be disastrous---you could find yourself pushing the brake pedal to the floor and finding it to have no effect on the forward motion of your trailer. Fortunately, replacing the old brake fluid in your trailer is relatively inexpensive if you do the work yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Park your trailer on a paved, level surface.

    2
    Loosen the wheel's lug nuts before lifting the trailer with a floor jack.
    Loosen the wheel's lug nuts before lifting the trailer with a floor jack.

    Turn each wheel's lug nuts with a tire iron or lug nut wrench just enough to loosen them.

    3

    Raise one side of the trailer with a floor jack and lower it onto a jack stand. Do the same on the opposite side.

    4

    Finish removing the lug nuts on each wheel with a tire iron or lug nut wrench. Remove the wheels. Behind each wheel you'll find a caliper, which sits atop the rotor.

    5

    Locate the bleed valve on one of the calipers. A bleed valve is a small nozzle on the left or right side of a caliper. Slip one end of a bleed hose over the bleed valve.

    6

    Pour brake fluid into a disposable container until it's about one-third of the way full. Hang the other end of the bleed hose into the container, making sure the tip is submerged in the brake fluid. This helps prevent air from backing up into the brake line.

    7

    Locate the master cylinder, which can be found near the coupler at the front end of the trailer. Remove the lid.

    8
    Use a turkey baster to remove old brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir.
    Use a turkey baster to remove old brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir.

    Insert the tip of a turkey baster into the reservoir and siphon out as much brake fluid as possible, putting the old brake fluid in a separate disposable container.

    9

    Refill the reservoir with new brake fluid.

    10

    Locate the bleed screw, found next to the caliper's bleed valve, and turn it with a locking wrench. This will open the bleed valve to allow the old brake fluid to be released.

    11
    A flat head screwdriver is required to release the old brake fluid from the line.
    A flat head screwdriver is required to release the old brake fluid from the line.

    Insert a flat head screwdriver into the hole on top of the coupler housing and push down until it's wedged under the pushrod nut. You'll know you're in the right spot when turning the screwdriver releases brake fluid through the bleed hose.

    12

    Apply pressure to the pushrod to flush the brake fluid from the line. When the fluid in the master cylinder reservoir gets low, refill it; allowing it to completely drain will result in air getting into the brake line. Also keep an eye on the disposable container to make sure it doesn't overflow.

    13

    When the brake fluid running through the bleed hose appears to be clean, release the pressure on the pushrod and tighten the bleed screw with a locking wrench.

    14

    Refill the reservoir and repeat the process on the other caliper.

    15

    Put the wheels back on the trailer and tighten the lug nuts with a tire iron or lug nut wrench.

    16

    Lift the trailer with a floor jack, remove the jack stands and lower the trailer to the ground.

Selasa, 17 Februari 2009

How to Change Brakes on an Audi

How to Change Brakes on an Audi

Worn brakes not only cause unpleasant squeaking noises while driving, but they are also unsafe due to their diminished stopping ability. Having the Audi dealership change your brakes can be very expensive, especially when you consider that changing your brakes, depending on what year your car was made, can be an easy do-it-yourself job. Below is the information you need to know in order to change your brakes.

Instructions

    1

    Place a brick firmly behind each rear wheel to prevent rolling.

    2

    Raise the front end of the car with a jack and place jack stands underneath the car to secure it.

    3

    Use a tire iron to remove the lug nuts.

    4

    Pull the wheels off of the car and set them aside.

    5

    Use a ratchet wrench and socket to remove the two bolts on the back of the caliper that are keeping it in place. In most Audis, these bolts need 7 mm sockets.

    6

    Pull the caliper housing off of the rotor, but be careful not to pull off the brake fluid line. Disconnecting this line will make the whole process much more difficult and messier.

    7

    Inspect the rotor to make sure that it is not warped and has no notches or grooves in it. You can do this by running your hand across the back and the front of the rotor, but make sure the rotors have had an hour or so to cool. If the rotors feel damaged in any way, they will need to be shaved or changed.

    8

    Take out the old brake pads from the caliper and discard them. Many Audis use an adhesive to keep the pads onto the calipers; if that is the case on your car, you will need to pry them out.

    9

    Use a brake caliper tool push the piston in the caliper back into place. Doing so will make room for the new, thicker brake pads.

    10

    Put the new brake pads into the caliper and place the caliper back onto the rotor.

    11

    Bolt the caliper back into place.

    12

    Lower the front end of the car, and move the bricks from the back wheels to the front of the front wheels to keep the car from rolling forward.

    13

    Raise the back end of the car with a jack. Place a set of jack stands underneath the rear end to keep it secure.

    14

    Use a tire iron to remove the lug nuts on the rear wheels and remove the wheels.

    15

    Remove the two bolts behind the caliper housing and pull off the caliper. In some newer Audis, the piston is controlled electronically, and as a result it will keep pressure on the rotor. In order to retract the piston, you will need a tool known as a VAG tool. If you have this tool, use as directed to retract the piston, if you do not, purchase it or have your brakes changed by a professional.

    16

    Remove the brake pads from the caliper and replace them with the new ones, using a brake caliper tool to push back the piston if it is not electronically controlled.

    17

    Inspect the rotors by hand to make sure they are free of warps, notches or grooves.

    18

    Place the caliper back onto the rotor and bolt it into place.

    19

    Put the wheels back onto the car and bolt them in securely.

Sabtu, 14 Februari 2009

How to Replace the Brake Pads in a Sunfire

How to Replace the Brake Pads in a Sunfire

If at any time your Pontiac Sunfire has trouble stopping or you hear a grinding sound when applying the brakes, you need to change the brake pads. You will likely need to change them at some point after 60,000 miles. Replacing the pads on the Sunfire is very much like doing so on other cars. You will, however, need to make sure you have the correct wrench and equipment for your Sunfire's calipers and make sure you get replacement brake pads specific to your year and model of Sunfire.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Siphon out at least half of the brake fluid from the car's brake master cylinder. Use a clean turkey baster or other type of suction tool that you have never used for anything else before.

    2

    Raise the car's front end and support it on jack stands; it is best to loosen the wheel lug nuts first. Remove the front wheels.

    3

    Remove the mounting bolts connecting the brake caliper to the steering knuckle--this requires a large Allen wrench in most cases--and remove the caliper from the knuckle.

    4

    Remove the outer pad from the brake caliper--press inward to release its mounting dowels--followed by the inner pad.

    5

    Use a wire brush to clean the caliper and the steering knuckle in the spots where the brake pads touch.

Installation

    6

    Compress the caliper piston back into its bore using a c-clamp.

    7

    Coat the backing plates of the replacement brake pads with anti-squeal lubricant.

    8

    Insert the outer pad in the caliper, making sure its mounting dowels line up with the caliper holes. Install the inner pad within the caliper piston, making sure to engage the retaining clip.

    9

    Clean the two mounting bolt sleeves and coat them with brake slide grease or a similar lubricant.

    10

    Place the brake caliper back on the rotor and apply the mounting bolts.

    11

    But on the front wheels once you have changed the brakes for both wheels, then lower the car. Tighten the lug nuts completely after the car is back on the ground.

    12

    Press the car's brake pedal several times until it feels firm.

Kamis, 12 Februari 2009

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 2002 Silverado 2500 HD

How to Replace the Brake Pads on a 2002 Silverado 2500 HD

The Silverado is a big truck, and it can take a toll on its brakes depending on how hard you drive it. You should change the front brake pads at 60,000 miles and at least inspect the condition of the rear brake pads. On the 2002 model 2500 Silverado, replacing the front and rear pads is basically the same procedure. Whether you're changing the front or rear pads, you need to change the pads on the left and right sides together.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Remove at least two-thirds of the brake fluid from the engine compartment's master-cylinder reservoir; use a syringe bottle, turkey baster or other siphon tool that has never been used. Dispose of the fluid as per your local ordinances.

    2

    Raise either the front or rear end of the truck and support it on jack stands; loosen the lug nuts prior to lifting the truck. Remove both wheels on the raised end and block the wheels at the other end.

    3

    Compress each of the brake caliper's two pistons using a C-clamp. Compress each piston slowly and observe the fluid level in the master-cylinder reservoir; siphon out more fluid if needed to make sure it doesn't overflow.

    4

    Remove the brake caliper's lower mounting bolt with a flare-nut wrench or similar, then lift and pivot the caliper upward.

    5

    Pull the inner and outer brake pads out of the caliper's mounting bracket.

    6

    Remove the retainers from the upper and lower ends of the mounting bracket. Inspect them for cracks or distortion and reinstall them; replace any that are damaged.

Installation

    7

    Apply an anti-squeal compound to the backing plates of the replacement brake pads; squeeze the compound out in circles that will match up with the position of the caliper pistons. Allow a few minutes for the compound to set.

    8

    Install the brake pads into the mounting bracket.

    9

    Pull the slide pin and rubber boot out of the caliper and inspect both for scoring, corrosion or other damage. Lubricate the slide pin with high-temperature brake grease and reinstall the pin and boot. Lubricate the mounting bolt with the same grease and install it with the wrench.

    10

    Unscrew and remove the caliper's upper mounting bolt and slide pin if the lower bolt and pin were dry. Lubricate this pin and bolt and install the two back in the caliper.

    11

    Reconnect the wheels and lower the truck after changing the pads for both wheels.

    12

    Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir with fresh fluid.

    13

    Press the brake pedal several times to set the brakes; do it until the pedal feels firm.

How to Change Brakes on a 2004 Corolla

How to Change Brakes on a 2004 Corolla

You need to change the brakes on your 2004 Toyota Corolla by 80,000 miles, but your driving style may require you to change them at an earlier date. Any sound of grinding on the brakes will instantly tell you to change them. The brake pads within the two front brake calipers must maintain a steady balance, so you must change the brakes for both wheels together. Each caliper uses two pads, and changing them is much like the process with other vehicles.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Open the brake master cylinder reservoir inside the engine compartment to relieve the pressure in the reservoir.

    2

    Raise the Corolla on its front end and support it on jack stands, then remove both front wheels.

    3

    Push the piston within the brake caliper using a C-clamp. This will cause the brake fluid to flow back into the master cylinder and reservoir; observe the level and siphon out fluid with an unused turkey baster, if needed, to prevent overflow.

    4

    Wash off the entire brake disc and caliper assembly using a brake cleaner spray. Catch any residue, which can contain asbestos, into a drip pan.

    5

    Remove the bolts at the top and bottom of the brake caliper with your wrench and remove the caliper; don't touch the center bolt connecting the hose. Hang the caliper on the strut spring by a strong wire.

    6

    Pull both the inner and outer brake pads out of the caliper bracket, which is still connected to the disc.

Installation

    7

    Pry the wear indicator off the old inner pad with a screwdriver, if it had one. Connect this indicator to the replacement inner pad.

    8

    Install the inner pad within the caliper bracket, making sure the pad's ears engage with the pad support plate. Repeat for the new outer brake pad.

    9

    Pull out the sliding pins into which the caliper bolts fit. Clean them off, coat them with high-temperature grease and install them back into the bracket.

    10

    Reconnect the caliper onto the bracket with its bolts, tightening the bolts to 25 foot-pounds with a torque wrench.

    11

    Repeat the steps for the other caliper, then reconnect the wheels and lower the car.

    12

    Fill the brake fluid reservoir with extra fresh fluid if needed.

    13

    Press the brake pedal several times until it is firm.

Rabu, 11 Februari 2009

How to Replace Rear Disc Brakes in a Dodge Durango

The Dodge Durango has one of two types of braking systems in the rear of the vehicle, drum or disc brakes. The disc brakes are easier to replace then the drum brakes and they work more efficiently as well. If your Durango has rear disc brakes read further to learn how to replace them in a couple of hours.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the Durango off the ground with a car jack. Support the vehicle on all sides with jack stands. Keep children and small animals out of the vicinity when you replace the brakes.

    2

    Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels with a torque wrench. Remove the wheel and tire assemblies and set them aside, face up, to prevent damage.

    3

    Compress the caliper and remove it by lifting the top up and off the caliper adapter. Hang the caliper from the Durango's frame with mechanical wire.

    4

    Remove the inboard and outboard brake shoes from the caliper adapter. Take off the top and bottom anti-rattle springs. Keep the springs separated, as they aren't interchangeable.

    5

    Press the piston into the bore with a C-clamp. To prevent damage to the pistons, insert an old brake shoe in between the C-clamp and caliper piston. Remove the C-clamp.

    6

    Wipe down the caliper mounting adapter and anti-rattle springs with brake cleaner. Grease the anti-rattle springs with brake grease. Install the bottom anti-rattle springs, followed by the top anti-rattle springs.

    7

    Install the inboard brake shoes followed by the outboard brake shoes. Replace the caliper and the wheel and tire assemblies. Lower the vehicle to the ground and pump the brakes to seat the pistons.

How Does an Over-Torque Warp a Brake Rotor?

How Does an Over-Torque Warp a Brake Rotor?

Every vehicle on the road has a specific wheel nut torque specification. Inexperienced do-it-yourself mechanics or even ones employed at repair facilities may have been guilty of over-torquing wheel nuts. Not only is there a specific torque specification, but there's also a proper way to tighten the lug nuts. By failing to do so correctly, wheel nuts can be over-tightened and warp the brake rotors and in some cases, damage the hub flange.

Identifying Rotor Warping

    A warped rotor will give off a identifiable side effect when braking. While most can be felt at high-speed braking, some extreme cases of rotor warp can be felt even at low-speed braking. The brake rotor stands vertically to the tire. It has a recessed surface that hugs the hub of the vehicle. When the brakes are applied, the pads squeeze against the rotor to slow the vehicle down. If the rotor is warped, this causes the brake pads to squeeze against the warping. That sensation is then transferred to the brake pedal as a thumping pulsation and will cause the steering wheel to shake.

How Over-Torquing Warps Rotors

    Wheel lugs flex under duress. Wheels nuts that are over-tightened or not tightened in the proper sequence can cause uneven tightening against the hub surface of the rotor. This is most often caused by mechanics who tighten lug nuts improperly using a pneumatic gun without the use of a torque stick or a do-it-yourself mechanic tightening them out of sequence with a lug wrench. Because one or more of the wheel nuts is not as tight as the other(s), the particular tightening balance off-centers the rotor. Once a rotor warps, it is difficult to undo.

Torque Patterns

    The pattern to employ when torquing wheel nuts is to snug one wheel nut up with a torque wrench or a pneumatic gun with a torque stick. Do not fully tighten the wheel nut, but simply snug it to the hub flange. Choose the next wheel nut in the opposite side of the first one you tightened and so on. An X pattern should be used for four wheel nuts, while a star-pattern should be used for five or more wheel nuts. Once you have snugged the wheel nuts, go over them again, employing the same pattern, until the torque specification has been obtained.

Tools

    Hand torque wrenches are almost always preferred more so than pneumatic guns with torque sticks. However, torque sticks come in a variety of thickness which in theory, only allow you to tighten the wheel nuts so tight. Hand torque wrenches can feature a specific torque specification or may feature adjustable settings to obtain the correct specification. A clicker ratchet-style hand torque wrench is favorable because it will pronounce an audible click once the specification has been obtained on the wheel nut.

Prevention/Solution

    Never tighten the wheel nuts in a circular pattern. This can tighten one side of the wheel before the opposite side and cause the wheel to be off-centered. Always use a torque wrench set to the correct torque specification for your vehicle (which can be found in the owner's manual) and always use a X or star pattern when torquing. Never use a pneumatic gun without a torque stick. The gun may feature as much as 300 to 600 pounds of torque in the forward position. Rarely are torque specs higher then 150-foot pounds on most light-duty trucks and are much lower for passenger vehicles. Again, if using a gun with a torque stick, be sure to employ the "X" or star pattern when torquing wheel nuts.

Selasa, 10 Februari 2009

How to Change MINI Brake Pads

The MINI was originally conceived by the British Motor Corporation (BMC) in 1959 and continued in production until 2000. The new MINI is manufactured by BMW and was introduced in 2001. The MINI comes as a hardtop coupe with frame-less window glass in the doors, creating a more open feel. The MINI also comes as a convertible coupe, Clubman wagon or a Countryman SUV. All MINIs come standard with four-wheel disc brakes that are more resistant to fade than drum brakes. When the lining wears down on the disc brake pads, they should be replaced to avoid rotor damage and restore stopping power.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen, but do not remove, the wheel lug nuts with a lug wrench on the corner of the car you want to start with. Chock the remaining wheels. Place a scissor jack under the jacking point and turn the handle to raise the wheel off of the ground slightly. Place a jack stand under the lower suspension control arm. Lower the jack so that the control arm is resting on the jack stand. Finish removing the lug nuts then remove the wheel.

    2

    Pull the brake wear sensor connector (if so equipped) straight out of the front of the caliper in between the brake pad and the rotor. Lift the flexible brake line from its mounting bracket on the upper suspension control arm and push it aside so that it is not stretched when the caliper is rotated away from the rotor.

    3

    Remove the lower brake caliper retaining bolt with a wrench. Lift the brake caliper and rotate it upwards. Pull both of the brake pads straight out of the caliper directly away from the rotor. Pry the pads loose with a flat head screwdriver if necessary. Discard the old pads.

    4

    Open the hood and remove the brake master cylinder cap. Place a C-clamp onto the caliper that you just removed the pads from and tighten it so the piston withdraws into the caliper housing. Remove the clamp.

    5

    Insert new pads into the caliper with the lining on each facing inward. Rotate the caliper back down over the rotor. Replace the caliper retaining bolt and tighten it. Push the brake line back into its bracket. Push the brake sensor back into place on the caliper (if so equipped).

    6

    Remount the wheel and tighten the lug nuts. Raise the car with the scissor jack and remove the jack stand. Lower the car and tighten the lug nuts once again in a criss-cross pattern.

    7

    Repeat the entire procedure for each wheel that needs brake service. Observe the level of the brake fluid in the master cylinder. Remove any excess fluid with a syringe to bring the level back down to the "Full" mark. Replace the master cylinder cap and close the hood. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the new pads before driving your MINI.